* Posts by Blotto

384 posts • joined 14 Sep 2016

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220 heads to roll as Steria hacks away at UK.gov back-office IT biz

Blotto
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Re: How does your country become the leader in IT

@commswonk

Recent events at Carillion (in conjunction with earlier mishaps at G4S / Serco et al) might suggest otherwise.

yes but sadly you'll find that the current and former management are still getting paid by Carillion and will be likely get all they are due in their employment contracts. the ones that will loose out will be the Carillion staff, contractors who are performing the work for Carillion and the customers.

The customers, effectively UK public, will end up paying more.

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Blotto
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Re: How does your country become the leader in IT

@AC

when you outsource everything you have and they make all the 'talent' redundant?

very true, but Steria are after profit growth which will come from inefficiencies in the contract caused by the moving on of the knowledgeable and skilled workers acquired when the staff TUPE'd over.

All outsourcers do it. there is no profit in some experienced person doing their job in 5 mins when it will take an inexperienced or even just unfamiliar with the account, highly trained UK or offshore degree holder a day or 2 to do the same.

the outsourcer management aren't stupid, & their customers have no clue as they TUPE'd away the only people in their organisation who knew how to get the technology to work the way the business wanted it to.

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Childcare is a pain in the bum and so is HMRC's buggy subsidies site

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@fangster

The other annoying thing is paying the provider, the same provider you've been paying for months!

until the last day or 2 (no longer asking for proof you've registered) you had to login to the childcare site which involves going to a stupid gov.uk page to register or sign in

https://www.gov.uk/help-with-childcare-costs/tax-free-childcare

you then have to prove you've registered by supplying your surname, dob & postcode

then sign into government gateway

await a text with a code to then enter on that page

then navigate to the account options

choose pay

select the provider and choose the amount

then it asks you 3 security questions like mothers maiden name, first car etc,

then it allows you to pay the supplier who have pre registered on the HMRC site for the scheme and that you already have been paying from the site.

Its a pain to operate, also they effectively add 25% to what ever you put on but a calculator would be handy, so if you need to pay £800 to the provider, the calculator would tell you you needed to add £640 (800-20%) to your account.

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Blotto
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Pint

Re: First hand experience...

@RyokuMas

How do you get your other half to do that stuff?

I have to to do it otherwise it just doesn't get done.

And then the site doesn't work, or they won't do the reconfirmation online, or when i phone they say i have to wait 10 days for a letter from them telling me if i reconfirmation has been successfully. Top Tip:: if they don't tell you electronically that reconfirmation has been successful then its not been and you need to send them stuff they won't tell you about till 14 days after your submission & then they have a further 14 days to process.

I now over pay every month in to the account so i have at least a months worth of nursery fees in there to deal with reconfirmation delays.

The question is, if nothing changed why is reconfirmation so difficult?

Once you know reconfirmation has failed, when you phone through they put you through to the reconfirmation team and they often just sort it out while your on the phone and it takes less than 5 mins for them to do and you to get the confirmation. You can't speak to them until you get the letter in the post telling you reconfirmation failed and tell them the letter ref so they can see it in their ystem.

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Black & Blue: IBM hires Bain to cut costs, up productivity

Blotto
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Holmes

Echo chamber feed back loop

The Bain consultants are just telling IBM managers what they want to hear. IBM managers must need to justify their findings for some reason which is why they have brought in Bain to reinforce their stance.

If Bain came in and said no your doing it all wrong, they'd not be in line for the next round of consultancy so why shoot themselves in the foot.

As IBM have their own consultants then for Bain to get a foot in the door (i'm sure they had an existing relationship, but anyway) is a massive opportunity for future revenue.

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Apple agrees to pay £136m in back idiot taxes to UK taxman

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@Lee

Revenue isn’t profit. Companies currently pay tax on profit.

If tax laws are changed to tax revenue companies can adjust their prices accordingly.

In the UK people pay VAT when we buy most non essential products, also payable on insurance and utilities at reduced rates. That is like a tax on revenue in that every sale to an individual generates 20% at retail, less for insurance, utilities. Yes HMRC allow those collecting vat to keep some for themselves but still every consumer sale includes 20% tax.

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UK Data Protection Bill tweaked to protect security researchers

Blotto
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balance

they need to balance the identifiers with anonymity, each identifier could be unique to that field value only re-identifiable by secured DB lookup but then the value of the data set could be worthless if the original identifiable information is missing or obfuscated to the point of being meaningless. Yes the resolution of the identifiers could be reduced but doesn't help when looking for things that are so rare that casual observation of its occurrence in a data set identifies the person it references.

Its hard.

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Indian data leak looks to have been an inside job

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Big Brother

A bit like civil servant access to uk systems like the PNC

In the past coppers never thought twice about looking up friends, colleagues, partners, kids partners etc on the PNC, yes they where told not to misuse their access, but things where different then and no one really took that type of misuse seriously. I for one am glad of the top down change in sentiment.

When you have a system with so much data with the need for so many humans to have random access to any of it there will always be opportunity for misuse, with the main thing that prevents misuse being trust in your staff.

the real problem, of course, will come when a new government comes into power and decides to use data in that DB to treat a subset of India differently to the rest.

We've seen it before and we'll see it again, sadly.

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IBM’s complete Meltdown fix won’t land until mid-February

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Patents

did all the major chip designers buy in commercial designs for their chips hence why so many vendors are have been caught out?

will they be releasing fixes for chips in space craft / off world rovers etc?

how about embedded military systems?

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CPU bug patch saga: Antivirus tools caught with their hands in the Windows cookie jar

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@AC

the people who run multiple AV are likely the lot who installed AVG free and then someone sold them another AV / they got one from their bank / Which told them about some other recommended product / some random bloke down the pub who cleans at a tech company recommended 1 etc but have no clue how to install the old one. They are likely the same people who have malware.

it happens more often than you think on consumer and small business pc's.

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FBI says it can't unlock 8,000 encrypted devices, demands backdoors for America's 'public safety'

Blotto
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Facepalm

Already too late for those 8k phones

i have to enter a passcode to update my phone while retaining the data. Even if Wray gets his backdoor, it won't help him unlock those devices.

That ship has sailed!!!!

Wray probably wants an FBI encryption mode where the central key is rotated every few months, or every device has a unique key registered with the FBI, obviously requiring periodic check in so the FBI know where the device is.

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If Australian animals don't poison you or eat you, they'll BURN DOWN YOUR HOUSE

Blotto
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Re: Yes and no.

there is clearly a problem with the way we are taught to view the world and collectively we are just starting to realise that we need to re evaluate what we have been taught rather than just accepting it.

We have for too long dismissed anecdotal information in favour of scientific hearsay & interpretation driven by people with undisclosed agendas.

the NHS springs to mind

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Mystery surrounds fate of secret satellite slung by SpaceX

Blotto
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Probably the work of SPECTRE

we need to send in 007 immediately to sort this out. He can use Q's new MELTDOWN tool delivered either by a code hidden on a music cassette or from some new fangled tech in bonds Omega smart analogue watch to infiltrate SPECTRE and stop them from their evil exploits.

we need an Austin Powers icon, also will be interesting to know if NK knew about SPECTRE and MELTDOWN before the exploits where published.......

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IBM melts down fixing Meltdown as processes and patches stutter

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Deep Think

probably better for IBM to put out a proper measured response rather than rushing to deploy something that isn't properly tested and breaks customer stuff. There is loads of mitigation that can be done to provide some assurance in the short term that systems are not currently being compromised and will not be compromised.

Doesn't stop teams learning and working stuff out in case a rapid response is needed.

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Google kicks itself out of its own cache when serving AMP pages

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Paris Hilton

Explanation needed

Google’s Tech Lead for the AMP Project, Malte Ubl, offered a third reason in a Tuesday post in which he wrote that current arrangements meant removing the Google.com URL would have let publishers know what readers were keen on before they visited sites, a privacy no-no.

El Reg probably needs to explain that URL you visit is also told about the URL you've just come from, hence the third reason quoted above. Effectively, the URL you visit from goggle can decode the google URL and decipher what you searched for hence the privacy issue. Removing the google amp prefix and making it seem like you visited the URL fresh enhances users privacy.

Google amp most likely increases page visits but like net neutrality is probably skewed in favour of the big outfits.

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With WPA3, Wi-Fi will be secure this time, really, wireless bods promise

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@Lee D

the full branded cisco gear does the same. Its handy for if you have a site surrounded by green space and you want to ensure people can only access your wifi to prevent MIM attacks etc.

i've used the Meraki Air Marshall at home, but its not so effective with just 1 access point.

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Game of Thrones author's space horror Nightflyers hitting telly

Blotto
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Re: I'm enjoying The Orville

Orville will be getting more scifi less family guy jokes

https://www.avclub.com/seth-macfarlane-says-the-orvilles-second-season-will-be-1821792442

Riker directed an episode too

https://trekmovie.com/2018/01/04/jonathan-frakes-contrasts-directing-the-orville-and-star-trek-discovery/

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Blotto
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I'm enjoying The Orville

I'm actually really enjoying The Orville, its very much like a modern version of the original Star Trek, turning many of todays views on its head and viewed through a futuristic eye.

The captain & first officer plot is an interesting distraction that will develop as the show matures, as do the other characters. I think we know more about more characters in Orville than we ever did in Star Trek of any generation.

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Woo-yay, Meltdown CPU fixes are here. Now, Spectre flaws will haunt tech industry for years

Blotto
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Optional mitigation

It would be good if performance degrading mitigation could be made optional, obviously turned on by default and difficult to turn off but for those of us that run stuff and want performance and whose systems are isolated from everything else the choice would be nice.

Even if the system is vulnerable, mitigation by isolation taking the is a valid solution (obviously taken in context of the tasks and data being processed)

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Blotto
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Big Brother

Stunned, but not surprised, when’s the next revelation due?

These things are highly complex with contributions from tens of thousands of people over decades. Whether deliberate or accidental, there will be more functions in these chips that will be found to be vulnerable under researchers scrutiny.

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And we return to Munich's migration back to Windows - it's going to cost what now?! €100m!

Blotto
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Seduced by office 365

It’s happening to public sector everywhere, they are hugely swayed by office 365, believing it’s the cure for all their IT woes.

I don’t know how it’s being sold but public sector are throwing everything at it. Maybe it’s becsuse they think they can ditch their Data Centres and save a fortune but don’t realise there’s other stuff they still need their Data Centres for.

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IBM lobs sueball at travel site Expedia for using some old Prodigy patents

Blotto
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IBM going the SCO route?

times must be hard.

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'Twas the night before Y2K and a grinch stole the IT department's overtime payout

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@macjules

A happy ending for the team, but I do hope the twat who chose to send the work offshore is currently looking for new work somewhere. A bit of unscheduled unpaid leave is probably what he needs to work out what was wrong with his plan.

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Oh good. Transport for London gives Capita £80m for WAN, LAN and Wi-Fi

Blotto
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Facepalm

Seriously?

TFL have gone to an outsourcer to source their Data network instead of going to a company that does networking?

simply stupid.

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Comms-slurping public bodies in UK need crash course in copy 'n' paste

Blotto
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Re: I wish I had more upvotes to give

IPv4 or IPv6 gives the IP of that connection at that particular moment in time. That's why they want to have ISP keep the so called connection meta data as it is a cornerstone in tying access request to a location, but must be used with other supporting data like subscriber log data to understand who's account had that IP at that exact moment in question, not before or after.

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All flasher Tintri makes play for the cash-strapped: Buy 'em drive by drive

Blotto
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Paris Hilton

@Richard 31

Tintri may be claiming 20/20 which as you say is average but is there a reason why you are double posting? posting twice doesn't make your points more valid.

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'I knew the company was doomed after managers brawled in a biker bar'

Blotto
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Re: RE Gearbox

When I picked up my new golf GTi turbo ~2000 I asked the mechanics if there was anything special I needed to do in order to keep it running smooth. They said take it easy in the run in and ensure to keep the turbo clean often by giving it good amounts of right foot regularly. So I did, at least twice per day, sometimes more. 8mpg along the m20 was seen a few times.

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IETF protects privacy and helps net neutrality with DNS over HTTPS

Blotto
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Re: DNS scales ...

@nick

Http2 permits the reuse of an existing http/s session, so a remote web server could serve all the resources of the page under its existing session without additional HTTPs renegotiation.

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Blotto
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Re: the devil is in the implementation

@charles

It’ll be the browser makers that’ll do dns look ups in browser over HTTPs instead of whatever they are doing now. I think browsers can already ignore local dns servers and instead use their own, will need to have a play to confirm but seem to remember safari and chrome working fine when my dns server was restoring last time round.

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Blotto
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Re: Now this would be a great idea...

@crypto

No need to build a DB of hostnames to ip’s that’s what a DNS server is for, or am I missing something here?

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'Suspicious' BGP event routed big traffic sites through Russia

Blotto
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Re: How many misroutings went through the USA or UK?

You actually saw Langley ip’s in your traceroute?

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UK lacks engineering and tech skillz to make government's industrial strategy work – report

Blotto
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Re: All the jobs were sent offshore to get it for cheap....

@ AC

Are you suggesting that it should go back to the old system where the local education authority paid and students had to get the right grades or not go, instead of any desperate college taking anyone because they can get a loan to pay the fees?

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Blotto
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Re: All the jobs were sent offshore to get it for cheap....

Perhaps some kind of tax rebate for uk degree educated technical or engineering staff?

I can see universities robing students and government blind with dual honours courses for lots of subjects so that students get their sociology / Media studies / waste of time and money for 3 years degree for free.

The uni / education system (like many other partially privatised systems) is being gamed and the government needs to come up with a strategy to defeat it.

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Opportunity rover survives Martian winter for eighth time

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Alien

Re: Martian Winter

for Mash get Smash

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4MTgjNkfyI

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Damian Green: Not only my workstation – mystery pr0n all over Parliamentary PCs

Blotto
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Re: Do you know what a password is for?

<clap clap> That's my point. Your argument only considered authorisation, when the password itself is actually more directly linked with the authentication step. Given we're commenting on a story which boils down to "so who downloaded the porn anyway?" it should be obvious to everyone why accounting is also important. You need all three.

you still don't get it.

The data on those machines in the MP's office is the MP's responsibility. By providing a username and password that accesses that data, the MP is authorising the person who those details where divulged to to access that data. Authentication, Authorisation, Access is a protocol / methodology that is used to try and have some accountability as to who is accessing what, when and to ensure that the account used in the authentication piece only access predetermined systems or data (the authorisation bit). don't forget this all happened 10 years ago, even if no one shared passwords it would still not be absolutely definite that Green accessed Porn, even though it was found in his user profile. even in 2017 many people walk away from their machines without locking it,

Neither the password, AAA or anything else stopped a copper walking in off the street and taking an unauthorised copy of the PC data, and its not stopped that copper from leaking, again unauthorised by the data owner and even former and current police chain of command, non illegal information about the contents of the data on the machine 10 years later.

the real complaint here should be that the copper is unauthorised to be divulging information that was on the machine. Even if Green had supplied the copper with a username and password (doesn't matter who's username) it would have been purely for investigating the suspected leak of information from the Home Office and not so some retired copper 10 years later could drag this ordeal back up and try and bring down a government minister.

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Blotto
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Re: Do you know what a password is for?

@ac

Three words.

Authentication

Authorization

Accounting

That's why there are logon process on computer systems. Your argument only covers the second of the three.

Thats actually AAA protocol, the password is actually the authentication part, not authorisation. Authorisation would check your authenticated detail against a list to check you can access the resource you are trying to connect to.

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Blotto
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Do you know what a password is for?

A lot of commentators here don't really understand what the password on the computer is for.

its to ensure the machine is used by authorised personnel only.

if the MP shares their password they are authorising those the password is shared with to work on and look at all the material on that PC, just as they would provide authorisation by handing over a document, the combination to a safe or brief case or whatever. The password is shared with trusted staff members.

its little different conceptually to support changing your password to wHatEver when you've locked yourself out, at that point someone not trusted & not known by the user also knows their password & could do whatever they want, resetting the password again before the user logs in.

when someone leaves always change their password before deleting the account, that way any connected AD/LDAP system should change the cached hash too, that way if something subsequently is removed from the net, the old password known to the now gone user is useless to login to it.

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Blotto
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WTF?

Re: Did he do it or not?

@AC

As someone who was involved in forensic computer analysis, I would guess it is likely that *if* he s being truthful then there is a beyond reasonable doubt that this was carried out by the person in question.

Divulging the information when it is not a police matter also seems wrong. But I would still very much doubt it was some kind of automated javascript popper that were randomly throwing porn thumbnails into the browser's cache and web history, for no reason.

^^^^^^^THAT IS FUCKING SCARY^^^^^^^

what hope is there for any truly innocent person embroiled in something reliant on computer forensics if that is the level of expertise called upon by the state and the courts believe the so called forensic experts to convict the person on trial.

it is utter garbage and dishonest

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Blotto
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Re: Much whataboutery about nothing

@Charlie Clark

Sorry, I don't buy this. If there was nothing to hide then why all the smoke? Make it a three-day wonder by admitting to having been unwise but having done nothing illegal.

but what if he is telling the truth. How do you know he caused those images to be there. Its more than likely that even if he had sole access to those PC's (it doesn't say if he had sole use or if other accounts where also on it even if those pics where only in Green's profile)

the example of the little old lady is valid. My dad barely knows how to use his laptop but it has all kinds of crap in his cache from links in emails people send him that he then clicks on. he doesn't know what the sites are or that the sites download a load of garbage.

Remember those stupid search bars from a couple of years ago that teenagers used to install that would alter the default search engine and dns & then load other crap despite you wanting to just go to bbc news?

If a teenager of a few years back went on a pc for 10 mins there would be all kinds of rubbish on it that neither the teenager or pc owner would have a clue about.

I'm sure an inspection of David Blauketts PC at the time would have thousands of porn thumbnails on it despite him not being able to even see them.

take Green's name out of the equation and pretend that this is a story about an elderly female relative who would have absolutely no want to peruse such sites, does the evidence as presented prove that porn was intentionally surfed by that relative?

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Car rental firms told: Tell your customers about in-car data slurps

Blotto
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Re: I tend to stick

Just purchase annual rental car insurance

http://www.insurance4carhire.com

Pay whatever the hire company want and send the invoice to the insurance company.

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Brit MP Dorries: I gave my staff the, um, green light to use my login

Blotto
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Re: Its up to the Data Controller to govern sharing of your data

Also, right there at the start of your 2nd para you list the police amongst those to be trusted. Well, there's one (ex-)policeman who evidently can't.

like the police, your doctors, HR or whoever that are meant to be treating your correspondence confidentially, there is no reason why they can't share that information amongst their trusted colleagues & staff members in order to provide their service to you.

While we should be able to trust the police, they continue to do things to make us question that trust.

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Blotto
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Re: Its up to the Data Controller to govern sharing of your data

@Blotto You worked at HPE and you are that clueless about login passwords, password security and the consequences of sharing passwords.

i've never worked at HP, no idea where you got that from.

the point being made is that people share credentials all the time with little regard. My sky pin can be used to purchase stuff from sky, my credit card allows several months wages to be spent in 1 go.

i'm sorry my comments have dimmed your view on HPE, i have no idea why though, as again, i've never worked there, maybe your just an idiot?

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Blotto
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Re: Sends a terrible message.

Hmmm...that should liven up the court cases for so-called online piracy claims. "Well, yer 'onour, everyone knows my password is 123456, so it could have been anyone torrenting all those films." Government ministers and MPs have set the precedent and created the doubt.

anyone with access to the locked premises who knew the password, unless your going to bolt your monitor and keyboard (or laptop) to the outside of your house with a sign stating free access. i suspect they'll find you negligent though for allowing access to happen on your system without attempting to proper guard against illegal activity.

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Blotto
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Its up to the Data Controller to govern sharing of your data

its really naive to expect your MP to open every piece of correspondence or email and personally respond.

like the police, your doctors HR or whoever that are meant to be treating your correspondence confidentially, there is no reason why they can't share that information amongst their trusted colleagues & staff members in order to provide their service to you. While the MP's have said they share their passwords amongst their staff, don't forget the information is still held on password protected systems. Someone walking in off the street can't just open the machine and access the data. If the machine was stolen, without a password just powering the machine on won't reveal its contents, and no I have no idea if the data is encrypted at rest but given how easy bit-locker is to enable it all should be encrypted now.

I share the sky PIN with my Mrs and others that stay.

I share my wifi password with visitors

I share bits of my password with strangers on the phone when I phone them and they ask me

I share my Credit card details when i phone for a takeaway

I know parents and friends pins & passwords for their phones and PC's from when they ask me to fix stuff for them.

At work we do have shared last resort 1 time passwords (of course they are changed often) as per pci/dss/sox procedures.

At work I only know my personal passwords not those of colleagues.

it looks like many commentators here are fixated by the need for a confidential password and don't actually understand what the password is there for.

For the MP's, the password is really there to safeguard the information from being accessed by unauthorised individuals. The staff are authorised by the MP to look at the MP's information. Authorisation given by shareing of teh MP's password.

Yes a better system of sharing the MP's info between staff should be implemented, a system that ensures accountability for individuals accessing the info, but at the moment the system is no worse than the MP printing everything off and shoving it in a filing cabinet in the office where all with access to the office (yes including maintenance, cleaners and security) could rifle through it, in fact its better than that.

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No 2017 bonus for you, HPE tells employees

Blotto
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Re: I see nothing much has changed.

In the last 8 years I worked at HP (now HPE) I got one pay rise of 0.6% (that is not a typo) and never got a bonus payment despite personally "exceeding requirements" for 6 out of the 8 years and our group always exceeding its targets.

more people like you need to get up and leave sooner in order to make those organisations stand up and realise they need to treat their staff better or they will leave.

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Ex-cop who 'kept private copies of data' fingers Cabinet Office minister in pr0nz at work claims

Blotto
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Quotes from the copper

My apologies but taken from the guardian

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/dec/01/damian-green-thousands-of-pornographic-images-on-computer-says-detective

Lewis said: “When I left the police I kept one notebook and that was the notebook for Operation Miser, because that was the case that I was uncomfortable with.”

Lewis said he was motivated to come forward when he read about Green denying claims by Quick, a former Metropolitan assistant commissioner, who told the Sunday Times that pornography had been found on the politician’s computer.

“His outright denial of that was quite amazing, followed by his criticism of Bob Quick,” Lewis said. “I contacted Bob Quick to offer my support.”

Asked if it was possible for anyone else to access Green’s machine, Lewis said: “It was so extensive, whoever had done it would have had to push Mr Green to one side to say ‘Get out, I’m using your computer’.”

He also dismissed a suggestion that a mistake could have been made. Lewis said: “I was the one who seized it from Portcullis House. I was the one who examined it, photographed it. I deal with computer forensics. That’s what I do, I produce digital evidence to court in relation to terrorists at the Old Bailey.

I can understand non technical people being convinced by Lewis’s account here, but it doesn’t pass techno muster to me. If this account by this detective is enough to convict someone then we are all doomed.

It is really not hard to believe that the mp delegated control of his user account to someone if not all in his office. In addition, it’s not difficult for a tech with admin access to have placed images on the machine. Much more information is needed from the machine logs to draw the conclusions the copper did. What the copper wrote would cause me to question every bit of evidence he ever supplied. Terrorists could walk free because of his actions and lax attitude to finding and presenting facts as evidence.

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Blotto
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Re: The issue I have with this

Or more recently Chris Huhne, who’s wife was also jailed after she took his speeding points and lied about it.

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Blotto
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Holmes

Amazed by some of the comments here.

I clearly need to get out more and do more interesting things..

I’m amazed so many commentators are happy with what the ex coppers have said and their alarm bells / bullshit detectors aren’t ringing and whaling in piercing tones.

1) why has the retired copper still got this data in his possession.

2) it’s thumbnails, not full size images the copper is complaining about, where are the full size images.

3) my understanding is that parliament networks / mp’s connections are not meant to be filtered else they may be blocked from seeing stuff they are meant to see

4) at the time the network logs should have been retained too. The proxy logs should reveal the sites those thumbnails came from and if any full size images where viewed.

5) the mp’s office was raided looking for data about leaks from the home office, yet all we are hearing 10 years later is about thumbnails of legal porn, reported by an ex copper who personally retained data from an mp’s pc gathered in a raid.

6) What other data does the ex copper have in his possession on other cases he worked on?

7) snowflakes may not remember, but we used to be plagued by pop ups and pop unders. They’d load all kinds of crap in your browser you’d never know about.

8) context is needed, what sites where visited at the times the thumbnails where stored, could they have been stored as a result of pop ups or unders?

9) any viruses or malware on the mp’s machine?

10) pc access logs, where was the mp at the times the pc was unlocked and the images stored.

11) it’s been said it was a machine in the mp’s office, not that it was the machine the mp solely used or even his usual machine, just a machine in his office, how do we know for sure it was the mp that intentionally accessed the sites that downloaded the thumbnails?

I could go on and on about stuff the copper mentioned that doesn’t automatically mean the mp intentionally caused those thumbnails to be there.

The main thing is that parliament, network and pc audit logs at the time should show if the mp was even present at the times the Images where recorded, or if we are now dealing with some kind of fabrication designed change our political makeup. Those IT logs are now likely long gone though, leaving the only record created by a now ex copper who illegally retained a what he claims is s personal copy of the machine in the mp’s office.

In light of this info I’d be inclined to not volunteer any personal or customer info to the police as it has a good chance of not being stored appropriately and may resurface at some time in the future, inappropriately despite never being illegal at any stage.

The police need to take a very hard line here, if they don’t the Home Secretary must.

I’d think 4 times over before I

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Ofcom proposes ways to stop BT undercutting broadband rivals

Blotto
Bronze badge

Re: If BT can lower their prices........

@Tom7

BT wanted to replace copper with fibre but Maggie stopped them, as the cable companies complained it would make their deployments unviable. BT. Had factories lined up and where ready to go.

http://www.techradar.com/news/world-of-tech/how-the-uk-lost-the-broadband-race-in-1990-1224784

Fibre transceivers aren’t cheap, I can’t imagine they where less than £100 28 years ago, unless they where extremely slow like tens of kb’s slow, in which case they would not be comparable to what we are doing today with lots of data down the fibre.

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Blotto
Bronze badge

Re: If BT can lower their prices........

@commswonk

a OFCOM are really aiming at wholesale pricing here.

While they have a current initiative to chop wholesale pricing especially for fttc, some other altnets are now complaining that that will deter their plans to build new nets as they won’t get their money back in addition if the wholesale cost is low the retail cost of fttc wil tumble and consumers won’t bother to look for full fibre if fttc is good enough and vastly cheaper.

OFCOM wanted low fttc costs to try and persuade consumers to ditch ADSL, they didn’t think it through and now realise low wholesale and fttc will deter new altnets. Fiddling with BT retail costs of fttc would allow low wholesale fttc but Force a minimum retail for fttc thereby providing some artificial margin for altnets to deploy their networks in and earn a profit. Of course that is all nonsense and all that would happen is altnets would just use OR wholesale and undercut BT Earn even more profit but OFCOM will never see it that way.

I still think to kick start proper competition (ok a 2 horse race) VM needs to be forced to wholesale their network. OR will then be forced to upgrade, and VM will get a huge revenue boost due to huge numbers of additional customers. Sky might not be too happy though (isp’s Could bundle vm tv with their B.B.), but then that’s just more competition in the tv market which should be good for consumers too.

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