* Posts by Mike Moyle

1543 posts • joined 8 Feb 2007

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Strong laptop demand drives Apple US retail share to 13%

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Look at it this way...

Re: Simple explanation

By Mectron

"Apple OS as never been more then a toy, always was, always will. If peoples want a different OS, use Linux at least you will get the real thing, not a pathetic half backed clone."

...So let me see - MacOS is a "half-baked" (I'll assume) clone of Linux because it's baed on UNIX which came... ummm... before... Linux...

<sarcasm>

Yuh-huh! Yuh-huh! That makes good sense!!!

</sarcasm>

I've had many discussions with Linux users who seem to feel that all users should be able to hack the command line - that to do less is, somehow, sub-human.

As a Windows-, Linux-, and Mac-user (and as a UNIX metwork sys-admin, in a previous life) my usual reply is to ask how they ever manage to use a pencil.

As far as I'm concerned, expecting a user to know how to hack his system's internals in order to be productive on his computer is exactly as reasonable as expecting a user to dig up his own graphite and clay and chop down his own cedar tree to make his pencil. (Don't even get me started on ball-points!)

If a computer system allows a user to get his work done easily and efficiently, it is a good system If it doesn't, it isn't. Any discussion that does not answer that basic criterion FROM THE USER'S POINT OF VIEW is, as far as I can see, simply a way of showing off how much kewler than the average user one believes oneself to be.

As an example from (slightly) outside the Windows/Mac/Unix/Linux brouhaha, in which so many have invested their emotions) I read, a while back, Jef Raskin's book "The Humane Interface", in which he describes his goals for a next-genertion OS and interface. Based on that, I went to the Raskin Center's website (http://rchi.raskincenter.org/) to test-drive the ideas.

...and found that the system appears to ASSUME that the user is a touch-typist.

If the user can move seamlessly from the keyboard to the mouse and back without taking his eyes off the screen, then it may well be faster than current systems. For those who, like me, never learned touch-typing the process is painfully slow. Technically, it may be brilliant. But from the point of view of an average user, it may be a non-starter, since it appears to REQUIRE the use of a skill OTHER THAN THE SKILL USED TO DO THE ACTUAL JOB in order to DO the job. If one needs to learn to use - ArcView GIS, say - to do one's job, that is one thing. Expecting the user to learn touch-typing in order to learn ArcView is taking a step backwards.

In the same way, expecting a user to learn the command line or system internals in order to use a computer to perform a productivity task is, as far as I'm concerned, a backwards step.

To put it another way: You've never worked a tech-support helpline, have you? Expecting J. Average User to learn to hack his system and NOT expect him to do something monumentally stupid - like finding out WHY " *.* " is not our friend, for instance - is a recipe for disaster! <insert grin here>

Alaskan man guilty of flogging seal penises

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Insert requisite...

..."WTF does this have to do with IT" rant here.

(Now the humorless jerkoffs who normally feel compelled to post such complaints can go away and try to get a life!)

Texas cops taser diabetic seizure man

Mike Moyle Silver badge

To the "Anon"(s)

"Further Proof...

Posted Wednesday 20th June 2007 13:23 GMT

...that the majority of Americans are trigger happy cowboys. This is part of the reason why the rest of the world hates you."

"Title

Posted Wednesday 20th June 2007 19:25 GMT

...No doubt it is generalisation, but it is generalisation that is justified. Compared to English and Europeans where you read about some bad incident once or twice in a year (if at all when compared to this), we read about these typical "American incident" every few weeks. This reminds me of the Uni Student incident."

I said it the last time one of these "all Americans are violent stupid doo-doo-heads" threads came up after a Reg story:

United States population: 301 Million (approx.)

United Kingdom population: 61 Million (approx.)

Five times the population means five times the number of people doing stupid things*. This does not imply that a higher PERCENTAGE do stupid things, just that there are MORE PEOPLE here, so more stupid things happen.

The other issue to remember is that something becomes news BECAUSE IT'S UNUSUAL! The fact that this incident is in the news at all (as it might NOT have been, 40 years ago) is because IT IS NOT NORMAL PRACTICE IN MOST PLACES!

"...To be honest, all we hear about US is the raise of tension here, there, everywhere. US likes to make enemies, but they don't like to make friends..."

In all honesty, I expect that that is, in fact, the problem: lack of information.

How many US newspapers do you read... how many have you EVER read?

If you actually WANT to hear about the good that happens, you can't expect that the international press is going to cover it, any more than I expect the US press to trumpet how many pints of blood the last Harrow blood drive took in. That's not what makes it into the international news. You need to read the local and regional newspapers.

It seems to me that, if all of your information about the attitudes and actions of people in another country comes from what makes it onto the news in YOUR country then you, really, cannot logically claim to know much of anything at all about those people.

The most dangerous person around, IMO, is anyone who could read that last paragraph and think, "I already know all I need to know about (Americans/police/Brits/French/Jews/Muslims/...)" - and I don't care WHERE that person is from, that person is a danger to rational thought and (if enough people think the same way) to any hopes of world peace.

""The mind of the bigot is like the pupil of the eye; the more light you pour unto it, the more it will contract.” -- Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

-----------

* I suppose, in all fairness, I should include trying to explain logical reasoning to obviously biased anonymous trolls in the "doing stupid things" category, but then, I never claimed to be the brightest guy in the room.

Need hard facts? Try Conservapedia

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Re: how does that work??....

" 'an objective, bias-free piece from a conservative perspective'

"surely that's an oxymoron????"

Remember: They're only oxymorons as long as they're still breathing.

Personally, I think I'd prefer them as DEoxymorons.

Oz boffins to polish perfect pair of balls

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Re: Defined inaccuracy?

"So 'changes of as much as 50 parts per billion" are a problem, but "We are trying for an accuracy of two parts in 100 million.' "

"That would be 2,000 parts per billion, or 40 times the granularity of the aforementioned problem.

"What am I missing from the story which would resolve this increased margin of error?"

Isn't that *20* parts per billion?

2/100,000,000 =

20/1,000,000,000

...or am *I* missing something?

Apple plugs holes in new Safari beta

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Re: OS X safe as usual

"Or it could be a deliberate act to create yet another opportunity to say, "see, OS X is safe, it's only Windows that gets the bugs," especially since they happen to have the fix immediately."

Paranoid, much?

Not sure if you're trying to be ironic, are used to long delays for Internet Explorer security patches, or whether you made the tinfol hat a bit too snug but, whichever it is, you may want to work on it a bit.

Macs are more secure: official

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Re: Contradiction

"How can

" ' you don't have to worry about the viruses and spyware that PCs do'

"and

* ' it did not claim Macs were entirely immune to viruses'

"be both true? Either Macs are entirely immune or appropriate precautions should be taken to avoid them."

That's the beauty of the language used: Mac users DON'T have to worry about any virus with a ".exe" suffix, or anything that writes to a Windorws registry file, since they don't use that terminology. Hence Windows PCs (or, rather, their programmers and users) have to worry about THOSE malware apps and Macs (and Linux boxes, I assume) do not.

(Isn't semantics fun?)

Mac-, Windows-, and Linux-boxes DO often have to worry about the same malware if it targets a flaw in a third-party app that runs on all three systems (e.g.: the recently announced OpenOffice vuln, IIRC).

Albanians swipe Bush's wristwatch

Mike Moyle Silver badge

They may have W's watch, but t's useless to them...

...One of Mickey's hands got broken off in the scuffle.

Boffins put encrypted bio-copyright watermarks in beer DNA

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Inadvertent patent infringement...?

Does it matter if their patented GM products are copied inadvertently..?

Scernario: Genetically "marked" über-maize is planted upwind of a field of low-tech plebe-corn. A year or two down the road, the downwind farmer has a field of redwood-sized cornatalks with "property of MegaGrainCo All rights reserved" marked on each husk and the corporation's lawyers are knocking on the screen door.

Does the ability to 'watermark" viable germ plasm increase the company's responsibility to keep it out of the hands on non-license-paying competitors, or just increase their ability to collect royalties from everybody else in the world?

Robot gender-bending reptile is a lover, not a fighter

Mike Moyle Silver badge

The wrong subcontractor, perhaps...?

Perhaps, rather than hiring the services of a movie-special-effects company, Dr. Moore should have hired a manufacturer with experience in the field of enticing the chronically lazy/socially maladjusted:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/04/22/android_begats_armageddon_machine/

Paris Hilton dragged back into court

Mike Moyle Silver badge

While I agree...

...that if Ms Hilton is too ill to remain in the "regular" population of Celebrity Jail that she should spend her remaining time in isolation in a locked hospital room under 24-hour guard - for the sake of her health and to minimize any threat to the health of the rest of the prison population...

...Nonetheless, it fascinates me how every news article in the Reg that deals with Ms Hilton (or many of the other, admitted, absurdities that leak from the United States' legal system) causes the inevitable Geek Chorus to walk onstage to chant, "Well, that just shows how stupid/ignorant/arrogant those stupid/ignorant/arrogant Americans are!"

Please, people - can we get real, here?

United States population: 301,000,000 (approx.)

United Kingdom population: 61,000,000 (approx.)

So there are some five times as many people in the US as in the UK. What this implies is that there are, on average, five times as many people doing stupid things in the US as in tha UK. Of COURSE you will hear about five times as many stupid legal decisions coming from US courts as from British ones!

...Or is the Chorus's assumption that half of the British populace ISN'T, by definition, dumber than average?

No, the reason *MUST* be because the Americans are more stupid/ignorant/arrogant than anyone else because, after all, in all of world history there have never been any cases of "If I'm rich ("well-born"/Norman/etc.) I can do what I want," except in the U.S., right?

This, therefore, is clear evidence that the French author, Anatile France, must have traveled extensively in the U.S, since he could have seen nothing in Europe to inspire him to write: "The law, in its majestic equality, forbids rich and poor alike to sleep under bridges, to beg in the streets, and to steal bread."

Right?

Crocodile tears for under-fire Microsoft MVP

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Three words...

"Embrace and Extend".

*BWAA-HAA-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA!*

UK boffins: extraterrestrial life will be discovered soon

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Re: Can we be detected?

And don't forget planetary rotation. Anyone near Alpha Bootes trying to catch the latest episode of "Benny Hill" have to deal with the fact that the Earth rotated 15 degrees during that hour, bringing Channel 3 out of line and moving some transmitter in Dakar, Senegal into a more direct line.

(And don't get me started on how much it costs to ship them a set that can switch between PAL, NTSC, and SECAM...!(

Any aliens trying to figure us out must assume that we have racial ADD.

(Which could, I suppose, bring us back to "Benny Hill"...)

Flaws galore in IE and Firefox

Mike Moyle Silver badge

FWIW

Safari (2.0.4), with "Enable JavaScript" and "Always accept cookies" selected (*NOT* my usual configuration!) returned:

"Failed to obtain cookie in 120 seconds.

"Your browser might be not vulnerable, or your

network performance deviates from what this

script expects. Try again or give up."

...Doesn't mean it's *SAFE*, but is, at least, one datum for Mr. Zalewski.

Your space, MySpace, everybody's space

Mike Moyle Silver badge

As a friend pointed out to me recently...

"I see that you are still hung up on that 'presumption of innocence' thing. Fuggedaboudit. You'll be much happier once you just accept that it is no longer a valid legal principle in this country."

Greek cops to paintball rioting fans

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Re: Europeans and their games...

"You guys always go on about America sucking so much (I agree with most of it), but at least we're more sportsmanlike! I don't see any riots because the Colts beat the Bears in the superbowl, however unhappy I may be. What is it with the rest of the world and football (American soccer)?"

In all fairness, I believe that there was at least one female college student killed by the tear-gas paintballs used by the Boston police in the Kenmore Square riot after the red Sox won the World Series. We're no more immune to "fan frenzy" than European footie fans (although - again, to be fair - we'd had to wait 86 frickin' YEARS for the chance to get that stupid!).

Royal Marine helmet-cam auteur hit during Afghan gunfight

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Re: Sammy is right...

Ditto on the firewall being the likely culprit. MIS recently upped the ante with us, as well - we don't get the link or even a placeholder graphic in the stories, these days, and copy-and-pasting the link that Robin provided gets me the "This request has been blocked and logged..." crap.

The Marine in question isn't the only one with a pain in the ass to deal with...

*mutter*mutter*grumble*gripe*

US seeks to criminalize 'attempted' piracy

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Re: prize for ‘attempt at chemistry’”

"I think I will immigrate to Iceland. Have you ever heard anything about Iceland? – Exactly."

Lovely country... nice people...

...Of course, (last I knew - mid-'90s) you WILL need to change your name and find a family to adopt you - they're rather strongly into racial/cultural purity, IIRC.

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Title

"'It is a general tenet of the criminal law that those who attempt to commit a crime but do not complete it are as morally culpable as those who succeed in doing so,' the proposal states."

So, if I'm reading Mr. Gonzalez's argument correctly, attempting get permission to illegally wiretap conversations - even if you *DON'T* actually get permission to do so - makes him as morally and legally culpable as if he DID do the wiretaps illegally...? (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/16/washington/16nsa.html?)

...interesting...

US in The Long Good Friday remake outrage

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Re: Baffling

"It would be no less effective to make a wholly original film..."

This *IS* Hollywood we're talking about, right...?

Russian teacher fined for MS piracy

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Were I the suspicious and cynical sort...

(...Which, of course, I'm not...!)

... I might suspect that the defendant's real "crime" was not buying from the right vendor; i.e., the higher-priced supplier who is protected by the former apparatchiks (now "enterpreneurs") who suubsidize the local prosecutor's salary.

It sure is a good thing that I'm not cynical and suspicious...

Robbers superglue naked man to exercise bike

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Re:"Kind of them" and "Vaseline and solvents?"

"Kind of them

"At least he could exercise while incapacitated. What thoughtful goons.

"Vaseline and solvents?

"All it takes is a bit of acetone."

... and clearly, he was able to give his acetone while waiting for the police...

...Right; I'll get my coat...

MoD to publish secret UFO files

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Re: waste of time

Option 5) Teenage Alien Joyriders From Outer Space" - They're here and they don't care who knows it - but they're too cool to talk to us.

Orange doles out an IOU to Christian pareidolians

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Re: why oh why

Hmmm -

"2. ...anyone who is going to base their entire life on hearsay is not going to listen to facts, logic, or reason.

"3. as for why the US is so awful even though supposedly it has so many good people in it, is that it dosen't, it never did, "

Interesting.

Logically, of course, statement 3 implies that the poster of "why oh why" is not a good person him/herself, since s/he apparently lives in the US.

Further, if the poster intends readers of "why oh why" to assume that s/he is amenable to "facts, logic, or reason", then surely s/he would concede the fallacy of assuming that just because s/he has never met any good people, that they do not exist. I have never personally seen a blue whale. All of my experience of them is at least second hand. This does not mean that I believe that they do not exist, just that I have no direct evidence that they do.

(And, to paraphrase Ron White: "Y'know, after meeting the first 20,000 or so (evil people), maybe you've oughtta start to wonder, 'Maybe it's ME... Maybe I'M the common denominator in this equation...'")

If you're going to insist on logic and reason from others, and pour scorn on those who don't use it, offer it yourself.

MS to 'backport' Office 2007 security improvements

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Slim and none...

[QUOTE]

Anyone out there knows whether MS will ship some security service pack for Office 2000? I mean... the sole reason why I would want to upgrade would be the security holes reported against it (mostly the same ones that haunt 2003 and 2007).

[/QUOTE]

...And the question is: What are the odds of Microsoft supporting older software instead of forcing customers to "buy a patch"...?

[QUOTE]

Otherwise I am perfectly happy with office 2000. Especially Frontpage 2000.

[/QUOTE]

...And it's exactly that sort of thinking that has kept them from their rightful place as overlords of the universe...!

Engineers write defence against aliens manual

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Re: Why would aliens bother?

...For the ginger, obviously - ask Harry Turtledove!

Google glitch loses user data

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Some days ya just can't win...

...So now folks are complaining that Google *ISN'T* storing their personal data indefinitely...?

Honestly...! There's just no pleasing some people, is there!

Disgruntled techie attempts Californian power blackout

Mike Moyle Silver badge

I haven't laughed so hard in ages...!

"Based on Sylvestre's short sentence and Denison's worst-case five years, McKinnon might not be compelled to enjoy the feds' hospitality for all that long a time – assuming that US justice is consistent."

BWA-HA--HA-HAAA...!

That may be the funniest one-liner of the day!

Thanks for the morning laugh.

(I'll now go away somewhere to weep over the fact that I find it funny.)

Yahoo! China! sued! in! US!

Mike Moyle Silver badge

RE: Stupid is as stupid does.

Phil -

At the risk of excessive pedantry:

"PS to whomever wrote this article: You may want to run the article through a spell checker before posting it. You have several errors in spelling and you use the wrong word in some cases."

Did you possibly mean a spellING checker...? I saw no magic(k)al errors.

Pot...

Kettle...

As to your statements:

"(T)he organizations backing this should be ashamed of themselves for leading her to believe that this has merit. They would serve their cause better if they acted in a responsible manner."

You might want to read this article (http://writ.news.findlaw.com/sebok/20040322.html) in which - while discussing a separate case - the author gives a brief but clear explanation of the history and scope of the Alien Tort Claims Act. Short form: It's not as certain a losing case as you seem to think.

Qantas jet almost rammed by sky-hog glider pilot

Mike Moyle Silver badge

...Musr eat lots of carrots...!

"- I think from that distance the smell of cheap watered down whiskey and the voice of the smarmy pilot mentioning 'If you look to your left you will see a handglider decending rapidly towards sydney harbor bridge' would be harder to overcome than puny backdraft turbulence."

You can see that all the way from Adelaide...? Damn, Aussie pilot's have good eyes!

ATM blagger cuffed after artificial leg falls off

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Never happen...

Any lawyer would tell him that it would never stand up in court.

Sony Walkman NW-A800 media player

Mike Moyle Silver badge

A Video Walkman...

...a Stumbleman, perhaps...?

(BTW - Am I the only person who can't help reading Sony's "Atrac" music format as "EightTrack"?)

US businessman makes $9m selling lunar real estate

Mike Moyle Silver badge

A small correction

Re:

Genius

By JP

Posted Wednesday 11th April 2007 13:46 GMT

"...And surely the way to get energy on the moon isn't helium 3, it's solar panels! You've got a satellite body with very little atmosphere, which has 50% always facing the Sun!Now all we need is a laser or something to send this energy back to Earth, and overheat our planet completely..."

Ye, it does - unfortunately, just like the Earth, it isn't always the SAME 50%. That's why we get Lunar phases and eclipses and all of that-there sort of fun stuff.

The same face of the moon always faces the Earth, which makes the lunar day 28,some-such earth-days long. So for about two (Earth) weeks, you can get solar power - for the other 14 days, you'll need to find something else.

(I realize that you were building up to a facetious comment, but there you go...)

Senator demands US create morally superior light bulbs

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Jeez, Fred; relax...

"If electricity were a good, efficient way to heat a house, then you wouldn't be heating your house with heating oil/gas/franklin stoves/whatever. This is not to mention the fact that many people who are happy to have an incandescent light in winter just crank the air conditioning up a little higher in summer to compensate. And air conditioning is way the heck less energy efficient than heating."

Having lived in homes with electric baseboard heating, I'm well aware of its deficiencies. My current apartment is oil-heated, which is why I said "adjunct"...

I agree with you, as well, about the inefficiencies of air conditioners. Which is why, with the exception of last sumer when my daughter (asthmatic) was living with me, I don't use them. I use fans.

The question remains: Is it more efficient, in order to achieve a given room temperature in winter, to use a CF bulb and more heat, or use an incandescent bulb and less heat? Or is it a draw?

"On my last visit to Ms. Boxer's office, the entire place was lit with fluorescents, and the two desk lamps I saw were CF. I can't speak to her house, since I have never had the pleasure of visiting it."

Fine. Excellent. That, at least, answers part of the question asked. Thank you.

As to, "California is the third to lowest energy usage per capita state in the US. " the key phrase here is "per capita". All that means is that you've got a lot of people to divide up the facts that Cali is still the nation's second-highest TOTAL consumer of natural gas, petroleum, and electricity. (http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/states/sep_sum/plain_html/rank_use_per_cap.html) Note that little Rhode Island, with FAR fewer people to split the load, used the least per capita.

One point that I didn't mention above and which, again, I have not seen addressed, is the cost issue. Yes; I understand that, in time, the price of the average CF bulb may come down to be within the same range as the average incandescent, but that doesn't help low-income people *NOW*. I have, at times, been in a position where I could barely afford 99 cents for a light bulb. Had I had to pay $4.50 for one - however much longer it was going to last - I would have ended up sitting in the dark.

How did the California law address this? (I really am curious!)

And, Fred, as a personal aside: If you want to show people the correct way to be responsible about energy, you might want to avoid having these sentences all in the same posting:

"It's amazing the spleen that people vent when someone asks them to act like responsible adults.

"(T)here are a lot of us who don't need to heat our houses, but we definitely make up for that in the summer with our air conditioning.

"And air conditioning is way the heck less energy efficient than heating."

Having spent almost 3 years (1988-1991) living in L/A. without having an AC unit in my apartment, I believe that the vast majority of people living there don't *NEED* AC, but use it anyway just because they can.

Mike Moyle Silver badge

A couple of points...

I have no complaint, in theory, with the compact fluorescent bulbs, but there are a couple of points that make them sub-optimal for my purposes.

1 - The ones that I've seen and tried are too yellow. I do illustration, painting, and design and yellow light skews the colors. Does anyone make daylight-corrected bulbs for general use? I haven't seen them. Further, the yellowness of the light, to me, makes a mockery of the "...equivalent to a XX Watt incandescent bulb..." crap on the packages; subjectively an "equivalent to 100W" CF bulb is actually closer to a 75W bulb, to my eyes.

2 - Much is made, in the pro-CF pieces, of the idea that "90% of the electricity used in an incandescent bulb is wasted as heat". Now, I realize that folks in Silicon valleyu amd the L.A. basin (for two examples) may not know this, but some of us actually have to HEAT our homes, at least part of the time, for six months out of the year. And with the price of oil, natural gas, etc., anythjing that I have to use for light in any case that is ALSO pumping 90 W of heat into my room for every 100W of power I'm using strikes me as a damned efficient adjunct to my home heating system. Esentially then, , it seems to me that in the winter I'm getting 100% BENEFIT from any electricity used by an incandescent bulb - 90% as heat and 10% as light.

(The small-souled, petty cynic in me wonders if any reporter has asked Senator Boxer, et al, on the record, whether they have replaced "ALL* of the bulbs in their homes and offices (both home-district and D.C.) with CF bulbs before exhorting the rest of use to clean up our acts... is that wrong of me?)

Sunshine

Mike Moyle Silver badge

...Amusing...

"I rather enjoyed the film apart from the complete lack of explanation as to why the crew were experiencing some sort of artificial gravity."

Um... We're sending a *single* (as in "one") ship to rekindle the frickin' *SUN* and the fact that they have artificial gravity bothers you...?

If we have the technology to (say it with me) Restart... A... Star... then, presumably, minor details like generating artificial gravity and, hell, lighting and heating the Earth WITHOUT NEEDING a sun, should already be off-the-shelf technologies. (...probably drives that would allow us to get to the vicinity of the sun in less time than the movie's actual running time, but I won't go there...)

...And Captain PINBACKER...?

No!!!

Really...?!!?

Is this file some sort of post-millennial remake of Dark Star...?

(Whose turn is it to feed the beachball?)

Why can't a computer be more like a brain?

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Although...

"a true thinking machine would have to be able to interpret and catagorize and then act on something that it knew nothing of ..."

A child* learns by constantly asking "What's that?" and "Why?". I see no reason why "a true thinking machine" should learn any differently. Integrating new data into the hierarchy of "C is sometimes like K and sometimes like S. Add this instance to the group of cases where C is like K," should be possible in the learning stages.

(* Not to mention college students... Perhaps we'll know when the computer is approaching human-level intelligence when it starts asking "Will this be on the exam?")

Satnav plunges £96k Merc into river

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Am I the only one...

... who thought that referring to the Easy Walk's "test pilots" from the Italian Blind Union. as "Guinea pig(s)" was just a LEE-E-E-E-ETLE BIT tacky...?

Bush team takes heat over global warming science

Mike Moyle Silver badge

I'm shocked - SHOCKED, I tell you...!

"(S)ome of the information the committee has already obtained... suggests there may have been a concerted effort directed by the White House to mislead the public..."

Surely not...

BA upgrades corpse

Mike Moyle Silver badge

If they must...

Assuming that BA HAD to move the departed and her relatives up to first, perhaps they might have let one of the rellies sit with her, rather than making someone unrelated be her "seat buddy"...?

I mean, since they apparently had sufficienrt extra seats in first class to accommodate the grieving relatives, surely placing the corpse WITH the family and AWAY from others might have been more sensitive to all involved.

I'm sure that, under the circumstances, being offered the option of moving to a different seat away from the vitality-challenged (perhaps with the offer of a free night-cap throwm in to help him get back to sleep) would have been agreeable.

...just a thought...

Sky takes ball and goes home

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Ah, I see.

That's different. Never mind, then. My bad.

On the other hand: "It's not piracy, it's economics. "

You've got it wrong, there. You're actually doing them a FAVOR*.

Any competent SysAdmin will tell you that you should back up your important data and keep one backup off-site in case anything happens to your locally--stored copies.

Thus, "It's not piracy, it's free off-site archiving."

* Yeah, yeah... I know... American spelling...

Mike Moyle Silver badge

I dont't know quite how to tell you this, Lee...

"What I would pay for, is the same content, stripped from adverts - broadcast as released in America and delivered nicely onto my telebox..."

...but if you're getting your hour-long program littered with 17 minutes of ads, you actually *ARE* getting it "as released in America"! It's sort of why people here refer to the TV stations as "commercial broadcasters" as opposed to "public television" (government- and donation-supported broadcasters).

...Or am I missing something, here?

NASA announces psych testing review

Mike Moyle Silver badge

Re: Where is the emotional training in our society?

Yes; clearly, a lack of emotional/ethical training is a classic American problem - as demonstrrated by good Americans like Tristan and Isolde, Isabella of France and Edward II, Messalina and half of Rome...

Every time someone does something phenomenally loopy, we get an outbreak of "What's wrong with us"-es.

It's NOT an American problem; it's NOT a Western problem; it's a HUMAN problem. I BELIEVE in the perfectability of humanity, but we're nowhere NEAR there yet - for a monkey with an overlarge brainbox we're doing pretty well, overall!

Remember - we're a species which can produce crazy astronauts and Desmond Tutus; Mussolinis and Mother Teresas. Don't worry so much about about what other people (or worse yet, "society") is teaching other people's kids. Teach *YOURS* to be sane and, just maybe, if enough of us do that it'll reach critical mass.

“A truly religious person worries about his own spiritual well-being and the physical well-being of every other human being on this planet; a hypocrite worries about his own physical well-being and the spiritual well-being of every other human being on this planet”- Rav Yisroel Slanter.

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