* Posts by John Gamble

516 posts • joined 6 Sep 2007

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Equifax's disastrous Struts patching blunder: THOUSANDS of other orgs did it too

John Gamble
Thumb Up

Re: re: Problem is that the technology works well ...

"The unwritten "risk management" rule for many managers is this:

"Almost any risk is acceptable until it happens to us, not someone else. And when it does happen, I probably will have moved on so it will be someone else's problem. That is acceptable risk." "

Ah, The Bottle Imp strategy of system management, without the moral self-examination.

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Facebook let advertisers target 'Jew-haters'

John Gamble
Facepalm

To See Oursels as Ithers See Us

Not surprised that the usual conspiracy theorists here are defending a tool to aid crackpots (by definition, a racist is a crackpot) find other like-minded folk with murderous tendencies (although interestingly the guy who has actually used neo-nazi catchphrases hasn't posted).

But I'm shocked, shocked at the similarities of their comments to The Onion's post today.

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Farewell Cassini! NASA's Saturnian spacecraft waves goodbye for its Grand Finale

John Gamble
Boffin

Re: Journalistic bias

Um. Huygens finished its mission twelve years ago.

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London Tube tracking trial may make commuting less miserable

John Gamble
Big Brother

Non-Londoner (Or Indeed British) Question

"TfL already tracks its passengers using the electronic Oyster card, which a huge percentage of Londoners use out of convenience and cost on their daily commute. But that data only tells the transport folk where people go into stations, where they exit, and any transfers they make to other lines."

The card tracks the exits? I'm trying to picture the method, and failing. In my city's system, all an exit has is a one-way turnstile -- it doesn't track or require a card to exit. What am I missing?

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Connect at mine free Wi-Fi! I would knew what I is do! I is cafe boss!

John Gamble
Unhappy

Why? Why?

"They could even call it the Guttenberg Project."

Haaaaaaate you....

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Atari shoots sueball at KitKat maker over use of 'Breakout' in ad

John Gamble

They were bought out by NeXT.

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How to build your own DIY makeshift levitation machine at home

John Gamble
Boffin

Re: Levitator?

I had no idea there were such things as "superconductor mag-lev train set kits". So I searched on that phrase, and as a bonus found a demo of a superconductor moebius track.

(It has a nifty Youtube video of the demonstration; direct link here.)

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Kremlin's hackers 'wield stolen NSA exploit to spy on hotel guests in Europe, Mid East'

John Gamble
Alien

Re: NOT Russians, it was an Elephant that did it!

Formerly respected journalist Seymour Hersch.

Back in my USENET days, a phrase often used for writers that latched onto crank theories was "the Brain Eater got him" (it was usually a him, I can think of only one woman writer who went down the crazy path).

It was usually used for formerly good writers of fiction who for some reason wanted to prove some philosophy in their fiction, but it wasn't impossible for non-fiction writers to be attacked by the Brain Eater, and Hersch got bit hard.

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Ancient IETF 'teapot' gag preserved for posterity as a standard

John Gamble
Angel

Re: As mentioned elsewhere

It's a pity the anti-ddate people seem genuinely befuddled about it. It's as though they seem unable to get in touch with their sense of humor at all.

A friend once included in his project a "truth" function that returned true if the argument was 42, and false otherwise. It was even documented that way, with no further explanation as to why.

He did get asked (which he never answered as far as I know) what he had against the asterisk character. He thought it was sad that these people had never read The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

I plan to revive the program, and I will not be removing anything from the function list.

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Google and its terrible, horrible, no good, very bad week in full

John Gamble
Facepalm

That Whirlwind

"Even though nuclear weapons and diversity hiring could not appear to be two issues further apart, in the revolving whirlwind that is uninformed opinion online, they felt one in the same."

Hmm, and continuing that theme, earlier today El Reg had an article on that very subject, with supplementary examples from the readers.

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Your top five dreadful people the Google manifesto has pulled out of the woodwork

John Gamble

Assuming They Don't Post Anonymously

I'm looking forward to the responses to this article.

With luck, we'll get the actual dreadful people in question responding to this, instead of their proxies.

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Hackers could exploit solar power equipment flaws to cripple green grids, claims researcher

John Gamble

Re: Widespread problem

Yes. The fact that the issues have been seen many times before (TELNET, default passwords, not using https, etc.), issues that even those of us not in security recognize and (one hopes) avoid, shows that we're basically seeing a "copy, paste, and minimally edit" style of so-called programming.

Somehow it need to be communicated to management that test suites must be installed along with the purchased (or freely downloaded) libraries, and security tests must be included.

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Guess who's here to tell us we're all totally wrong about net neutrality? Of course, it's Comcast

John Gamble

Re: Aren't they the ones that throttled Netflix?

Netflix wasn't overloading Comcast's network, Comcast's customers were overloading Comcast's network.

Their customers will connect to popular things, that's just the way of it. If Comcast can't satisfy their customers, that's their lookout. Blaming Netflix is absurd.

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Hey, remember that monkey selfie copyright drama a few years ago? Get this – It's just hit the US appeals courts

John Gamble
Angel

Meanwhile, We're Missing the Most Important Detail In the Article

"Hit the Road Jack" was written by Percy Mayfield. Ray Charles's recording is of course the most famous version though.

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May the excessive force be with you: Chap cuffed after Star Trek v Star Wars row turns bloody

John Gamble

Nice picture choice. The only thing that would make it better is if you Photoshopped the Stargate behind them.

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Bonkers call to boycott Raspberry Pi Foundation over 'gay agenda'

John Gamble

Self-Interest and Cranks

As of this writing, the petition has 10 supporters (the petition started "2 days ago", which is a little vague, I don't know if the software rounds up or down).

The petitioner, "NoRottenPi", as 23 supporters. So 13 people think NRP is okay, but like RaspberryPi better.

Not sure what to conclude from this. Even bigots are willing to quell their bigotry for the sake of cool tech?

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John Gamble
Boffin

Re: Oh what a Gay Day...

"From the time when Gay meant happy."

Still does mean that. If you are referring to a time when it exclusively meant that ... it's unlikely that was ever the case.

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Dead serious: How to haunt people after you've gone... using your smartphone

John Gamble
Alien

Or, with a different twist, a Ray Bradbury story (I know it's set on Mars, but I can't remember if it's an actual Martian Chronicles story). Hmm, time to re-read...

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Sharp claims Hisense reverse-ferreted its US telly licence deal

John Gamble

Yeah, I admit that my opinion was formed back in the VCR days, but there's a reason I stopped buying anything with the Sharp label.

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Cuffed: Govt contractor 'used work PC to leak' evidence of Russia's US election hacking

John Gamble

Re: Can someone with more knowledge on the subject answer me this:

"With respect, winning by the rules is what having a mandate is defined as."

That may be how it works in a parliamentary system, but in the U.S., where power is split between three separate organizations (President, Senate, and House of Representatives; I'm skipping the oversight power of the Supreme Court for the moment), a mandate is a psychological attribute dependent upon the margin of victory.

Despite his win, Trump's popular vote loss tends to offset any "mandate" claims.

Honestly, the last president who had a clear mandate was Nixon (in my opinion of course; your candidate's mileage may vary). And he had to resign to avoid impeachment. So even a "mandate" won't shield you from your actions.

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Seminal game 'Colossal Cave Adventure' released onto GitLab

John Gamble

How To Test Your New Computer

And of course it makes critical appearances in The Soul of a New Machine, by Tracy Kidder.

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RightNow founder turned politician gets assault charge after 'bodyslamming' reporter

John Gamble
Unhappy

Re: Unlikely to change the outcome

And depending on his district's beliefs, this might be of interest as well:

Gianforte, 56, is a billionaire businessman who sold his company, RightNow Technologies, in 2011 and apparently now spends his time funneling money toward the Glendive Dinosaur and Fossil Museum, which publishes a newsletter explaining that "the Biblical worldview is consistent with the scientific evidence we find in the fossil record" and argues that dinosaurs rode on Noah's Ark.

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John Gamble

Re: I'm sorry

He may indeed get voted in. Montana has early voting, and he may have had a significant vote count before this. Too late for them to change their minds.

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Has AI gone too far? DeepTingle turns El Reg news into terrible erotica

John Gamble
Boffin

Dinosaurs

"Clearly, it has a thing for dinosaurs."

Well, who doesn't have a thing for dinosaurs? Of course, that means the researchers have failed in their fight against "algorithmic enforcement of norms".

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Bloke charged under UK terror law for refusing to cough up passwords

John Gamble

Re: "if they didn't pick up arms and charge over the top"

"Im pushing 60. Both of my grandfathers were born in 1901."

Likewise. My grandfather (three years older) was a Canadian, about to be shipped over to the RAF, when WWI ended.

And here's a rule of thumb: the more exclamation points in a post, the less likely the poster knows what he or she is talking about.

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Uber red-faced from Waymo legal row judge's repeated slapping

John Gamble
Pirate

How To Look Like a Genius

"The judge also notes that it is more than possible that Levandowski simply kept the files on a personal device and referred to them whenever needed."

That was my first thought as well. What better way to look like an indispensable genius than to keep code and designs for yourself, to be produced after an apparently difficult work session when a tough problem needs to be cracked?

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Call the fuzz, says Google, get the reward

John Gamble

Re: What the fuzz?

Fuzzing

I believe this could be considered a follow-up article to Email client lib blown apart by CC: list of death.

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It's been a few days, so what fresh trouble has Uber got into now?

John Gamble

Re: Prediction...

I'm sure Volkswagen can supply enough to cover Uber's needs. It might even help VW's bottom line.

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Hackers emit 9GB of stolen Macron 'emails' two days before French presidential election

John Gamble

Re: swaying elections

"A week or two ago, giving time to analyse the massive cache, would have been far better."

No, it's the classic "surprise" strategy. Dump the so-called incriminating evidence just before the voting takes place. It allows no time for analysis or rational thought, which means one's tendency towards suspicion takes hold.

The only difference between this and the decades-ago technique of stuffing "scandal" flyers under windshield wipers the day before an election is that this can be done on a far more widespread scale.

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Apple fanbois are officially sheeple. Yes, you heard. Deal with it

John Gamble
Joke

Re: Licensees

I view it more that the British put forth the stodgy Ubuntu version of English, while its colonies everywhere produced the cool Mint versions.

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1

Another career suicide as reporter leaves The Register for broadcaster

John Gamble

Re: Move #1...

Move #2 (stop that giggling) I think, as another El Registite went to the Wall Street Journal maybe a couple of years ago.

The annexation proceeds.

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NASA's Cassini snaps pic inside Saturn's ring – peace among the stars

John Gamble
Happy

Re: A colour photo, please

Also, quite frankly I find the B&W photos a lot more compelling. There are a few color shots on the Cassini website, and they're just not as interesting.

My computers have a dozen or so JPEGs from Cassini as desktop images, all of them black & white.

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A bot lingua franca does not exist: Your machine-learning options for walking the talk

John Gamble
Boffin

Julia

Julia is definitely a powerful language -- but it's just about to release version 0.6. The goal is to have every corner of the language nailed down by version 1.0, and that goal is very close (the Github repository is here), but if you start using it now, you have to be willing to risk having some code go obsolete on you.

(My projects in Julia are definitely in the "toy" area right now, so the updates are fairly painless to me.)

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Would you believe it? The Museum of Failure contains quite a few pieces of technology

John Gamble

Re: Several sorts of fail

13: Marketing attack (not, strictly speaking, sabotage) -- RCA's marketing of their "RCA SelectaVision VideoDiscs", which from the outsider's viewpoint looked like an attack on the Philips system with a cheaper and technically inferior design. But it divided the market, and the Philips system didn't get the market share it needed to succeed, at least in the U. S.

14. I presume some failures might be due to actual sabotage or industrial espionage, but I'm not familiar with any cases that may be out there.

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Apple's zippy silicon leaves Android rivals choking on dust

John Gamble

Re: It's just a shame

"Well it should be OpenBSD, the best of all the BSDs."

Ahem.

(I still up-voted you, but FreeBSD for the win.)

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'Trash-80' escapes the dustbin of history with new TRS-80 emulator

John Gamble

Re: Dragon 32

I was impressed with the durability of the CoCos, as I saw them in use far beyond (by over a decade) what I thought would be their end-of-life. And the software that their owners would run was impressive. A grand leap over the ancestral TRS-80.

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Miss Misery on hacking Mr Robot and the Missing Sense of Fun

John Gamble

Re: Tech props only

"But it is purely gratuitous. The techy detail "revealed" does nothing to further the plot..."

That's true, but lack of that detail often goes hand-in-hand with other types of sloppiness. So while I agree that it's not a feature that makes or breaks the show, it is nonetheless a feature that demonstrates that the effort is being made.

Note, haven't seen any episodes myself, so I don't know how well I'd receive it upon watching. Maybe I too would switch over to another show for relief. Leverage is a show I don't get tired of.

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Boffins crowdsource hunt for 'Planet 9'

John Gamble
Coat

And Its Moon Would Be Called Nithon

Hmm, very surprised to not see Yuggoth suggested thus far.

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What should password managers not do? Leak your passwords? What a great idea, LastPass

John Gamble

Re: Fuck LogMeIn.

You can never have too much milk.

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This AI stuff is all talk! Bots invent their own language to natter away behind humans' backs

John Gamble

"I am trying to remember if it was Clarke or Asimov who had a giant computer that was hidden underground in a secret location and needed other computers and technicians to translate between it and people."

I believe you're referring to "The Machine That Won The War", by Asimov. Nobody trusted the data coming in, and everyone secretly cooked it.

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Bloke cuffed after 'You deserve a seizure' GIF tweet gave epileptic a fit

John Gamble

Re: What an asshole

"JG tried to rebut the obviously-correct and he utterly failed."

Oh dear. Still didn't read the article.

Read the article. Rebut with evidence and facts. Don't try to impress with made-up scenarios (seriously, not one, but two imaginary cases? You really don't know what a straw man argument is, do you?)

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John Gamble

I'm not certain what there is to question. Yeah, the Reg could have used an alternate headline from "A Confederacy of Dunces", but that doesn't change the facts of the case. It doesn't matter how big a nitwit the victim is, he was still attacked.

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John Gamble

Re: Ignoring the deliberate assault aspects of the case

Nope, but I can go back even further and bring up A. E. van Vogt

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John Gamble
Boffin

Re: What an asshole

"Actually it's a perfectly good counter-example to unlimited free speech."

Didn't read the articles, did you? Start with the first link, the one to the Atlantic article. Your argument is flatly wrong.

If you need a broader historical perspective, I recommend Perilous Times: Free Speech During Wartime, by Geoffrey Stone.

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Hell freezes over: We wrote an El Reg chatbot using Microsoft's AI

John Gamble
Coat

An Handy AI for Bannon

"That said, none of it is very sophisticated. Throw anything more than a short, simple sentence at LUIS, and it will quickly get confused or give up."

Soon to be a White House staff member then.

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User jams up PC. Literally. No, we don't know which flavour

John Gamble
Headmaster

"And that was a nursery (kindergarten for you colonials) where a 3 or 4 year old... "

Minor American English quibble: if the children were three or four year-olds, then over here it's a "nursery school". Kindergarten is (generally) for five year-olds, the class just before first grade.

Good story though.

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Naming computers endangers privacy, say 'Net standards boffins

John Gamble
Coat

Re: If you want to start an argument..

Hmm. Maybe I shouldn't have named my machine "Tabs4Ever".

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Force employees to take DNA tests for bosses? We've got a new law to make that happen, beam House Republicans

John Gamble
Boffin

Re: The two things combine quite nicely

How wonderful that you can make up preposterous scenarios.

(Here's a clue: If you're shot, the first thing the surgeon is not going to do is perform a liver transplant. And oddly enough, matching candidates for livers doesn't require instantaneous matching of genotype. Why, you'd almost think medicine had advanced enough to keep people alive while performing what are now routine tests.)

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If fast radio bursts really are revving up interstellar sailcraft, here's the maths

John Gamble
Boffin

Re: 2015?

More accurately, Niven got there in 1971. And of course over four decades earlier Konstantin Tsiolkovsky suggested the idea.

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AMD does an Italian job on Intel, unveils 32-core, 64-thread 'Naples' CPU

John Gamble

Re: @Titter

Pizzeria Uno hasn't been Pizzeria Uno for a couple of decades now (this is true of all of the formerly great Chicago pizza places, as they got bought by "entrepreneurs" and immediately lost all of their individuality and unique recipes.

Plus, deep dish pizza, despite being introduced in Chicago, is hardly what I would call Chicago-style.

(Currently buying my pizzas from Apart, FWIW).

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