* Posts by tinman

19 posts • joined 23 Apr 2016

Is that a stiffy disk in your drive... or something else entirely?

tinman
Alert

It would appear you're not the only one. Here is an ATM next to a parking ticket machine at my workplace and the added sign asking users not to put tickets in the ATM suggests others have made a similar mistake to yourself

https://i.imgur.com/XCz30sh.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/FsdIRWQ.jpg

Microsoft: Yo dawg, we heard you liked Windows password expiry policies. So we expired your expiry policy

tinman

Re: Bank web security

well why didn't you do that from the start?

Oh yes, because it'll have been one of those systems that has lots of requirements for your password such as letters AND a number, or at least one upper case, but doesn't tell you that beforehand and instead waits until you get the first attempt wrong and then points out only one mistake!

A quick cup of coffee leaves production manager in fits and a cleaner in tears

tinman
FAIL

Re: So...

however... in Trials of an Expert Witness, Harold Klawans, a neurologist, talks about being called in to consult on a case that was somewhat similar.

A hospital porter had been tasked to taking a patient to theatre for surgery. He didn't notice that she had a respiratory arrest and that she stopped breathing for a time. It was spotted by someone else and she was resuscitated but the respiratory centre of her brain was damaged so she was conscious and unaffected cognitively but couldn't breathe without a ventilator. This meant she ended up staying in ICU for some months. As she was awake and aware she got fed up with crosswords and knitting so she asked for a TV which the hospital were only too happy to supply as they were facing a lawsuit from her for their staff member's negligence.

The TV was brought by a porter who had recently been taken off patient transport duties due to his lack of clinical awareness and unwillingness to be retrained in CPR. He brought it to her room, and seeing she was asleep thought it would be a nice surprise for her if he plugged it in so it'd be on for her when she awoke. So what medical equipment did he disconnect to plug in the TV? Yes, it was her ventilator and this was back in 1974 so the machine was not designed to alarm if unplugged. And yes, it was the same porter who'd failed to notice her problem in the first place

All good, leave it with you...? Chap is roped into tech support role for clueless customer

tinman

Re: I have a rule these days.

That's what known as an OCAMITE bag, "och I might need this, or I might need that"

Crash, bang, wallop: What a power-down. But what hit the kill switch?

tinman

Re: Kill switches that go bang

at least your MRI did shut down. In this report the kill switch had been disconnected so the two staff in question had to suffer entrapment for several hours until a GE engineer came to shut the system down

https://medicaldialogues.in/ge-pays-rs-1-crore-settlement-to-technician-who-got-stuck-in-mri-at-tata-memorial/

NHS needs to pull its finger out and prep staff for future robotics, genomics, data-led healthcare

tinman

has anyone looked at the pdf of the report?

Maybe I'm missing something but is there a reason that the pdf is formatted with a permanent two page layout making it really awkward to read, instead of a single page layout? Is this indicative of how we can expect any digital innovation to proceed, with poor consideration of the end user?

Heatwave shmeatwave: Brit IT departments cool their racks – explicit pics

tinman
Mushroom

Re: I always like when people put flammable materials...

jest ye not, I know a senior engineer who thought that inflammable means doesn't burn...

Trainee techie ran away and hid after screwing up a job, literally

tinman
FAIL

that'll never hold, let me fix it

There have been safety alerts issued in the past for curtain rail systems used in healthcare settings where fitters have not followed the manufacturer's instructions because the installation was obvious. The problem has been that the rails in question were anti-ligature systems, designed to drop under a light load so that patients can't hang themselves, Unfortunately some installers would take one look at the set-up and say, "that'll never hold, I'll just put a few extra screws in there to keep that up", with subsequent fatal consequences

Boss sent overpaid IT know-nothings home – until an ON switch proved elusive

tinman
Facepalm

it's not just users who are numpties

I work in the NHS and asked our IT department to install a PC interface card for a thermometer calibrator in a theatre area. I could have done it myself and had done in the past but this time I thought I'd do it by the book. I checked a couple of days later and the nurse I'd liaised with said they'd come out but the guy said it wouldn't fit. Knowing it would as I'd checked it myself previously, I rang them up and got the techie himself who'd been out.

"It's too tall" he said

"It's a low profile case, did you try turning it sideways?"

He grumpily said he'd come out later, but then a few moments later launched into a tirade, calling me a cheeky bastard and the like, before slagging off his supervisor. I was rather startled at this but then realised he'd hung up my end of the call but not his and was still using his headset and talking to the rest of the helpdesk office

My Tibetan digital detox lasted one morning, how about yours?

tinman

Re: Fifty shades of tea

if you want it right every time then you need to work to a standard so here it is...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_3103

Intellisense was off and developer learned you can't code in Canadian

tinman
Pint

Re: Boro

The trouble with English is that it's a complete packrat of a language - it has vocabulary and grammar from quite a few other languages grafted onto the fairly simple Germanic roots until the end result is more like a hazel thicket than a mighty oak tree..

hence the famous quote from James Nicoll oft used to silence those who complain that no one speaks "proper" English any longer

"The problem with defending the purity of the English language is that English is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don't just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary."

Nip/Tug: Plastic surgeon accused of mid-surgery 'hardcore' smut binge

tinman
Coat

just saying

The professional body for cosmetic surgeons in the UK used to be called the British Association of Plastic Surgeons, but they later stuck "Aesthetic &" in the middle as they left the initials of the former lacked sufficient gravitas

Military techie mangled minicomputer under nose of scary sergeant

tinman

I am pushing the button

MRI scanners usually also have a Big Red Button so they can be shut down in an emergency. As use of this subsequently costs £10K+ to replenish the helium that is vented off and it takes several days to recalibrate it is normally protected by a molly-guard. but sometimes the button is just disconnected as in this case where an acute incident was prolonged by hours whilst they waited for an engineer to shut down the system

https://medicaldialogues.in/ge-pays-rs-1-crore-settlement-to-technician-who-got-stuck-in-mri-at-tata-memorial/

'Please store the internet on this floppy disk'

tinman

Re: I'm not sure what's worse

sending a form in WORD format via email for completion and receiving back a pdf of the response which has been completed in WORD, printed out and then the printout is scanned and emailed back

tinman
Angel

Re: Not apocryphal.

"he worst are people who have never been shown even how to log in without using the mouse to get from the user name box to the password box."

I've had a rep as an IT guru in various NHS settings over the years for knowing esoteric maneuvers such as CTRL-Z and CTRL-V, and no I don't work in ICT

tinman
Pint

Re: iPads

bortaS bIr jablu'DI' reH QaQqu' nay'

€100 'typewriter' turns out to be €45,000 Enigma machine

tinman

Re: Reason for sale

and not only that but it never prints the same letter twice

BA's 'global IT system failure' was due to 'power surge'

tinman

Re: Really a power failure?

Authenticated you say?

http://www.snopes.com/horrors/freakish/cleaner.asp

but... in Trials of an Expert Witness Harold Klawans, a neurologist, talks about being called in to consult on a case that was somewhat similar.

A hospital porter had been tasked to taking a patient to theatre for surgery. He didn't notice that she had a respiratory arrest and that she stopped breathing for a time. It was spotted by someone else and she was resuscitated but the respiratory centre of her brain was damaged so she was conscious and unaffected cognitively but couldn't breathe without a ventilator. This meant she ended up staying in ICU for some months. Being aware she got fed up with crosswords and knitting so she asked for a TV which the hospital were only too happy to supply as they were facing a lawsuit from her for their staff member's negligence. The TV was brought by a porter who had recently been taken off patient transport duties due to his lack of clinical awareness and unwillingness to be retrained in CPR. He brought it to her room, and seeing she was asleep thought it would be a nice surprise for her if he plugged it in so it'd be on for her when she awoke. So guess what medical equipment he unplugged to plug in the TV? Yes, indeed it was the ventilator and this was back in 1974 so the machine was not designed to alarm if unplugged

FAIL - the most incompetent IT pros

tinman
Facepalm

"can you hear me mother?"

This isn't as epic as previous stories here but it tickled me

I work in medical devices governance for a hospital trust and had arranged for our IT department to fit an I/O card into a PC for a thermometer calibrator. I could have done it myself but it wasn't my PC so I thought do it right, and get them to install it. A little later I get a call from the ward sister to say that someone had called out but said the card didn't fit. Having seen the card and PC myself I knew immediately what the problem was, so I called the helpdesk.

"Hi, I'm calling about a request to get an I/O card fitted"

"Yeah, I called out but the card doesn't fit"

"It's a low-profile machine, did you try turning it sideways?"

I get a grumpy "no, I'll call over" in response

and then as I wait for him to tell me when he'd be out, the next thing I hear from the phone is

"Cheeky bastard!"

"Eugene Doherty, who the fuck is he anyway?"

Me, "Hello?"

"...Telling me how to do my job..."

He had obviously cut off my side of the call but not his. There then followed several more minutes of ranting to his office colleagues about me and then his supervisor who'd had the temerity to tell him to go to another building a short distance away to fit new hard drives, "...and it's raining outside!"

After trying to interrupt his tirade several times, I hung up as it was clear he couldn't hear me, though I could clearly hear him.

I subsequently emailed his boss, in amusement rather than anger as he hadn't realised he was addressing me, but advising that they teach him how to hang up before slagging off the caller

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