* Posts by Dave Bell

2012 posts • joined 14 Sep 2007

Shock: Brit capital strips Uber of its taxi licence

Dave Bell

Re: 40,000 drivers out of work

Arguing about what the Police should have been doing is an ancient tradition, you can see elements of it in a couple of Shakespeare's plays. When I was a kid, they still had village bobbies, and beat points, and there was a reason there were Police Boxes with a telephone, that didn't disappear through time and space. No radio, you see.

Not my side of the family, but I still heard a few stories. One of my Great Uncles knew a kid who ended up commanding a squadron in the Battle of Britain. He reckoned the Germans deserved him.

It needs manpower to pick up the gossip, to know the people who might bear watching. These days, they need daytime TV programs reporting on the dodgy to do the watching.

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Dave Bell

Re: 40,000 drivers out of work

As an occasional visitor to London, I have stuck with Taxis, rather than private hire. It could just be good luck that I have never had problems. I've also used Underground, DLR, and buses without problems.

OK, that might just be good luck. Any public transport system can have something go wrong. I have seen a couple of bus breakdowns, not a disaster for me.

Maybe we're both 3-sigma from the mean, in opposite directions.

I do have an IT connection here. The local bus company has a web page, and their timetable pages have a "Live Updates" box displayed. It has to be amended by the IT company that runs their web page, so I can read it on the phone from the bus stop, but their traffic manager can't actually put anything there from his office.

They've been running buses for over 100 years, and I trust them. Computers, not so long.

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Linux 4.14 'getting very core new functionality' says Linus Torvalds

Dave Bell

I have found Linux to be a good alternative to Windows, but there are times when I get a problem, I start looking for an answer, and I get flooded with ten-year-old answers with fixes for hopelessly obsolete versions of kernel and any other program you care to name.

And every year is the Year of Linux.

Multi-OS coding seems to be faltering, Linux versions of software are vanishing or losing formal support. One gripe I have is that people shout, "Use Wine!", and never bother to say anything about which version to use. It does make a difference.

So, yeah, I can see why people ask. Asking here is pretty pointless, but answering questions seems to be a skill that few have. How many people have actually said anything useful?

And is this default point-to-forums strategy really any good? I suppose somebody might have written a web page, somewhere, since the turn of the century, with links to the definitions of the jargon they use. Maybe all that matters in that the new kernel has interesting new ways to break my computer.

I can wait.

27
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123-Reg customers outraged at automatic .UK domain registration

Dave Bell

Lies, damned lies, and a bit of statistics.

Let's start with the statistics. If it was a properly done survey, it's enough people to get a reasonably accurate percentage. If that's why they chose the defaults they did, the sample size isn't a problem. But it doesn't sound like a random sample, and that's the killer. All the maths depends on the sample being random. There are other aspects, such as the precise wording of the question, that can warp the results, and there are ways of testing for that, but it all depends on random samples.

Oh, and there are ways of deciding if a set of numbers is random, or behaving that way. A good pseudo-random number generator is good because it looks random. But if you used the same seed value, you'd get the same results. Sometimes that can be useful, other times not.

Now the lies. My domain is a ,org,uk and I got the email giving me the offer. It's not a .co.uk and it's not something all that special. If somebody wants the plain ,uk I'm not all that bothered. I set things up in the last century because I suspected something could suffer a mammary orientation challenge, and I felt it was worth having a consistent email address.

So the big lie? You'll never change your ISP

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Gov claws back £645m in BT broadband from subsidy

Dave Bell

Re: DCMS think the final 5% costs the same as the first 95%?

I know that we have fibre to the cabinet. I'm not sure whet length of copper is needed to the cabinet, or the cable run from cabinet to the exchange but I'm getting over 3 megabits over copper all the way to an exchange 1.6km away, straight line distance. Cable length might be twice that.

It might not be enough for a family, but I wonder how many people are sharing what you think is "meaningful broadband"? If you're using labels such as that, instead of definite numbers, I can't help but distrust you.

I am seeing claims that some new, VR-based, services need 10 megabits. We're all talking about superfast connections to the exchange, but I wonder if the networks on the other side of the exchange can cope with that sort of increase. Are they planning for 10 megabits per family, or 10 megabits per person?

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Developer swings DMCA sueball at foul-mouthed streamer PewDiePie

Dave Bell

I think it may be an open question. Streaming the playing of a game, or a walkthrough video, looks to me to be a derivative work. It's not just the game, it's the player's actions to control the game. And the DMCA process can end up in court if there are conflicting claims.

I'm not sure that this is a good answer in this case, but both parties have claims, and I don't have a problem with somebody saying "Don't stream my games again." What bothers me is applying the DMCA to content which has already been streamed.

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Connect at mine free Wi-Fi! I would knew what I is do! I is cafe boss!

Dave Bell

Lightbulbs

Control by voice seems a bit daft, and I really don't believe the colour space claimed, but the"white" colour needed can depend on several local details. Did the decorator use "white" paint or "magnolia"? A slight change might make the TV look better. I know some people don't even bother setting up their computer screen properly.

I can recommend http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/ as a check.

Just getting screen brightness and contrast as near to right as you can makes a huge different, and ambient light is a factor in that. I still have a cache of photographic filters marked up in Mireds.

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Can North Korean nukes hit US mainland? Maybe. But EMP blast threat is 'highly credible'

Dave Bell

The Geneva Conventions class using indiscriminate weapons, or any kind, as a War Crime.

Does that matter?

Apparently not.

The last time things blew up in Korea, both North and South almost lost. Both countries suffered horribly. Each has reason to be scared of the other and its allies.

If China, backing North Korea said they would back a deal, it might be possible to trust them. Would anyone want to trust the current UK or USA?

Oh well, do we even matter any more?

18
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75 years ago, one Allied radar techie changed the course of WW2

Dave Bell

Re: 22yr olds today

Yes, there have been some big changes.

Can we really blame the kids for them?

Should we judge them by how the group might live up to the examples set by a very few really exceptional people?

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No, the cops can't get a search warrant to just seize all devices in sight – US appeals court

Dave Bell

Can we ignore those people?

With so many places based in the USA, operations such as Google and Facebook and Twitter, lawyers in the UK and the EU as a whole have to pay attention to the US system. We've given the USA privileges under Data Protection laws and, because of those giant corporations, we maybe don't have much choice, but I sometimes feel that the EU isn't really trying. And can we expect a UK, sitting alone, to be able to do any better?

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UK.gov is hiring IT bods with skills in ... Windows Vista?!

Dave Bell

Re: It's a trick

They also go back to Windows XP, and that body of experience might be very useful in updating old apps to work with current Windows.

But there is so much in that doesn't really fit with a short contract, so I am inclined to agree on the sort of trick it is.

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Old Firefox add-ons get 'dead man walking' call

Dave Bell

Does any browser team manage to communicate with actual users?

Firefox is only the most obvious. They all come up with changes that are poorly explained to the end user. I use Opera a lot. I set it to open maximised. And suddenly it didn't. There's a long-running series of bug reports, obsolete third-party fixes, and eventually I found something which worked. Except when it doesn't.

It is as if programmers can talk to computers, but struggle to communicate with human beings. Even when there is documentation, it can be confusing and out-of-date. I have seen a technical label change, and if there is a link between old and new, it's one-way.

It's not so terribly hard to see that Damore chap at Google as part of the same problem. Management, the control of programmers, is a part of the general human communication problem, and he didn't seem to think that mattered to a programming company.

I know good programmers who don't have that problem, but C. P. Snow's problem of The Two Cultures hasn't gone away. Though perhaps Flanders and Swann did manage to help with the Second Law of Thermodynamics

Are today's Two Cultures the programmers and the users?

(Use one side of the screen only)

16
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For fork's sake! Bitcoin Core braces for another cryptocurrency split

Dave Bell

Re: Where does the money come from?

So who has the Mother Mary job in these times of trouble?

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Your top five dreadful people the Google manifesto has pulled out of the woodwork

Dave Bell

Why did Google even hire the guy?

It's emerging that Mr. Damore lied on LinkedIn about having a PhD, but I find myself wondering just what he had that Google thought they needed. What does "Research Intern" at MIT really mean in terms of skills? What of his time as an Intern at Google?

I don't know enough of these things, but I do hear stories about "Interns" being unpaid positions in expensive cities used to stack the hiring deck against the less-privileged. As I recall, the name used to refer to the Junior Doctors in American Hospitals. How much has the label changed.

Google doesn't do just programming and computer engineering, but I can't figure out what skills they were paying for.

4
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Mid-flight jumbo font smartphone text shock sparks kid abuse arrests

Dave Bell

Re: Freedom of speech dies a little each day

Some grey areas here, but with pics on the witness's phone it looks pretty solid. I am a little surprised that the local Police are implying he would have been lost to them once he left the plane; that suggests they wouldn't have had any name or address at all.

It is likely that the pics would have been enough to justify a search of the phone, and that's what blows things open.Compared to other cases that have been reported, this is looking pretty clear. I said, to somebody, a few days ago, "get a pic with your phone". Nothing to do with crime, that time, but it it fixes a moment that shows something you worry about.

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Go fork yourself: Bitcoin has split in two – and yes, it's all forked up

Dave Bell

Re: In related NEWS....

Gravity futures are still trending down.

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UK ministers' Broadband '2.0' report confuses superfast with 10Mbps

Dave Bell

Re: Don't shoot/kill the messenger...

It's different sorts of cable, and that matters a lot.

There's also some pretty horrible wiring, network and power and telephone, in some buildings. The old BT telephone wiring was done decently, though I know of one house that had the line running through an orchard, not even clear of the trees.

The old telephone systems were not even made for data, and I remember some very geeky arguments about the difference between Baud and bits-per-second.

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Dave Bell

Re: Available but not realistic

"Line of sight" on these links may be a little less critical than you think.

For an example, a FiberNinja video on YouTube: https://youtu.be/DGOPESpU64A

Though it's not that long a distance, which would help.

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Dave Bell

Another report by ignorant people.

These people have been hopelessly confused by the advertising use of "fibre", a label defined in a way that would have included my first 300 baud dial-up modem, because the signal was only on copper for a few hundred yards.

They also ignore measures such as bandwidth per person.

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systemd'oh! DNS lib underscore bug bites everyone's favorite init tool, blanks Netflix

Dave Bell

Re: underscore illegal dns character

There has been a recent significant bug fix for systemd but this may be a later version.

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Dave Bell

Re: Alternate

There are other choices, but who do you trust?

If I were suggesting a non-ISP address for DNS, I would try to identify the server in human terms as well. Even on The Register one should assume one is being read by humans.

I infer the suggested fix doesn't care which server is used. In my case I would be working through my ADSL modem/router which provides NAT and DNS for the LAN. In turn, it can either automatically use the ISP server, or an explicitly set server such as the Google one at 8.8.8.8

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Judge uses 1st Amendment on Pokemon Go park ban. It's super effective!

Dave Bell

Of course this is still current

There was a Pokemon GO event organised in Chicago this weekend, huge crowds and a lot of technical things went wrong. That was a big formal event, and would fit with the sort of big event this law seemed to be based on. A lot depends on the scale.

If was big enough that one of the problems was the local mobile network was overwhelmed. That seems to be the sort of level where the freedom of speech of the event is messing up the freedom of speech of other people. I know large events in the UK will set up portable base stations for mobile calls.

I suppose the next few weeks will be the test. School holidays.

There have been new Pokemon appearing and changes to both the gameplay and the key locations.

tl:dr The game can still attract crowds which can mess up mobile phone networks, as well as the obvious problems of litter and general safety

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Ten new tech terms I learnt this summer: Do you know them all?

Dave Bell

Re: Teledildonics

The first times I saw it, it was in association with multi-player text-based games, and some of those are still running. There were already comments about one-handed typing taking place, and it's still arguable that it's more fun to create personal text, rather than rely on something that looks like just another porn movie. A lot of the VR erotica turns out to depend on motion-capture animations.

But even with just text, and a dial-up modem, these remotely-controlled devices could be added without using excessive bandwidth.

It may have all the problems of the Internet of Things, and it's simple enough that's surprising that it's still so obscure. Some sort of simple motor control may be all that's needed. But add a bit of security, IP67 sealing (a QI charger would be good), and developing a safe and secure control app, and I rather doubt the numbers would work out.

Do you really want hackers to take over the teledildonics? There's likely a kink for that. Rule 34 applies.

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Openreach asks UK what it thinks about 10 million 'full fibre' connections

Dave Bell

Re: Why?

I don't see any reason why there has to be a single choice of ratios. If I could trade a bit of download capacity for extra upload bandwidth, I'd be tempted.

The current situation is like expecting everybody to drive an 850cc Mini. It could do a lot, more than you think, but sometimes I needed a Land Rover.

When there is only one product, maybe with a bit of badge engineering, do you really have a market?

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Dave Bell

Any download can saturate a connection while it is running, and one advantage of bittorrent is that is doesn't put all the load on one server. I used if for my last Linux upgrade. That tech has had options to limit download rates for years, and just being able to do that, not saturating the physical connection, would make a big difference. Why not run the download overnight? How many different huge files do you need to download now?

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Dave Bell

I get enough from ADSL for video streaming and gaming, but I am living alone. When my brother visits, we have to be careful. There are some things emerging which would need more bandwidth than ADSL can provide, but whether they are even usable from the UK, because of the effects of ping time, I am not sure.

The current fibre to the cabinet option is expensive, and I just cannot get reliable info on how much more bandwidth I would gain. If Openreach want people to buy into this, they're going to have to reach out and be more open.

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Now here's a novel idea: Digitising Victorian-era stamp duty machines

Dave Bell

Not sure if it was stamp duty

Yes, it happened. I'm not sure it was quite the same thing as Stamp Duty, as it was a fixed fee for the document, rather than a percentage of the transaction. So the tax-stamp was already on printed cheques and the money collected as part of the per-cheque bank charges. But you could still write out the whole cheque on any piece of paper and add the stamp.

That was already unusual in my father's day. He was given a cheque like that when he sold a farm trailer, written on a sugar bag that had been re-used to wrap sandwiches. He was a bit worried, he told me, but the people at the local cattle market knew of the guy. and the cheque went through clearing.

I am not sure what the current system would do. A cheque could also be "endorsed": it was an instruction for the bank to pay you. and you could add an instruction to pay somebody else. My father said that some of his cheques went through a chain of several endorsements at the cattle markets such as Melton Mowbray, Uttoxeter, and Bakewell. It meant that people trusted him.

Maybe that's the sort of business dealing that inspired the idea of blockchain currencies. I doubt anyone involved in that has the trust that my father had. It's a hard act to follow.

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GSM gateway ban U-turn casts doubt on 8-year prosecution in Blighty

Dave Bell

It's at least arguable that there have been technical changes of the lifespan of this law.

Meanwhile, it is hard, from round-trip times, to figure out whether an IP address is in the UK or not. It may be that everything goes via a few nodes, such as Telehouse, in London. Or it may be that everything goes through a few nodes in Cheltenham.

The CPS might be close to honest, but can we trust their political lords and masters.

8 years on bail? nulli vendemus, nulli negabimus aut differemus, rectum aut justiciam

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Good luck building a VR PC: Ethereum miners are buying all the GPUs

Dave Bell

Other problems for VR

The graphics hardware, computer and display device, are looking to be a big barrier, but some VR concepts also seem to depend on fast internet connections, not just bandwidth but round-trip-times to servers. I have seen a figure of 40ms quoted before there start to be problems with people sharing an environment, but it hasn't been clear whether that includes the transmission time across the internet.

Maybe it's enough to wait for the 3D world model to download, and then a user can walk around the new building to see what it looks like, but as soon as you have somebody else in view, not in the next office, there will be problems.

You can cope with these problems with a monitor screen as a window on a virtual world. It's the new VR element, the head mounted display feeding each eye and overwhelming the other senses, which make any sluggishness a problem.

40ms? That's barely big enough to cover California. Bandwidth has increased enormously, but the round-trip times have hardly changed since I started using dial-up.

And I have not seen a convincing explanation of why I might be wrong. But it looks from here as if the VR-hype comes from a geographically localised cluster of enthusiasts around San Francisco Bay.

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BOFH: That's right. Turn it off. Turn it on

Dave Bell

Re: Not scary - true

That's a perilous path. A bug fix, making something work as documented, is one thing. But if the fix is done by somebody who hasn't checked the documentation, and changes the name of some menu option on the way, is the sort of thing that turns a BOFH into a mere user.

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Dave Bell

Over the years, I have seen a lot of art that only looks good on a badly adjusted monitor. Most people can't even get brightness and contract right, though you may have trouble getting the full range.

I used to do this with chemical photography, and printing an image has all the same problems. You cannot get anything whiter than the paper. The BOFH obviously knows this. 8 bits on the data, and 6 useful bits from the monitor.

Those high range images do have some use, but most of the detail will get thrown away at the end. And not even Ansel Adams could give 8 stops brightness range. (Different jargon, 1 stop difference is a factor of two, 1 bit.)

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Feelin' safe and snug on Linux while the Windows world burns? Stop that

Dave Bell

It's about control

I run Mint Linux, and v18.2 has just come out. It's based on the most recent Ubuntu LTS version.

There were a couple of big changes, but if I used the update process, I had the choice whether or not to use them. Do I switch the window manager? Do have make the jump from the 4.4 kernel to the 4.8 kernel?

Or I could install from scratch.

I used the update process, and then made the optional switches. It was all under my control.

I like being in control.

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London suffers from 'sub-standard' connectivity - report

Dave Bell

What do these surveys measure?

I have my doubts about some of these surveys.

I have been on ADSL since it was introduced in summer 2005. The speed has increased a couple of times, a change in contract details (it was throttled at first) and then a tech improvement. It's OK as a speed for a single user, and I don't feel any urge to go to FTTC. I may be moving before next summer anyway.

This whole "up to" speed advertising thing is an illusion, but some of the surveys I have seen seem a bit vague about how they compare fibre and ADSL. Also, I think my connection would be in the "up to 17Mbs" category, and that would drag down the averages even if, from distance to the exchange and the like, I would reckon my speed pretty good.

It does sounds as if there are genuine reasons to complain about the situation in London, but the way some of this is being reported is hiding the way in which many people may be deciding that there is no point in paying for the higher speeds.

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What? What? Which? Former broadband minister Ed Vaizey dismisses report

Dave Bell

It's more than just download speed

I get an adequate speed from ADSL, but upload speed is terrible, and if I was sharing a connection with a family, several people wanting to do different things, it wouldn't be enough. Some things, like VR headsets, are claimed to need low ping times to work well, and the UK's backbone network probably fails that test: everywhere seems to be abour 50ms from everywhere else in the UK.

That last problem may be why researchers are seeing people staring at the centre of a VR display, staying concentrated on the straight-ahead view. Is it bad design of VR, or is it that the slow ping times deter head movement by inducing motion sickness?

This might be why one long-established VR company keeps deferring the launch of a new product and keeps hyping it with a touring show. They can't get low enough ping times. The ping times I get today are rarely any better than I got with dial-up a quarter-century ago.

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TalkTalk customers complain of being unable to load Amazon website

Dave Bell

Re: the delivery time should not exceed 40 minutes.

I understand the delivery is rather flash. It doesn't want to miss you.

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Dave Bell

Re: Rule #1

For how long can I trust Google?

I have a little notebook with a list of DNS servers, including my ISP, Google, and OpenDNS. If something did go pear-shaped I don't need to look them up on the internet,

Worst-case, I have my android phone.

Doesn't solve the who-to-trust problem, and the whole connection could still fail, but it's some extra resilience.

I actually was with Talk-Talk for a while, after a take-over. Since I have my own domain-name and use non-ISP email, all they had to do was move packets, and they were OK at that.

Some of this is a habit I started in my dial-up days, when the company was bought by another (and both have since vanished).

Only downside? My weird interests can be tracked a long way back, but some of them are even in print.

0
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Fancy buying our aircraft carrier satnav, Raytheon asks UK

Dave Bell

Re: Himself? Herself?

I would have to check, but the HMS Queen Elizabeth could have been named after the Royal Mum. There were earlier ships of the same names as the current carriers.

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Dave Bell

Re: But.... Does it actually work?

It's nothing like flat earth, but GPS does make assumptions about the shape of the planet which makes slight differences to the latitude and longitude readings.

The basic differential GPS idea will cover things such as that, but it means the ship will have to transmit some sort of signal. This doesn't need to be powerful, but there is no way around a transmission from ship to returning plane, just to get into visual range.

Most GPS error comes from variations of signal velocity in the atmosphere, and there is always going to be the "cocked-hat" known to old-style navigators. As an extra problem, a ship's deck is never going to be as stable as a concrete runway. With the ship moving, it can't be quite like the differential GPS sending an error signal that can be applied in the vicinity of a fixed location. What the ship would have to do would be to transmit its current GPS position, encrypted, and the incoming plane gets a very good relative position.

1
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BOFH: Halon is not a rad new vape flavour

Dave Bell

I have had cold sales calls to a domestic line, on the TPS list, from salesmen like this. They get abusive if you say no. They ring back if you hang up. The calling number is always withheld.

I suppose their calls are what keeps the Openreach engineers in employment. Honesty is becoming worthless.

7
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When we said don't link to the article, Google, we meant DON'T LINK TO THE ARTICLE!

Dave Bell

Re: fraud without deception?

I rather think translation might be a big part of the problem in this case.

1
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Raspberry Pi sours thanks to mining malware

Dave Bell

Re: Bah!

The Mac uses a BSD base. Maybe nor more secure, but it is different. I can see how Linux might be bit less secure for other reasons but Windows is the existence proof for closed source not being safer.

2
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Amazon granted patent to put parachutes inside shipping labels

Dave Bell

I though a patent was supposed to describe the invention in sufficient detail to make a working copy

9
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Nvidia: Pssst... farmers. Need to get some weeds whacked?

Dave Bell

Nothing really new here.

I was seeing this general sort of selective herbicide technology in the sixties. It wasn't just herbicides that affected weeds but not the crop, but for certain sorts of crop it was already to cultivate to kill weeds between the crop rows, and it was trivial to use the same control system for a herbicide spray. It was called band-spraying.

I remember seeing ways of pulsing the spray on and off to hit non-crop plants at an early LAMMA show. I think that was when the show was at Lincoln, and that would put it in the last century, but I can't find the date when it moved to the Newark showground.

One of the problems that might have been solved is how the whole system behaves. You need some way of producing a cloud of liquid particles, usually a mix of water (as carrier) and pesticide, that are the right size particles to stick to the plant, not bounce off, when they hit, and large enough not to be too easily affected by wind, or evaporate too rapidly. There may be adjuvants, such as wetting agents. And somehow with the rapidly varying flow, you need to keep the pressure right, if you're using a hydraulic nozzle.

There are other ways of generating the droplets. with more control over droplet size, but I am not sure they can be used to aim the droplets.

This is starting to look like somebody having a clever idea about image recognition, which is good, who know sweet F.A. about actual farming.

We were in at the beginning of the Green Revolution, and I was coming home from school and doing things as routine that my teachers had been telling me were impossible.

At least my teachers knew about crop rotations. They did get confused about Jethro Tull.

2
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The revolution will not be televised: How Lucas modernised audio in film

Dave Bell

Re: Also Sound / Video tests.

The argument is that low-frequency sound from a sub-woofer is not very directional, the wavelength and the size of our heads, but when I set up my system for Fellowship of the Ring I had a pair of stereo speakers which were rated for a lower frequency-response than any sub-woofer I have seen. Nothing that special, just big speakers. If you have the TV set up in the middle of of a good stereo pair, you might not need the centre channel. It was the rear surround that really made the difference.

You don't need huge speakers, but a box about the size of four hardback books is a good balance. A lot of computer speakers today are just too small, about on par with the old transistor radio.

I worked in a noisy environment, and I probably can't hear the difference that a tweeter would make, but some pre-packed sound systems look to be all-tweeter.

5
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Netgear 'fixes' router by adding phone-home features that record your IP and MAC address

Dave Bell

Re: Similar technical data

Some countries, you can get a decent Geo-IP fix from the RTT to known servers. There's a research project based on this that I took part in, and one of the possibilities is confirming a Tor-node is in the country it claims to be.

Trouble is, the UK seems to be wired, via BT, so that everywhere is the same distance from everywhere else. So every ISP's address block is in the same fuzzy 30ms block as everything else, and my RTT to servers in California is little different to what it was on the days of dial-up.

The results I got plotted a circle that was about the same radius as the distance from London to Timbuktu.

0
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Hi! I’m Foxy! It looks like you want to run Flash. Do you need help?

Dave Bell

Re: Dear BBC,

The way the BBC is handling pictures also happens to trigger ad-blockers. There's the bbc.co.uk domain for the web pages, and a lot of the content is coming from servers on the bbci.co.uk domain.

A domain-name like that feels like somebody pretending to be the BBC

1
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Wannacry: Everything you still need to know because there were so many unanswered Qs

Dave Bell

Re: No place to hide

It would be a very bad idea for any government not to cooperate, though there are some good reasons not to hand people over to the USA for a trial. And we might not be much better But the scary prospect is for some government, absolutely sure of somebody's guilt, bypasses the legal process and arranges to push some hacker off the platform in front of a train.

Part of it is the thinking that we know, but cannot give away how we know.

This feeling that some governments are willing to mess around the system lies behind some aspects of the Julian Assange case. The people who worked on this malware may have killed somebody in the UK, and it might legally amount to manslaughter. They aren't innocents. But I would rather trust a court than a politician.

4
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Britain shouldn't turn its back on EU drone regs, warns aerospace boffin

Dave Bell

Everything the EU did had to be made into British law by our politicians, and much the same for this, through the CAA. And issues like this should have been argued about before Mrs May even sent the "I quit" letter. Some of the problems are in the EU stage, others on the people, politicians and civil servants, in this country, but it's so convenient to blame the EU when you get something wrong.

I've seen it happen.

And people such as Boris Johnson lied to get the result they wanted, and the new PM rewarded them by giving them high office.

Labour are not that much better

They're all blaming the EU for the problems, and expect us to let them run the country. The EU doesn't have to be all that clever to look better than the British Parliament..

If you want to re-elect the party of lies, go ahead.

Don't expect me to be polite.

5
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For now, GNU GPL is an enforceable contract, says US federal judge

Dave Bell

Re: Good writeup, I guess

The Shockwave Rider was published forty years ago. It's rather worrying how good a prediction it has become. though perhaps, that soon after Nixon, the politics was an almost routine thing.

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PC repair chap lets tech support scammer log on to his PC. His Linux PC

Dave Bell

All these calls: scammers, illegal automated calls; don't give a company name and withhold their number.

How can you make an effective report when they do that?

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