* Posts by gormreg

1 post • joined 29 Oct 2018

Official: IBM to gobble Red Hat for $34bn – yes, the enterprise Linux biz

gormreg

Re: Amidst all the wailing and knashing of teeth here

Live OS upgrades -- Live Patching for kernel, userspace is a WIP and high risk

Active Memory Expansion -- zswap depending on exact requirements

Active Memory Sharing -- Not sure, could be done with swap files depending on requirements

Memory De-duplication -- KSM for anonymous, file-backed is a mixed bag

Great Cohesive admin framework -- undefined what this means exactly but admittedly how to tune certain parameters lacks consistency

ASO/DSO -- tuned but by and large, live monitoring for automatic tuning goes to hell if the workload does not behave as expected

Workload Partitions -- cgroups, capabilities and semantics of the isolation varies depending on the resource so it does depend on requirements

Suspend / Resume -- close the laptop lid, otherwise depends on the hardware and whether the firmware can handle being fully suspended or not.

Great Filesystem (JFS2) and volume manager -- variety of choices, depends on requirements

"ODM" as opposed to DevFS -- devfs hasn't used in years

Transactional Memory -- supported but hardware support has been iffy so while the software can use it, the hardware does not always behave correctly or gets disabled in a microcode update

Support for CPU embedded accelerators -- driver-specific so depends on whether you mean something ppc64 specific or a missing driver for an x86 accelerator

Memory Protection Keys -- already there

There are things that AIX does better due to the tight integration with hardware and the ability to always control the entire software stack but a number of the "enterprise" features you claim are missing do exist albeit with different terminology and sometimes capabilities. Often, the priority that support is improved depends on how many customers actually request it as opposed to just filling out checkboxes that sound Enterprisy

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