* Posts by Dazed and Confused

2077 posts • joined 12 Sep 2007

Big contenders in the broadband chart this week, but who will be #1? Well, not Britain

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: There needs to be a concerted push to bring FTTP to all areas

In the news yesterday they were talking about insisting all new homes get charging points for electric cars. How about insisting that they get fibre too.

8
0

'Plane Hacker' Roberts: I put a network sniffer on my truck to see what it was sharing. Holy crap!

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Insurance Black Boxes

> saying they'd caught them doing over 100mph round a roundabout.

I've just got insurance for my son which requires a black box. The cost difference is over £1000.

On his first trip with it they logged him doing just over 40 in a 30 zone and included the location. It's a bloody great dual carriage way which has a 50 limit all the way down it.

7
1

RIP Peter Firmin: Clangers creator dies aged 89

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge
Coat

Re: The clangers was a documentry series

aka the armpit

That would be the top right hand corner where it joined to the rest of the body.

1
0
Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Lovely chap, great series

but it's well worth checking out the original black and white series

When the time came for little confused to arrive I sort out the "complete" set of Ivor the Engine and was applauded that some of the ones from my dim and distant memory of times yonder were missing. Still I persevered and was able to find that those too had been released on a separate VHS tape. So my children were brought up to the sounds of Ivor singing with the choir.

The first of the stories from the black and white series is essential to understanding the rest, it's where the story comes from. It took a while hunting through eBay to find the original story book.

7
0
Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

The clangers was a documentry series

Surely they didn't make it up

Next you'll be telling Ivor doesn't live in the top left hand corner of Wales.

31
0

Creep travels half the world to harass online teen gamer… and gets shot by her mom – cops

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Now he can get a tattoo, "Shot by the Mom!"

LRRH kept her pistol in her knickers.

Everyone knows that.

"The small girl smiles. One eyelid flickers. She whips a pistol from her knickers."

Roald Dahl

17
0
Dazed and Confused
Silver badge
Pint

Re: "Auckland to Sydney"?

Auckland to Sydney isn't half a world away, it's a whole different planet. Neither of whom chose to admit the existence of the other :-)

Beer coz it's not to early from one at either end of the worm-hole.

24
0

Dob in naughty data slurps to top EU court, privacy groups urge

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Can the European court go after the telecoms companies?

I'm not sure whether their legal remit allows them to fine the telecoms companies. If the likes of BT were to be repeatedly slapped with multi million fines they'd pretty quickly bring pressure to bare on the government.

Business leaders and shareholders are far more likely to have an impact of government policy than mere voters. Political parties tend to oppose these sorts of things while in opposition but they all seem to immediately change their tune when in power (and change back again next time they aren't).

5
0

Linus Torvalds tells kernel devs to fix their regressive fixing

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: A thin line

> Sigh ... Somewhere, perhaps, there is an unparallel universe, where software is carefully designed before it is coded, and programmers translate carefully written specifications from people-speak to machine-speak. And I'm sure if it exists, it runs a lot better than this universe.

OK, so it's been 20ish years since I was programming professionally, rather than just hacking the odd bit together to solve an immediate problem.

This is how we worked back then.

I was working for one of the major IT vendors. There was an "external reference specification" written and only once that was agreed on were we allowed to start coding. If you found something which couldn't work out in code it took an act of god to get the spec changed and you'd get a kick up the pants for not having got the spec right. You didn't just add code on a whim.

I know that company no longer works that way. I know they have a lot more quality issues. In fact non of what we did as "good practice" seems still to be done.

8
0

Great news, cask beer fans: UK shortage of CO2 menaces fizzy crap taking up tap space

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge
Pint

Re: Irony?

I don't know, first they tell us there's too much of the stuff, now they complain there isn't enough of the stuff. Can't they just make their bloody minds up.

27
1

Cops: Autonomous Uber driver may have been streaming The Voice before death crash

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: To which I reply "autopilot".

The safety driver's job is... well, the clue is in the title isn't it?

To which I reply "autopilot".

To my mind this is the problem with the Tesla autopilot. They say that the human driver is responsible for safety and is supposed to step in and take control when they notice the automatics not doing the right thing. Well this tragic case highlights a total failure to understand human nature. Here there was a "test driver" specifically tasked with monitoring a protype out on the road and yet they still can't keep their mind on what is happening. What chance is there have your average customer is going to be paying enough attention to make split second decisions and over-ride the vehicles automatics.

8
1

Keep your hands on the f*cking wheel! New Tesla update like being taught to drive by your dad

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Auto-crash-pilot

> I can't stand all these driver assistance aids, even automatic lights are pretty annoying. Cruise control is the only item that might be useful, and even that isn't always perfect. Rain sensitive wipers are never quite right. Reversing sensors are useful, but proximity sensors when driving along occasionally get things wrong and actively distract from being able to to study the road.

The roads over here are rarely quiet enough to contemplate cruise control but most cars that have cruise control can also be set to use it as a speed limiter and this I do find much more useful.

Your point about rain sensitive wipers I find interesting. The Mrs' previous car had them and they worked really well, after 150K miles we upgraded it for couple of generations newer model and the wipers are no where near as good as the previous ones. I assume that the earlier one was a first generation and the solution the engineers had found wasn't too cheap, so the bean counters sent them back to the drawing board and told them to find a cheaper way to implement the function according to the 80/20 rule.

We don't care if it's only 80% as effective so long as it only cost 20% of the working version.

1
0
Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Seriously have we all just forgotten how to drive?

> And don't get me started on parents getting / installing a baby seat from the traffic side. In a narrow road with parked cars both sides. Are you trying to get yourself and your kid killed? People really are getting dumber by the day.

And parents who push a pram/buggy out in front of them through a gap in parked cars till they can see what's coming, by which point the poor little darling has been pushed into the middle of the traffic flow.

1
0
Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Auto-crash-pilot

> something like ABS, it should detect your emergency stop and provide the most effective stop the car is capable of.

That's not what ABS does, ABS just cadence brakes for you only it's able to detect when a wheel loses grip and stops that wheel actually braking until there is a chance to regain grip when it will re-apply the brake effort. A proper ABS system should be able to do this many times more quickly than a human driver.

What you sound like you are describing is emergency brake assist where the computer decides you are doing an emergency stop and then takes over and brakes as hard as it can, relying on an ABS system to avoid locking up the wheels and loosing braking efficiency. The idea is that often drivers don't brake hard enough or scare themselves at how violently the car brakes when they do hit the peddle hard that they back off and don't slow enough to avoid hitting things.

Emergency brake assist systems can be a total PITA. The Mrs' Merc has this and if you move your foot too quickly from the accelerator to the brake peddle it guesses you're emergency braking and tries to pull a full blown stop. So unless you're careful you find the car doing crazy things while you drive moderately quickly down country lanes, where it is normal to move your foot quickly but only apply minimal pressure. Once the stupid computer has got it into its tiny mind you want to stop you have to completely remove you foot from the brake peddle before it will give you control of the car back.

9
1
Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Auto-crash-pilot

> What kind of prat waits for the car to decide?

This is the core problem with the current system.

"Drivers" won't be paying as much attention to the road with AP engaged as they would be without it. If they have to then why bother with AP at all if it ain't saving you any effort. But even if you try to concentrate most drivers simply won't be able to keep their attention on the road with AP engaged as they would be without it as they won't be needing to make all the regular adjustments that are normally required while behind the wheel.

My feeling is that this system shows a basic lack of understanding real people.

17
0

Judge on Microsoft gender discrimination case finds 'flaw' in class grouping argument

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Tigra 07

Also most new doctors, by some margin are now female - yet we're not even talking about gender imbalance or how men will be treated for male-only problems by female doctors.

Also far more female teachers, particularly in younger years education establishments.

Weren't the figures for last year that 35% more females went to university than males, in the UK?

As to male teachers, for my kids there was not a single male teacher at their primary school the entire time they were there.

3
0

Men are officially the worst… top-level domain

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: I'm feeling left out

Hmmm well I can't find any from .men, but acoording to my mail log I've had 6 from .date.

So when I find enough time to be bored I'll have to work out how to get postfix to just block all these buggers.

1
1

Which? calls for compensation for users hit by Windows 10 woes

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: One would expect a consumer magazine...

> ... to know somewhat more about Microsoft, than to expect that they would now compensate their users.

It's W10 we are talking about here so the term "users" is perhaps not the best. If they were able to be "users" then they wouldn't be griping. It's the "not able to be a user" that needs compensation the most.

4
1

HPE: Exafloppers need to be 'memory-centric' as world cannot afford internode data slinging

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: 1^15=1

but it's so much easier to scale from 1^15 to 1^18.

2
0

Oddly enough, when a Tesla accelerates at a barrier, someone dies: Autopilot report lands

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Not an "autopilot"

> It's about time they banned these driver "aids".

It's no good the manufacturer saying but we told you to look where you're going too, so don't blame us. The average car driver is not like an airline pilot plus co-pilot pair. If they don't have to concentrate they won't concentrate. Even if they are nominally looking where they are going their minds will wonder. So when a problem happens they aren't immediately ready to handle it.

16
3

Linus Torvalds decides world isn’t ready for Linux 5.0

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Déjà vu

I seem to recall MS Word did that once - going from 4.x to 6.0 just to beat WordPerfect which was at 5.1 at the time.

Given the signs of logical behaviour exhibited by MS Word it wouldn't have surprised me in the slightest if they'd gone from version 4 to version 6 followed by version 5.1.

27
0

UK chancellor puts finger in air, promises 15 million full fibre connections by 2025

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Paul

I feel for you Paul. There are 2 green cabinets on out housing estate and BT only chose to upgrade the further one to fibre so all my lines are limited to 30Mb down and ~5.5 up. No Virgin here either (stupid greedy cable company tried to extort money from thick as shit builders) so no other option for the last mile. I know a lot of people do a lot worse.

2
0

Openreach consults on shift of 16 MEEELLION phone lines to VoIP by 2025

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Problems

someone stuck in a lift who almost certainly has a mobile phone on them

Back in the late 90s my wife was working for an IT supplier managing customers support needs. One of her accounts was one of the mobile phone companies. While visiting their site she was in the lift with a number of their IT managers when the lift broke down. The emergency phone didn't work. Done of the guys from the mobile phone company could get their phones to work, no signal. Luckily my wife's company had a deal with a rival mobile network and her phone worked fine much to all the techies amusement.

2
0

You love Systemd – you just don't know it yet, wink Red Hat bods

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: fscking BINARY LOGS.

And config too

When it comes to logs and config file if you can't grep it then it doesn't belong on Linux/Unix

17
0
Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

> where developers have crawled up their own asses and lost sight of the light of day

Gollum...

It hurts our eyeses it does my precious.

5
0
Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Predictable names

I can't remember if it's HPE or Dell (or both)

It's Dell. I got the impression that much of this work had been done, at least, in conjunction with Dell.

2
0
Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Predictable names

It renamed network interfaces so they would have predictable names.

Hmmmm nice idea, but that's not how it works in practice and I'm not sure this is a core systemd feature. The new naming conventions in RHEL7 don't work in all cases. It has 5 different naming schemes or which it only uses 4 by default.

Firstly it tries to find out whether a network device is an "onboard" one, and looks in 2 different places to make this decision.

Secondly it looks to see whether the NIC is in a named PCI slot, well again there are 2 different places it seems to look, one of which doesn't appear to be readable from the files under /sys, at least not with any of the NIC drivers I've ever tried. Great if you can read it from SMBIOS, not otherwise.

Failing those it then looks to see if the driver is a PCI one and then uses the PCI address, well these aren't natively persistent nor are they consistent. Persistence can be requested from the firmware configuration, but it often isn't enabled by default.

Failing all that it just uses the kernels non persistent & non consistent naming without the benefit of udev rules to provide persistence. Given the asynchronous driver initialization in the Linux 3 & 4 kernels this is particularly bad as if you've got 2 different sorts of NICs then it's anyone's guess which one with get to be eth0 before systemd starts to play it's games.

Now if you run this lot inside a VM then virtio drivers for KVM don't provide the identifiers used by schemes 1 & 2 and they're not PCI to scheme 3 is out too. Scheme 4 is never used by default so we drop through to the kernel names. If you also have emulated NICs in you VM and you've got random naming for your network cards.

The situation with VMWare is just as bad, if not worse. It doesn't provide persistent or even sensible onboard device numbers or you end up with name for you NICS like eno167654321 (something over 2^24). So they put a kludge in the systemd code to spot the ridiculous onboard device numbers and then drop through to scheme 2, but the version of SMBIOS emulated does allow the slot numbers to be pulled from the type 9 records and the field that is used can't be read from /sys and doesn't seem to be consistent, so I can't find a way to know in advance what a NIC will be called so how the *&^% am I supposed to write kickstart files for these things?

And all of this has nothing to do with the job of PID 1, which is the orphan catcher, without which the kernel will die.

21
0

UK age-checking smut overlord won't be able to handle the pressure – critics

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Sex Education

Where did you learn about sex?

My parents just made sure there was a collection of educational material on the bookshelf and assumed that we'd find it when the time came to look.

4
0
Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: I never knew CBeebies had a porn section...

When I setup netnanny (I think) on a PC for my kids back when they were "CBeebie" age they tried to go to their website to find it was blocked by default.

CBeebies was part of the BBC (no not that one, the broadcasting corporation) and the BBC does have some material likely to shock small kiddie widdies.

1
0

If you're a Fedora fanboi, this latest release might break your heart a little

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

> Linux tip: Avoid Nvidia graphics cards if possible

Back in the late 90s the Nvidia Linux drivers were way ahead of their Windows ones.

I used to dual boot my laptop, most of the stuff I was forced to use for work was Windows only, but when I was able to reboot and come up in Linux the screen was just so much nicer I often had other engineers stopping by and asking how I managed to get things like fonts displayed that nicely.

0
1

When WAN works like LAN: RStor's network acrobatics helps it wolf $45m from Cisco 'n' pals

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

When WAN works like LAN

Then Einstein will have been disproved or we'll all be using quantum entanglement routers. Until then it will still take ages to get data from one place to another.

4
0

Windows 10 April 2018 Update lands today... ish

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Focus Assist

Can you use it to suppress that useless time wasting trash called

constant bloody updates. If I wanted to send this much time managing my PC I'd have become a systems administrator.

20
2
Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: "Keep clicking, Windows-lovers! It's bound to come along soon."

They have that too. Both automated and human.

They might have, but they clearly don't actually use it or there wouldn't be anything like the number of bugs managing to get out of the door to customers.

9
4

Nominet drains mug of tea, leans back, calmly explains how to make Whois GDPR-compliant

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge
Trollface

Re: "the IP lawyers ain't gonna be happy"

Are you sure?

In short, the IP lawyers ain't gonna be happy. But tough. ------8<------------- they can get it for free if they wait a day.

They're lawyers, they'll bill for that day.

They'd probably argue for needing it to be longer than just 1 day.

17
0

France building encrypted messaging app for politicians

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: How times change

> I remember when it was "illegal" to pgp files here.

Yepp this is the same France where encryption was illegal until quite recently. Even GSM had to have an exception for France so that the don't encrypt A5/0 mode was normally known as French mode.

3
0

Whois is dead as Europe hands DNS overlord ICANN its arse

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Unstable operation coming soon...

> I wonder if companies house is allowed to continue under GDPR

I wonder whether the concept of a limited company will be allowed to continue under GDPR.

The idea of Companies House publishing your details is because you are asking people you do business with to do so on the basis of trust. If you do business with a limited company you have to accept that you may not get paid and that ultimately their liability is limited to the share capital of the company (usually a couple of quid). So you need to be able to find out whether the directors are people you are prepared to trust. Publishing their details at least holds them (me) to a certain amount of accountability. If you aren't allowed to find out who they are why should you trust them? Business people being able to use the right to be forgotten to hide their past illegal behaviour is bad enough. Letting conmen have complete anonymity seems to be an unexpected consequence of the new rules, unless you subscribe to the black helicopter view of things.

3
6

They forked this one up: Microsoft modifies open-source code, blows hole in Windows Defender

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Microsoft -- the Monopoly and Marketing Giant...

> Clearly shiny-shiny is more important than functionality.

Shiny-Shiny is obviously more important than security. Security is really boring and doesn't look sexy in ads.

27
0

What's silent but violent and costs $250m? Yes, it's Lockheed Martin's super-quiet, supersonic X-plane for NASA

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Even if it comes to pass..

> You didn't miss out on much.

As my Aunt, who flew it out to NY quite a number of times put it.

"It wasn't very comfortable, but it wasn't very comfortable for not very long, so better than all the other planes"

She was flying on before the days of modern full lie flat business & first class seats.

BA's cattle+ seats are basically the old business class ones.

8
0
Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

> It was even better on the perimeter road at the end of the runway, when the reheat was still active. Made the world shake.

It was a lot of fun when you were queued up behind one at Heathrow in something little like the smaller versions of an A320.

2
0

Happy 100th birthday to the Royal Air Force

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Grandfathers / Grandpa

> Funny how WWI produced odd combinations.

My Grandpa saw Blériot flying over the channel and became interested in the idea of flying, joined the navy as they were starting to take an interest in aeroplanes hoping for the chance to learn to fly, as the son of farm labourer he had no other chance. Joined the Royal Naval Air Services when it was born and flew throughout WW1. Due to the general shortage of planes and experienced pilots his squadron assisted the army and flew over the trenches where he was shot down but survived and made it back over our lines where he then got caught up with the ground war before he was able to get back to his squadron. When the RAF was formed he was given the choice of staying in the Navy or transferring to the new service and he chose to move to the RAF where he continued to server until after the end of WW2. He managed to get decorated by all three services in his time. Things were all a bit more mixed up back then.

18
0

Windows 10 to force you to use Edge, even if it isn't default browser

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: "no problem giving Apple a pass" - One major difference

> As we keep hearing here, Windows is not mandatory anymore, if one doesn't like it, choose an alternative.

OK so you get a choice of which OS to use but you don't have a choice of which OS you have to pay for. It is very difficult to buy most PC HW without paying for a W10 license. There are also issues with the FW being reluctant to run other OSes.

12
3
Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: "no problem giving Apple a pass" - One major difference

Apple provide iOS installed an hardware they make.

Microsoft provide a generic OS that can be installed on any (compatible) hardware.

You can only get iOS if you buy Apple's HW. MS SW comes on almost everything else. MS also have contracts with just about every other HW manufacturer making it difficult for them to supply non-Window's systems, so it is very difficult to buy a non Apple PC without being forced to buy Windows. MS are considered to be a monopoly and as such are expected to behave in ways minority players aren't. The EU has in the past forced MS to give users a choice about browsers, they then quietly forgot and the EU quietly forgot to enforce the ruling until it became public that there was an issue and they were chided back into action.

13
4

Age checks for UK pr0n site visitors on ice as regulator cobbles together some guidance

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

while of course the other camp still think it's 1970s, so not only no Internet but no power no.... the list goes on. Sod it they're all as bad as each other and none of them have the faintest clue.

5
0

Violent, powerful wind that lasts 100s of years. Yes, it's Jupiter, not you after a Friday night curry

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

violent wind that lasts for years

Yeah, I have wind like that too sometimes.

13
0

Ofcom to probe Three and Vodafone over network throttling

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Curious about Three's tethering

Playing devils advocate here.

I'm looking forward to seeing what (if anything!) happens because there are very strict limits on tethering for me and once that allowance is used I have to wait until my next billing cycle.

Three offer different types of SIMs at different prices.

An all you can eat data for a phone SIM is now £30 (Eeek I hope they don't move me to that!)

They don't offer an all you can eat data SIM, at £30 only gets you 40GB.

Now I guess they do this because in their experience on average phone users use less data than "Data SIM" users. I've got all you can eat data but only average 2GB, my wife uses much less, my youngest averages over 160GB and they don't quibble. I guess he's the exception (or perhaps he's why they now want to charge £30 per month! they used to do unlimited phone data for £12.99).

But I guess on average people with Data SIM use more than people with phones.

1
0

UK takes first step towards criminalising driverless car hackers

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

hacking drierless cars

How about laws to handle hacking the current crop of human driven cars. There have already been proof of concept demos showing that critical car control systems can be accessed remotely. The hacker should be punished sure, but those responsible at the car company should be punished 10 fold, and it needs to be people not just the company, fines are too easy for companies to just pay.

1
1
Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Manufacturers should be liable

> If something fails then they should be liable just like in the airline industry.

Would we also have a case like with the aviation industry where a fault can lead to the grounding of all similar planes until the problem is fixed?

6
2

Copper feel, fibre it ain't: Ads regulator could face court for playing hard and fast with definitions

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Give 100 houses 1Gb fibre connections running through a 10Gb router and they won't all get 1Gb throughput though will they (for example..)?

Well not if they aren't all trying to download big files from fast sites all the time. But most people don't. They use their connection in bursts. So if the chances are that 100 people sharing a 10Gb link won't notice that they aren't getting 1Gb each, but sure, there will be times when peak demand exceeds 10Gb, just probably not very often. Even when my son was burning his way through 300GB/month on my link that still works out as less than an average of 1Mb/s so a contention ratio of 10:1 would probably meant real conflicts were very rare.

Back before people tended to have Internet at home, or even Jo public had ever herd of the Internet I did a deal with the network team at work to swap a whole bunch of 9600baud pad lines for a 64kb IP one. They thought I was mad and thought they'd got the best of the deal, while I knew I'd effectively upgraded everyone from 9600baud to 64k since we had a bursty (block mode) application and so sod all contention.

Of course your mileage may vary, perhaps you do spend you're life downloading stuff at a constant 1Gb, but if so you aren't the average user.

7
1

Full shift to electric vans would melt Royal Mail's London hub, MPs told

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge

Re: Hmmm

> Could they not install solar panels on the roof and some powerwall size batteries?

Nope, the sort of batteries you need are more like "Dinorwig Power Station" Find a large mountain. Bore out the centre and when you've got excess power pump water up to the top. When you need to charge all those delivery vehicles start letting the water pour back down the hill.

Pity the article doesn't give any details of the power draw needed. Telsa's site says you'll need 16.5kW for 2 hours to go 100miles. They've got 49,000 vehicles, assuming 2 hours each per day that's going to be a lot of power. Telsa's speal about powerwall talks about an installation in Hawaii which is 13MW and requires 55,000 solar panels. RM would need at least 5 of these just to power their fleet and we don't get anything like the sun that they get in Hawaii.

4
0

Yorkshire cops have begun using on-the-spot fingerprint scanners

Dazed and Confused
Silver badge
Big Brother

You think this is invasive

Just wait till they've got on the spot DNA scanners.

scene: bloke down the park pushing his kids on the swing, police officer enters stage right

officer: what are you doing with these kids

bloke: they're my children

officer: click click click I don't think so sonny, you're nicked

9
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018