* Posts by Waseem Alkurdi

674 posts • joined 16 Apr 2018

Page:

1,700 lucky Brit kids to visit Apple Stores for 'Year of Engineering'

Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Not an Apple strong point

English, of course, meaning different things to different sides of the Atlantic.

0
0

Microsoft's edgy Open Enclave SDK goes cross platform

Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Open Enclave xD

I know ... I was talking about the mental picture of an “open lock” ...

0
0
Waseem Alkurdi

Open Enclave xD

Is the whatevertheycallit intended here?

Like in "open lock", " open safe", ... ?

1
1

Macs to Linux fans: Stop right there, Penguinista scum, that's not macOS. Go on, git outta here

Waseem Alkurdi
Joke

And I love BlackBerry (the fruit, not the dead business phone company).

3
0
Waseem Alkurdi
Joke

Hey what?! I thought macOS was just expensive people's Windows!

2
4
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Chromebook + Gallium OS for meeeee

And an SSD, in case *God forbid* it uses a hard disk! ^_^

The build quality though. It, er, sucks.

0
0

Bill Gates joined on stage by jar of poop as he confesses deep love for talking about toilets

Waseem Alkurdi

Re: That's nothing...

This isn't the problem. The problem is that some people are going to immediately disbelieve their eyes and believe his denial. He said it, so it must be right. This class of people is what we call fanboys/gals.

3
0

Mourning Apple's war against sockets? The 2018 Mac mini should be your first port of call

Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Macs typically have a longer usable life than Windows PCs ...

I can vouch for that. I have one from 2010 still going strong (headless server) and 2 from 2012 editions - again running one of them as headless server and the other as my working from home kit.

The 2010 ... You said it's running headless. Can I assume that you're not running macOS? If that's the case, can't a similarly specced machine with a similar footprint (think about these machines which are small enough squares that you can hang off the monitor) achieve the same result, with the same footprint and same power consumption?

2
3
Waseem Alkurdi

Granted, it was a couple of years ago that I last did this specifically to prove the point, but my laptop is EIGHT YEARS OLD. And it can virtualise MacOS in one-quarter of its resources, faster than Mac native hardware.

Except if you ran it on time-period-correct OS X version (maybe Snow Leopard), and you used GPU passthrough, I can't believe you. Like really. Anything above Mavericks runs like a dog in a virtual machine (and that's coming from a "gaming" laptop test).

Snow Leopard, on the other side, ran perfectly fine on Intel Atom. Yeah, Intel Atom. No wonder it'd run fast on a laptop with an i7 (of back then).

Anyhow, you can run macOS/OS X on the hardware itself (that's called a hackintosh setup). Lots of resources online, but you have to fix drivers et al.

Waaaaaaaaaaaaay faster than on a VM, and that's how I got myself a touchscreen "Mac".

3
1

Chuck this on expenses: £2k iPad paints Apple as the premium fondleslab specialist – as planned

Waseem Alkurdi

Re: 2000 quid?

You seem stunningly ignorant about iPads, ever used one ?

I had a pair of iPad 2s at home. They shipped with iOS 5.1.1.

They ran iOS 6 like a beast, they ran iOS 7 like a beast. iOS 8 comes and the devices slow down to grinding halt. iOS 9 doesn't change much. Still unusable.

Really much of a change between 7 and 8? Nope.

And now with many, well, most apps (and games) not supporting iOS versions before 9 (and the oncoming 64-bit-only apps not going to ever run) ... the devices are scrapyard material.

I'm not ignorant, I'm being realistic.

On the other side, Android devices don't suffer from that problem. I am in care of several Note IIs (2012 era devices) and they work surprisingly well with Android 7.1.1 via custom ROM.

Tell me, how's the iPhone 4 doing in its graveyard?

(That's not to say that Samsung devices are better than Apple. Each has its own advantages.)

Single threaded performance of the latest Apple chips is indeed equal to or better than a mid-range Intel laptop chip with a typically lower power draw.

Apples to oranges.

As for old iPads, my original Retina iPad is still going fine, at 6.5 years. Battery is fine, display is still good, and it works. Can't use latest iOS, but the version it has is quite OK.

'Nuff said.

2
1
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: "A professional tablet is repairable, extensible"

They are hard to find, but I'm typing on one: an HP EliteBook convertible. HP made them for years, Dell did (Latitude series), and Lenovo did (various ThinkPad tablets).

All are super-duper-repairable.

3
0
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: 2000 quid?

£799 will get you an 11 tablet more powerful than many laptops sold at the same price.

Nope, it isn't. Not while it runs iOS on an ARM SoC anyhow.

People spend close to £2000 for a MS Surface Pro, they run Office on it, nobody called them "idiots"..

And they keep them for five to ten years (well, they're supposed to keep them that long). An iPad could give you like three years and five on life support (aka waiting for the upgrade that'll "un-crap" it a la iPhone 4S / iPad 2 and what they became with iOS 8)

6
11
Waseem Alkurdi

As it currently stands, two instances of the same app are not supported.

9
0
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: £2k - excellent! Sign me up for a couple...

a couplea couple dozen

Fixed!

1
0
Waseem Alkurdi

Apple makes super-expensive professional tablets. It probably won't mind one bit.

Nope.

A professional tablet is repairable, extensible, and, er, not Apple.

And please convince me how could "apps" originally designed for mobile substitute for real productivity packages on a desktop?

25
9
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: What Part of that?

The 2,000 $CURRENCY. Make that five.

2
1

Cray's pre-exascale Shasta supercomputer gets energy research boffins hot under collar

Waseem Alkurdi

Re: The important question

No, the real question is whether it runs Fortnite/PUBG/<insert stupid overhyped overfed kids' game here>.

1
0

Facebook sets Linux kernel tools free

Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Hmm, usually when a company does that...

And get some brownie points for being open-source-friendly.

13
0

Official: IBM to gobble Red Hat for $34bn – yes, the enterprise Linux biz

Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Poettering

OS/2 and Poettering? Best joke I've ever heard!

(It'd be interesting if somebody locked them both up in an office and see what happens!)

6
0

Florida man won't be compelled to reveal iPhone passcode, yet

Waseem Alkurdi

It's the cat pics. They're the cause of all evil ^_^

On a more serious note, it might be about text messages or WhatsApp conversations, maybe something to the effect that he's been drinking?

5
0
Waseem Alkurdi

Maybe he was a minor at the time, and is now an adult, given how time crawls in a court?

8
0

Break out the jelly and ice cream! Microsoft's Small Basic turns 10

Waseem Alkurdi

This, and all this!

1
0

Sysadmin running a Mac fleet? IBM has just thrown you a lifeline

Waseem Alkurdi

Re: IBM has just thrown you a lifeline

Also known as a sophistry (a sentence that makes perfect grammatical sense but has no meaning).

5
0

Science: Broke brats glued to the web while silk-stocking scions have better things to do

Waseem Alkurdi
Trollface

Re: This is a case of youngsters being what the world is coming to

You don't use Facebook? *gasp*

1
0
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Define digital skills

Or using the Emoji palette on the keyboard.

1
0
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: A Wise Man Once Said...

Yes sir. You have just described a stereotypical adolescent.

3
0

AI clinician trained to save humans from sepsis – and, er, let's just say you should stick to your human doctor

Waseem Alkurdi

I agree with you on this sentence. It is, as you said, a fact of medicine.

But your first sentence, that human illnesses, accidents, etc can be completely random is where I disagree.

It might not be a 2+2=4, but it's definitely not random. For each given disease, there are signs, symptoms, and other markers helping you to make the diagnoses. It's nowhere close to random.

(After all, medicine is a science).

Forgive me if this wasn't what you intended, but that's what I understood.

1
0
Waseem Alkurdi

They're talking about a decision support system, not a decision making system. If I were looking for a system to support my decision making I'd want it to be able to explain its recommendations to me. What we frequently hear about AI is that the system isn't able to produce anything that looks like reasoning. Is this one different?

And what if people offload their decision making to a decision assistant system? It produces nasty stuff.

And I tell you, a tired doctor AND a doctor w/o experience are quite likely to do that, especially if the doctor in question doesn't particularly understand the stuff.

And nope, from the article there doesn't seem to be anything like "decision justification" to me.

2
0
Waseem Alkurdi
Thumb Up

Re: I'm not sure that word means what you think it does.

Exactly ... vasopressors induce vasoconstriction.

1
1
Waseem Alkurdi

The problem with this approach is that human illnesses, accidents etc may not have consistent patterns, they can be completely random.

Tell this to a pathology lecturer and he's going to have a seizure on the spot.

(And, BTW, does the brain have a /dev/urandom? ^_^)

4
0
Waseem Alkurdi
Thumb Up

Oh THAT. Now that's going to be expensive, like everything else being marketed as having "AI" or "IoT".

3
0
Waseem Alkurdi

@James 51

what would undoubtably be a very expensive tool

Not really. It's a computer with "arms" extending into either a patient database or into medical equipment.

In the least, it's a program running on, hell, a Raspberry Pi, for a front-end, and a server doing the AI lifting.

4
0
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: The Wright Brothers

I guess it's good that The Wright Brothers didn't listen to people like you, and decided to plough on despite the massive rate of failure.

Big difference. If AI failed in the hospital, much more people could be at risk, and the negative effects are not always immediately obvious.

Imagine a AI clinician that delivered the wrong amount of a drug whose therapeutic index (TI) is low (i.e. only a teeny tiny too much and it turns into poison). And dose calculation has many, many factors differing between one person and another (aka there's almost no room for error).

On the other hand, an aircraft crash is immediately known of and the outcomes are almost always immediately determined.

8
1
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: The Wright Brothers

The AI is only as good a the doctors whose prescriptions it analyses / mimics.

As I see it, it's not mimicking a real doctor. Rather, it's, well, studying medicine; it's collecting data about variables and matching diagnoses.

(It's worse than mimicking a doctor).

So while it's a useful tool it's no better than an intern or junior doctor who can help with the mass 'rank and file' cases

But these can't replace interns and junior doctors in 'rank and file' roles. Or else, how are (interns and junior doctors) going to learn? More textbook-crunching and less hands-on? Medical students are getting less and less training because of the numbers of students / year ... Add AI to the picture and it becomes very gloomy.

I hope that I just make it through med school before the AI gets on the case ...

7
1
Waseem Alkurdi

But then, we would be introducing aviation's problem onto medicine: Over-reliance on the machine, especially with junior doctors.

"Hey doc, it might not be lupus, but polymyositis"? But what if it *was* lupus? What if the computer missed a parameter?

Call me a cynic, but until AI takes over the cockpit, it can't take over the clinic.

6
0

Roughly 30 years after its birth at UK's Acorn Computers, RISC OS 5 is going open source

Waseem Alkurdi
Trollface

Re: The Archimedes was a brilliant machine.

And this BOFH episode I dedicate to you my friend: https://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/09/28/bofh_episode_33/

7
0

Yale Security Fail: 'Unexpected load' caused systems to crash, whacked our Smart Living Home app

Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Let this be a lesson

IoT is an answer waiting for a sensible question.

How to get free rides on your local university campus' dockless bike ride-share system with bikes secured with BT LE and a crappy mobile app?

1
0

Apple to dump Intel CPUs from Macs for Arm – yup, the rumor that just won't die is back

Waseem Alkurdi

Re: 68K -> PPC

You're going to be surprised at how much Macs changed.

0
0
Waseem Alkurdi
Joke

Think Different. Isn't that Apple's catchline?

0
0
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: This Old Techno-Ignorant Rumor Now Bores Me

you don't understand why, it's because you have some Computer 101 facts to learn.

So you don't have anything to back up your dismissal of the rumor, and you're accusing the other side of not knowing enough because they can't back up your own argument.

Wow.

We're all 1D10Ts here. Care to explain to us, professor?

0
0

London flatmate (Julian Assange) sues landlord (government of Ecuador) in human rights spat

Waseem Alkurdi

Re: I really hope he gets the boot

He's a human being after all. Would any human being "want" to get arrested by a TLA notorious for prisoners going poof?

12
31

Well slap my ass and call me Judy, Microsoft's Surface Pro 6 is just as hard to fix as the old one

Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Overpriced

Point taken, but only when we're talking about "expired" devices.

What about when the device breaks after the warranty's over, but before it becomes useless? Do we just throw it out?

Let's talk about PC tablets (like the Surface, ones that are x86_64 and run Windows or whatever). They have a functional life of five to seven years, and a mean warranty of two years (one year for consumer models, two for EU models, three for most business models). Should we throw out a computer that's only two CPU generations old if the screen breaks?

2
0
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Microsoft use a lot of glue

And that's why civil aircraft end up in the scrapyard as soon as Boeing/Airbus/whatever update their range. Oh wait.

(The idea is that glue is a major component, but not the major component.)

2
1
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Well whats the old saying

Great idea yes, great product no.

Dead battery = dead laptop? Since when?

And there are alternatives (business-class at least, not proleconsumer stuff) which do the same concept whilst maintaining reparability, although at a few inches thicker (I know, because I'm typing on one right now).

1
0
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Overpriced @ Ian Joyner

Because that'd make the thing repairable, and you won't pay an extra grand (or sell a kidney) when an asshole who's got your Surface drops it.

4
0

Microsoft points to a golden future where you can make Windows 10 your own

Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Higher Power?

Probably because Administrator accounts or no UAC and Metro/whatever "apps" don't mix. But not for in installation anyhow, no probs I see in that.

2
1
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Deinstall parts of W10?

@DropBear

"Updates were of no concern to any windows computer I ever had so far, starting from DOS. Over two decades of absolutely zero problems caused by that"

Either that you're extremely lucky or that we all are damned for some reason.

3
3
Waseem Alkurdi

Re: Deinstall parts of W10?

plus it's only available in pirated form because MS won't sell it to none-VL [sic] customers.

No need. You can get Enterprise Evaluation LTSB from Microsoft itself then rearm the trial 3 times for 90 days * 3, and reformat after that (because a Windows machine desperately needs it after 9 months) (other hacks for EnterpriseEval possibly available).

And it's legit because you're not using cracks or anything, you're, ahem, evaluating.

2
1
Waseem Alkurdi

From the article:

Sadly, it doesn’t seem that Microsoft’s largesse extends to making the Edge browser uninstallable.

Isn't removable because the OS would break without it, ad infinitum, ad nauseum.

Oh, was that IE?

4
0
Waseem Alkurdi
Linux

C: sda

Fixed!

10
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018