* Posts by Dave314159ggggdffsdds

56 posts • joined 26 Apr 2019

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So your Google Play Publisher account has been terminated – of course you would want to know why exactly

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Dancing with the devil

If you want to stop people gaming the system, telling them the rules isn't a good plan. Guy in this story freely admits to trying to push things to the limits; that's why they banned him.

Really, it's not difficult: Don't take the piss.

Looming US immigration crackdown aims to weed out pre-crime of poverty. And that may be bad news for techie families

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: I'm a US taxpayer...

The state minimum wage is far higher than that, but you've chosen to lie by omission, because you prefer Nazinomics.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: I'm a US taxpayer...

The minimum wage in the US is pretty high at the moment, by historical standards. But you can't kill the Jews until you persuade everyone that the Jews are stealing their money, and you can't persuade them of that until you sell them a lie about how poor they are. It's also well established historically that setting a too-high minimum wage allows the prejudiced far more opportunity to act in a racist manner.

Adjusted for purchasing power, the US minimum wage puts full time workers into the top 5-10% on the planet by income. You're selling Nazi bullshit.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: I'm a US taxpayer...

None of that is true, particularly your conclusion. If you truly believe those neo-Nazi conspiracy theories, you should be calling for a new Holocaust. But my guess is you're just a useful idiot rather than understanding you're a Nazi.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Bye bye Reg

Er. Not that I agree with them, but those two things aren't contradictory. They don't want (the country to have that) stuff, and don't want to pay for it.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Yes, and not for non-resident citizens. That's what medical tourism is.

I could throttle you right about now: US Navy to ditch touchscreens after kit blamed for collision

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Touch screens

Leaving a vehicle in gear is great until some idiot gets in and tries to start it without checking for neutral.

I once worked on top of a mountain, and we had a work vehicle we'd park facing a stone barn, and leave it in gear jic. The area manager would show up every couple of weeks and take the van for an hour or two. Every single time, she would ram it into the stone barn when she turned the key. Eventually one of my co-workers parked it facing out at the top of a steep bank a couple of metres high when she was due. No injuries, we got a new van, and she finally learnt to check.

Tor pedos torpedoed again, this time Feds torpedo four Tor pedos – and keep how they unmasked dark-web scumbags under wraps

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Don't underestimate capabilities of tradtional police investigative techniques

That's a lot of words to try and pretend Tor isn't an obvious honeytrap. Otoh, if it's working, maybe I shouldn't point that out...

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Is it really an issue ?

As far as I'm aware, there are plenty of good reasons to think Tor was created as a honeytrap by the US, and is thoroughly compromised by design. The name Tor is shortened from 31-TOR - ROT-13 backwards - in a nod to the level of security it offers.

One person's harmless japery can be another's night of LaserJet Lego

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Heavy...

Is there anything at all in the world that you can't turn into an antisemitic conspiracy theory?

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Heavy...

Sadly, it's not only entirely apocryphal, but appears to have been made up by David Cameron for a speech he was giving.

Here's to beer, without which we'd never have the audacity to Google an error message at 3am

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Never mind the beer ...

Unless it's a spirit.

I miss him already, says judge as Mike Lynch's court marathon ends

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Thinking of the poor children ..

What auditors do is audit the accounts, to check that they're reasonable from a tax and accounting perspective. What they don't do is e.g. check with a bank that the cash claimed to be held in an account is actually there - unless there's some red flag, of course.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Thinking of the poor children ..

Deloitte haven't done anything wrong. Here, anyway.

In general, most people seem to have completely the wrong idea of what auditors do, and criticise them for not doing it. In fact auditors (mostly) only audit the accounts, not the underlying business, and so only report on whether the books add up. Competent fraudsters will pass an audit until it all falls apart.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Four weeks

2 & 4 - I'll fish from my new yacht.

PIN the blame on us, says Monzo in mondo security blunder: Bank card codes stored in log files as plain text

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: And BigBank?

It's worth opening an account and using it when convenient. If my experience is typical, you'll end up using it regularly.

They're trying to grow fast, which is often when it all falls apart, but so far they're unbelievably good compared to normal banks.

Judge rules Oracle didn't have to listen to its Euro Works Council over support biz layoffs

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

That ruling is binding on EU nations after Brexit (should it ever happen), unless it goes to a higher EU court. But it won't.

Reality is that EWC regs are paperwork with no effect on what a company does. They were introduced in a homeopathically watered down form because that was all that everyone agreed on. There was no intent for them to be more than they are, for the same reason.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: So much for EU workers protections then...

Re France Telecom, one should mention that the allegations and trial are obviously politically motivated and that in a common law jurisdiction the defence would have been able to file a motion dismissing the case - either pre-trial, or as soon as the trial started. The first question is actuarial: were there more than the expected number of suicides given the number of employees. (There were not. No case to answer.)

Our hero returns home £500 richer thanks to senior dev's appalling security hygiene

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Ahhh passwords...

I use ******** most places.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Ahhh passwords...

Stickynotes aren't an urban myth, but anywhere that doesn't have hotdesking, 8/10 passwords are guessable within three tries based on the desk furniture so it doesn't make much difference. Once you have physical access, you have access. Engineer the users, fiddle with the hardware, or just ask nicely. Hacking is for people too far from their target to do things properly.

BT boss warns 16-min walk from current HQ to new London base 'just the tip of the iceberg'

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Sell 90% of Real Estate

Nonsense. BT is not a property investment company and shouldn't be investing in property. Doing so simply increases the capital required to carry out their core business, making it lower yielding.

Those who specialise in something are usually able to do it better, so a lot of the time they're able to provide the same service at lower cost while making a profit. That division and specialisation is what underpins all human development since prehistory.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Prehaps I've become overly cynical

Yay! Yay! Kill the joooooz! Adolf was right! Yay! Yay!

Fuck you and your think veiled National Socialism.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Prehaps I've become overly cynical

"...And that's why we must kill the jews."

You people are so insane that you can even work a company moving offices into your conspiracy theories.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: "Just the tip of the iceberg"

Nonsense. BT still has loads of legacy property they have no business owning. A friend of mine tried to set up a deal to buy it all off them a few years ago, but they weren't selling then.

That's quite aside from the property that has appreciated significantly over the last few years and is now being sold off because it's too valuable or unfit for BT's purposes.

Yes, I've been swotting up on court evidence in advance, says Autonomy founder Mike Lynch

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Full disclosure?

Barristers are there to come up with an answer like that immediately, under pressure in court. They are specialists in presenting cases and thinking quickly, which is a different skill set to slowly thinking a problem through. That's why they have to be instructed by a solicitor.

Facebook chucks 1.5 hours' profit at Citizens Advice anti-scam charity to defuse consumer champ's defamation suit

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

WTF?

Why is the Citizens Advice Bureau a 'scam charity'?!

It's happening, tech contractors: UK.gov is pushing IR35 off-payroll rules to private sector in Finance Bill

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

How about...

...Not pretending to be a contractor for tax purposes? Which is all anyone in IT has ever done.

One teeensy little 13-minute power cut, and WD you look at the size of that chip supply cut!

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Welcome to the world of "just in time" supply chains.

Anyone doing jit in hours is either working within the UK or using air cargo. Neither would be particularly affected by idiot-Brexit scenarios.

(I wish I could say it's ridiculous to suggest the government will impose any of the idiotic and harmful ideas floating around instead of the better options, whatever form of Brexit is eventually chosen. But the adults aren't in the room.)

The dread sound of the squeaking caster in the humming data centre

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

We had a cage full of pcs that we'd just replaced. The bank's facilities guys insisted that as soon as the cargo lift doors opened on the loading bay level, moving it was something only they were allowed to do. They promptly moved it down a slight ramp and off the edge of the loading dock. I let them sweat for a few minutes before I admitted the computers were on their way to be recycled.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: I don't think that means what you think it means

Experience can include finding out that shit sometimes does inexplicable stuff.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Brought the house down

Changing a lightbulb in the office, standing on a swivel chair, I grabbed the burglar bars over the window for support. They came down, bringing part of the wall with them in a shower of bricks and rubble. None of the brickwork was load bearing, and the builders had skimped on cement for the mortar. The structure was a deathtrap, although the company bosses were more worried about security, given that thieves could kick their way through a wall.

Planes, fails and automobiles: Overseas callout saved by gentle thrust of server CD tray

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: airport security

If you have access to a heatsealer, you can divide a plastic bag up into multiple compartments of less than 100ml, ice bag style, which will separate enough to flow into each other after a careful squeeze. Cut the corner off and you have a pint or so ready to drink. Technically permitted, and surprisingly often allowed through in practice.

Never let something so flimsy as a locked door to the computer room stand in the way of an auditor on the warpath

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

"what happens if the fire door catches fire?"

At least you'll die in an ironic way. I once knew someone who had a bunch of burglar alarms stolen (prior to installation). The police thought he was taking the piss at first when he reported the crime.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: PIN locks

Pin locks are trivial to crack, if you have access and a couple of minutes to play with them. You can normally see the buttons which are pressed often, but you can always feel which they are by pressing. If you know the four digits, it's just the order to work out.

I have seen people who think the 'c' is a digit in the code. Reduces security somewhat when the third digit of four resets the input.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: whether if they'd had their sidearms they could have shot the lock off instead

Why do people cite mythbusters as if it's science rather than tv entertainment?

In reality, it doesn't normally take much force to punch a lock through a door. Bullets can easily impart enough kinetic energy to do so. Mainly whether it will work is down to the door.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: so easy to get in

I used to know a few squatters. One told me all about opening a squat on Oxford Street. Turned up at 9am on a weekday wearing hi vis, knocked on the door next to the target, and asked to plug in an extension lead. Then took an angle grinder to the sitex. No one looked twice, including passing police.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

The only places I've seen must-fob-out it was a health and safety thing. Only one person through the door at a time - worked like an airlock - and no way to swipe someone else in or out. That way you know who is inside if e.g. the biological containment fails.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Wouldn't Happen Here

An 'it audit' often means nothing more than checking which users/locations actually go with which bit of kit. The first step in a deployment/rollout may be to 'audit' which user sits at which desk and what their usernames are.

I have 'conducted IT audits for [major international bank]' on my cv. Looks a lot better than 'went from desk to desk collecting asset numbers'...

Dedicated techie risks life and limb to locate office conference phone hiding under newspaper

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Back in the days I was doing frontline support, one of the clients was a big investment co, and we had all kinds of strange commitments supporting the big wheel anywhere in the world. I usually dealt with him, and he was generally polite and reasonable.

One Thursday afternoon, he called up just before closing time, from his villa by lake Como. (When I say by, I mean with private shoreline and jetty. V nice.) His pc wouldn't turn on. I did the usual basic troubleshooting - "are you absolutely sure it's plugged in?" - but there wasn't anything I could do remotely. I passed him to the manager who would normally deal with sending out engineers, and they tried to get him to send the machine to us to look at. Cue shoutyman.

The client insisted that they send an engineer asap, and insisted it was me. Manager explained that I don't do work travel because I won't go without my partner. My partner worked on the same desk, which the client knew. Shoutyman really goes off on one, so we can hear his voice coming out of the handset from across the room. "I DON'T CARE ABOUT THAT SEND BOTH OF THEM IF YOU HAVE TO I WANT HIM HERE IN THE MORNING I PAY ENOUGH I EXPECT YOU TO DO WHAT I WANT" and so on.

So the next morning the wife and I are on a plane with overnight bags. Get to his villa about lunchtime, shoutyman isn't at home. Oh, the client is there all right, but he's being his usual polite self. He invites us to lunch, served by his staff on a terrace overlooking the lake. After a small digestif he takes me to look at the pc that isn't working. It is sitting there neatly, with the power cable obviously unplugged. With a massive wink he says "oh, how silly of me, it must have been unplugged after all", and then tells me to fix it and check it all works. While I do, he starts on a conference call. Three minutes later I'm done checking, he puts the call on hold for a second to say he wants me to wait around til he's done, so I can demonstrate it's all fixed. Tells his butler to takes us to the garden to wait, and being us drinks, newspapers, etc.

Two or three hours later he finally finishes his call, it's five ish on Friday, and he says (with another wink) that the call took longer than expected and now he's done working for the week, so my demonstration will have to wait for Monday morning! We say we'll go check into a nearby hotel, he says nonsense, use one of the guesthouses in the garden, make yourselves at home, use the pool or the boats if you want, I'll see you again on Monday.

One full-service ultra-luxury romantic weekend by Lake Como later, I demonstrate to him that a computer that's now plugged in does indeed work. He thanks both of us for being so helpful over the last few months, and explains that he once tried to pay a bonus through our employer, but they insisted on taking a large cut, so he did this instead.

I put the problem down on the ticket as a 'power supply issue', which is technically about true.

Assange rape claims: Complainant welcomes Swedish investigation's reopening

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Right to stay in the UK?

The short sentence means he stays in cat 1 prisons the whole time. It's immaterial really, they slapped him with one charge that could be summarily tried with a low sentence so they could hold him while they decide what to do. They have a whole bunch more, including several of the most serious charges of perverting the course of justice that carry potential life sentences.

If they really want to be mean, they'll charge him with legally questionable things he's bound to fight, and which will take years to get to the Supreme Court. Because he's not getting bail, and being held on remand for that time is much worse than serving a sentence that long.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

The whole concept of Assange's expulsion being illegal under international law rather falls down at the first hurdle, which is the question of whether it was ever legal under the same treaties and conventions for Ecuador to grant him asylum in the first place. It obviously wasn't, since he was fleeing criminal charges.

The UK would have been legally justified in expelling the embassy, but Assange was never that important.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: The rape charges were always bogus

It's quite clear that he didn't think he was raping anyone, even while he was violently restraining a victim who was crying and begging him to stop. His defence - he has admitted the facts are true - was that a concept called 'implied consent', as applied to St Julian, meant it was legally impossible for him to commit the criminal offence of rape.

The reality is that for all his denials and obfuscations, Assange stipulated under oath in the Crown Court that the facts as alleged are true. He's an MRA as well as racist and antisemitic, and a conspiracy theorist. That is alt-right, not lefty in any way. It does serve as another example of how easily Guardian-reading types are fooled and infiltrated by the more subtle branches of the far right.

Get in line, USA: Sweden reopens Assange rape allegations probe

This post has been deleted by a moderator

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Best outcome for Assange™

Probably multiple Swedish convictions. But the UK isn't done with him yet. He still faces serious charges here; they slapped a year in him in a summary trial so they can hold him while they decide what to do. There are a whole sheaf of perverting the course of justice charges that could be brought, including very serious ones like witness intimidation.

One solution to the whole mess is for the UK to give him multiple life sentences on those charges, at which point he's never getting out anyway.

Probably the best Assange can hope for is a successful M'Naghton plea and subsequent treatment for whatever personality disorder led him to claim it was impossible for anyone to refuse consent to St Julian. But I still doubt he'd ever be considered safe to release.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

"Assange has always denied the accusations."

No, he has never denied them. He admitted the facts as alleged are true, and claimed they don't constitute a crime: his defence was solely a point of law. Obviously, physically holding down a woman while she begs you to stop is rape everywhere, and when he was told that by the UK courts he fled to the Ecuadorian embassy.

It's also simply not true that Sweden ever dropped or closed the case against Assange.

As for extradition priority, Assange has to serve any further jail time the UK gives him before he can be extradited anywhere. If the US request takes priority then Assange has successfully evaded Swedish justice by fleeing UK custody and so faces a life sentence for perverting the course of justice. More to the point, the US doesn't need to extradite him, because he's spending the rest of his life in jail anyway. The nature of his defence is such that there are undoubtedly a whole string of previous offences which haven't become public yet because he wasn't around to be prosecuted. Once he's convicted by Sweden, he'll face charges around the world.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

That's partly what makes it so clear he fled from justice. Sweden doesn't have a bend over backwards extradition treaty with the US.

"Can he shorten the process by dropping any opposition to the Swedish request"

He can't object to it at all, so it doesn't matter. He tried that route before he fled to the embassy.

Techie with outdated documentation gets his step count in searching for non-existent cabinet

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: So it wasn't his job

Simplify it to triple-u triple-u and it's easier to say.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Another 5 minute job...

Sounds like bullshit to me for all kinds of reasons, not least that if you have a sheet of armour plate for the floor, you'd just weld the seatbelt mounts to it.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

Re: Wayne / Ian

No wonder he couldn't find the right cabinet, he was in the wrong story.

Dave314159ggggdffsdds

If an employee lies to me, chances are they're getting fired. If a client lies to me, they're almost certainly getting fired. Decent human beings react to that with the appropriate shame-faced apologies, after which I may reconsider.

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