* Posts by Archtech

430 posts • joined 9 Jul 2016

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Julian Assange wins at hide-and-seek game against Sweden

Archtech

Re: No charges have ever been brought

'Julian Assange has been vindicated because the Swedish case against him was corrupt. The prosecutor, Marianne Ny, obstructed justice and should be prosecuted. Her obsession with Assange not only embarrassed her colleagues and the judiciary but exposed the Swedish state's collusion with the United States in its crimes of war and "rendition".

'Had Assange not sought refuge in the Ecuadorean embassy in London, he would have been on his way to the kind of American torture pit Chelsea Manning had to endure.

'This prospect was obscured by the grim farce played out in Sweden. "It's a laughing stock," said James Catlin, one of Assange's Australian lawyers. "It is as if they make it up as they go along".

'It may have seemed that way, but there was always serious purpose. In 2008, a secret Pentagon document prepared by the "Cyber Counterintelligence Assessments Branch" foretold a detailed plan to discredit WikiLeaks and smear Assange personally.

'The "mission" was to destroy the "trust" that was WikiLeaks' "centre of gravity". This would be achieved with threats of "exposure [and] criminal prosecution". Silencing and criminalising such an unpredictable source of truth-telling was the aim.

'Perhaps this was understandable. WikiLeaks has exposed the way America dominates much of human affairs, including its epic crimes, especially in Afghanistan and Iraq: the wholesale, often homicidal killing of civilians and the contempt for sovereignty and international law'.

http://johnpilger.com/articles/getting-julian-assange-the-untold-story

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Archtech

Re: If he's a "first rate cock"

"He'll probably still be able to pull the ladies, even with the 'possible rapist' allegation following him around the rest of his days".

Jealous, are we? I thought so.

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Archtech

Re: Slightly complicated...

"Is it too difficult for you to understand that the girls refused to press charges?"

I think it's too difficult for him to accept that the alleged (or, actually, not alleged) offences were not committed against him, and that not only does he know nothing about it, it is none of his business.

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Archtech

Re: @Mike Richards ..Slightly complicated...

"In fact the US would not issue any sort of warrant or extradition request of Assange while he's in the UK".

Thanks for that firm assurance, er, Mr President.

Oh wait a moment - even if Ian were the President of the USA, we still couldn't believe a word he said.

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Archtech

Re: I wish they'd stop calling it "rape".

So now we know that seven Register readers believe that "a condom ripping during voluntary sex" does qualify as rape.

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Archtech

Obviously fair

Thanks for informing me about this - I'm delighted to hear there is something I can like about French law.

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Archtech

Who are these people?

There seem to be an awful lot of comments here by people who either work for the US or UK government, or relish slavery and being kept in ignorance.

Assange has merely been doing what good journalists have always done - and what is their bounden duty to do. What the people who uncovered the Watergate scandal and many others did.

Without discovery and revelation of information about what governments are doing, citizens have no idea what is being done in their names and with their money. If those who criticize Assange want to live in a Western version of the USSR or Nazi Germany, that's fine for them - but many of us prefer freedom.

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Archtech

Re: "I will be able to decide to resume the investigation immediately"

Hello, he has already BEEN questioned by Swedish prosecutors - not once but TWICE. Once in Stockholm, where he extended his stay for that reason alone, and once at the Ecuadorean Embassy in London several months ago.

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Archtech

"Yes, but you need to defend yourself in a tribunal (in a civil and democratic country, and Sweden looks to be one), not escaping away trying to avoid the trial".

Assange delayed his departure from Sweden for several weeks for exactly that reason. He did not fly to the UK until the original prosecutor had interviewed him and told him no charges would be brought.

It is astounding and quite unprecedented, when the alleged "victims" are on public record as having acknowledged that they do not believe any crime was committed and that they do not wish a prosecution to take place, and when the prosecutor has interviewed the accused and publicly announced that there is no evidence and so they are not bringing charges, for a different prosecutor suddenly to pop up and act as if none of that had ever happened.

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Archtech

No charges have ever been brought

"The evidence would be the testimony of the women involved".

Precisely.

'The woman of whom Mr. Assange is accused of the offence of "lesser rape" (a technical term in Swedish law) sent an SMS to a friend saying that she "did not want to accuse JA [of] anything" and "it was the police who made up the charges". The other woman tweeted in 2013 that she had never been raped. Both women’s testimonies say that they consented to the sex. A senior prosecutor already dismissed the ’rape’ accusation, saying that there were no grounds for accusing Mr. Assange on this basis'.

https://justice4assange.com/

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Blighty's buying another 17 F-35s, confirms the American government

Archtech

Re: Tough choices

The annoying thing is that, while the money would be better spent on any of a dozen productive things we can all think of, a couple of aircraft carriers in the South China Sea (or the Persian Gulf or the Baltic) can only cause us all very large amounts of grief.

Look up the effects of a single Topol or Yars warhead; then look up how many of them the Russians have; then try to find one square inch of the British Isles that would be habitable if Putin were to get cross enough with us to push the button.

But of course, if the Russians wiped out the UK with a thermonuclar attack, it would be OK - we can rest assured that our faithful American allies would commit suicide by avenging us.

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Archtech

Tough choices

"Each aircraft costs around $120m, though the exact price is jealously guarded by all involved".

Exactly the cost of a medium-size hospital, by a curious coincidence. Not that we want any of those.

Or the cost of paying 1,000 doctors for a year - since Tony Blair cleverly negotiated their pay up through the roof.

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Archtech

Re: Appeal to armchair strategists

Your post reminds me of the old apple-seller whose friends pointed out that he was selling below cost. "But I'll make it up in volume!" he explained. (This was in the days before Amazon, of course, which actually did that).

No matter how many old pieces of floating junk the Yanks have, I bet the Chinese and the Russians have at least ten missiles for each of them. Furthermore, I am willing to bet the missiles cost less than the ships.

"The thicker the hay, the more easily it is mown". - Attila the Hun

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Archtech

Re: Appeal to armchair strategists

I think it must be the tried and tested "Mouse that Roared" strategy.

Monday: Declare war on China.

Monday lunchtime: Surrender.

Tuesday: PROFIT!!!!!!!!!!!

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Archtech

Re: I'm in the mood for being a downvote magnet

"The F35 is intended to be everything to everybody".

And thanks to our ingenious and hardworking American allies, it fulfills every single role far better than any dedicated aircraft ever could.

Don't you love the smell of technology in the morning?

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Archtech

Re: F-35A - the Widowmaker

Killed more German pilots than the USAF.

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Archtech

Er,

1. 1957 was actually 60 years ago. 60 years before 1957, the Wright Brothers hadn't yet flown.

2. Sandys and his ilk DID destroy the British aircraft industry - no "nearly" about it. (See "Empire of the Clouds", passim - if you can read it without vomiting). But that began in 1945. The Yanks said, "You owe your soul to the company store (i.e. us), so for starters we'll have your aircraft industry. And the British government assumed the position.

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Archtech

Re: Flying Duck

A MiG-15 would have reasonable chances against an F-35. Especially in a dogfight.

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Archtech

Re: civilian Intercept

"The Venrable EE Lightning which was basically a Jet Engine with a Pilot on top..."

Er, if you please, a jet engine with a jet engine on top with a pilot on top.

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Dell BIOS update borks PCs

Archtech

Re: So to get zero stars

"Schroedinger called. He wants his cat back".

Maybe.

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Someone is sending propaganda texts to Ukrainian soldiers

Archtech

Biased much?

"This is the kind of thing that pops up on Ukrainian soldiers' smartphones when they're at the front".

This is the kind of sentence that makes me wonder if it was simply transcribed from a Kiev junta press release; or whether the writer actually thinks of the place where the Ukrainian soldiers are as "the front".

In case anyone is unaware or has forgotten, "the front" is what the Kiev people call the de-facto border between the DNR and LPR and the rest of Ukraine. It is the line where the combined armed might of Ukraine - once a substantial part of the USSR - was stopped dead in its attempts to exterminate the civilian populations of the DNR and LPR or drive them from their homes en masse. (Essentially the same project as ISIS has been undertaking in Iraq and Syria, and very probably planned and driven by the same people).

Those civilian populations are citizens of Ukraine, who until 2014 paid taxes and fulfilled all their other civic obligations. When the Kiev junta sent armoured columns to "punish" them for the crime of objecting to the violent illegal coup d'etat that drove out the President for whom they had voted, the Donbass civilians astonishingly took up arms and, after a tough struggle, drove the Ukrainian armed forces and the amateur Nazi "brigades" and "regiments" assisting them into wholesale retreat.

It's hard to find words suitable to describe a "government" that sends the full strength of its armed forces against a segment of its own civilian population, shelling and bombing cities, towns and villages mercilessly. That's not a "front": it's an attempted, but hopelessly bungled, genocide.

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Archtech

Re: "Sinister text messages reveal high-tech front in Ukraine war"

So far, I see two people have chosen to downvote DAM's comment about the Ukrainian general calling for the destruction of all Jews.

Was this because the Jewish Chronicle is considered an unreliable source? Because the downvoters approve of calls for the destruction of Jews? Or just the vague belief that it's in poor taste to mention such matters?

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Just so we're all clear on this: Russia hacked the French elections, US Republicans and Dems

Archtech

Re: Kettles and pots?

"But who would have thought it was so hard to run a country?"

Not Donald Trump.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-100days-idUSKBN17U0CA

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Archtech

Same guy?

"Clapper said Russia has been trying to influence American elections since the 1960s, and had scored a major win in 2016..."

Is this the same James Clapper who is known to have deliberately and knowingly lied to Congress on at least two previous occasions?

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'Crazy bad' bug in Microsoft's Windows malware scanner can be used to install malware

Archtech

Francis Aloysius Xavier Murphy, at your service sor

"Oh you couldn't make this up".

Au contraire, it's merely a basic example of Murphy's Law at work. That kind of thing should be extremely familiar from the first week of Engineering 101.

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Archtech

Re: Meanwhile MS is messing with Windows Update...

Are Indians then the only people who have cousins? If so, why was I not told before?

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Archtech

Re: So now we can only hope...

"... they should be more likely to use better anti-malware than Security Essentials or whatever its title of the week is".

Er, such as?

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Archtech

Re: So now we can only hope...

About 50 years ago, I learned that in linear programming you can only optimize one variable. A similar rule obtains in real life. If you really want to accomplish something you have to make it your top priority and ruthlessly subordinate everything else to it.

The main reason for Microsoft's success has been that it has always observed that rule meticulously. The corporation's top priority, obviously, is maximizing long-term profit. As a result, it has brought in vast amounts of profit down the years.

As a side effect, it has also neglected the interests of users - such as security. Implementing and maintaining good security is not only very expensive and time-consuming; it also militates against almost every other possible parameter of running a software business.

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Australian Taxation Office named as party preventing IT contractors being paid

Archtech

The logical implication...

... must be that the ATO cannot unfreeze Plutus' accounts because of a software glitch, which a contractor was supposed to have fixed this week.

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ATM security devs rush out patch after boffins deliver knockout blow

Archtech

Re: It's difficult to take ATMs seriously on security...

Er, not forgetting that as soon as you deposit money with a bank it becomes legally the bank's property. All you get is an IOU.

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Red alert! Intel patches remote execution hole that's been hidden in chips since 2010

Archtech

Re: Holy shucking fit

"I'm glad I'm an AMD customer".

Starting today, so am I.

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Archtech

In a slightly different light

Still feel as negatively disposed towards Wikileaks and Julian Assange now?

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Kali Linux can now use cloud GPUs for password-cracking

Archtech

Kali...

Shouldn't those lovable penguins have eight arms and lots of swords and skulls?

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Ministry of Justice scraps 'conviction by computer' law

Archtech

Re: the government's aim...

Cheap for the government, perhaps. But the main objection to the "justice" systems in all Western nations is still that justice (such as it is) is available to the rich only. You can't get justice without one or more clever and tricky lawyers, and they cost real money.

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Archtech

Re: Still "be able to" attend court?

Exceptional circumstances that are mitigating?

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Archtech

"Victim"?

TV Licensing collected £3.7 billion in revenue in 2013/14.

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Regulate This! Time to subject algorithms to our laws

Archtech

Mortgage

That's quite a good case in point - precisely because it is so simple. For a start, as soon as the bank people said anything like, "The computer doesn't think you can afford the payments", they revealed their utter ignorance of what was really happening.

Computers do not think. One day they possibly might, but as of today they don't. What they should have said was, "We have done some predetermined sums on our computer, and we don't think you can afford the payments".

The decisions were all made by bank staff - probably managers - and then programmed into the software. If any mistakes (or legal offenses) resulted, they were the fault of those people.

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Archtech

Re: Even if

It's certainly true (or very plausible) that some neural networks or even computer programs may reach reasonable decisions by methods that no human being can ascertain (or understand).

But anything arising from such automated decision-taking is still entirely the responsibility of whoever used the computer to make decisions. It can't be any other way.

If you can't be sure exactly how your decision-making system will work in ALL circumstances that might possibly arise, don't deploy it. If you do, you are like someone firing off a gun in random directions and hoping you never hit anyone.

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Archtech

Re: what...

Nevertheless, however the computer works and regardless of whether any human being can understand how it arrives at decisions, the people responsible for using it to make decisions must carry the can legally. The buck cannot stop with a machine, so it must stop with the people who installed the machine as part of their system. In principle, I suspect it's not very different from hitting someone with a spade. It's not the spade's fault!

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Archtech

Re: I am not a lawyer but...

Can a computer break the law? Literally speaking. I don't think any inanimate object can be treated as capable of understanding the law. (Neither is any human being, but that's another rant).

This is actually a very deep and potentially very embarrassing inquiry. Seeing how many human systems and organizations - such as governments and corporations - are largely designed to diffuse blame and prevent any specific person or people from being held legally responsible.

When decisions are embodied in a computer program, they become definite, exact and undeniable. But the program, and the computer that executes it, are not the kind of entities that are capable of legal or illegal behaviour.

So the computer program becomes a kind of "confession in advance" by those who can be held legally responsible if anything goes wrong. Once this doctrine becomes established and widely understood, there may be a very noticeable decrease in the amount of automation.

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'Nobody's got to use the internet,' argues idiot congressman in row over ISP privacy rules

Archtech

Editor strikes

"The FCC acknowledges that around 75 per cent of US consumers do not have more than one choice of high-speed internet provider..."

The FCC acknowledges that around 75 per cent of US consumers do not have a choice of high-speed internet provider...

FTFY.

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Who really gives a toss if it's agile or not?

Archtech

Re: Government still spends an outrageous amount of money on IT

I hope you were joking. If not, try reading the classic book "The Mythical Man-Month".

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Put down your coffee and admire the sheer amount of data Windows 10 Creators Update will slurp from your PC

Archtech

"Me Mam used to call me a mardy-arse bugger when I was a lad".

But what did she call you when she got cross?

(And by the way, shouldn't that be 'when I were a lad'? Just asking).

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Archtech

Re: no edge cases for MS

"... kinda like the issue with the US border people".

Gee, I wonder if there could be some kind of common factor at work here?

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Archtech

Re: I thought

When did playing some childish game become a reason for making a committal decision that could destroy your privacy and eventually cost you a lot of money?

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Archtech

Re: Why can they not grasp

"Those whom the gods wish to destroy, they first make mad".

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Archtech

Re: BongoJoe

But then the NSA and the CIA would be cross with them. And experience shows that isn't good for your business. (Or your health).

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Archtech

Re: "T he owner of the documents agreed to the privacy policy.." (sic)

"What assurances do I have that my medical records are not currently being shown on some screen in Redmond?"

Well, you do have an assurance that your medical records are currently being stored on some server in Redmond... and on a few others belonging to the NSA. (Just in case they ever want to look you up, indict you, frame you, blackmail you...)

"... and how is it that this *ISN'T TOTALLY ILLEGAL !!*??"

That's slightly harder to explain. The simplest way I can put it is this: It's what the US government wants, and therefore it doesn't matter whether it's totally illegal under anyone else's laws.

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Archtech

Unfortunately that turns out to be a misunderstanding, not an understanding.

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Archtech

Re: "Make sure you don't put Windows 10 into Full telemetry mode"

It certainly dovetails admirably with the NSA's requirements to record and store everything.

Probably just coincidence.

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