* Posts by Dazed and Confused

1879 posts • joined 12 Sep 2007

Microsoft's DRM can expose Windows-on-Tor users' IP address

Dazed and Confused
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Re: What? you mean

@cbars

Firstly it wasn't me that downvoted Cynic, any cynic is OK by me.

As to whether the article is clear, I clearly didn't feel it so, hence the original question about whether it was the IP address of the PC or whether it was the IP address of the router. I'd read the article as saying that the Windows media shit was exposing the IP address of the PC, as presumably (my guess from the article) that was inside any packets. OK, perhaps I'm in the tin foil hat brigade but when I resort to TOR I make sure there are no other routes off the PC.

> I also find it odd that you don't think someone knowing your name, address and phone number would be a problem

What I was saying was the exact opposite of this. I'd said that if, like me you run fully routed addresses which can be looked up in whois then you're wide open. But if it is the NAT'd address which is exposed then there isn't much harm and that everyone should do this to avoid casual identification.

Lots of ISPs also NAT the routers IP address and these are not persistent. So to the casual observer the only thing which would be visible would be which ISP you're using.

What I'd not considered was state sponsored snooping where of course the ISP is likely to reveal your ID to the hacker. Or perhaps where the hacker is the ISP.

My other mistake was not to realise that people using TOR would be allowing non-TOR traffic at the same time.

Thanks for the explanation and please accept 1 up vote for your trouble.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: What? you mean

Firstly 192.168.X.X is not a class C address, it is a contiguous range of 256 class C address ranges and therefore constitutes a /16. Except the whole concept "class C" or A&B was deprecated not long after Noah realised he was going to need slightly more than an umbrella and at about the same time it became practical to have dial up Internet connectivity at home in the UK.

Well of course any 192.168.X.X is a reserved private address block, other 192 addresses have other jobs, I used to "own" 192.195.something.orother. But when did you last see a non technical home user ever change it, or even a technical one for that matter, there is almost never a reason to change it from the one your ISP has setup when they ship you a router (assuming you run the router they give you). My point was that the private IPv4 address that most people use is of no practical use to anyone as a means of identify you and it isn't even persistent. There could easily be a hundred million PCs currently using that IP address.

The article completely fails to give any details of how the attack compromises you. It's bad that information can be leaked, but a limited sort of bad in most cases.

Sure if you run routed IP address blocks then a quick whois will give the miscreant your name, address and phone number. The PC I'm typing this on would fall into that category. The one next to it is using an RFC1918 private address which admittedly isn't 192.168.0.0/24, for reasons of a private joke.

One thing the article doesn't say is whether it is just the IP address of the PC itself, I'm assuming that is all that can be leaked here. So if you are DNAT'd then there isn't much to worry about for most people.

If you are running IPv4 real public address or you're using IPv6 (which is more likely to use public addresses) then you might well be being left open to identification.

Personally I think everyone should use NAT'd address for client only systems to avoid casual identification. I don't see any reason why people should be forced to walk around the Internet with a label stuck to their foreheads with their name and address in large print for anyone to read. The backers of IPv6 don't seem to agree with me. Sure there are protocols which NAT buggers up but in most cases the answer should be to fix the bloody protocol not make everyone pull their pants down and show their privates.

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Dazed and Confused
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What? you mean

192.1.0.1 ?

Isn't that what most home PCs use?

Or is it the IP address of your router, lots of ISPs NAT those too.

OK, so I'm an awkward bugger with routed IP address blocks at home, but most people don't.

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Who do you want to be Who? VOTE for the BBC's next Time Lord

Dazed and Confused
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Harriot Harman

Then we can all just hope some Dalek gets lucky.

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Boeing's 747 to fly off the production line for the foreseeable future

Dazed and Confused
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Re: even if its role has changed to a cargo-hauler.

Errrrr it always was a cargo-hauler.

That's why it's got an upstairs, it allowed the cargo version to have an opening front end which is normally where those pesky pilots sit and mess up the easy loading and unloading. By moving the flight deck up above the loading doors they could solve that problem, which then gave the distinctive hump and room for a few (later more and more) seats up top.

Personally my favourite place to fly is on the upper deck, I've been lucky enough to be upgraded to first class a few time by BA but I still think the upstairs window club seats are better with that row of lockers all down the side which are a convenient place to stuff all your s*&t and spread out your junk during the flight.

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Oracle sues its own star sales rep after she wins back $200k in pay fight

Dazed and Confused
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Re: binding

No, it's like a license agreement. You agree you owe them everything and they agree they owe f*&k all. The abitrator didn't understand this basic tenant of Oracle law.

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Penguins force-fed root: Cruel security flaw found in systemd v228

Dazed and Confused
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RHEL/CentOS 6

I think I loath and despise 7 more and more with each and every passing day.

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Dazed and Confused
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WTF

If you touch a file, make it 7777 so it's world writeable and SUID then a non root user writes to the file the kernel takes away SUID and SGID. So not only is systemd being done in letting you create the 7777 file in the first place. It's being dumb is letting you write something to it which could then be executed.

Only root would be able to issue the write without the 6000 mode bits being reset.

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Microsoft Germany says Windows 7 already unfit for business users

Dazed and Confused
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Re: let's now guess which screen my window is going to open on next

Actaully that's pretty much my experience of W10 with dual screens, or actually of 1 of my dual screen W10 systems, the other one isn't doing it.

The laptop I'm writing this on has a micky mouse 1920x1080 ulr (ultra low res) screen and then there's a 2560x1440 32" monitor I mostly use. Everytime I open MS Edge it opens on the laptop screen regardless of where it ran last time whereas FF will open of the screen it last used. If I open the dialog for text colour in TB it opens on the crack between the two screens. Some applications will move to the laptop screen when the screen saver blanks the displays... others don't.

There are other apps that display weird behaviour on this PC with dual screens.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Enough Whining.

Windows 10 never has been fit for business use if any of my W10 boxes are anything to go by. The best that can be said for it is that at least it isn't quite as bad as 8.

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Embrace the world of pr0nified IT with wide open, er, arms

Dazed and Confused
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Laser printers are always “faster” and “last longer”

Nah, each new generation of laser printer will simply demand that you buy it ever more expensive toner cartridges. If you buy consumer level laser printers then the toner will probably cost you more than the damn printer did!

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Anti-smut law dubs PCs, phones 'pornographic vendor machines', demands internet filters

Dazed and Confused
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Re: the local government websites are actually pornographic

Now that all political announcements are made via Twatter and Twatter is so called because there are more pictures of twats on it than even the most addicted of porn surfers can shake their sticks at, it should be easy to block all politicians.

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Fedora 25: You've got that Wayland feelin', oh, that Wayland feelin'

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Wayland. Fedora 25

> Remote X sessions are an absolute requirement.

Remote X has a major issue apart from the security side of things which is handled by an SSH tunnel. A lot of X applications are latency sensitive, so while they work well over a LAN they are often a pain over a WAN. If you're sitting in Blighty and looking after a stack of servers in the US then using X directly can be a pain. Remotely displaying with VNC leads to much more responsive displays (and you can still tunnel it through SSH).

I've not yet played with Wayland, I'll have to have a play, been banging around with X11 for 30 years come later this year and of course X10 before that.

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The Register's Top 20 Most-Commented Stories in 2016

Dazed and Confused
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Re: 100% certain

> The full extent of Chinese subsidy of Apple assembly in China is now known

Hmmm, if China doesn't want to build them, and Samsung don't want supply critical parts might we have seen peak i-Thingy?

(oh no, commenting about Apple, bang goes my up/down ratio :-)

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Apple sues Nokia's pet patent trolls

Dazed and Confused
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Supreme sidestep

Well that's one way to chose which court you want to sue in, "We think you broke the law in Germany, so we'll see you in a German court".

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Did webcam 'performer' offer support chap payment in kind?

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Oops

> a not unattractive female teacher

As a teenager I was a very keen photographer. One lesson our teacher hadn't shown up and we had a relief teacher who just let us sit there and read. So I was reading through an article in Amateur Photographer, when suddenly the teacher came straight up to me and confiscated the magazine.

"You can have that back after school"

I was a little bemused, but found something else to occupy my time. After school I went to the staffroom to fetch my magazine back. Later that evening I think I realised why it had been taken away by this particular teacher. There was a lovely series of photos of her topless posing with some butterflies. I'd never have noticed it was her if she'd not brought it to my attention.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Love a good pr0n investigation

> The great thing about having a teenage son is being able to blame such things on them. ;)

Is that like when politicians claim that having a husband explains why they are claiming for porn vids on their expenses?

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Microsoft offers UK cloud customers private pipes

Dazed and Confused
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Re: less latency and therefore less failover

The difference in latency of using a direct link and leased fibre via an ISP is likely to be tiny. A leased fibre is giving you what? a 2ms latency via an ISP, at least that's what I used to see on a line from BT to a data centre in the middle of nowhere going to some other Internet sites over 10 years ago. Skype runs happily over comparatively large latencies or we wouldn't all use it. I'm not an expert on the human perception in communication, but I'd be surprised if you can spot a 100ms delay. delays of over 200ms are human recognisable but don't seem to affect how easily we can talk to people in Oz, delays of a whole second mess you up and you have to get used to not interrupting each other.

So I stand by my comment that it's generally wrong to associate latency to availability.

And no I didn't miss the story about MS having patched their patch, but if you can't get on the network you can't load the patch for the patch.

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Dazed and Confused
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less latency and therefore less failover

OK, so if they know that little about networking then I can think of a really good reason for not going to talk to them.

Perhaps this explains their recent hiccough with DHCP.

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Microsoft quietly emits patch to undo its earlier patch that broke Windows 10 networking

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Alternatives to skype

The problem with not using Skype is that everyone you want to talk to does use Skype.

If the grandkids say, Grandma why don't you use Skype, then you get your ears bent because the PC you set up for her doesn't use Skype.

It's also the case that abominations like flash on websites (which of course should be outlawed) exist and are easier to deal with in Windows.

If I knew my mother would only do things which worked on Linux I'd have setup her PC using Linux. My bother and I both work in Linux and would find it much easier. But she also gets very useful help from grand kids, and they don't work with Linux.

Windows is what most people use because it is what most people use.

I wish it wasn't, I wish there was something much simpler that just worked.

Facetime is not the answer unless all the people you talk to are also Apple users. As my mother knew 70 or more years ago, when your house is the only one in the village with a telephone you can't use it to talk to anyone else in the village.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: ,So there's an online fix for not being able to get online?

Or, you know, you could run "ipconfig /release" and "ipconfig /renew" to get back online and then download the update.

Sure, that was the first thing I tried on the Misses' laptop and it worked.

But

There is zero chance I'm going to be able to get my mother to type those commands on her's. She now reads emails and will finally even read text messages on her phone, but despite having worked as a typist in the past she is not prepared to send email or texts. The chances of getting her (and I'm extrapolating from her) and millions of similar people to do an ipconfig... are zero.

If she gets the problem it will have to wait until I can drive over and see her. In the mean time I'll just hope she's not been affected, and hope even more that if she has, my father who as debenture hasn't tried to fix it for her.

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Botched Microsoft update knocks Windows 8, 10 PCs offline – regardless of ISP

Dazed and Confused
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Re: loss of business

Government's should do this, and I'm sure they can take on MS.

EU seems keen on doing this sort of thing.

Sadly they don't seem keen on wiping the whole EULA thing off the face of the planet. I really wish they would as no one else it likely to manage. Of course if the judge's PC were to bork part way through the trial it might help. If they felt the pain the rest of us do they might well reach of the black cap.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: loss of business

You agreed to the EULA which says that you owe MS everything and they owe you nothing. If you want compensation you'd have to convince a court that the EULA wasn't a reasonable contract (it isn't) and that you basically agreed to it under duress (you don't have any choice). Then you might be able to go after the compensation you (and all the rest of us) rightly deserve. However MS will spend more of legal fees than you, so they'll win.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Oh goody

Well he could be using his fixed IP address directly on his PC. I do one some of mine.

The issue isn't to do with the router except is as much that most people use their router as their DHCP server. But regardless of what you are using as a DHCP server W10 was knaggered it. The DHCP server is happily responding to requests and offering configs and it looks like W10 is just ignoring these responses.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Plusnet are a bit pushed right now

> Still think it is IPv6 related

Hardly, It's been taking out my wife's W10 PC most of last week and that is getting it's DHCP from my CentOS server. The server is sending DHCP responses and they aren't being acted upon. I'm only handing out IPv4 addresses.

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Dazed and Confused
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Trollface

Re:There is a Microsoft theme song in there.

It goes

Share and enjoy...

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Busted Windows 8, 10 update blamed for breaking Brits' DHCP

Dazed and Confused
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Re: O rly...

Is everyone sure that this is actually a problem limited to BT routers?

My wife's W10 PC has been suffering from network disconnects all this week. It's losing it's IP address and we aren't using a BT router. The DHCP addresses are coming from a Linux server and I can read the logs on there and my box is offering the DHCP info and it just isn't being taken up. It's only affected 1 PC, none of our other ones seem to be affected.

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Crims using anti-virus exclusion lists to send malware to where it can do most damage

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Sig check

Might work for executables, as long as you can new hashes out in an AV update before new updates to the SW are released, but the only files I've added to my exclusion lists are the junk mail and trash cans for my email client. I don't need those virus scanning, that's where I put the shit. But they'll change all the time so can't have a stored hash.

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Dazed and Confused
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Surely every malware author knows

You need to call your dirty programs svchost.exe as every user is used to there being millions of these buggers on there PC, no one knows what they do and they frequently use 100% of a CPU.

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Linus Torvalds finds 163 reasons to wait a week for a new Linux

Dazed and Confused
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Happy

Re: my 2.6.34 and 3.10 kernels are happy

> ‌2.6.34

seems a bit new fangled to me, 2.6.32 is where RHEL/CentOS 6 is at. That 3.10 stuff comes with systemd in DeadRat land and we don't want to go there if we can help it.

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SHIFT + F10, Linux gets you Windows 10's cleartext BitLocker key

Dazed and Confused
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Re: This, because we can't overwrite files that are in use. @Dazed

> Oh B*&^^&*r

Oh double triple B*&^^&*r

That advisory has just been followed up with. c05348215

Saying that you can't use HW encryption with bitlocker.

Now I just want to scream!

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: This, because we can't overwrite files that are in use. @Dazed

> HP has an advisory document regarding this problem.

Oh B*&^^&*r

> but losing the drive encryption is a big blow

You can say that again.

Pity they didn't tell me.

Pity they didn't tell me before I bought this laptop in June. It's a EliteBook Folio 1040 G3, which isn't on the list, but I assume it's being clobbered by the same issue.

Thanks

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: @Daniel

I mean: no computer is safe when an attacker has physical access. Including those which have applied HD encryption.

The data on your disk should be safe if the encryption is any good (ie doesn't have a May door). That's the whole point of encrypting the thing.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: This, because we can't overwrite files that are in use.

The W10 1607 update seems to have real problems with drive encryption generally. This laptop and the one on my desk use HP's drive encryption and now everyday I get a nag from Windows saying an update failed. If I go through the fix it process then eventually it comes back and says that I need to remove the encryption SW, which means I need to decrypt the whole disk then once that has happened I can remove the SW and then I can update after which I would need to reinstall the encryption SW and re-encrypt my disk. Yeah like thanks guys. Just pull your F*&^ing fingers out and sort this, it isn't funny.

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'Toyota dealer stole my wife's saucy snaps from phone, emailed them to a swingers website'

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Unless you're the FBI...

> Sue the bugger who stole the pics

Well because at the time he is alleged to have stolen the pictures he was working on behalf of the Toyota dealer and it was as "the dealer" he asked for and was given access to the phone.

If he'd give the guy his phone to look at in a bar social then no he shouldn't be allowed to sue the guys employer.

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Plastic fiver: 28 years' work, saves acres of cotton... may have killed less than ONE cow*

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Pandora's box?

> Why waste valuable lentil-growing land to graze sheep

Coz sheep will graze on land you can't grow lentils on. Ever tried growing crops on the side of a mountain without cutting terraces?

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Pandora's box?

> How do vegans / principle-based veggies feel about clothing made from wool, or stuff like hand-cream which contains lanolin?

If you don't wash the wools in harmful detergents before spinning and knitting the wool then you'll find the natural lanolin in the clothes you wear keep your hands beautifully soft.

On the other hand, my herdwick jumper is pretty scratchy so less soft hands might be a benefit.

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Jersey sore: Anchor rips into island's undersea cables, sinks net access

Dazed and Confused
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Re: @boltar

I really believe that is the first time in my life anyone has suggested that I'm a lefty. I'm impressed by your originality, but you clearly didn't read what I wrote. You normally write quite sensible things here. What I had said which you failed to read was that I suspect that you wouldn't consider yourself of either of those things.

Please read carefully before picking up the flame thrower.

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Dazed and Confused
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Facepalm

@boltar

> situation that is clearly too complex for people like you to discuss.

Hardly, I just happen to enjoy winding racists up, that's all.

I also enjoy winding up extremist white supremacist Christians by reminding them that Jesus was an Arab Jew and so quite unlikely to be blue eyed and blond.

Now I wondering which camp of people I enjoy winding up you'd put yourself in. I suspect neither of the above.

Now have a nice day

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Dazed and Confused
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Black Helicopters

Re: @crazyOldCatMan

> Whilst the BNP may be obsessed with race, UKIP is concerned with EU control and immigration numbers

Pah, we're all bloody immigrant, we're all bloody Africans when it comes down to it.

Back to the topic of the story, are we sure it was an accident?

Or were these sub-sea cables dug up as Jersey wasn't monitoring their populations browsing habits properly and now there a chance to splice in some proper monitoring equipment?

Mine's the one with the black helicopter and tin foil hat in the pockets.

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Jeremy Hunt: Telcos must block teens from sexting each other

Dazed and Confused
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> "I think..."______He doesn't

Not just "doesn't" more a case of "can't"

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Vegans furious as Bank of England admits ‘trace’ of animal fat in £5 notes

Dazed and Confused
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Pint

Re: Rational?

When is a strawberry legally dead?

Have an upvote for plugging TIMC

BTW, this pint looks clear enough to probably not be vegan either.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Fighting your way to the top of the food chain?

> Grass can grow on hill farms when very little else will.

Our beautiful "natural" landscapes like the Lake District and not at all natural. They are maintained by the sheep farming. This is why this were not culled in the Foot and Mouth disaster a few years back.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: Vegans and the Provisional Vegan Front

> There are other vegans who extend that to trying to avoid all animal-based products.

Many vegans chose to eat organic food. Most organic food is grown using manure and even bone meal.

Do animal-based products become acceptable when they have been recycled by a vegetable or other sort of plant?

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100k+ petition: MPs must consider debating Snoopers' Charter again

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Well...

I suspect this will do nothing except slow your connection down - they'll be storing NetFlow records, no doubt, which basically say "This IP had a TCP connection to that IP and this amount of data went in one way and another amount in the other direction."

Switching to UDP based protocol makes this so much more fun :-)

No formal "connection" to summarise. Log files can be orders of magnitude larger and the trick of playing with the packet sizes would probably work too.

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Three certainties in life: Death, taxes and the speed of light – wait no, maybe not that last one

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Death and taxes are still constant...

I thought Trump had shown that taxes aren't either.

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Small ISPs 'probably' won't receive data retention order following IP Bill

Dazed and Confused
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Re: If I said the next thing a say will be a lie and the last thing I said was the truth

> Virtually all smaller ISPs resell services from larger ISPs

Well they make use of OpenReach for the cabling (and a few others, but OpenRetch in my case).

I guess the monitoring could be put in place before the packets are delivered to A&A, but if that were likely to be the case then they could always sell encrypting routers and the corresponding service at their end or just sell a service using an encrypted tunnel. In the Beeb's article the RevK was quoted as talking about using VPNs and non EU sites.

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Dazed and Confused
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Re: If I said the next thing a say will be a lie and the last thing I said was the truth

> Easily done. I have -for work- a file of passwords belonging to other people ...

The contracts that I sign regularly that have that sort of shit in them all changed a few years ago to include a clause excluding divulging the information to law enforcement agency when instructed to.

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Dazed and Confused
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If I said the next thing a say will be a lie and the last thing I said was the truth

My ISP has an interesting legal conundrum posed on their site.

They state that they don't have any monitoring or filtering systems in place. They point out that they could be forced to in the future and that they could be forced to lie. Failure to comply would put them in breach of the Snoopers Charter. However since they market their service as having neither filtering nor monitoring systems and base their business on this claim if they were to lie they would be in breach of the Fraud Act and it's difficult to see how they can be forced to break one law in order to comply with another.

Being forced to lie is also legally questionable.

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A closer look at HPE's 'The Machine'

Dazed and Confused
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Re: Controlling access to shared memory

If you go through the video you'll see they were talking about an atomics library to handle these issues. With current architectures they can't rely on native CPU instructions so they've chosen to implement this sort of thing with functions.

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