* Posts by Archtech

777 posts • joined 9 Jul 2016

Page:

Mueller bombshell: 13 Russian 'troll factory' staffers charged with allegedly meddling in US presidential election

Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Wonderful timing!

Apologies - only about 3 million civilians murdered in Iraq (since the First Gulf War), not 23 million as I fat-fingered.

Incidentally, if anyone wants chapter and verse for that figure of 81 instances of election interference...

https://www.mintpressnews.com/governments-own-data-shows-us-interfered-in-81-foreign-elections/226143/

3
1
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: I'm Confused Still

Very clearly and cogently explained. Thank you!

0
0
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: A quiet refrain

"If it's a crime in the US, it not being a crime in Russia is not exculpatory".

So you will certainly agree that if it's a crime in Russia, it not being a crime in the USA is not exculpatory.

Won't you?

0
0
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: One example

Assuming the parent wasn't just overdoing the irony and really needs a corrective dose of facts...

http://anonhq.com/46716-2/

0
0
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: But how gullible do you have to be...

"In the echo chambers of the internet, one can get a lot of mileage by feeding people stuff that is crafted to appeal to their biases".

But if they are already biased, and your "stuff" is "crafted to appeal to their biases", how can it change their opinions or their voting plans?

Eh?

0
0
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Calling for an indictment of Steele is a bit thick, laddy.

'You may well want to imply that "Russian Trolls" are posting here...'

Well, obviously they are! All the signs are clearly evident. True facts, logical arguments... Putin has weaponized the truth!

3
0
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Canadian in great jeopardy -- not.

"As I understand it, US law forbids foreign entities from financing efforts to sway the US electoral process".

So... supposing you were a journalist employed by, say, The Guardian or The Times or the BBC... and I were your employer.

And I were to pay you to write an article expressing opinions about who should win a US election.

Then I would be breaking US law. (And perhaps you would too).

Such a law essentially forbids anyone not of US nationality from expressing any opinion about US politics.

2
2
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Canadian with a made-up name

"And that, I think, is "the angle". It's not what they said, nor the sock puppets so much, as the banking thing".

Quite right!

But there is absolutely no connection whatsoever to the presidential election, or indeed anything political.

0
0
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Wonderful timing!

I thought we weren't going to talk about Mrs Clinton?

0
1
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Wonderful timing! -Everyone else is under 3%. This includes our preferred rival.

The difference being that Mr Farage, like Mr Putin, wants his country to remain independent. Or, in the case of the UK, to become independent.

0
2
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Wonderful timing!

Actually the one fact that the West has failed to grasp about Mr Putin is that he is the best Russian leader for them. Literally any other candidate who could be elected would be far harsher and tougher on the West. Mr Putin is mostly criticized for being too soft, too polite, and too accommodating.

2
1
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Wonderful timing!

If you read American history you will be surprised to see that such "tactics" have been standard since the early 19th century. Candidates have actually been physically kept away from the microphone, conventions have been cynically adjourned by people who had no right to do so.

It's a zoo. So naturally those who win are the biggest bulls.

2
1
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Wonderful timing!

Mr Putin doesn't and didn't, have any serious rivals.

0
1
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Wonderful timing!

"I don't think anybody seriously believes the US has never meddled in a foreign election..."

I think the number is 81 times up to 2000. (Not including actual coup d'etats, murdered heads of state, etc.) Since then, it's been hard to keep up.

"[I]t's been a while since they actively overthrew a foreign government".

Er, which planet have you been living on? Libya? (president murdered). Afghanistan? Iraq? (president murdered, along with about 23 million civilians). Syria? (didn't quite manage to pull that one off, but you can bet its president would have been murdered too). Yemen? Sudan? Egypt?

4
1
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Last name on the list is not likely to be Russian

"Whether the name is Bulgarian or Slovak or Martian, the individual concerned could still be Russian. And even if he's not, he could still be working in and employed by Russia".

Come to that, he could be American. The USA is full of Russian emigre(e)s. And even if (s)he isn't American, he could very well be employed by the US government - which certainly spends far more on trolling and propaganda than anyone else in the world.

"Let's not get distracted by trivialities".

Yeah, such as the truth.

1
1
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Last name on the list is not likely to be Russian

And "Boris" is not a popular name in Germany or the UK; so Boris Becker and Boris Johnson don't exist.

2
0
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Last name on the list is not likely to be Russian

Well, someone had $200 million to spend on trolling as long ago as 2011; and, as you will know, government budgets generally grow with time.

"Revealed: US spy operation that manipulates social media

"Military's 'sock puppet' software creates fake online identities to spread pro-American propaganda

"Jeff Jarvis: Washington shows the morals of a clumsy spammer"

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2011/mar/17/us-spy-operation-social-networks

1
0
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Is lies! Lies! All lies!

Or you could seek an education. Better late than never.

1
0
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Many layers of subterfuge

"We, on both sides of the Atlantic, have become a real-life Idiocracy".

Well, it took nearly a century, but Mencken is vindicated.

"The larger the mob, the harder the test. In small areas, before small electorates, a first-rate man occasionally fights his way through, carrying even the mob with him by force of his personality. But when the field is nationwide, and the fight must be waged chiefly at second and third hand, and the force of personality cannot so readily make itself felt, then all the odds are on the man who is, intrinsically, the most devious and mediocre — the man who can most adeptly disperse the notion that his mind is a virtual vacuum.

"The Presidency tends, year by year, to go to such men. As democracy is perfected, the office represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. We move toward a lofty ideal. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron".

- H. L. Mencken (Baltimore Evening Sun, July 26, 1920)

10
0
Archtech
Silver badge

Wonderful timing!

It is marvellous that this has been done immediately before the Russian presidential election.

Now, if any American even says a word about preferring one Russian candidate to another, the Russians can indict him (or her) and imprison them.

Not, of course, that any American would ever dream of trying to influence an election in any foreign country.

https://img.timeinc.net/time/magazine/archive/covers/1996/1101960715_400.jpg

https://www.sott.net/article/290848-Meet-Alexei-Navalny-The-US-State-Departments-inside-man-for-regime-change-in-Russia

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/putin-rival-russian-paris-hilton-invited-trump-breakfast-article-1.3775844

15
13

Hate to ruin your day, but... Boffins cook up fresh Meltdown, Spectre CPU design flaw exploits

Archtech
Silver badge

Re: "effort wouldn't be better expended on something of more value to society."

The syndrome here is very similar to that with GM food (and other substances).

Some of the engineers object that the full consequences are unknowable, and the badness of those consequences seems to have no limit.

The bosses reply that they have to think about next quarter's profits and stock price, so do it anyway or be fired.

In the conflict between a potential serious risk to the whole human race and someone's personal wealth in the short term, always back the latter.

15
1
Archtech
Silver badge

Consistent

"The Meltdown and Spectre design flaws are a result of chip makers prioritizing speed over security".

Which is just another typical instance of modern business prioritizing marketing over quality.

"Never mind the quality; feel the width!"

3
0

Yes, Assange, we'll still nick you for skipping bail, rules court

Archtech
Silver badge

"The point was also that if he were sent to Sweden and the Americans requested his extradition, the UK would have to agree to it before it could happen".

Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha!

That's the funniest yet.

0
7
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Oh, come on

"...anybody wanting to get their nose into the Westminster trough knows that grovelling to the USA is job #1 as far as the UK is concerned".

Eleven people actually pretend to disagree with that?

0
6
Archtech
Silver badge

Unsupported libel

"For a rapist, Mr. Assange protests far too much".

Now who is it who has no respect for law? Assange has not even been charged with rape; he was wanted for interview only (and that interview has now been granted and completed). The two women whom he allegedly raped have made it perfectly clear that they don't think he did, and they didn't want him prosecuted.

Why does it satisfy you so much to libel someone who has only tried to make your life better?

I have never seen such a grotesque, colossal case of multiple Stockholm Syndrome.

2
6
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Oh, come on

"...work to elect MPs who will vote to abrogate the treaty."

Hahahahahahahahaha!

I suppose you think the UK is a democracy.

Obviously, no such person could be elected. The Force of Money is strong in Washington. As is the Force of murder.

1
4
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Schrödinger's Embassy

"I think we already know he's a total arsehole".

Any evidence for that? At all?

0
6
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Schrödinger's Embassy

And if he gets it wrong, he dies. Perhaps slowly and horribly.

0
8
Archtech
Silver badge

Incorrect

"Every single thing he's done is exploit a loophole, to remain free from a custodial sentence whether in Britain, Sweden or the U.S..."

That turns out not to be the case.

Assange waited in Sweden at the request of the authorities until it seemed they had lost interest. Then he returned to the UK, at which point the Swedes immediately issued a warrant for his arrest. (Still without preferring any charges). He gave himself up to the police and went to court. When it seemed that he would be sent back to Sweden, he sought political asylum.

If he had not done so, his life would likely have been over - one way or another. As you very well know, the US government has not the slightest interest in any law - from the UN Charter to the US Constitution itself. As you very well know, the US government has lawlessly killed literally millions of people who had done nothing to deserve any punishment, let alone death. They would kill Assange as carelessly as they would tread on an ant.

But the most important fact is that Assange has done nothing either wrong or illegal. The leaks he facilitated were an act of great selflessness and bravery. He is not a US or UK citizen, so he cannot have committed treason against those governments.

0
11
Archtech
Silver badge

Politicians too?

"The people throwing out all this info into the public domain need to be above reproach, otherwise you have to question their motives..."

Would you apply that criterion to political leaders too? If so, you are insane. If not, you are hopelessly inconsistent.

2
2
Archtech
Silver badge

Funny people should accuse Assange of disrespect for the law

"I am not convinced of his innocence or [guilt] either way..."

Innocence or guilt of what? Assange has not been charged with any crime in any country.

The Swedish authorities asked to interview him; he waited for several weeks during which they chose not to, then returned to London at which point they immediately issued a warrant for his arrest.

He sought political asylum because he believed - I think rightly - that if he gave himself up he would find himself, first in Sweden, then in the USA, and finally in an unmarked grave before he could blink.

"Unmarked grave" may be wrong. Maybe they would just have imprisoned him in a secret dungeon for the rest of his life, or rendered him to Egypt, Uzbekistan, or Afghanistan to be tortured to death.

2
6
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: astroturfing

Well said, Adrian 4. It was worth while reading down the first umpteen dozen comments to find one that shows the commenter's brain is working and he is not seeing red and screaming "Rip him apart!"

1
7
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: the arrest warrant was not in the public interest and therefore ought to be scrapped

Read this thread carefully, everyone.

This is what a lynch mob looks like. Are you part of it?

0
11
Archtech
Silver badge

Apparently homo sapiens is not intelligent

You would think that, quite apart from the ethical aspects of the matter - which I would never expect governments or courts of law to respect - human beings would have a lively eye to their own advantage.

Apparently not.

What Assange and his colleagues have done is to reveal to the public what their governments have been doing in secrecy. It was like lifting a large flat stone to uncover masses of disgusting bugs and worms.

So I would expect anyone who doesn't wish to be exploited, robbed, deceived and oppressed to be profoundly grateful. But it seems a large majority prefers to abuse Assange and call for his punishment.

Please don't forget that the crowd insisted that Jesus be crucified instead of the well-known robber and murderer Barabbas.

And the crowd demanded that Socrates should be executed for the unforgivable crime of trying to educate the Athenian youth.

Well, you have made your own beds: I hope you find them comfortable in the years to come.

2
11

Equifax hack worse than previously thought: Biz kissed goodbye to card expiry dates, tax IDs etc

Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Things will never change

Remember in 1999-2000 when Microsoft had been found bang to rights in a criminal court of law, and the judge was pondering whether to break it up or just force it to publish the source code for Windows?

Then Dubya was elected and suddenly the DoJ dropped the case on the floor.

11
0
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Equifax hack worse than previously thought?

The so-called "DNC hack" came close. They complained their servers had been "hacked by Russia", but refused to allow the FBI to examine those servers.

Nothing to hide, no sirree bob.

9
14

UK worker who sold customers' data to nuisance callers must cough up £1k

Archtech
Silver badge

Policy

Government is on the side of the entrepreneur... always. After all, it's entrepreneurs who pay them. (Not their official salaries, silly, those go for cocktails).

0
1

Electronic Frontier Foundation chap John Perry Barlow has died

Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Before we all get wet eyed ...

Nowadays those two lines alone would get him a prison sentence.

1
0
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: Going to be

You can't go wrong.

0
0

Why aren't you being arbiters of truth? MPs scream at Facebook, YouTube, Twitter

Archtech
Silver badge

How different from the home life of our own dear government

"...the firm was "not proud" of evidence that showed false information was shown to people through this system".

Thank goodness no "false information" is ever shown to people through the House of Commons, 10 Downing Street, or Whitehall.

Luckily that would be quite impossible due to the unimpeachable integrity, benevolence and omniscience of their occupants.

16
1
Archtech
Silver badge

More data required...

'But this argument got short shrift from Collins, who later said: "You haven't looked! You haven't looked, have you?"'

Looked at what, for what...?

Every account, to see if the account holder has any relations, friends, acquaintances, business partners, customers, suppliers, etc. who knows anyone who might be Russian?

Every message, to see if it might not be true?

What??????

8
2
Archtech
Silver badge

You mean children don't have to have Twitter accounts?

"What is this [spread of misinformation] doing to our children?"

Nothing, unless their parents are irresponsible enough to expose them to it.

12
0
Archtech
Silver badge

I wonder...

... how many tweets, posts, etc. will be produced by accounts "linked to" "US actors" during the upcoming Russian presidential election.

Because, of course, the US government has NEVER interfered in any way with Russian politics.

9
2
Archtech
Silver badge

Bleeding obvious...

"Beyond that, Pickles said, it wasn't for Twitter to revoke access because someone had said something untrue".

Otherwise politicians couldn't have Twitter acounts. Duh.

9
1
Archtech
Silver badge

Unbriefed?

"This is the problem, Mr Milner," Ian Lucas said to Facebook's UK policy manager Simon Milner. "You have everything. You have all that information; we have none of it because we can't see it."

Hasn't Mr Lucas heard of GCHQ?

Or maybe even THEY won't let him see it.

10
1
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: How would they know?

"I can't remember the last time I heard a politician make a truthful statement".

Isn't there a law against it, or something?

7
1
Archtech
Silver badge

If only there were some quicker, cheaper, simpler way...

"...the members of the digital, culture, media and sport committee selflessly flew to Washington DC on the public purse..."

Er, why? Facebook, YouTube (part of Google) and Twitter. Haven't all of those immense corporations developed clever means of, er, exchanging information across long distances by electronic means?

Presumably the MPs wanted written transcripts of the conversations. So wouldn't it be better to send written questions and let the corporations reply in writing? Or, if interactivity was necessary, perhaps one (or more) of the corporations could have come up with some way of doing that without anyone flying thousands of miles (and enjoying luxurious hotel accommodation and meals) on the public purse?

7
0

Brit regulator pats self on back over nuisance call reduction: It's just 4 billion now!

Archtech
Silver badge

If government was serious about this...

... they could easily stop it. I mean, the "security services" know perfectly well whenever each of us takes a dump or combs her hair - not to mention reading all our emails and listening in to our phone calls. They certainly - admittedly - have all the metadata, including which number called which other number when.

So they could easily call in the SAS or whatever and take those bastards out if they wanted. (For the soft-hearted among us, make that the Special Law Services).

3
0
Archtech
Silver badge

Re: So how come I don't get any?

"I can't help but wonder if at least in part somewhat self inflicted....?"

You mean like a girl who goes out in public with a short skirt, or a bloke who uses an expensive smartphone?

7
5
Archtech
Silver badge

Ruled right out

Oooooooh no - that would infringe the "human rights" of the offending corporations.

1
6

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018