* Posts by Mike Moyle

1333 posts • joined 8 Feb 2007

Page:

Hello DARKNESS, my old friend. I've come to talk with you again... about a 10,000-pixel alien-hunting camera

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: Good to see your tax money being wasted on something

The project cost $811,000. That's less than one round-trip to Mar-A-Lago on Air Force 1.

Hell -- Would $811,000 even qualify as a rounding error in the military budget?

17
0

Scissors cut paper. Paper wraps rock. Lab-made enzyme eats plastic

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: Doorways!

...and did our heroes end up accidentally infecting every world that they visited thereafter?

0
0

Civil war erupts at top of FCC over Sinclair's creepy grasp on US telly

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

"As to the "not identify their actual ownership" charge. It doesn't stand up."

Do they clearly identify "Part of Sinclair Broadcasting Corporation" in on-air station identification breaks? Does it appear on the identification slides?

No...?

Then it's not really the same thing, is it?

0
0
Mike Moyle
Silver badge

"So what? I read the text (at ThinkProgress); there is nothing in it that would have raised an eyebrow if it had appeared in the New York Times which, as a matter of fact, employs a full-time staff member (Margaret Sullivan) whose duties include receiving comments about incorrect, incomplete, or biased reporting."

Oh... So if the New York Times publishes a slanted editorial piece, You *KNOW* that it came from the Times' editorial board, or from the person whose byline it ran under, and they *TELL* you whom to contact *AT* the Times to complain to...?

Now, if you see an editorial that you disagree with from one of the three Sinclair stations in Syracuse, NY, or the four Sinclair stations in Wichita, KS, or the seven covering the Redding, CA area, how do you contact the home office that required their local news anchors to read it without attribution? If the local newsreaders were allowed/required to bracket one of the "must-reads" with something like: "The following is an editorial from Sinclair Broadcasting, the corporate owner of Station [CallLetters] and does not necessarily represent [CallLetters]'s point of view," and "The preceding has been (...). Comments or corrections on this editorial can be made to [PRFlackName] at [SinclairContactAddress]," I would have a lot fewer problems with the company's apparent intention to flood local markets across the country with different-looking fronts for the same agenda.

As it actually IS, though, I have major problems with it.

2
0
Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Ooops... didn't notice in time: The appropriate sentence in the first paragraph in my post just above should read:

"...Sinclair owns 33 ABC affiliate stations, 27 CBS affiliates, 22 NBC and 47 Fox affiliate stations."

0
0
Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Here's the thing: Unless you go looking, Sinclair may not show up anywhere on your local Sinclair-owned station. Many of them are affiliate stations of the national broadcast networks -- WPRI in Rhode Island, for instance, is an NBC affiliate while KDSM in Iowa is a Fox network (not Fox News) affiliate. In fact, Sinclair owns 33 ABC affiliate stations, 27 CBS affiliates, 2 NBC and 47 Fox affiliate stations. Further, in many cases, they own multiple stations -- often "fronted" by competing networks -- in the same market. And, since most affiliate channels are just that -- voluntary affiliates, not owned and operated by the national networks, their local editorial slant -- as in the case of the Sinclair-owned affiliate stations -- may not match the views of the owners of the national networks with which they are affiliated, although many people (like yourself, apparently) assume that they DO march in lockstep with the national branding on their identification slugs.

Now, I would have less concern if companies owning multiple stations were required to declare that ownership with every station identification slug -- in fact, IIRC, when I was growing up in the '60s, this was the case. The local NBC affiliate's slide included the call letters and channel number, the NBC logo and, in one corner, "A Westinghouse Broadcasting Company",or some such, identifying the company that owned the chain of stations of which it was a part.

(...This was also a time when station editorials ended -- by law! -- with some phrase like "This has been an editorial from [CallLetters]'s General Manager [Name]. Station [CallLetters] recognizes its responsibility to present opposing points of view from responsible spokesmen," and then would DO SO when called on it... Don't even get me started!)

The point of all of this is that, currently, one company can own APPARENTLY competing stations in one market, not identify their actual ownership of those stations to the viewers, present matching viewpoints that appear to come from opposing sources, not identify the ACTUAL source..., AND are no longer required to present genuinely opposing points of view.

...and according to some people, this is all a Good Thing (TM) because "Unfettered capitalism is Good and regulation is Bad, m'kay...?"

Does that clear everything up?

4
0

'Housemate from hell' catches 24 new charges after alleged nightmare cyberstalking spree

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

On behalf of decent Massholes everywhere...

...we don't know this dickwad and we don't WANNA know him!

1
0

Intel outside: Apple 'prepping' non-Chipzilla Macs by 2020 (stop us if you're having deja vu)

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: Makes a lot of sense

"Photoshop emulated on Arm ? Are you nuts ?"

Well, that just opens the door wider for Serif Software's Affinity Photo program, which has Photoshop-level capabilities and currently runs on iOS, MacOS, and Windows. (...and SELLS for $50 -- no subscription needed!) (Serif ALSO makes an Illustrator competitor -- Affinity Designer -- and is working on a page layout program to compete with InDesign. I'm hoping to get my employer off the Adobe Cloud crazy train as soon as I possibly can!)

Trust me: If it means losing their market, Adobe will adapt.

1
0
Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: Why?

"...this could be the prelude to the demise of Apple. Or at least of the Macintosh."

If it is -- and I'm not convinced that it is, mind -- it won't be because of low outside development or niche marketry or code incompatibility or any of the other "This will be the end of Apple, just like I've been predicting for the last 20 years!" reasons that most people give. It will be because this time they don't have a Steve Jobs-level obsessive beating Apple's engineers brutally about the head and shoulders demanding that they Get It Right. Love him or hate him, he had a vision of what he wanted and was -- well, "ruthless" is such a HARSH word, isn't it...? -- let's say "determined" in getting it from his designers and engineers.

18
1

Law's changed, now cough up: Uncle Sam serves Microsoft fresh warrant for Irish emails

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that Microsoft's response is going to come from the Ireland business unit saying that they are waiting for clarification from the EDPB re: their duty as a business operating in Europe and holding data on EU citizens. That should stall things for another couple of years, at least.

13
0

Skip-wrecked! Boat full o' rubbish scuppered in Brit residential street

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

" "It never ceases to amaze me the lengths some people will go to fly-tip..."

Particularly since they can move so much FASTER than cows and don't make as satisfying a "thump" when you DO manage to tip them! I guess it's the challenge of the thing.

9
0

BOFH: Give me a lever long enough and a fool, I mean a fulcrum and ....

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même merde!"

FTFY.

1
0

NASA fungus problem puts theory of 'Martian mushrooms' on toast

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: They came from outer space

Boys! Raise Giant Mushrooms in YOUR Laboratory!

4
0

It's Pi day: Care to stuff a brand new Raspberry one in your wallet?

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: Dates

@peter_dtm

"That very sensible convention was invented by WHO (the drs; as inb World Health Organisation; not The Dr.)"

The WHO may have standardized on the practice and format, but the practice itself predates them.

A 1928 letter from Marc Chagall, albeit with a slightly different format:

https://books.google.com/books?id=WXI6K9vPLfkC&pg=PA347&hl=en#v=onepage&q&f=false

0
0
Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: Dates

"I always thought it funny that Americans use MM/DD except for "4th July" when they celebrate Independence Day....... by using the format we use here (UK)."

We actually use them both interchangeably; either "the fourth of July" or "July fourth". Note that all words as above are used in the former case and no interstitial "the" needed in the latter; "4th July" or "July the 4th" just tend to sound wrong on so many levels!

0
0
Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: Dates

"In which context? In any technical context they are both bad because they're ambiguous (as are year abbreviations YY) and this is the big problem with Americans using the abbreviation in technical contexts and why we have an ISO standard (of course, not without its own problems). Outside of a technical context then you might as well write out the month name or three letter abbreviation. MAR-14 or 14/MAR or whetever."

Back when I worked a tech pubs job where I had to co-ordinate our materials with our branches in the UK and Australia, I got in the habit of denoting the month in Roman numerals. Still do it to this day for most purposes. I'm mostly out of that field these days, so I don't know if it's still done but it used to be quite common in scientific publications.

1
0

Cyborg fined for riding train without valid ticket

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: Lawyer logic

As with any job, some days you just have to do the best you can with what you're given to work with.

3
0

BOFH: Honourable misconduct

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: who would play BOFH and PFY?

I always saw bosses more as this week's Number 2, myself.

Auditors and security bods may justifiably be considered redshirts.

0
0
Mike Moyle
Silver badge
Thumb Up

+1

Props for the shoutout to the immortal Don (flabbadap flabbadap flabbadap... skglooosh!) Martin!

16
0

At last, sex trafficking brought to an end with US House vote on new internet law (Yeah, right)

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: The House passed it?

"The guy who believes in deconstructing the Federal Government and the return of State rights and governance."

...except for when he and his AG, Jeff "Keebler" Sessions, DON'T believe in states' rights and local devolution, vis. marijuana legalization and "sanctuary cities".

5
0

Why, why, Mr American Pai? FCC boss under increasing pressure in corporate favoritism row

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: "Sweet" Pai. So called because he keeps the regulatory environment sweet

Were I the cynical and suspicious sort of individual -- which, of course, I'm NOT! -- I might suspect that part of the problem is that Pay was put into his current position by a man who gives every indication of distrusting anyone who appears as though he might be more intelligent or more competent than himself.

0
0

Fender's 'smart' guitar amp has no Bluetooth pairing controls

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: Right ....

Go for the nuclear option: Mary Schneider, "Yodeling the Classics".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awp3-7EVM0Q

2
0

Chilly willies: Swedish nudie nightclub opens in -11°C to disgust of locals

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: Not my cuppa tea.

He couldn't get the free admission if he kept his collar on.

10
0
Mike Moyle
Silver badge
Coat

Re: IT?

"The make-out room should rather be seen as an open lounge."

...and, in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, Julian Assange is reconsidering returning to Sweden.

There's your IT angle.

21
0

Apple Macs, iThings, smart watches choke on tiny Indian delicacy

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: I'm guessing this thread doesn't contain many contributions from people with Apple hardware.

FWIW -- I had surgery earlier today and am on painkillers, which may explain why I was loopy enough to open this in Safari on my IPad Pro (IOS 11.2.2). If all these posted glyphs have been generated correctly, then -- at least under the conditions listed above -- the bug apparently doesn't happen in Safari. The article DOES say that Apple's chat app is affected, but maybe people don't generally use that to comment on El Reg. ;-)

1
0

Rogue IT admin goes off the rails, shuts down Canadian train switches

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: So did the accused admit his guilt?

"An open window, at court, is the difference between breaking and entering (a crime) and entering to dick with you (...)

Hence one is a crime the other would be a civil case at best..."

I don't know how things stand where you live but around these parts "Criminal Trespass" and "Illegal Entry" are still criminal, not civil, offenses. They may be only misdemeanors while B&E is a felony (combining within itself, as it does, both trespass AND property damage), but still criminal.

2
0

Blackbird shot down, patent nuked by judge in Cloudflare legal battle

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: hmmm. Musical reference?

I think I'd prefer if they were "Carrion, my wayward son"!

16
0

Icahn't get right Xerox Fuji merger spoils, cries activist investor Carl

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: Just because he's a git, doesn't mean he's wrong

"I don't know the details of this one, and it could be a great idea, but I'd be shocked if it works out well in the long term"

And if I had ever heard of an Icahn deal that worked for the long term, I can't remember it now. He's always been about seizing control, stripping the corporate assets of every salable bit imaginable and leaving behind a burned-out husk with screwed-over employees and pensioners.

He's just pissed because either:

A -- This plan will work out, leaving him a minority player with no way to make his usual quick strip-mining operation work, or;

B -- They saw him coming and beat him with his own con.

9
0

Game of Thrones showrunners to make Star Wars flicks

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Somehow, "Mother of Speederbikes" just doesn't seem to have the same cachet...

2
1

Boffins crack smartphone location tracking – even if you've turned off the GPS

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

The impression that I got from the article is that users are never ASKED to authorize sharing of barometric data because handset/app makers don't consider that personally identifiable information. Hell, they may not even specifically intend to collect it, but simply don't NOT collect it along with temperature and other environmental data.

So "clueless users" criticisms might be misdirected, in this case.

Or, am I missing something...?

22
0

CLOUD Act hits Senate to lube up US access to data stored abroad

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: At least it's now more honest

I think that's why Microsoft, et. al., support this. They figure that their overseas divisions can argue that they have to abide by, e.g., EU data privacy laws and can tell the US gov't, "Let's you and him fight!" I think that they will argue that -- at least, as described here -- this law takes them out of the line of fire and places it directly between the respective governments.

Which is actually -- if you're going to argue this at all -- exactly where it should be.

15
0

A Hughes failure: Flat Earther rocketeer can't get it up yet again

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Have any Flat-Earthers ever "explained"...

...if the Earth is a disk centered on the North Pole, why it doesn't take several times as long to fly from, say, Sao Paulo to Johannesburg as it does to fly from Chicago to Zurich? On a globe, each pair is on a (very roughly) east-west line and are comparable distances -- in the 4500 - 4600 mi. range, while on a flat disk SP-JB should be at least twice as far, being 2 - 3 times further out from the center.

3
0
Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Foolish, maybe, but probably not enough to kill himself.

He is, after all, "California man", not "Florida man".

1
0
Mike Moyle
Silver badge

"All donors will be guaranteed to get a piece of cheese, that is if they can find me after I've run off with their money."

Grytpype-Thynne, is that you? (A-a-a-a-a-o-o-o-rgh!)

3
0

PC not dead, Apple single-handedly propping up mobe market, says Gartner

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: Not rocket science

"For example, editing photos, audio or video. The sort of Apps for these tasks aren't up to full-fat use. I've tried plenty of photo editing apps on my phone/tablet, but nothing comes close to Photoshop (or equivalent) running on a PC/Mac. Pro image editing means working with multiple layers, and there simply isn't enough oompf on a mobile device for that sort of work."

If you're on an iPad, you might want to look into Affinity Photo by Serif software ( https://affinity.serif.com/en-us/photo/ipad/ ). They've done (always IMO) a damned good job of porting their desktop version to iOS. Layers, PSD support, good typography controls, and a lot more -- I'm impressed. (I'm currently evaluating their software at work, to see if we can drop our Adobe subscription. Based on what I've seen so far, I've bought copies for my home desktop and my 'Pad.)

7
0

Blockheads changing company names to surf crypto wave get a warning from the SEC

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: we have spirit yes we do we have spirit how about you

"US federal law now consists of about 96 bazillion pages worth of codes, which together span nearly 34 zillion volumes. If the spirit part ain't in there, either add it in or let it go (preferably the latter)."

Coming on a tech site, comments like this are (unintentionally, I'm sure!) hilarious. There are "96 bazillion pages worth of codes" exactly BECAUSE people look for every possible loophole to give themselves an advantage. Complaining that there are too many laws is rather like complaining that there are too many lines of code in a program when all that's really needed is a "Do What I Meant" button.

...Unless, of course, the intended argument is that cheating people is OK if they can't stop you; in which case the person propounding that argument is an ass.

1
0

In Soviet California, pedestrian hits you! Bloke throws himself in front of self-driving car

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: My first taxi ride in Paris

Also common in metro Boston, Massachusetts. We ALSO learn early to look both ways when crossing one-way streets.

0
0

FCC drops idiotic plans to downgrade entire nation's internet speeds

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

"The 3% of the country stated in this article likely captures 75% of the population.

"Next, when looking at costs and speeds, realize that the sparsely-populated rural areas can be hundreds of kilometers from a large city. Do not try to compare the difficulties in providing services throughout the US to a country like GB."

Are you actually a closet Democrat? Because, usually, it's they who are accused of writing off wide swathes of "flyover country" when suggesting policies, and yet here you are.

0
0

Smut site fingered as 'source' of a million US net neutrality comments

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: I weep for my country...

"You mean the GOP who currently hold all the branches of power and are taking political control of the judiciary? That way lies a totalitarian state."

...and whose demonstrated rampant gerrymandering and voter suppression are intended to create a "Permanent Party".

12
1

What do Cali, New York, Hawaii, Maine and 18 other US states have in common? Fighting the FCC on net neutrality

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

"The FCC – the nation's broadband watchdog..."

We had a dog like that once. Dad always said he was a great watchdog -- he'd watch someone steal everything in the place!

5
0

US senators vow to filibuster FBI, er, NSA's domestic, errr, foreign mass spying program

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

" 'I'm surprised we're not being allowed an amendment,' said Paul, adding that he objects 'to not being allowed to vote on our reforms.' "

Suddenly Rand Paul is shocked (Shocked, I tell you!) that his party's leadership wants to rush through a bill that screws people over, with no debate or amendment...? Has he not been paying attention? That's been McConnell's M.O. from day one!

12
0

Butt plugs, mock cocks, late pay and paranoia: The world of Waymo star Anthony Levandowski… by his kids' nanny

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Not sure what it says about the nanny...

That she immediately recognized elk hide.

"2. 30” elkhide flogger"

36
0

Amount of pixels needed to make VR less crap may set your PC on fire

Mike Moyle
Silver badge
Devil

Re: Number! It's the flipping number!!!

Inappropriate use of "amount of..." instead of "number of..." still grates on my nerves, but I've pretty much given up on fighting that battle in order to save my resources for the truly IMPORTANT ones.

...like the Oxford Comma.

2
1
Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: Saccades

"Any "Focus tracking" (if using that approach to try and give acceptable visual image in "focus" area on a system without the pixels / hardware grunt to render all data at high res) will need to handle that as will pixel rendering (with smooth focus change lots of time to prep the hi res pixels at the expected new focus point, with position "jump", need to "instantly" render a new area as the hi res pixel zone."

Heh.

I have a pretty nasty nystagmus. My eyes "jiggle" constantly, to the degree that, if there is an emergency vehicle with lights flashing by the side of the road, from a distance the first flash may be directly on top of the vehicle but the next may appear to be 10 - 15 feet up and to the right, say, depending on the distance away it is. The closer we get, the closer the flashes are to their actual locations. So, we're talking a couple of degrees of twitch happening several times a second. It's fast enough, and I'm sufficiently accustomed to it, that unless something like flashing lights brings it to my attention I never notice it. On the other hand, something directly in front of my eyes trying to keep up with that and constantly shifting focus to whatever it thinks I'm looking at could end up being a strain on both its hardware and my software!

I wonder if I could rent myself out to VR developers as a test subject...

3
0

Of course Uber allegedly had a tool to remotely destroy evidence

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: Bros before LEOs

I was thinking: "For our definition of 'valid', of course!"

4
0

Brit transport pundit Christian Wolmar on why the driverless car is on a 'road to nowhere'

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: POLITICS is driving the driverless car

Or, some of us who are disabled and physically CAN'T drive hate having to impose on friends/family or wait for sometimes-overbooked taxi services to get out to places WHERE or at times WHEN the buses don't run and fully self-driving cars would be a godsend.

So please take your "Lib'ruls are coming to take our g̶u̶n̶s̶ cars!" paranoia and shove it!

(Yeah... Everything hurts, I'm going to be standing outside waiting on the buses to and from a doctor's appointment today, and I'm cranky. Deal with it.)

3
1
Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Is it just me...?

When I see something like "A multi-billion dollar hype built on gullibility, says railway man" my first thought is often "Trains that travel at 40 miles an hour...? Ridiculous! You won't be able to breathe, traveling at that speed!"

Judging the usefulness of future technology solely by the state of today's technology and assuming that "good enough" solutions won't be found if enough people want a particular new capability is just being a mug (or an opportunist with a book to sell), IMO.

3
0

WikiLeave? Assange tipped for Ecuadorian eviction

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: He hasn't been in the news much lately...

"It's probably just another way of to pump up his profile/ego a bit."

Please, Bre'r Fox... Whatever you do, PLEASE don't throw me into that briar patch!!

4
0

Good lord, Kodak's stock is up 120 per cent. How? New film? Oh. It launched a crypto-coin

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

KODAKCoi-oi-oin -- It's made with a nice, bright blockchain,

And its usefulness escapes my brain.

But mama, don't take my KODAKCoin away-ay-ay-ay!

6
1

You GNOME it: Windows and Apple devs get a compelling reason to turn to Linux

Mike Moyle
Silver badge

Re: So, 2018 will be the year of the Linux desktop because of Gnome?

"So, exactly how is "apt" (apt-get is obsolete, obviously) any worse than the maze of cryptically-named menu entries you have to navigate through to make Windows update (or, more importantly these days, *not* update)?"

Basically, if you want Linux to become more than a niche OS -- and I'm assuming here that you are comfortable with the command line and likely comfortable building computers and/or modifying system files to get your machine to work just the way you want it -- you need it to meet potential users where THEY are, rather than making them come to where YOU are. Would they be more competent and independent computer users if they knew more about their machine's internals? Probably so, but they wouldn't necessarily be HAPPIER, and people want to use their machines -- be they computers, cars, or cook-stoves -- to perform the tasks that THEY want to do to make themselves happier. There is a reason that most modern microwave ovens come with a "one touch = one minute on high power" button or a "Popcorn" button, as well as the plethora of settings for time, power intensity, etc. It's because most people just want to be able to heat something for three minutes and enjoy it in as easy a manner as possible. It's why car manufacturers figured out how to provide automatic starters, spark-timing, and shifting; because most people just wanted to GO somewhere with minimal effort. The enthusiast who enjoys tinkering under the hood has his place, but he is NOT the mass market. The mass of computer users just want to be able to shop online, email their friends, and maybe see the video of the new grandkid. They don't want to tinker under the hood, they don't want to learn a new language, and -- with rare exceptions -- they don't think that doing either of those will make them happier.

I used to work in tech documentation. Among other gigs, I worked for an -- at the time -- Fortune 400 computer manufacturer, for a networking hardware startup, and for an automobile-security accessory manufacturer. And in literally EVERY case, the project engineers were convinced that their designs were so intuitively obvious that documentation wasn't necessary. (Fortunately, cooler heads prevailed!) People who are highly technically literate in a particular field often forget that not everyone is nor cares to be and often forget their stumbling early days ("It's all so SIMPLE once you get used to it!"). But those latter "I just want to do 'X'," people are the ones who will take a product mass-market. The technical leader -- the explorer -- has to be the first out into the frontier, but if the greater population -- the homesteaders, if you will -- choose not to follow because the explorer insists that the only way to go is on foot with a bedroll, a frying pan, and a knife, the migration into the new land will be stalled before it starts.

That is where the larger take-up of the Linux desktop has stalled. The mass market doesn't want to worry about WHICH "repository" they need to go to to get an application ("A 'repository...?' Isn't that one of those things Gramps used to use when he couldn't go...?"); they want to go to THE app store. The. The One. The Only One. Sneer at the Apple "Walled Garden" all you want but, with their App Store, as long as you know WHAT you want to do, they made it just about as easy to find and get a HOW that'll do it as it is possible to get. And they don't want to know from "dependencies", "SUDO", or anything else that gets between their "what" and their "how"; they just want to do their "what".

Don't assume that they're stupid; in general, they're at least smart enough to judge whether a tool will let them do their what as easily as possible -- by THEIR terms -- and go elsewhere if it won't.

"I ask out of interest, but as I write this, I realise I won't get an interesting answer."

Sorry to be boring.

0
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018