* Posts by Dazed and Confused

2056 posts • joined 12 Sep 2007

UK chancellor puts finger in air, promises 15 MEELLION full fibre connections by 2025

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Paul

I feel for you Paul. There are 2 green cabinets on out housing estate and BT only chose to upgrade the further one to fibre so all my lines are limited to 30Mb down and ~5.5 up. No Virgin here either (stupid greedy cable company tried to extort money from thick as shit builders) so no other option for the last mile. I know a lot of people do a lot worse.

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Openreach consults on shift of 16 MEEELLION phone lines to VoIP by 2025

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Problems

someone stuck in a lift who almost certainly has a mobile phone on them

Back in the late 90s my wife was working for an IT supplier managing customers support needs. One of her accounts was one of the mobile phone companies. While visiting their site she was in the lift with a number of their IT managers when the lift broke down. The emergency phone didn't work. Done of the guys from the mobile phone company could get their phones to work, no signal. Luckily my wife's company had a deal with a rival mobile network and her phone worked fine much to all the techies amusement.

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You love Systemd – you just don't know it yet, wink Red Hat bods

Dazed and Confused
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Re: fscking BINARY LOGS.

And config too

When it comes to logs and config file if you can't grep it then it doesn't belong on Linux/Unix

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Dazed and Confused
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> where developers have crawled up their own asses and lost sight of the light of day

Gollum...

It hurts our eyeses it does my precious.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Predictable names

I can't remember if it's HPE or Dell (or both)

It's Dell. I got the impression that much of this work had been done, at least, in conjunction with Dell.

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Dazed and Confused
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Predictable names

It renamed network interfaces so they would have predictable names.

Hmmmm nice idea, but that's not how it works in practice and I'm not sure this is a core systemd feature. The new naming conventions in RHEL7 don't work in all cases. It has 5 different naming schemes or which it only uses 4 by default.

Firstly it tries to find out whether a network device is an "onboard" one, and looks in 2 different places to make this decision.

Secondly it looks to see whether the NIC is in a named PCI slot, well again there are 2 different places it seems to look, one of which doesn't appear to be readable from the files under /sys, at least not with any of the NIC drivers I've ever tried. Great if you can read it from SMBIOS, not otherwise.

Failing those it then looks to see if the driver is a PCI one and then uses the PCI address, well these aren't natively persistent nor are they consistent. Persistence can be requested from the firmware configuration, but it often isn't enabled by default.

Failing all that it just uses the kernels non persistent & non consistent naming without the benefit of udev rules to provide persistence. Given the asynchronous driver initialization in the Linux 3 & 4 kernels this is particularly bad as if you've got 2 different sorts of NICs then it's anyone's guess which one with get to be eth0 before systemd starts to play it's games.

Now if you run this lot inside a VM then virtio drivers for KVM don't provide the identifiers used by schemes 1 & 2 and they're not PCI to scheme 3 is out too. Scheme 4 is never used by default so we drop through to the kernel names. If you also have emulated NICs in you VM and you've got random naming for your network cards.

The situation with VMWare is just as bad, if not worse. It doesn't provide persistent or even sensible onboard device numbers or you end up with name for you NICS like eno167654321 (something over 2^24). So they put a kludge in the systemd code to spot the ridiculous onboard device numbers and then drop through to scheme 2, but the version of SMBIOS emulated does allow the slot numbers to be pulled from the type 9 records and the field that is used can't be read from /sys and doesn't seem to be consistent, so I can't find a way to know in advance what a NIC will be called so how the *&^% am I supposed to write kickstart files for these things?

And all of this has nothing to do with the job of PID 1, which is the orphan catcher, without which the kernel will die.

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UK age-checking smut overlord won't be able to handle the pressure – critics

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Sex Education

Where did you learn about sex?

My parents just made sure there was a collection of educational material on the bookshelf and assumed that we'd find it when the time came to look.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: I never knew CBeebies had a porn section...

When I setup netnanny (I think) on a PC for my kids back when they were "CBeebie" age they tried to go to their website to find it was blocked by default.

CBeebies was part of the BBC (no not that one, the broadcasting corporation) and the BBC does have some material likely to shock small kiddie widdies.

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If you're a Fedora fanboi, this latest release might break your heart a little

Dazed and Confused
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> Linux tip: Avoid Nvidia graphics cards if possible

Back in the late 90s the Nvidia Linux drivers were way ahead of their Windows ones.

I used to dual boot my laptop, most of the stuff I was forced to use for work was Windows only, but when I was able to reboot and come up in Linux the screen was just so much nicer I often had other engineers stopping by and asking how I managed to get things like fonts displayed that nicely.

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When WAN works like LAN: RStor's network acrobatics helps it wolf $45m from Cisco 'n' pals

Dazed and Confused
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When WAN works like LAN

Then Einstein will have been disproved or we'll all be using quantum entanglement routers. Until then it will still take ages to get data from one place to another.

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Windows 10 April 2018 Update lands today... ish

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Focus Assist

Can you use it to suppress that useless time wasting trash called

constant bloody updates. If I wanted to send this much time managing my PC I'd have become a systems administrator.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: "Keep clicking, Windows-lovers! It's bound to come along soon."

They have that too. Both automated and human.

They might have, but they clearly don't actually use it or there wouldn't be anything like the number of bugs managing to get out of the door to customers.

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Nominet drains mug of tea, leans back, calmly explains how to make Whois GDPR-compliant

Dazed and Confused
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Trollface

Re: "the IP lawyers ain't gonna be happy"

Are you sure?

In short, the IP lawyers ain't gonna be happy. But tough. ------8<------------- they can get it for free if they wait a day.

They're lawyers, they'll bill for that day.

They'd probably argue for needing it to be longer than just 1 day.

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France building encrypted messaging app for politicians

Dazed and Confused
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Re: How times change

> I remember when it was "illegal" to pgp files here.

Yepp this is the same France where encryption was illegal until quite recently. Even GSM had to have an exception for France so that the don't encrypt A5/0 mode was normally known as French mode.

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Whois is dead as Europe hands DNS overlord ICANN its arse

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Unstable operation coming soon...

> I wonder if companies house is allowed to continue under GDPR

I wonder whether the concept of a limited company will be allowed to continue under GDPR.

The idea of Companies House publishing your details is because you are asking people you do business with to do so on the basis of trust. If you do business with a limited company you have to accept that you may not get paid and that ultimately their liability is limited to the share capital of the company (usually a couple of quid). So you need to be able to find out whether the directors are people you are prepared to trust. Publishing their details at least holds them (me) to a certain amount of accountability. If you aren't allowed to find out who they are why should you trust them? Business people being able to use the right to be forgotten to hide their past illegal behaviour is bad enough. Letting conmen have complete anonymity seems to be an unexpected consequence of the new rules, unless you subscribe to the black helicopter view of things.

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They forked this one up: Microsoft modifies open-source code, blows hole in Windows Defender

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Microsoft -- the Monopoly and Marketing Giant...

> Clearly shiny-shiny is more important than functionality.

Shiny-Shiny is obviously more important than security. Security is really boring and doesn't look sexy in ads.

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What's silent but violent and costs $250m? Yes, it's Lockheed Martin's super-quiet, supersonic X-plane for NASA

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Even if it comes to pass..

> You didn't miss out on much.

As my Aunt, who flew it out to NY quite a number of times put it.

"It wasn't very comfortable, but it wasn't very comfortable for not very long, so better than all the other planes"

She was flying on before the days of modern full lie flat business & first class seats.

BA's cattle+ seats are basically the old business class ones.

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Dazed and Confused
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> It was even better on the perimeter road at the end of the runway, when the reheat was still active. Made the world shake.

It was a lot of fun when you were queued up behind one at Heathrow in something little like the smaller versions of an A320.

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Happy 100th birthday to the Royal Air Force

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Grandfathers / Grandpa

> Funny how WWI produced odd combinations.

My Grandpa saw Blériot flying over the channel and became interested in the idea of flying, joined the navy as they were starting to take an interest in aeroplanes hoping for the chance to learn to fly, as the son of farm labourer he had no other chance. Joined the Royal Naval Air Services when it was born and flew throughout WW1. Due to the general shortage of planes and experienced pilots his squadron assisted the army and flew over the trenches where he was shot down but survived and made it back over our lines where he then got caught up with the ground war before he was able to get back to his squadron. When the RAF was formed he was given the choice of staying in the Navy or transferring to the new service and he chose to move to the RAF where he continued to server until after the end of WW2. He managed to get decorated by all three services in his time. Things were all a bit more mixed up back then.

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Windows 10 to force you to use Edge, even if it isn't default browser

Dazed and Confused
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Re: "no problem giving Apple a pass" - One major difference

> As we keep hearing here, Windows is not mandatory anymore, if one doesn't like it, choose an alternative.

OK so you get a choice of which OS to use but you don't have a choice of which OS you have to pay for. It is very difficult to buy most PC HW without paying for a W10 license. There are also issues with the FW being reluctant to run other OSes.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: "no problem giving Apple a pass" - One major difference

Apple provide iOS installed an hardware they make.

Microsoft provide a generic OS that can be installed on any (compatible) hardware.

You can only get iOS if you buy Apple's HW. MS SW comes on almost everything else. MS also have contracts with just about every other HW manufacturer making it difficult for them to supply non-Window's systems, so it is very difficult to buy a non Apple PC without being forced to buy Windows. MS are considered to be a monopoly and as such are expected to behave in ways minority players aren't. The EU has in the past forced MS to give users a choice about browsers, they then quietly forgot and the EU quietly forgot to enforce the ruling until it became public that there was an issue and they were chided back into action.

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Age checks for UK pr0n site visitors on ice as regulator cobbles together some guidance

Dazed and Confused
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while of course the other camp still think it's 1970s, so not only no Internet but no power no.... the list goes on. Sod it they're all as bad as each other and none of them have the faintest clue.

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Violent, powerful wind that lasts 100s of years. Yes, it's Jupiter, not you after a Friday night curry

Dazed and Confused
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violent wind that lasts for years

Yeah, I have wind like that too sometimes.

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Ofcom to probe Three and Vodafone over network throttling

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Curious about Three's tethering

Playing devils advocate here.

I'm looking forward to seeing what (if anything!) happens because there are very strict limits on tethering for me and once that allowance is used I have to wait until my next billing cycle.

Three offer different types of SIMs at different prices.

An all you can eat data for a phone SIM is now £30 (Eeek I hope they don't move me to that!)

They don't offer an all you can eat data SIM, at £30 only gets you 40GB.

Now I guess they do this because in their experience on average phone users use less data than "Data SIM" users. I've got all you can eat data but only average 2GB, my wife uses much less, my youngest averages over 160GB and they don't quibble. I guess he's the exception (or perhaps he's why they now want to charge £30 per month! they used to do unlimited phone data for £12.99).

But I guess on average people with Data SIM use more than people with phones.

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UK takes first step towards criminalising driverless car hackers

Dazed and Confused
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hacking drierless cars

How about laws to handle hacking the current crop of human driven cars. There have already been proof of concept demos showing that critical car control systems can be accessed remotely. The hacker should be punished sure, but those responsible at the car company should be punished 10 fold, and it needs to be people not just the company, fines are too easy for companies to just pay.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Manufacturers should be liable

> If something fails then they should be liable just like in the airline industry.

Would we also have a case like with the aviation industry where a fault can lead to the grounding of all similar planes until the problem is fixed?

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Copper feel, fibre it ain't: Ads regulator could face court for playing hard and fast with definitions

Dazed and Confused
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Give 100 houses 1Gb fibre connections running through a 10Gb router and they won't all get 1Gb throughput though will they (for example..)?

Well not if they aren't all trying to download big files from fast sites all the time. But most people don't. They use their connection in bursts. So if the chances are that 100 people sharing a 10Gb link won't notice that they aren't getting 1Gb each, but sure, there will be times when peak demand exceeds 10Gb, just probably not very often. Even when my son was burning his way through 300GB/month on my link that still works out as less than an average of 1Mb/s so a contention ratio of 10:1 would probably meant real conflicts were very rare.

Back before people tended to have Internet at home, or even Jo public had ever herd of the Internet I did a deal with the network team at work to swap a whole bunch of 9600baud pad lines for a 64kb IP one. They thought I was mad and thought they'd got the best of the deal, while I knew I'd effectively upgraded everyone from 9600baud to 64k since we had a bursty (block mode) application and so sod all contention.

Of course your mileage may vary, perhaps you do spend you're life downloading stuff at a constant 1Gb, but if so you aren't the average user.

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Full shift to electric vans would melt Royal Mail's London hub, MPs told

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Hmmm

> Could they not install solar panels on the roof and some powerwall size batteries?

Nope, the sort of batteries you need are more like "Dinorwig Power Station" Find a large mountain. Bore out the centre and when you've got excess power pump water up to the top. When you need to charge all those delivery vehicles start letting the water pour back down the hill.

Pity the article doesn't give any details of the power draw needed. Telsa's site says you'll need 16.5kW for 2 hours to go 100miles. They've got 49,000 vehicles, assuming 2 hours each per day that's going to be a lot of power. Telsa's speal about powerwall talks about an installation in Hawaii which is 13MW and requires 55,000 solar panels. RM would need at least 5 of these just to power their fleet and we don't get anything like the sun that they get in Hawaii.

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Yorkshire cops have begun using on-the-spot fingerprint scanners

Dazed and Confused
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Big Brother

You think this is invasive

Just wait till they've got on the spot DNA scanners.

scene: bloke down the park pushing his kids on the swing, police officer enters stage right

officer: what are you doing with these kids

bloke: they're my children

officer: click click click I don't think so sonny, you're nicked

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Tower ProLiants on the warpath: HPE takes on Dell 'n' white-box gang in SMB space

Dazed and Confused
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Re: What's the deal with firmware updates?

> Do you have to sign up for a support agreement?

Not while they are in warranty

Sadly they are restricting access to the core system FW updates after that :-(

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No, Windows 10 hasn’t beaten Windows 7’s market share. Not for sure, anyway

Dazed and Confused
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Re: "No everything works perfectly here k'l; ';jksdfk#V"

Bu**er, I forget the printer problems in my tirade. Why is it the print spooler can't find something on the network when the web-browser can with exactly the same name.

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Dazed and Confused
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Numbers of seats or total uptime

It will take a huge number of seats advantage for W10 to counter act the uptime advantages of W7. When you switch your laptop on and W10 decides that it won't talk to any USB devices today or your main external monitor it's not easy to show up on any usage logs on a website. If it were just 1 PC showing these sorts of traits I'd assume it was just a one off issue, but this is spread over the majority of the PCs you come across it tends to point to it being a more general issue.

No doubt I'll get massive numbers of down votes from the MS shills who always down vote anyone who dares to suffer less than perfect behaviour from W10. I'm really happy for them that their experience is perfect. I'm just yet to meet anyone in person who doesn't suffer from random "this bit won't work today" issues.

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Should ISPs pay to block pirate websites? Supreme Court to decide

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Pass it on

> I'm not even sure it qualifies as a "scam". Are these dodgy vendors deceiving their customers? Usually not, I think. In some cases, at least, they are merely providing a service which the government, following the advice of lobbyists, has chosen to make illegal.

This is a much better analogy.

If I kill someone who I disagree with that is a criminal act and the police will come and arrest me and I'll be punished at the government (actually you and me)'s expense.

But if I libel them then the police and the government have no interest in the matter, it is up to the individual I libel to seek redress against me.

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I want life to be boring, says Linus Torvalds as Linux 4.15 debuts

Dazed and Confused
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Tell it like it is

> cat /sys/devices/system/cpu/vulnerabilities/spectre_v2

Oh the joy of not needing to keep a marketing department on board.

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Newsflash: Car cyber-security still sucks

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Tech + Knowlegy

> ABS braking is great assistive tech, but is not included in most vehicles.

Errr since when?

You might still be able to buy something like a Caterham 7 without ABS, but according to Wikipedia

ABS are required on all new passenger cars sold in the EU since 2004. In the United States, the NHTSA has mandated ABS in conjunction with Electronic Stability Control under the provisions of FMVSS 126 as of September 1, 2013.

You can of course have non electronic ABS, Ford used to do this on Escorts and Onions in the late 80s, but ... lets not go there.

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Aut-doh!-pilot: Driver jams 65mph Tesla Model S under fire truck, walks away from crash

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Artificial Stupidity.

> Do you know why nobody is investigating Artificial Stupidity?

I thought lots of companies were already investing heavily in artificial stupidity, aren't we discussing a case in point?

As the saying goes "To ere is human, but to really F*** things you you need a computer"

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: of course you could

> just program the 'autopilot' to keep slowing down until

Or better still mandate a "rat on a twat" feature. Any driver not paying sufficient attention the car calls the cops and hands over the evidence that they deserve to spend some time walking more.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: anti-collision

Maybe it's like W10 and was too busy loading updates to do any work.

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'WHAT THE F*CK IS GOING ON?' Linus Torvalds explodes at Intel spinning Spectre fix as a security feature

Dazed and Confused
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Re: I Remember When...

> Still waiting for AMD, Microsoft, Apple, and Linux to announce that they are discontinuing x86 development

This isn't an x86 problem, its affecting other CPU architectures too. Aren't Sparc and IBM's Power chips also suffering, some ARM CPUs are.

Intel have a chip which isn't, apparently, affected. But it's illegal to say nice things about Itanium here at El'Reg.

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Destroying the city to save the robocar

Dazed and Confused
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Re: A strange idea

The idea of the walkable city is such contradiction in terms.

I think you've missed the whole point of cities.

I was born in London and to be honest I wouldn't live there if you paid me to.

But, I love visiting London of an evening. It's vibrant, There's lots happening, a huge variety of places to eat, places to go for entertainment. Lots of places to meet up with friends etc.

To me that's the advantage of cities.

If I was 30 years younger then I'd love to live in a place like that.

The idea of the walkable city is such contradiction in terms.

Nope!

I want to be able to walk around it.

I'd love to be able to just walk around without having to worry about cars, buses, trucks and cyclists.

London has a high enough population density to fund burying most of the transport infrastructure. The more of that which is out of sight and out of mind the better.

If they want to plan a city for autonomous cars then it should be one where the roads have been removed from the places that the pedestrians want to walk, live in 3 dimensions take it up and/or down.

If all the roads were buried in tubes then people probably wouldn't care that much about driving.

Oh yes,

PS. I love to drive and wouldn't want an AV in today's road system.

PPS, when AVs start to appear on our roads you can bet I'll be one of the people who game them.

PPPS, I've said here before that as a pedestrian I will not give way to an AV, it can damn well stop and give way to me.

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UK.gov admits porn age checks could harm small ISPs and encourage risky online behaviour

Dazed and Confused
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Re: BBFC

I used to quite like it when the BBFC rated video games. You could go to their website and get the detailed report by the "censor" on what content of the game resulted in it's eventual rating. Loads of games ended up with higher age ratings of bad language, I'm not stupid enough to think that kids aren't going to swear, so my attitude was "you can have the game but if I hear you using that language and you'll lose it, use that language at your mother and you'll lose the console". So we never had an issue, but it meant that when they kids wanted a particular game we could make an informed decision and we could argue our corner when we said no.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: perhaps that's what the government wants...

Well given than "the government" in the shape of the Number10gov official site and Theresa May in her own name plus of course Jeremy Corbyn and probably every one else in parliament regularly post to one of the worlds premier porn distribution sites, I'd say that the government positively support porn.

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We translated Intel's crap attempt to spin its way out of CPU security bug PR nightmare

Dazed and Confused
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Re: 'how Itanium isn't affected'

With the Itanium processor virtual addresses are global, the bits of the kernel have 1 set of virtual addresses while all user processes have other virtual addresses. The cache tags and the TLB basically know who a bit of addresses space belongs to. Sadly it's been too many years since I played that far inside the Itanium to remember whether there is a region register which is programmable from user privilege level (like there is 1 user programmable space register on PA-Risc) but even if a long virtual pointer were used from assembler the access would be blocked by the TLB's protection mechanism.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: it doesn't really matter if you can read the kernel memory from user space.

Re: If you control your own computer, it doesn't really matter if you can read the kernel memory from user space.

Hardly.

Take Berkeley Unix, which is where Unix page based memory management came from. The assumption here is that the computer is owned and run by the CS dept. but used by bloody students who's primary interest is in buggering things up. No OS designed has ever wanted to have it's internal data read by unprivileged user code. If such behaviour was considered a "good thing" then /dev/kmem would be world readable. The kernel often has data which should be private to other processes running on the same system so it damn well should ensure that it's private.

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'Suspicious' BGP event routed big traffic sites through Russia

Dazed and Confused
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Joke

This just seems to show

That Russia is years behind China. This very organ reported years back about the Chinese using BGP to re-route lots of traffic so they could take a good look at it.

Come on Russia, pay attention.

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Millions of moaners vindicated: Man flu is 'a thing', says researcher, and big TVs are cure

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Medical Scotch

Your taste goes when you have man flu so never waste good scotch on it.

I wasn't aware I was ill when I drank it. The sickness hadn't had time to get me, I certainly wouldn't have wasted it later on, I couldn't even hold down water.

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Dazed and Confused
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Medical Scotch

Years back I bought myself a lovely bottle of 1962 Oban (years back, but this was still getting on for 30 years old at the time). One evening a few weeks later the wife and I headed over to my sister's where my brother in law proceeded to drink the said bottle and I must say it was divine. Silky smooth.

The next day I awoke with a bad head and the Mrs wasn't very sympathetic (for some unknown reason). When I was feeling much worse by night time she finally relented to accepted that perhaps my ailment wasn't of my own causing. After everything that went near my mouth for the next 5 days bounced the Mrs (who was a nurse) finally persuaded the GP that I might have food poisoning (I'd stupidly eaten a burger from a dodgy looking van during the day before the drinking session). I was put on a dose of antibiotics and a few days later started to return to the land of the living. A while later I was chatting to one of the consultants at the hospital and the story came up and he postulated that I quite likely owed my life to that whisky he thought that the golden liquid had likely killed off quite a lot of the organism that did me so much harm.

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Kentucky lawmaker pushes smut filter law (update: maybe not)

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Seriously?

You have to remember that by and large the world is run by frustrated old men* who hate the idea that someone, somewhere, is having more fun than they are. As a consequence they are determined to ban anything they might not be getting the chance to enjoy personally.

(*) In my experience the feeling isn't gender specific.

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Language bugs infest downstream software, fuzzer finds

Dazed and Confused
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Facepalm

Re:"undocumented features"

It's about making sure that "undocumented features" don't exist.

You don't always have to go that far. Sometimes developers don't do a full trace back to zero check of library function paths to know about the documented features.

I remember years ago coming across the feature of the chsh command, due to this needing to modify the passwd file it needed to run SUID to root. The command was quite simple and just relied on the standard password file functions of the time and those functions relied on the stdio functions. There was kind of a sibling command to chsh, chfn, the developer of chfn had read all the manual pages and knew that the underlying function wasn't going to handle a line of over 1024 characters and so had included code to ensure that it wouldn't be asked to. The developer of chsh hadn't been so diligent, So you could chsh and give yourself a shell with a short name, such as the Bourne shell had, then using chfn you could max out the length of your passwd file entry. Then going back to chsh you switched to a shell with a longer name, csh or ksh would do, and the command didn't sanity check on the data nor understand the lower level functions and would write out a really dumb entry in the file.

The feature was known, but only to people who had RTFM'd.

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Rogue PIs found guilty of illegally snagging personal financial info

Dazed and Confused
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Re: shocked, shocked!

> I'm sure Woodgate and Clark Ltd were shocked, shocked!, to learn of such heinous crimes by the PI's they hired.

The firm's director, Michael Woodgate, was found guilty of two counts

Let's just hope that the sentence is custodial. A fine, which is bound to be smaller than the profit of rogue trading, just isn't sufficient incentive to behave well.

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