* Posts by TrumpSlurp the Troll

279 posts • joined 4 Mar 2017

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Machines learned to assemble IKEA’s semi-disposable furniture

TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Trollface

Re: Not the real world

Wannabe real men already try this.

Which is why IKEA instructions clearly tell you not to use power tools.

Man + impact driver + IKEA = world of hurt (and splinters).

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Soyuz later! Russia may exit satellite launch biz

TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Trollface

Space race, what space race?

Trump doesn't seem to be trumpeting how the USA is beating Russia in a head to head race to be top nation, probably because this would involve giving more money to NASA which could be frittered away generating fake news.

So no incentive for the obviously not gay bare chested horse riding Putin to throw resources behind a launch vehicle.

Wait a few years until China is the new world leader in state sponsored rocketry.

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OK, this time it's for real: The last available IPv4 address block has gone

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Windows

Various inane ramblings.

Back in the day a certain large Telco had several Class A allocations because at the time few companies wanted one or even knew what one was. Have they been returned, or are they an appreciating asset?

Users demand V6......come on, 95% of users at least have no idea what IP stands for, what DNS is, MAC address, anything that underpins the easy names used to identify and connect to network resources. If all new installs from ISPs were IPv6 only, the end user wouldn't even notice as long as all the devices in the home were V6 capable. Even then the ISP supplied router could act as a gateway for legacy kit.

I suspect that one of the main anchors is ISPs continuing to roll out obsolete kit {cough}SH3{cough} and not wanting to replace the enormous real estate which is end user devices. The current service is "good enough". In the States, allegedly, there is a vast estate of cable routers which are old, slow and tired {know how they feel} which are also a massive cash cow. Why kill the cow that gives the golden milk?

Until major services start to fail in an obvious manner and there just aren't any more bodges (NAT, carrier grade NAT) to keep the current edifice stumbling along there is no incentive to go V6.

In fact, didn't NAT completely take the wind out of IPv6's sails by making it an interesting but non-urgent idea?

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Size does matter, chaps: Oversized todgers an evolutionary handicap

TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Trollface

It is reassuring to know

That being completely full of bollocks is contra survival.

It's the extended timescale that is depressing.

Way beyond the life of the current parliament, at least.

Come to think of it the worst offenders at the moment are female, so how does that work?

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Sysadmin’s worst client was … his mother! Until his sister called for help

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Windows

Re: My Dad...conductive fingers

Some tablets and phones are less sensitive than others.

However I have had to resort to licking a couple of fingertips to get resizing or horizontal scrolling to work (after first mentally checking back to when I last washed them and what I have touched since).

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TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Mentioning no names, but there is a website not a million miles from here which doesn't regularly autosave draft posts.

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Latest F-35 flight tests finish – and US stops accepting new jets

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Unhappy

Re: Trial by fire

This looks like a carefully orchestrated live fire test between the USA and Russia.

It would be irresponsible to declare an armed services sporting tournament with live fire. Apart from anything else, where would you build the stadium?

Here you get to use an area which is already comprehensively trashed and locals who are beyond complaining.

Each side gets to evaluate the performance of their main potential opponent's technology and take the results back to their military industrial complex. Russia gets to demonstrate it can take out USA missiles and as an extra bonus to demonstrate that stealth technology isn't.

USA gets results which say "listen up, fuckwits, we need more money for better technology".

As unexpected side effect might be to demonstrate that defence is far more effective than attack at the moment. If it could be shown that both sides can effectively block nearly all attacks that might discourage open conflict. However we haven't yet seen the USA trying to stop a Russian missile attack on a convenient 3rd party.

Getting back to the F35, if Russia has just demonstrated they can shoot it down at will, who is the intended alternative target? Presumably anyone who can't /won't buy Russian technology (or hasn't developed the equivalent).

All in all it seems like a very successful marketing exercise.

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Whois is dead as Europe hands DNS overlord ICANN its arse

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Trollface

Re: 250 Years War

World cup?

Germans, wasn't it?

I think they may have almost won WW2 by now as well, looking at who is in charge of Europe.

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Data exfiltrators send info over PCs' power supply cables

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Trollface

Re: Ethernet over power is old tech

My first take was that the whole scheme would be much more difficult if there was a "Homeplug" Ethernet running random data between two points on the local power wiring.

I assume that this low bandwidth connection similar in speed to the old dial up modems would rely on a relatively stable supply (as in relatively noise free phone line) and would have similar problems to trying to use the same phone line for two simultaneous competing modem connections. I do remember that you can share a line between multiple modems if they are aware of this and cooperate.

Are they selling random mains noise generators by any chance?

Or special oxygen free mains cables which only allow pulses to propogate in one direction towards the PSU?

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How do you get drones talking to air traffic controllers? Pretty easily, says Brit startup

TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Trollface

Information overload?

All gliders to be tracked; too much information, so ignored. All drones to be tracked; even more too much information so swamping the glider information and also to be ignored. All the tracking information needs to be stored for future analysis or what is the point? Otherwise by the time you realise there was a problem/incident the information has gone. So, infrastructure.

Is this starting to sound familiar?

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Snubbed R Us: Microsoft eschews Vulture Consultants in Playmobil tech research

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Trollface

Disrupt. Break things! Fail early fail often!!

Has this been tested in a household with one or more cats?

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El Reg needs you – to help build an automated beer-transporting robot

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Trollface

Re: What's wrong with...fridge

Sod the down votes this is a proper designer talking.

Loads of detailed comments further down which are really over engineering, but the basic requirement is to have beer available without having to send someone to get it.

Oh, and the obvious fun bit (of the more practical designs) is in the transport of filled glasses without spillage. Pending further information I am assuming that snacks and drinks are self service, so loading the platform is going to be the major development task, not the trundling bit. The beer is also going to be bottled/canned so no glass filling required prior to transport. If the office provider is foolish enough to have a full time barperson then table service is a small part of the role.

Reminds me strongly of the urban legend that NASA spemt millions developing a pen which would write in zero gravity, whilst the Russians used a pencil.

As for lateral thinking, how about a mobile desk which the journo can push/drive to the snacks area and back? Make it a stand up one and work, exercise and refreshment can be combined.

Complicated design can be fun but how many times have developers gone off on one without even reading/receiving the full requirements?

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Great Western Railway warns of great Western password reuse: Brits told to reset logins

TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Windows

Security Upgrade!

Now even I don't know the password.

I haven't used/needed the account for about 9 years now.

So good luck to anyone who breaks in.

Nothing to see there.

For the commentard asking why you even need an account.

I buy discounted rail tickets on line pre-purchasing.

However I do buy them from a commercial provider, my local rail franchise.

Just the same as if I walked into a station and bought one over the counter.

It is not clear to me what is wrong with this arrangement.

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Airbus plans beds in passenger plane cargo holds

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Windows

Costs and stuff

We fly to the Antipodes every few years.

Last but one we flew coach with Cathay Pacific with a stopover in Sigapore.

Never again. Too cramped and too many overweight people.

As you get older and less flexible (and less tolerant) flights much over 4 hours in cramped conditions become intolerable.

Last time, due to short notice, the really cheap seats had gone. We had already decided to fly Premium Economy (like old style Business Class) when we realised that flying Business Class with Malaysian was only a touch more expensive.

First leg outwards was an A380, second leg was an A320. The A380 with a fully reclining bed was bliss. The partial recline in the A320 was OK but not a patch on the A380. Still way better than coach.

One of the best bits was the airport lounges. Eat drink and be merry, followed by priority boarding. We even got whisked through immigration at the other end which we thought was a bit off. Obviously not the target demographic but we expected that at least our luggage would have been sniffed over by the dogs looking for drugs and food.

Heathrow lounge was superb. BC and FC had the same food and drink, just table service in FC.

KL was a depressing pit but large and the champagne was drinkable. Flying back the lounge at Auckland was a joke. A fridge with some tinnies and a bit of a buffet. Like the breakfast room at any bottom budget chain hotel in the UK but worse.

On the pricing I assumed that it was 20% over BC prices.

Anyway, if this was offered on a non-stop flight to Oz or NZ and costed in against a two hop flight then I would certainly consider it. 17 hours in the coach class lottery - absolutely no way! I note that the press flew business class on the inaugural flight apart from one brave soul who booked into coach and was not impressed.

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Digital air traffic control upgrade puts potential delays on London flights

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Trollface

What you need

Is GPS enabled data packets to allow a true geographical trace route.

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Brain monitor had remote code execution and DoS flaw

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Trollface

Re: "... heavily sub-optimal ..."

Fat?

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They forked this one up: Microsoft modifies open-source code, blows hole in Windows Defender

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Trollface

Compiler flag?

See title.

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EUROCONTROL outage causes flight delays across Europe

TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Drop in capacity?

Is this about right due to switching over to purely manual handling by Air Traffic Controllers?

Or perhaps national systems (if they still have them in Europe) couldn't automatically hand over at the border?

Noting the explanation posted upstream that a testing error ditched all the stored flight plans a minor drop in capacity seems pretty damn good!

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Intel admits a load of its CPUs have Spectre v2 flaw that can't be fixed

TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Unhappy

Re: So since Intel have now confirmed that are unwilling to fix...

Struggling for a good car analogy because most things that fail can be fixed/replaced with new or recycled parts.

However let us invent some metal fatigue problem which has a potential to cause a chassis failure in cars over 10 years old which could only be rectified by a new body shell.

How likely is it that the manufacturer would (as some commentards seem to be suggesting) provide a brand new body shell (from a non-existent production line right back to the steel maker) or failing that a brand new car?

Consumer law is unlikely to try and enforce this because the vehicle has lasted a reasonable time. Any compensation would probably be limited to the current trade in value (prior to the discovery of the fault).

So what is the street value of a mid specification Core 2 Duo (or quad) system? That is, processor, memory and motherboard?

If Intel really cared they might do a scrappage deal where if you handed in a motherboard, processor and memory then you would get say 50 UKP off a brand new configuration. Or hand in a complete laptop and get similar off a brand new one.

Restarting a production line for old chips with a different silicon density and different leg count so you can replace chips like for like - that is, several generations where the pin numbers and locations have been deliberately changed to force you to buy a new motherboard with a different socket - is obviously not feasible. What happens to old silicon foundries anyway, when the next generation of fabrication hardware is installed?

Free replacement isn't going to happen for reasons above (plus probably many others) and a scrappage scheme to get you to buy the latest i9 is in effect rewarding Intel for designing vulnerable processors.

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Watchdog growls at Tesla for spilling death crash details: 'Autopilot on, hands off wheel'

TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Re: Wonder why it swerved - white lines and snow

Some roads in the Moors (Lancashire and Yorkshire) hove these tall wooden poles spaced down both sides of the rosd. Strange until you realise that in snow they are the only thing visible to show where the roads is.

A bit like the withys along tidal channels in rivers. They show you where the channel is at high tide when you can't see the mud inches below the surface.

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Details of 600,000 foreign visitors to UK go up in smoke thanks to shonky border database

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Unhappy

For those familiar with large projects - BREXIT roulette

I may, of course, be in the minority but my experience of large and complicated projects includes RAG status reporting, and deadline roulette.

Everyone knows that they have slip in their project, but they also know that if they report amber status then they will be on a very large naughty step and have nasty things said to them.

Eventually one of the PMs cracks, and admits that they won't meet the delivery date in the plan. After the ritual whipping and an announcement that the delivery date has slipped, suddenly all the other parts of the project realise that quite by chance they have suddenly noticed that they wouldn't have met the original date but can of course meet the new one.

I am getting a strong sense of this from the Brexit progress reporting. Everyone knows that the timescales are impossible but nobody is admitting it. Nobody wants to be held responsible. Everyone is waiting for someone else to crack first.

Of course, the EU may extend, the UK may extend, Parliament may throw a spanner in the works, there could even be another referendum and/or a general election. Who knows, perhaps the horse will sing.

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Get the message, PHBs: New York City mulls ban on after-hours biz email

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No working for free

Seems sensible. If you want people to work from home just pay them. Simples.

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Are you able to read this headline? Then you're not Julian Assange. His broadband is unplugged

TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Trollface

People of a certain age protesting.

Trip out followed by a nice cup of tea.

Not a white hot enraged mob of Internet activists, then.

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Uber self-driving car death riddle: Was LIDAR blind spot to blame?

TrumpSlurp the Troll
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FAIL

Re: "...a [Lidar] blind spot low to the ground all around the car."

Drunk crawling. Victim of previous accident. Someone who tripped. Recumbent bicycle. Kid sitting on a skateboard.

Speed bump. Log in the road. Bricks, blocks, other obstructions.

An autonomous car has to scan for any and all obstructions ahead, and also be aware of hazards approaching from the sides and rear.

There is no excuse for not detecting someone wheeling a bike. Far smaller targets should be detected and acted on.

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What the @#$%&!? Microsoft bans nudity, swearing in Skype, emails, Office 365 docs

TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Facepalm

To quote(ish) Monty P

Silly bunts.

.

.

.

.

What a load of collocks.

Can it tell the difference between a bugger and a debugger?

Will also have to move my copy of Roger's Profanasaurus to Libre Office.

.

.

Does this stupidity encompass any file that finds its way onto One Drive?

Sigh.

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Sysadmin wiped two servers, left the country to escape the shame

TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Windows

Re: Biggest point - glossed over.

Just to add that back in the day with mainframes and exchangeable discs we always (on full backup day once a week) took the full backup to tape, removed the discs, put in fresh disc packs and restored to them.

We always had a proven set of backup tapes plus the discs from a running system.

Three sets of tapes as well.

Tape store, on site disaster store, off site disaster store.

Tell that to the kids of today....

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TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Trollface

Biggest point - glossed over.

The backups actually restored.

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Corking story: Idiotic smart wine bottle idea falls over, passes out

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Trollface

Bottle stopper

If you must buy wine with a cork closure then there is a nifty little device with an expanding rubber bung and a lever in the top which saves you any hassle trying to get the cork back in.

A quick Google shows many other different design variants on bottle stoppers under 10 UKP.

For those having trouble keeping red wine fresh in the summer, there is a wonderful new appliance called a fridge.

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SpaceX blasted massive plasma hole in Earth's ionosphere

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Mushroom

Re: Compare and contrast

Been reading Footfall?

I sometimes wonder much the same but I think there are far too many things which could go spectacularly wrong. Emergency use only.

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BOFH: Give me a lever long enough and a fool, I mean a fulcrum and ....

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Trollface

Re: Isn't it time for LART to get updated? IAAS?

Is that Injury As A Service?

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Now that's a bad trip: 880k credit cards 'likely' stolen by Orbitz hackers

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Year free credit monitoring

I wonder how many people have two or more of these for the same year? If so, the value of the offer is trivial at best.

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US govt's final bid to extradite Lauri Love kicked into touch

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Trollface

Re: "stopped at any airport [..] and extradited by the judiciary there"

Do you think they would go as far as sailing a gunboat up a river to menace a city?

Oh, sorry, that was then and this is now. We've given that sort of thing up. That and no working gunboats.

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BOOM! Cambridge Analytica explodes following extraordinary TV expose

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Trollface

Dodgy dealings with elections

Could this impinge on any ongoing investigations?

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Geoboffins believe gigantic volcanoes kickstarted Mars' oceans

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Unhappy

3.7 billion years ago

So as usual all the interesting stuff, poolside seats, surfing and skin diving is over.

Nothing mre depressing than an off season planet.

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BT: We're shuttering final salary pension scheme

TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Trollface

Defined Benefit?

Not for the plebs these days.

However I suspect that members of both houses may still be sorted, and many Director level pension schemes may be generously funded.

Did I read that there was a Carillion scheme for the directors which was still healthy or did I just imagine it?

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Another day, another self-flying car pipe dream surfaces

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Black Helicopters

Re: Obstacles

With you all the way on that.

Trying to picture a Microlight with full crash protection to Euro NCAP 5* rating.

Wings? Will it fit in a Lidl parking space?

I really am struggling to visualise a vehicle with the footprint of, say, an Audi A4 which can safely take off and land and also achieve 50 mpg or better on a long run.

Looks like you need the functionality of a helicopter without that big whirly thing that can hurt people extending beyond the vehicle footprint and a failsafe landing system good when the power train has an issue.

I seem to think that the regular servicing requirements for flying things are more onerous than for driving things as well.

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Breaking up is hard to do: Airbus, new bae Google and clinging on to Microsoft's 'solutions'

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WTF?

Dual systems

As several have already commented, having systems with access to both "secure" and insecure infrastructure is going to cause leakage into the cloud from day 1.

Unless, of course, they are running a secure operating system which will allow you to move documents up a classification (Google to Windows) but not the other way. Even with copy and paste.

This is looking like a two part process. After about a year it will be obvious that everything is in the cloud even though it shouldn't be. Cue a "that was then and this is now" moment with a push to ditch Office.

Concerning that they say that this is part of a strategy to change user behaviour. What can users not do under Google that they can do in Office? First obvious thing is massive complex spreadsheets. Perhaps they hope to stop new ones being developed. I can't see them prising Excel from the cold dead hands of those with mission critical spreadsheets; at least, not without an enormous development team to reimplement them. Non-trivial. Just look at the UK Government IT failures trying to replace old, complex systems which are continually evolving.

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Whois? More like WHOWAS: Domain database on verge of collapse over EU privacy

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Trollface

Re: An open registry of who owns domains is important - SWAT?

I don't think they do that in the EU. More of a Merkin hobby to charge around all guns blazing.

With a few notable exceptions like for plumbers on tube trains.

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MailChimp 'working' to stop hackers flinging malware-laced spam from accounts

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I quite like MailChimp

It worked really well for a small charity group to run a self managing mailing list.

I am open to an alternative with similar functionality. The real issue seems to be a lack of security combined with a lack of virus scanning. So they need to clean their act up before another system takes their market. There is an obvious need.

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Intel: Our next chips won't have data leak flaws we told you totally not to worry about

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Trollface

Just checking

Intel have just upgraded their architecture to catch up with AMD?

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Fermi famously asked: 'Where is everybody?' Probably dead, says renewed Drake equation

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Trollface

Why the fixation with "I Love Lucy"?

I would imagine that the most powerful transmissions from Earth in the last 100 years with everything from visible light to EMP were various atomic explosions starting with Hiroshima and Nagasaki (sp?) and then various above ground tests before people worked out that a pair of dark glasses wasn't sufficient protection against high doses of radiation.

So look for evidence of an emerging atomic age on planets.

Then work out how to differentiate this from "dinosaur killer" impacts by space rocks.

There are reasons why some advanced thinkers are very keen to get us off this rock where we are a sitting target with an historic record of getting belted by a big one on a regular basis.

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Patch LOSE-day: Microsoft secures servers of the world. By disconnecting them

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Paris Hilton

Just a dumb query

On my W7 boxen I download the patches then wait a few days/weeks before applying them.

I assume Windows Update will ditch any failed patches held locally.

Then again I seem to recall still seeing the pre-release of the February bulk update in the Optional list when I had the real thing ready to apply.

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UK.gov urged to ensure punters can 'still roam like at home' after Brexit

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Land borders

A lot of blowing off hot air about borders.

The UK is perhaps fortunate that most of our borders are sea. We have only one land border with the EU (and yes, it is a border with the EU not just Eire).

It might be productive to look at the land borders between the EU and non-EU countries to see what is the norm.

I do remember that in the western part of central Europe land borders were very soft back in the 1960s. If you wanted a stamp in your passport you had to ask specifically. A decade or so later you just slowed down at the border check point to indicate a willingness to stop, then speeded up again. The border checks were for lorries. So a soft border could work. No real check on small vehicles so people living either side of the border could go and work and shop on the other side. Big parking areas for articulated lorries to do the endless paperwork.

I expect that a significant majority of the country can't remember far enough back to realise which things in daily life are part of being in the EU and which are not. Reality check incoming.

The one thing I do agree with is being outside the Euro. Having a national economy but not being able to devalue your currency to boost exports has screwed at least Greece. Germany especially has bent and broken all sorts of rules to protect their banking industry.

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Toyota to flog 10,000 aaS wagons to Avis Budget rentals

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Riding someone else's aaS

Kudos for the phrase. :-)

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Russian boffins blow up teeny asteroids with tiny laser... to work out how to nuke the real thing

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Re: I'm curious...

https://science.howstuffworks.com/asteroid-nuclear-bomb.htm

This site doesn't seem too optimistic about the approach of blowing a solid rock into gravel. I assume the difference would be similar to that of being hit at close range by a bullet or a shotgun blast.

The favoured suggestion is to deflect the asteroid using several above surface (stand off) nuclear weapons. On or subsurface blasts just split the rock, and I assume that changes the problem from applying lateral force to a single object to applying lateral force to lots of smaller objects.

First task is to marry your nuclear weapon to a launch vehicle which can get you out into space far enough to meet the rock in time to divert it. AFAIK the current weaponry is designed to go high (but not that high) then fall back. So probably one of the very large cargo rockets.

Edit: Project Orion was a rocket motor driven by repeated nuclear explosions, and had an awesome lift capacity. Perhaps a series of explosions following the same principle would provide enough power to move an asteroid.

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Look! Fitbit's made a watch that doesn't suck!

TrumpSlurp the Troll
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Re: loses its predecessor's GPS chip but retains Wi-Fi and near-field communication (NFC)...

I assume they dropped the GPS chip to improve the battery life?

Time will tell if GPS is a key feature of a fitness watch.

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Air gapping PCs won't stop data sharing thanks to sneaky speakers

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Windows

Some issues

I can see that you could have a secure room with two PCs, one connected to the development system and the other connected to the live system. This would allow you to cross check code, log files and the like without having more than an eyeball connecting the two systems. You could test to replicate a fault. You could also have a management centre where secure networks at different levels of security all have a terminal in the same room. Air gapped, but joined in meatspace.

I can even see that you might be using a standard build of PC to reduce unknowns, and that the secure systems might need audio capability.

However infecting both PCs with cooperating malware might be a bit of a stretch. Not impossible for an insider to conceal the code on development so that it is eventually shipped as live but very unlikely with code reviews. The software would also have to be permanently active to be able to work on the rare occasions that the secure room was in use. Even then you still have to exfiltrate the data from the less secure system. This also assumes that the bad actor doesn’t have access to the secure terminal.

So this falls firmly into "am I paranoid enough" territory.

One more thing to consider when trying to prevent the "one in a million" chance.

Could make a good film script, perhaps.

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Stock trader gets two years in prison for pumping up with Fitbit

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Facepalm

Darwin Award?

All the effort to set up and commit fraud resulting in a very small profit?

There should be some award for the most futile crime each year. This would be a contender in the financial sector.

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UK digi minister Hancock suggests Facebook and pals give your kids a time-out

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Re: Matt Hancock does not know where the switch to his router and electrics are.

Which router is thst?

The one in the cell tower for the mobile phones?

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Cavalry riding to the rescue of DDoS-deluged memcached users

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Trollface

Simples

Spoof the source address on the flush_all command.

After all somebody spoofed your address to launch the attack.

Source for the goose is source for the gander.

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