* Posts by Bronek Kozicki

2433 posts • joined 6 Sep 2007

East Midlands network-sniffer wails: Openreach, fix my outage-ridden line

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: AAISP

... and here is the relevant link

There is a catch though, which I guess might apply in this case "DSL requires a working PSTN line, if the PSTN line has a fault then this will need to be resolved first."

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Fitness app Polar even better at revealing secrets than Strava

Bronek Kozicki
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Duh

I do have a Polar Flow account and was never under the impression that my routes are private. I wonder where did the military men get that impression from? Or perhaps they just made certain assumptions without checking?

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SD cards add PCIe and NVMe, hit 985 MB/sec and 128TB

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: 128TiB in an SD card?

... not to mention bitrot. Which is real thing if you store large enough set of data.

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Who dares wins, they say, so Toshiba's SAS drive plans another hit on SATA

Bronek Kozicki
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I will have eight such disks, please

free samples for test purposes, of course.

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Linux literally loses its Lustre – HPC filesystem ditched in new kernel

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: a Thinner Linux Kernel

I build my own kernel for every minor release - it's pretty easy actually, but not because of my (rather embarrassing level of) knowledge of how to do it, but simply thanks to the distribution making it easy to customise and build own packages.

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Bronek Kozicki
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Re: Uh-oh...

Other great filesystems aside, I think that you do not need to have Lustre in the upstream kernel in order to be able to use it - just build your own modules from out-of-tree Lustre sources. Not entirely sure about this and happy to be corrected.

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What's all the C Plus Fuss? Bjarne Stroustrup warns of dangerous future plans for his C++

Bronek Kozicki
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why std::shared_ptr<T> or std::vector<T>::iterator did not provide some additional checking whether memory gets destroyed whilst within the member function itself

My response to this category of problems is: fix your design.

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Bronek Kozicki
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Re: Design by committee

if on the other hand the committee is seen as a vehicle to push each member's pet projects and goals...

It is not - because it is possible for any member of the committee to stop dead a pet project of another member if they deem it an "unworkable time hog". Sometimes that saddens me, sometimes I glad because of that. There are many proposals and also some interesting research which deserve closer attention than they receive.

However, "design by committee" does show up, in the very very long "bikeshedding" discussions where most participants agree in principle on a feature or change, but cannot agree on how it should be designed.

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What can you do when the pup of programming becomes the black dog of burnout? Dude, leave

Bronek Kozicki
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I will not get into your examples (graphics is not my area) but you are touching two issues here:

1) motivation at work - this is indeed doing what you have passion for and being recognized for your work

2) lack of motivation as a result of three points you have listed above.

But there is also another thing: burnout as a result of doing what you love, but too much. This may happen, too. Sadly most employers do not recognize when this happens and have no policies for helping employees who work more than e.g. 60 hours per week.

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Boffins offer to make speculative execution great again with Spectre-Meltdown CPU fix

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: I have a simple plan...

"3. Make much faster memory" to be honest, we already have much faster memory, it is called SRAM - sadly required power makes it not practical for anything beyond small amount inside the CPU for caches. I agree that we should invest in research (and productisation) of new types of memory, optimised for very low latency.

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Bronek Kozicki
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Re: Hard as I try... (@ GrumpyOldBloke)

"Does this make sense? Honest question." - nope. The compilers are not at fault, although they may help alleviate the pain. It is multistage pipelines in the CPU and the associated high cost of branch misprediction which pushed the CPU designers to speculatively execute branches before we know whether or not we need it. Couple this with the high cost of cache misses and that's your side channel attach right there.

One way to fix it would be to push the "speculative" part from the CPU to the compiler like Mill architecture does, but it is a very different beast to what we have now, with a very different instruction set to match.

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Bronek Kozicki
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Re: Hard as I try...

I'd like to believe that 1) SafeSpec is actually viable (in terms of die space and performance cost) and that 2) CPU vendors will actually spend money implementing it. But I try not to be too optimistic ...

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Wires, chips, and LEDs: US trade bigwigs detail Chinese kit that's going to cost a lot more

Bronek Kozicki
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Devil

Treasury notes

Here is the thing - China is, by far, the largest buyer of American debt. The interest of which is tightly coupled to price, which can be manipulated by someone with a sufficiently large long position - like China for example. If things go much further, Chinese could imaginably ruin American economy by flooding the interest rates market with Treasury notes, which would push the yields up. It would cost them an arm and leg, but who knows - for a centrally managed economy it might be just doable, especially if aimed only at the weeks where the impact would be the biggest i.e. re-issuance of more Treasury debt. With the interest rates adjusted to match the inflated yields.

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Citation needed: Europe claims Kaspersky wares 'confirmed as malicious'

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: You do not need evidence against Russians

@DiViDeD - while you are correct that indeed, the initial accusation was based on little evidence, the investigation recently concluded by the Dutch government is more conclusive

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Trademark holders must pay for UK web blocking orders – Supreme Court

Bronek Kozicki
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Pint

Re: Good decision

I especially like this clause, which is hard to argue against: "The protection of intellectual property rights is ordinarily and naturally a cost of the business which owns those rights and has the relevant interest in asserting them."

Good sense wins!

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BlackBerry Key2: Clickier, nippier, but how many people still want a QWERTY?

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: Battery

Sadly I think not - otherwise, it would be a talking point.

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Bronek Kozicki
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Re: QWERTY Yes

BlackBerry is not stock Android - its software is pretty good actually (especially Hub and DTEK). They learned to do it right, well before Google did. Luckily BlackBerry is still doing the software and it appears that, on the hardware side, TCL is not too bad either.

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US websites block netizens in Europe: Why are they ghosting EU? It's not you, it's GDPR

Bronek Kozicki
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Another one ...

... is wisconsingazette.com

I think it is good that these names should be listed in public. If they are unavailable to EU because of GDPR that means that either 1) they are collecting PII data they have no business knowing or 2) they have no idea what GDPR is, and act out of fear. Either way, it is good that these sites should be publicly known.

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Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04: Make yourself at GNOME. Cup of data-slurping dispute, anyone?

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: Opt-in is the only way to go...

Me neither, so I did "apt-get install xububtu-desktop" first thing after completed installation. There is more to choose from.

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President Trump broke US Constitution with Twitter bans – judge

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: So... @BronetKozicki

@ThomT I think we are both right. The reason why anybody would be blocked/kicked out is NOT to prevent them from hearing the information (because it becomes public knowledge anyway), but to prevent them from asking inconvenient questions (expressing opposing views etc) publicly in the context where the announcements were made. I think this is where the violation lies.

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Bronek Kozicki
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Re: So...

Similarly, if EPA holds a press conference and kicks out reporters of a specific political option out of it, they are also violating the Constitution. Hope someone tells them.

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Finally: Historic Eudora email code goes open source

Bronek Kozicki
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"RogueWave's 20-year-old MFC library" There appears to be a typo here. I was programming with MFC (bleh) in the '90s and it held Microsoft copyright, just as it does today. RougeWave was known for its implementation of standard C++ library and set of other related libraries

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'Clive, help us,' say empty-handed ZX Spectrum reboot buyers

Bronek Kozicki
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Consultant to a crowd-funded hardware startup: nice job if you can get it.

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'Facebook takes data from my phone – but I don't have an account!'

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: Maybe not a popular choice but...

I also checked my BB keyone (I also cannot use a touch keyboard and prefer real one) - no trace of Facebook aside from WhatsApp. I remember installing it for communication with work colleagues, so it is not as if I can blame someone else. Thankfully I no longer need it, so it has been just removed.

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Blood spilled from another US high school shooting has yet to dry – and video games are already being blamed

Bronek Kozicki
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@frank ly firearms are not banned in the UK. They are regulated. You need checks, permit, training and reason to own one. For shotguns, the sufficient reason is sport or shooting vermin. Reasons for owning a rifle are also rather relaxed. On the other hand, self-defence is not considered to be a valid reason, for any type of weapon. Also, UK does have firing ranges where one can train even without the necessary permit (subject to club membership).

Obviously, that kind of legislation severely limits the number of firearms which can be legally sold to a civilian population, which is the one and only reason why NRA would never allow it in the USA. All these lives lost in the vicious cycle of the homicides, fatal accidents and mass shootings are for one reason only: profit of weapon producers. Which is why any argument in defence of NRA and the 2nd amendment comes out as defending the indefensible, at best.

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Open justice FTW! El Reg fought the law – and El Reg won

Bronek Kozicki
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Facepalm

Re: Streisand effect in 3..2...1...

duh

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Bronek Kozicki
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Re: Streisand effect in 3..2...1...

Shame on El Reg! Huh? What for? Does one automatically become a saint, after having made millions and then shown up on a TV programme meant to show millionaires in a good light?

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NASA will send tiny helicopter to Mars

Bronek Kozicki
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Bernoulli’s Principle

You realize the myth that Bernoulli law has anything to do with flying has been busted very long time ago?

Also, RC helicopters do exceed 2000 RPM sometimes, so 3000 RPM for a helicopter this small is not that much of a feat. What is (going to be) remarkable achievement though, is a stable landing from which said helicopter can start again without human intervention.

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Make masses carry their mobes, suggests wig in not-at-all-creepy speech

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: Dear Sir Geoffrey,

... I guess anyone found to be a god will be also instantly found guilty. Because gods kill people, that's what I learned from Greek mythology.

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Every major OS maker misread Intel's docs. Now their kernels can be hijacked or crashed

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: Be careful about version numbers.

The article is referring to version numbers of the upstream kernel, not distributions. For the very simple reason that there is one upstream kernel and many distributions (each with its own set of patches).

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Bronek Kozicki
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Re: Most importantly...

... and does it have a logo?

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Windows Notepad fixed after 33 years: Now it finally handles Unix, Mac OS line endings

Bronek Kozicki
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Going back to my Windows programming days, I guess that the fix should be also in any application using standard Windows edit box control. Because Notepad is nothing else but an application wrapper for this control, hence the fix would be in text rendering of the control itself. Which also explains why it took Microsoft so long to fix it - they have large problem with making changes in the behaviour of existing APIs, controls etc. (which also explains why they come up with new ones so often).

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Kremlin's war on Telegram sees 50 VPNs stopped at the border

Bronek Kozicki
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OK I framed it wrong - obviously did not mean single server literally. They all rely on an easy to discover and block IP range(s) where the servers are hosted. As a workaround, Signal employs domain fronting, but they can not continue doing that.

Perhaps we need a secure chat which employs distributed peer-to-peer user directory, but then it might become vulnerable to state manipulation (and interception) simply by brute force.

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Bronek Kozicki
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Or Threema. The weak point which all of these apps have is a single central server, making it a point of attack for the authorities.

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Fresh fright of data-spilling Spectre CPU design flaws haunt Intel

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: My Dad was right

Nope, you confused Metldown with Spectre. The only check the CPU can do and is responsible for is moving the data between the rings, which is what Intel got wrong (and AMD did right). The program logic, on the other hand, is a different story. Most execution branches have nothing to do with security (data access enforcement, authorization etc.), so penalising all speculative executions in the name of robust security checks would have exactly the effect I described - much slower CPU, for little gain. The difficult task of figuring out which execution branches are related to security is (apparently new) job of the programmer, perhaps helped by the compiler, and then securing those (e.g. with a reptoline). Which is why we now have slow, steady and continuous trickle of patches in Linux kernel.

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Bronek Kozicki
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Re: My Dad was right

@Dr.Sommer Like most timing attacks, Spectre is more subtle than that. Robust safety principles directly contradict the performance goals, because in order to hide the data that the attacker should not have access to, you would have to add delays to his data accesses. Since obviously, you have no idea if the process being run at the moment is controlled by an attacker or not, this means adding delays to everything. Show me a vendor who will argue that his ware is better than the competitions because it is resistant to a fairly obscure mode of attack even though the security measure applied makes it few percents slower. Do you think they will continue selling such ware for much longer?

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Bronek Kozicki
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Re: My Dad was right

We wouldn't be in this situation if someone came up with a technology to create RAM with latency lower than 10ns, within sane power budget and fabrication cost. As the things stand, we need multiple levels of caches with very limited capacity and a significant chunk of CPU space and power is used for speculative execution, cache preloading etc. just to ensure we have full instruction pipelines and data at hand when needed. This is where the complexity is coming from.

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The Rocky Planet Picture Show: NASA Mars InSight ready for launch

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: Why from Vandenberg?

@Dave 32 my guess would that they are not sending this on the orbit around Earth ;) Depending on the direction of travel, it might be desirable NOT to include Earth's rotation for getting to Mars.

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TSB's middleware nightmare: Execs grilled on Total Sh*tshow at Bank

Bronek Kozicki
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@AC you might be onto something. Banks love presentations and UML graphs, and Java is best suited for the kind of software that can be presented as UML. It impossible to find an established bank without large Java presence in the critical systems. When Oracle finally starts charging royalty fees, banks are going to be captive users for decades to come.

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Bronek Kozicki
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Re: 'The issues we’re seeing in the system are - middleware'

"Middleware" to banks is what trucks are to a shipping company. Sadly banks execs do not know it.

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We just wanna torque: Spinning transfer boffins say torque memory near

Bronek Kozicki
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I'd like to get excited, but ...

... too little detail here and too far from off-the-shelf availability.

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GitLab crawling back online after breaking its brain in two

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: "Git is plain and simple a very impressive tool"

@AC Git is a HUGE step BACKWARD in the ways server software is written

Nope, git is not server software in the first place. If you try to use it as such, you will meet inevitable failure (unless your use case is so trivial it barely merits "server" word). That's why you need something like gitlab. It is not an omission, server part (except for the most trivial case) was not and is not in scope, by design. You are setting yourself for failure if you ever think otherwise.

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That's no moon... er, that's an asteroid. And it'll be your next and final home, spacefarer

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: Three generations of kids going "are we there yet".

If the asteroid is of reasonable size and a required structure can be built to support it, the artificial gravity (perhaps much smaller than 1g, but still) could be created by spinning it along the axis of the travel direction.

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Brit bank TSB TITSUP* after long-planned transfer of customer records from Lloyds

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: Tested how many times?

"Testing is for wimps" well yes, in order to be able to test the thing, you have to design it for testing first. Try designing something (anything !) properly, when the only thing that matters is meeting the deadlines with the ever-growing list of features. Where things such a monitoring, or testability, or control, or logging, or benchmarking are sure to have dropped down the list because the only thing the managers understand is the flow of forms, or in the best case Excel spreadsheets. And when was the last time you saw tested spreadsheet?

I am not saying this has happened here (do not have sources in TSB or Lloyds) but I have worked in banking long enough to know that competent managers are exception, not rule.

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Capita reports pre-tax LOSS of £515m for 2017

Bronek Kozicki
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is it the same CAPITA which was just handed a large government contract? Not entirely unlike Carillion, right before its demise?

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SpaceX finally Falcon flings NASA's TESS into orbit

Bronek Kozicki
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@Lee D whoever gave you lessons in trolling, ask them for a refund.

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Windows Admin Center: Vulture gets claws on browser-based server admin

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: DC

Well, AD servers own your "keys to the kingdom". It only makes sense to be careful how much of a potential exposure there is to such a machine.

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Best thing about a smart toilet? You can take your mobile in without polluting it

Bronek Kozicki
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Toilets which blow hot air...

That sounds nasty

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It's April 2018, and we've had to sit on this Windows 10 Spring Creators Update headline for days

Bronek Kozicki
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Re: GDPR rights vs MS

GDPR still has to be enforced - that's why I support NOYB

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