* Posts by Baldrickk

507 posts • joined 26 May 2016

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LG G7 ThinkQ: Ropey AI, but a feast for sore eyes and ears

Baldrickk
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My G3 was fantastic. It still runs fine, though only if I use a USB-OTG and screen mirroring to my smart TV - I smashed the screen just before my 2 year contract ran out. I had no problems with the phone itself, and would have gladly gone LG again...

...but the S7 was on a very steeply discounted contract so I picked one up instead.

Now the question is, when my contract is up in a few months, should I actually look at upgrading to this, or any other new phone from this year, or stick with my S7 which is still going strong (and put LineageOS on it to get updates)?

It doesn't feel like I'm really missing out on anything except the bokeh effects from dual lenses. I'd prefer to buy a decent camera instead tbh.

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Wearable hybrids prove the bloated smartwatch is one of Silly Valley's biggest mistakes

Baldrickk
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Re: The Number of the Beast

It's not really that the processors are too powerful for the job - they do the job fine. The bigger problem is that they are too powerful for the batteries you can fit in them...

If batteries could deliver ten times the power for the same volume, then the drain would be less of a problem.

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Baldrickk
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When I'm driving...

I have a clock on the dashboard, failing that the radio has one, failing that, the phone is mounted for use as a sat-nav and displays the time.

Failing that, and only when looking isn't convenient - "OK Google, what is the time?"

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Sad Nav: How a cheap GPS spoofer gizmo can tell drivers to get lost

Baldrickk
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I don't know about "Mainly" but our Discovery 3 falls back on inertial guidance when it loses GPS.

It's accurate enough to show your rough position while in a tunnel, or get you past a junction in a black spot, but the accuracy degrades pretty quickly beyond that.

It fixes itself once it starts getting updates from GPS again.

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Baldrickk
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Re: Luckily

It can be a good way around an incident. Recently skipped 40 minutes of stationary traffic by use of a side-road and a car-park with an exit onto that road and the road I wanted to get onto by following some locals. Turns out there had been a smash across the junction that I avoided.

I typically learn my route beforehand. The GPS is a backup to my brain and a convenient way to see traffic levels, plus there is always an atlas at hand in the car as the next fallback.

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It walks, it talks, it falls over a bit. Windows 10 is three years old

Baldrickk
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Re: block any specific up/down traffic via firewalls?

Sure, you can, but that's a bit like seeing everything as a nail, right?

Really an OS should just behave itself.

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Baldrickk
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Re: Windows Update on 10

True, but how often do you end up being forced to reboot Windows as opposed to Linux?

The megalithic kernel in Windows ends up being rebooted far more often.

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Baldrickk
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Windows Update on 10

Is still as bad as it was from the start.

You can get it to not force a reboot during your standard "working" hours, sure, but you can't dictate when it downloads the updates.

Right when I'm in the middle of playing online games is NOT the right time to take over my bandwidth.

It shouldn't be hard - if there is constant use of the CPU, GPU or HDD, coupled with network activity - the user is probably doing something that requires those resources in use, and doesn't want their OS to hold their network and disk access to ransom until they are done.

Why it can't just notify that there is an update ready to be downloaded and let me download it when ready... I don't know. It was an option in Windows 7.

But even that would kill performance in Windows 7 - I never got to the bottom of that, but when there was an update ready for download, everything slowed down until installed.

There is also no way to <br>

a) shutdown the PC leaving the update pending - it now forces the update installation, even using the command line. - Fantastic when you need to shutdown the PC quickly for whatever reason.<br>

b) fully install the updates (including any restarts needed) - so you tell it to install updates and shutdown when finished using it, and then when you need to hop on quickly the next morning, it has to go through the post-restart update process which takes its time. <br>

slow shutdown or slow boot after updates. PICK ONE MS! or better yet, let us pick.

Or, you know, go the *nix route and be able to update practically everything in place.

gah

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'Fibre broadband' should mean glass wires poking into your router, reckons Brit survey

Baldrickk
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They should/could have kept using coax > telephone wire and left "fibre" to full fibre connections.

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Baldrickk
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Re: Virgin Media are the worst

No problems with them over here, in my old house or at my Father's.

Well, only problem is that they don't have a link onto my new estate.

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Baldrickk
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Re: telephone that isn't dependant on the mains

My mobile isn't dependant on the mains, as long as I don't let it run out of battery at least.

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Baldrickk
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Should really be advertised as it is...

...whether that is "FTTP and FTTC" or "hybrid fiber"

The average consumer doesn't care about what the back-haul is built from or how it works. They care about the service they can get.

I'd argue that providing accurate bandwidth estimations should be enough, but the homeowner is also concerned about their direct connection, as that is what can limit upgrades in the future (that they have to care about)

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Forking hell. It's summer, and Windows 10 is already thinking about autumn

Baldrickk
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Re: PDFs in Edge

Same here. Started breaking after a Windows update.

Not bothered looking into it either, just switched to something that works.

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Baldrickk
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Features I want to see:

Stabilisation of the OS is good.

Along with that can we also have stabilisation of the UI?

- you know, so we only have one way of changing settings, instead of being split across two separate disparate applications with different conventions.

Unfortunately, *nix gaming isn't yet quite at the same level as Windows gaming, so I'm going to have to keep using it for a while to get the best experience.

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Python creator Guido van Rossum sys.exit()s as language overlord

Baldrickk
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Re: I like Python and C

I don't think comprehensions are obscure, they're just different, a construct that doesn't exist in C.

But then again, someone moving from python to C will probably feel the same way about pointers and references.

A comprehension has the advantage of being succinct, which is why I like them in general

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Sysadmin cracked military PC’s security by reading the manual

Baldrickk
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Re: Microsoft XML crazed fever extend to games.

A friend got his hands on street sweeping simulator...

The variables were done in the same way, and he had great fun with the game - changing them so that the wheels were in different positions, making it spawn more, increasing speed etc, making the wheels put quarry dumper trucks to shame, and then putting them all round all over the place, so it acted more like a huge ball.

ah, here it is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHKpCD1OOvQ this was still quite early on in his experiments.

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Leatherbound analogue password manager: For the hipster who doesn't mind losing everything

Baldrickk
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And those links should be one-time use only. So if you request a reset and it doesn't work, you know there might be something going on there.

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Baldrickk
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Re: Telememo watches

And yet I've lost more watches than notebooks.

In face I don't think I have ever lost a notebook, but I've lost at least 5 watches...

I take them off, I don't like wearing them. Notebooks are bulky enough to be in a bag or something.

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Baldrickk
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Re: When did you last test a back-up?

I ran a (someone else's) script on Friday and wiped out a decently large amount of one of our network drives.

The backup is being restored today (no snapshots on that drive, so Thursday's tape had to be acquired.

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The Notch contagion is spreading slower than phone experts thought

Baldrickk
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Re: Charge by wire

Even with micro-usb, getting compacted fluff out is usually nothing more than a cocktail stick or similar to snag it and extract it.

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Smash-hit game Fortnite is dangerous... for cheaters: Tools found laced with malware

Baldrickk
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Re: Amiga

I'm remembering (Ok, I lie, I still play it) a game where the useful cheats were:

XAYBAX

BAYXAB

ABXYBA

- all with left trigger held in on the start menu.

Congrats to anyone who can tell me what game that is.

I never actually used the cheats myself though... I was good enough (and knew where all the in game upgrades were) that I put them in for all the people I was playing against so they had the advantage against me.

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Oddly enough, when a Tesla accelerates at a barrier, someone dies: Autopilot report lands

Baldrickk
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Re: @Baldrickk

Seeing the stationary objects is easy enough.

Determining which ones are actual hazards and which ones are overhead gantries, street furniture, potholes/cracks, leaves blowing across the road, stationary traffic in another lane or an actual threat is another matter entirely.

Lidar + processing power (as seen in autonomous vehicles) maps out the surroundings. With the 1D radar used for autopilot, there is no positional sense - at all.

You decide if you want to keep slamming your brakes on automatically and unnecessarily when on the freeway, causing someone to ram you up the rear, or filter out all the stationary returns.

Bear in mind that the driver is meant to be in control at all times, Autopilot or no.

Traffic slowing to a halt is easy, you can track the change in velocity and match it.

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Baldrickk
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Re: And in a final effort to pin the blame for the crash on Huang

He was the driver.

Why would the cruise control release the car to the driver? By all accounts, he never tied to take control.

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Baldrickk
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Re: A human driver would have no problem with leaving the 101 for the 85

As the barrier was damaged from a previous crash, and we haven't heard about a Tesla crashing there before, I think it is safe to assume that a person had indeed crashed there previously.

So much for human drivers having no problems.

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Baldrickk
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Re:1 person dies due to 1 stupid mistake of an autonomous system

Tesla autopilot isn't autonomous.

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Baldrickk
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Non tesla driver here

I test drove a Model X. Got the sales-person to turn on Autopilot

Car immediately accelerated hard and pulled sharply to the left, presumably to find the line, only it was sharp enough to have taken me off the road had I not resisted the turn which stopped it. Autopilot was immediately turned off again.

It's not fully autonomous, and I wouldn't be happy to leave it trying to drive without my guidance/overwatch if I were to get one.

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Baldrickk
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Re: Tesla was driving the car.

No, Tesla was not driving the car. The car wasn't driving the car. The Driver was driving the car, and it was his responsibility for whatever the car did.

"Autopilot" aka assisted cruise control was on, but those are driving AIDS, not an autonomous system.

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Baldrickk
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Their cars lack hardware that would dramatically improve safety

A permanently enabled immobiliser would dramatically improve safety.

A fully autonomous system would improve safety

a foot-thick crash barrier of honeycomb aluminium to absorb impacts would improve safety.

Not all of those are desirable, with convenience and cost. Sometimes when creating a product, you do have to draw a line.

Not that making safer cars is a bad goal, but a Tesla is also arguably one of the safer cars around.

I don't know exactly what that driver was doing, but when you get people like the guy mentioned above who was arrested for climbing into his passenger seat to read a book - there's not much you can do for that person.

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Baldrickk
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For them to try and cast aspersions because hands on the wheel were not detected is wrong.

Hands on wheel or not, if the driver had been paying attention, one of the hands on wheel, steering, braking sensors would have triggered had the driver had a response to the actions of the vehicle.

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Baldrickk
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Exactly.

Here's why it might have hit the divider:

https://youtu.be/6QCF8tVqM3I

And El Reg has (I think) already run a piece on why the car won't stop for stationary objects.

Here is WIRED's take on it:

https://www.wired.com/story/tesla-autopilot-why-crash-radar

And a summary feom elsewhere:

Tesla "Autopilot" cannot see stationary objects. It has a radar, but it is 1-D and low resolution. It uses this to localize other moving cars. In theory, it could use this to see a highway divider or firetruck it's about to hit, but since it's 1-D that would also mean that it would have to slam on the brakes when it sees an overpass coming up, because it can't tell the difference between an overpass and a highway divider or a firetruck. It can assume that overpasses aren't driving at 60mph, so it will see other cars. The Tesla algorithm is "look for lane markings and try to stay between them, and don't hit any moving vehicles. If there is any stationary object, including another a vehicle in your lane, the "Autopilot" will plow right into it.

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Microsoft open-sources UI Recorder tool for Windows 10 developers

Baldrickk
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Re: The GitHub repo includes a zipped executable of UI Recorder

Note that it isn't actually in the repo - it's a hosted release binary.

I really don't see the problem with that.

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Virtual reality meets commercial reality as headset sales plunge

Baldrickk
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Re: Vive pro...

I'm holding out for the Ultragear (at least right now)

There's not been much information about it recently, but with LG building the new panels in collaboration with Google, and the Knuckles (possibly) being released if/when it is released, it seems to be a good thing to wait for.

Of course other companies are working on HMDs too, so really, I just want to get a 2nd gen HMD

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PC nerds: Can't get no SATA-isfaction? Toshiba flaunts NVMe SSD action

Baldrickk
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Fast, but is it really worth it?

Looking at benchmarks, the current crop of NVME drives stand out - on the synthetic benchmarks at least.

On more representative tests, the performance as seen by the end user is nearly (not quite, but nearly) imperceptible to the end user from the performance of a Sata SSD. (this is when looking at applications, not the raw read/write).

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Brit mobile phone users want the Moon on a stick but then stay on same networks for aeons

Baldrickk
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That's been my experience with them too, and I've even found that not-spots are rare.

When the provider you have is the one that offers you the best deal, then why switch?

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... Aaaand that's a fifth Brit Army Watchkeeper drone to crash in Wales

Baldrickk
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Re: Thales

54 - 5 = 49

49 /100 = 49%

With math like that, maybe they should hire you to fix it - you'd make a great engineer

Or maybe not.

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User spent 20 minutes trying to move mouse cursor, without success

Baldrickk
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Re: Keyboard ecosystems

cleanliness is vital when making drinkable fermentables

Isn't the fermentation and associated alcohol meant to kill off the nasties?

Which is why we drank it instead of water in the middle ages.

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Baldrickk
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Re: Trackball can be worse....

Of course you could try washing your hands, both before and after your ball and socket cleanout...

Of course you still have the problem of secreted oils and skin cells that constantly die and come off, forming that lovely grey or brown crud that gets over everything...

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Boffins offer to make speculative execution great again with Spectre-Meltdown CPU fix

Baldrickk
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Re: To Stop Futures and Derivative Plays as Presently Planned for the Past ..... Believe in Miracles

LINE!

Oh. Sorry.

I thought this was buzzword bingo.

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Don’t talk to the ATM, young man, it’s just a machine and there’s nobody inside

Baldrickk
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Re: Hi Vis...

Don't forget the clipboard.

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WannaCry reverse-engineer Marcus Hutchins hit with fresh charges

Baldrickk
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93-98% conviction rate

Sure, but are they really going to take people to court that they don't think did it?

What about all those people who never end up in court?

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Baldrickk
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Re: Who do you trust?

Neither of them.

I don't know enough about the case, but it wouldn't surprise me to see either:

- trumped up charges being made (no pun intended r.e. America)

- a "security researcher" with a foot both sides of the line

or, you know, both.

As to whether any of that applies here? I don't know, and I'm going to leave judgement to those who do know more, and hope that they get it right.

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Stern Vint Cerf blasts techies for lackluster worldwide IPv6 adoption

Baldrickk
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Re: Analogy Units

I read the Wikipedia article "List of unusual units of Measurement" and now I'm wondering how many IPv4 addresses fit into the complete works of Shakespeare.

https://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/stats/ after calculating stats on loading the page (wait, what? the works of Shakespeare are not a fixed thing, now he is dead?) reports that

There are 884,421 total words in Shakespeare's 43 works.

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1208.6109 says that for English, the average word length is 5.1. hmm. Close enough?

Add one for punctuation

(5.1+1) * 884,421 = 5,394,968.1 should be a fairly close estimation. But wait, that's modern English. Does Shakespeare's English differ?

Luckily enough, Copyright has expired, and the texts are available online from e.g. https://ocw.mit.edu/ans7870/6/6.006/s08/lecturenotes/files/t8.shakespeare.txt

Strip out the blurb to leave just the works and we have: 5,461,565

Hey, the estimation was pretty close!

We're forward thinking so lets use UTF-8 instead of ASCII. That's 87385040 bits of data. That's enough to store 2,730,782 IP addresses.

So the complete works of Shakespeare is a little under 2,3/4 MIP

*takes a bow*

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At last: Magic Leap reveals its revolutionary techno-goggles – but wait, there's a catch

Baldrickk
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I think I am going to have to go and watch this

If only for the comments.

I've spent too long on gaming forums recently, and it sounds like the comments on this video are a step up.

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Ex-US pres Bill Clinton has written a cyber-attack pulp thriller. With James Patterson. Really

Baldrickk
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Terrible writer

I'd wager that he's actually a pretty decent writer, if not one of the best. The problem comes from the fact that he has many ghost writers under his name. It's fairly easy to tell when it's one of his stories or just one using his name to sell the book.

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Experts build AI joke machine that's about as funny as an Adam Sandler movie (that bad)

Baldrickk
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Re: Major Overreach

I wish my phone keyboard would stop trying to automatically learn from my typos and let me configure rules for autocorrect.

The number of times I type "tge" instead of "the" - and this using swipe based input.

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Help, I'm being held prisoner in a security camera testing factory. So please read this...

Baldrickk
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My CCTV solution

Was to repurpose my old Galaxy SIII.

Attached to the viewfinder on my door, it provided me with a screen to view the image of the outside without squinting through the viewfinder (as well as blocking use of a viewfinder reverser, if anyone ever wanted to use one)

Footage was also streamed on the network and saved to a NAS drive, and when motion was detected, I got an alert with snapshots and a link to the clip emailed to me.

All it cost me was some time to set up and a couple of quid for a long USB power cable. Could probably make a decent enclosure for mounting outside too, though the battery would have to be pretty big to last the night if you can't wire 5V to it.

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Linus Torvalds decides world isn’t ready for Linux 5.0

Baldrickk
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Re: Power

It's the one reason I preferred Windows on my laptop at Uni - it was always better at power management on battery power.

For everything else - I enjoyed playing with a new Linux every month or so.

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Did you test that? No, I thought you tested it. Now customers have it and it doesn't work

Baldrickk
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Empty...

I was one of a group in my IT class who found that when you took a 3.5" floppy, took the actual disk out and glued it together before putting it back into the drive, magic happened.

Specifically the type of magic where Windows 98 (or was it ME/2000? The school had some older and some newer machines) decided that it didn't like it one bit and just killed all power - not even a BSOD.

With the metal sleeve reattached, it looked no different from a normal drive unless someone tried pulling it back.

Floppies were still the most used method of taking data home, and people would be happy to swipe any that were left around.

This was at its most fun when someone has been working on an essay all lesson and hadn't saved a local copy, instead intending to just save straight to a disk...

Or the more direct method used by some others in my class of just walking up and sticking the disk in someone else's machine.

If nothing else, my class learned to save their work regularly.

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A Reg-reading techie, a high street bank, some iffy production code – and a financial crash

Baldrickk
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Re: Can I Just Point Out ...

But it should still be testable.

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Baldrickk
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QA's Fault?

This should never get to QA. It should be picked up by unit tests, or if those are deficient, a code review should have picked this up.

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