* Posts by Baldrickk

520 posts • joined 26 May 2016

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Currys PC World given a spanking for misleading laptop savings ads

Baldrickk
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Not one shop, instead, they make product A expensive in location #1, product B expensive in location #2...

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Baldrickk
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Re: PC World still exists?

Optical connectors.

That really is stupid. Even worse is that the linked one is £9.99, and this one: http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/digital-audio-optical-toslink-to-mini-toslink-adapter-web-only-l71ba is £0.22 despite being identical...

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Researcher says fixes to Windows Defender's engine incomplete

Baldrickk
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Re: Almost as good as the shill who posted that WD was not inferior to Kaspersky

I use Windows because I have to; mandated at work, and most of my games don't have *nix support yet.

I personally would prefer to be able to use a Linux as my primary OS, but that's primarilly because I prefer the way it does things. I was perfectly happy to be using Windows 7, but the telemetry, ads, pre-installed "recommended" apps in Windows 10 are an annoyance, at best.

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BT's Ryan Reynolds helicopter Wi-Fi ads 'misleading', thunders ad watchdog

Baldrickk
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Public Wifi Access

I was actually talking about this this morning. My colleagues BT hub kept falling over, needing reboting regularly.

He is convinced it is because he lives outside a train station, and so gets many many short term connections as people's phones connect as they walk past...

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Baldrickk
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Given the chance...

I go with wires anyway.

That leaves my phone as the sole Wi-Fi using device in the house.

Annoyingly it gets network dropouts (Wi-Fi still connected, strong signal shown, but no internet access).

Even more annoyingly, it's an issue with the phone, as the internet still works, and the problem is 'fixed' by disconnecting the wifi and connecting it again, but other Wi-Fi devices (when connected) don't suffer the same problem.

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Lockheed, USAF hold breath as F-35 pilots report hypoxia

Baldrickk
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Re: O2 many issues

@Ledswinger

My point about the size of the carrier was to do with it being large enough to land conventional jet aircraft on the deck.

Sure, you can launch them with a catapault - and I agree, we should have had them in the original spec, but recovering them with a restrictive runway is a lot harder.

While the Harrier did have full VTOL capability, it was typically launched conventionally, and landed vertically for this reason (and limited coolant meant that you wanted to minimise time spent in vertical mode)

You'll have to ask an aeronautical engineer as to why they chose the design they did for the F-35s. My assumption is that the more conventional engine layout was superior for both the stealth aspect and for the sharing of parts. Note that the F35 has only one jet nozzle and the Harrier has four.

I wasn't suggesting to put the Harrier on new carriers, it was indeed a very successful aircraft, but you are correct, it is inferior to the current generation in combat. Until the F-35B becomes operationally availiable though, it is afaik the only VTOL jet availiable to the US. It's continued use shows that it is indeed useful still, because of that capability.

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Baldrickk
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Re: O2 many issues

Yes, because every nation can afford to build Nimitz class carriers... the US have 10 built over 50 years, you are pumping them out so fast yourselves... /s

Besides that, half the US carriers are of the STOVL type, carrying either helos or the venerable Harrier, which, oh, they bought all the old British ones. I'm sure they don't value the VTOL capabilities at all...

Remember that the F-35 comes in different varieties, and only the carrier based one gets the VTOL.

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Please do not scare the pigeons – they'll crash the network

Baldrickk
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Re-crimp?

Re-crimping the cable - sounds to me like a temporary solution at best. If that much strain is being put on it, it is likely to fail again. The more robust solution would be to slacken the cable so that the wire support does its job and takes the strain, not the network cable.

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Human-free robo-cars on Washington streets after governor said the software is 'foolproof'

Baldrickk
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Wrong word?

Foolproof was probably not the word that most describes the sentiment he wanted to put across.

If you read the quote, he was trying to say that an automated car doesn't drive drunk, on drugs, on the phone, tired, distracted by dogs/cats/kids/significant others etc. or without due care and attention. all of which are 'foolish' things for a human driver to do.

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Teen texted boyfriend to kill himself. It worked. Will the law change to deal with digital reality?

Baldrickk
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Re: All this vitriol for a little girl ...

And you knew nothing about right and wrong when you were 15? Nothing about the value of a human life?

Yes, before some point people don't fully understand the concequences of their actions. I don't believe that it is as late as the law states, the law isn't the definitive point - for a start, it varies between countries.

Things like murder are a whole other level though, and I personally think that extremes such as this are understood more clearly at younger ages than some of the 'grey areas'. I'm not a psycologist, but I'm in no doubt that she knew exactly what she was doing, for the simple fact that if she didn't, she wouldn't have been able to pull it off.

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What a tit! Uber CEO hijacks his staff breast-pump room to meditate

Baldrickk
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On one level this seems overhyped.

I get all the sexist claims that have already been made, but as the article says, the room was empty at the time.

It doesn't say if he blocked anyone else from coming in and turfing him out. If that is the case, this reads a lot like "man uses vacant room"

If he did inconvenience others by being there - fair enough.

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The harsh reality of Apple's augmented reality toolset ARKit: It's an incredible battery hog

Baldrickk
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Re: Makes sense

Indeed, nothing comes for free, you want to do more compute intensive tasks on a device, it needs to drink more power. This isn't exactly flappybird.

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Apple gives world ... umm ... not much new actually

Baldrickk
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Re: Back to the 90s

The problem is less that they are not being innovative, but that they are also lagging behind, or worse, devolving their products.

As people have been saying, you don't go to apple now for 'pro' needs, you find a good solid workstation instead, because apple's gear doesn't cut it anymore. I mean, not being able to upgrade the memory? really?

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Vodafone to block its ads from appearing next to 'fake news'

Baldrickk
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Most Vodafone ads are fake news already.

I've been with Vodaphone since 2011/12, they had good coverage in my area at the time SW, and good coverage in the area I live in now, SE.

Coverage was a little dodgy when I was in the NE, but it improved.

Recent trips to Wales, the Peak District and other out of the way places showed that, at least for where I was, the coverage was far better than the 3, EE and O2 networked phones other members of my family were using, and I lost coverage only once, when down a narrow, twisting valley where no phone coverage could reach. When leaving, my phone was on the network (and I was making a call) long before my Father's phone had reconnected to his network.

I'm sure there are still deadspots around for Vodaphone, as there will be for all carriers, but I haven't found them lacking myself.

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No hypersonic railguns on our ships this year, says US Navy

Baldrickk
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Re: And you believe this?

There is a difference between mounting something on a ship to go test it, and actually installing an operational system for use in combat...

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Baldrickk
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Re: When the missile is doing mach 8...

Minor physics question for you:

What is the magnitude of the differnce between:

1) two identical cars each travelling at 30kmph in a head on collision

2) one of the above cars colliding with a cliff wall

(the answer is probably smaller than you might think)

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Baldrickk
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Re: Railguns vs lasers

But when you need an extra barrel for every 4 shells, the mass savings are not exactly positive any more.

Where you save is in the supposedly vastly better accuracy and penetration power - if it takes 1-2 shots to take out a ship, rather than say, the 20 or so* you would have to fire to reliably take out an enemy ship in WWII era (*estimate off the top of my head, thinking about ranging shots, misses, non-penetrations etc) then you do need less.

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Break crypto to monitor jihadis in real time? Don't be ridiculous, say experts

Baldrickk
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Re: RE: A time machine and a quantum computer

Sure, I'll give them to you in a week, you then still have a week to pay up. Giving you them in advance would be cheating!

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Hyperloop One teases idea of 50-minute London-Edinburgh ride

Baldrickk
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Not that I am saying we must have one and it is the best thing ever, but why only Germany? UK is tectonically stable (afaik, I'm not a geologist, but where are our fault lines?) and has an even longer history with rail.

You might even think that a hyperloop would get more public support than HS2, being out of the way and not cutting through some important bits of the countryside, and people's homes.

Interesting tidbit about St Petersberg though, thanks for that.

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Baldrickk
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you rock much harder than Shelbyville

Monorail, monorail, monorail [sing it with me] Monorail!

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Amazon granted patent to put parachutes inside shipping labels

Baldrickk
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"No overhead wires here either, but within a 100 ft of where I'm sitting there is a big tree, some lampposts and of course the roofs of the houses in my street."

The same here, plus being under the landing path of a small-ish airport (busy with private jets, not airlines or light aircraft)

I'm sure delivery drones would be well received...

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Baldrickk
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Joke

Re: This is Getting Out of Hand

"Pond

In fact, dropping something by 'chute sounds like a way of introducing uncontrollable randomness into where the package actually ends up, which can be only a bad thing. What's to stop the package drifting off and landing in, for example, my pond? "

At least with all the bubble-wrap it'll float

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Google to give 6 months' warning for 2018 Chrome adblockalypse – report

Baldrickk
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Paid consumption

Ad slinging pages have themselves to blame here - Ad-blockers are popular because ads are annoying, and to a lesser degree (though more serious) potential ingress routes for malware.

The more pages sling annoying ads, the more people get annoyed with them (surprising, eh?) and want to stop them. So the more people block them.

Advertising in the street may or may not be eye-catching, but the majority is billboards in set locations, or bus stop advertising boards, or on the side of busses. It is passive, and people generally just get on with their lives.

If the web had followed suit, and restricted themselves to static banner ads on web-pages, then we probably wouldn't be talking about this now. People would just accept it and get on with their lives.

But no, we get popups, pop-unders, banner ads that spread across the page, ads that get in the way of what you want to do on the site, auto-playing videos, auto-playing videos with audio, and combinations of the lot.

So we want them gone. Is anyone suprised?

I don't see pay-per-view being a popular choice either. Most things don't exist in just one place on the internet.

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Your emotionally absent pic-snapping partner's going to look you in the eye again

Baldrickk
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Why would anyone want one of these?

They look terrible.

Besides, a camera, or phone held so that you are looking at the screen or through a viewfinder will be from "a human perspective" so again, why?

Only purpose is making you look like a Tw_t

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Virtual reality headsets even less popular than wearable devices

Baldrickk
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I want one, but...

I have tried phone based VR, with Cardboard, but even on a fairly powerful phone (Galaxy S7) the latency is too high. Shake your head at a relatively low speed and you still end up with the scene 100% out of phase with your motion - that's what makes people feel ill.

I have tried the Rift (Developer kit) but the resolution on those was far too low - the cardboard solution with my old phone at the time (LG G3) was of better visual quality.

I have heard some very good things about the Vive, from people I know online who own it, but it is both too expensive at the moment to be a viable purchase for me, and something that costs that much, I want to try before I buy. I believe the only place I can do that at the moment is a store in central London. Not exactly catering to the larger market here... So far, I have chosen to buy a (cheaper!) 50" smart tv, as something that will see much more use overall.

Playstation VR seems to be doing well, and at that price it is definitely more affordable. Something around that price for the PC would be attractive. There seems to be a couple more products getting towards release, such as Lenovo's offering. It looks like some interesting things may happen on this front, so for now, I'm watching this space.

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Windows XP crashed too much to spread WannaCrypt

Baldrickk
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Re: Funny

Well if they are all those big businesses, then they should be able to provide updated software that can run on an OS for which support ended 8 years ago, and extended (paid) support ended over 3 years ago.

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Security company finds unsecured bucket of US military images on AWS

Baldrickk
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Re: Id imagine...

"Tell me again, why putting sensitive information in the cloud is a good idea?"

A question I've struggled with since the cloud became "a thing"

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NASA boffins find an explanation for Saturn's wonky moon

Baldrickk
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Re: Astonishing. This would have been hit very hard indeed for that tipover

From reading the article, it wasn't the impact itself that 'tipped' the moon. Instead, the impact destabilised the surface, changing its shape.

Imagine a lead ball spinning on your desk.

Now hit it with a hammer, deforming it

Try spinning it again - it's unlikely that it will spin as smoothly as it did before - it is now unstable and flops around because the mass isn't evenly distrubuted. - the centre of mass is now not at the centre of the sphere.

Over time, the moon stabilised again, now with the misshapen bit at one of the poles, where it has the least angular momentum, and the least impact on the stability.

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UK ministers to push anti-encryption laws after election

Baldrickk
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Re: Well..

The company I work for didn't get affected by Wannacrypt, at all.

Obviously we were the ones behind it... (not)

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How good are selfies these days? Good enough to fool Samsung Galaxy S8 biometrics

Baldrickk
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What happened to blinking?

My old HTC Desire (or my Galaxy S3, I forget which) back in the day had facial recognition to unlock it as an option. An additional option required you to blink on demand to prove that you were not a static cutout.

I'm surprised something like this isn't implemented in addition to the iris check. Still not secure, but it prevents just a photo getting you in and should be trivial to (re)implement.

"selfie flash" feature as mentioned somewhere above to incite iris contraction would also be a good feature to 'prove' that it is a real eyeball, somewhat.

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8 out of 10 cats fear statistics – AI doesn't have this problem

Baldrickk
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Cat-food

I remember hearing that before.

Thing is, I always interpreted the updated message as "of those that responded to the survey"* when of course, they are discounting everyone who said "my cat doesn't exhibit a preference to a brand"

So even the "clear" explanation can be mis-interpreted

*note; I was a lot younger and much less of a sceptic at the time

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Go ahead, stage a hackathon. But pray it doesn't work too well

Baldrickk
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Kerbal

As this is basically how Kerbal Space Program came into being, I can't really complain about this.

Yes, it is a good example of something that has, pretty quickly, taken over the company that spawned it, a company that originally had no designs in that direction, it's also a pretty great success story.

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Kill Google AMP before it kills the web

Baldrickk
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Re: Turning it off

Firefox Mobile is good. addons mean adblocking on mobile! saves data (all those auto-running video ads, urgh) without resorting to static pages in mini-browsers (which are also good, but break some sites)

I do however wish they would improve the zoom though, only supporting two finger pinching right now, which invariably requires two handed use to be effective. They add this, I'll probably make the full switch.

So Pros and Cons

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Three home security systems found to be vulnerable – if hackers were hiding in bushes

Baldrickk
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Re: Wireless is one of those ideas that sounds good but is rubbish.

Wireless infrared sensors will typically use a single D-Cell battery and last over a year (guidance to replace once a year)

Magnetic door sensors will run on two AAs and have a similar lifetime.

The battery life of these alarm system sensors is not a major consideration.

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The real battle of Android's future – who controls the updates

Baldrickk
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Re: Google don't even Support Nexus

It might make it easier for them to support Nexus, if a phone is a phone is a phone, then the updates should be more universal. This /should/ apply to Nexus and other phones equally.

If this is the case, then "a proprietary Android." or not, I'll be happy to have an OS on my phone that doesn't become obselete before the hardware.

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Yo, patch that because scum still wanna exploit WannaCrypt-linked vuln

Baldrickk
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Re: Why but how?

I would guess that these are either mostly businesses, probably small ones, and this was an easy way to make files accessable from home/client sites etc, or somthing going on with UPnP which could open the ports if requested.

I haven't looked into whether Windows smb can open ports via UPnP though. As a general rule, disabling it is one of the first steps to securing your LAN - you want to know what ports you are exposing to the world, and it's easier to track when they are not being opened automatically on request from whatever applications are being run.

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Robot lands a 737 by hand, on a dare from DARPA

Baldrickk
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No, I think it is the one on the right, where a seat should be.

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Baldrickk
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Re: Huh?

It will still need to be customised for every type of plane, as they are all different with different characteristics - even moreso with a robot rather than fly by wire, as not only do the planes handle differently, the controls will be in different places in different cockpits...

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Britain shouldn't turn its back on EU drone regs, warns aerospace boffin

Baldrickk
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If you are flying a drone with a headset (to fly via onboard camera feed,) does it count as in line of sight? because you can't actually see it...

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Virtual reality upstart UploadVR allegedly had in-house 'kink room,' drugs, rampant sexism

Baldrickk
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Re: "monogamous reproduction"

This was a reply to PompusGit, who stated that for 25% of births the father is not the mother's husband.

I was enquiring as to whether he had the numbers on whether this was:

a) cheating on an existing partner

b) sex outside of a partnership

c) partners having children outside of marriage

The original comment seemed to imply a, and possibly b.

As for who's concern it is:

on a personal level, only those involved.

on a statistical level, anyone reading this forum thread?

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Baldrickk
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Re: "monogamous reproduction"

How many of those are cheating on their husband, and how many are partners but not married at the time?

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Chrome on Windows has credential theft bug

Baldrickk
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Isn't this an issue outside of Chrome?

Chrome in this case appears to be doing _exactly_ what it is told to do. That being to download a file and store it in the file system.

The actual issue, that a shortcut file can cause your machine to attempt to communicate with a third party just by opening the directory it is stored in would seem to me to be more of a Windows issue.

Or am I wrong?

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Bot you see is what you get: The cold reality of Microsoft's chat 'AI'

Baldrickk
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The way these bots approach gathering data reminds me of my old programs when I first started coding:

Hello, what is your name?

> Baldrickk

What is your date of birth?

> ## ## ####

Thanks Baldrickk!

You are ## years old!

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Android O-mg. Google won't kill screen hijack nasties on Android 6, 7 until the summer

Baldrickk
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Most users...

"Since most users won’t be able to approve the permission manually, such apps could be hurt by it."

Most users should be able to follow some simple instructions on what to do, just tell them how to enable it in your app if you want to use that feature.

It's not like the android settings menu is as complex as say, the Windows Registry.

Heck, my file browser uses this method to tell the user how to enable SD card access, so it's not like it's not been done before.

Oh, and that facebook messenger 'bubble'? It can go die in a fire. I won't let facebook's apps anywhere near my phone, but on other's phones who use it, it is constantly covering useful bits of other apps which are, funnilly enough, not designed to have a chunk of their UI hidden.

Of course you can move it, but then it is hiding something else, if not in that app, in another.

Intrusive crud.

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Amazon announces new Echo just as Microsoft's first Cortana-powered clone breaks cover

Baldrickk
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And... I won't be getting any of them.

They are pretty pointless gadgets really, a solution looking for a problem.

Tablets at least had a role to play, but now the people who want one have one, less people are buying them.

There is even less need for these.

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America's mystery X-37B space drone lands after two years in orbit

Baldrickk
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Re: it is unlikely that it carries any weapons... cough... cough...

relevent? https://what-if.xkcd.com/21/

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Facebook loves virtual reality so much it just axed its VR film studio

Baldrickk
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Cost is a big barrier here

The problem with VR goggles is that, well, they are pretty restricted in what they can do. They just do VR human interaction.

I built a new gaming PC at the beginning of the year, pushing the cost/performance ratio about as close to the sweet spot as possible, resulting in a machine that can handle VR without breaking a sweat... ...if I had some VR goggles.

It cost me about as much as the Vive, which would be headset that I would go for, were I to get one today, yet, being a powerful computer can do, well, everything you would want a computer for.

In terms of what it actually /does/, VR headsets are still a peripheral, device, akin to my monitor and my keyboard and mouse (or my controller), albeit wrapped up in one package. The thing is, the package costs 6 times as much as the items above put together.

Assuming that you are not literally rolling in money when you go to bed each night, you have to ask yourself, is it really worth spending that much for what you get? And the answer is no. Well, it is for me at least.

The best way, as I see it, to make money from VR, is to make the cost of entry as unprohibitive as possible. In the same way that an Xbox console is a loss leader, with the money from the system being made on the content, that should probably be the way that VR should be monetised.

The unfortunate thing is that unlike the closed ecosystem that is a console, the PC market doesn't have a channel where the device manufacturers can offset the cost of the hardware by selling the content.

In a way, we rushed into VR when the Occulus kickstarter went live, and didn't really consider this enough...

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User loses half of a CD-ROM in his boss's PC

Baldrickk
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I see I am definitely going to need to remember the "joke alert" sign next time.

I will admit to wondering what it would take to keep two halves of a disk -intact- connected when spun up to 52x. speeds.

Obviously, some tape isn't going to do it.

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Baldrickk
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And taping the CD together would work?

I know CDFS is designed to be error resistant, but would that not be excessive, even if you lined it up perfectly?

I guess you couldn't lose half of it then...

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ISPs must ensure half of punters get advertised max speeds

Baldrickk
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I've not had any bandwith/speed issues with Virgin Media, peak times or no.

And I couldn't complain even if my speed was to drop by 50% and stay there. I signed up for the 30Mbs service 3 years ago, which has been upgraded with no further cost to my contract to 80Mbs - and I've achieved downloads of around 100Mbs at times.

If it were to drop to 50%, it'd still be 30% better than what I started paying for...

Maybe not everyone has the same experience though, but I'm certainly happy.

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