* Posts by gypsythief

74 posts • joined 22 Apr 2016

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Boss visited the night shift and found a car in the data centre

gypsythief
Coat

" I can't even get the spark plugs out of my wife's car."

That's 'cos they don't have spark plugs in diesels.

Ok, ok, I'm outta here. Mine's the one with the Haynes manual in the pocket.

14
0

Release the KRACKen patches: The good, the bad, and the ugly on this WPA2 Wi-Fi drama

gypsythief

Re: Already patched here.

Except that as I understand the issue, _everything_ needs patching; not just your laptop (not withstanding "but then I don't have Wifi on this machine either"), but your router also.

And good luck getting any patches out of Brontosaurus Telecom. This problem ain't going away anytime soon.

6
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Essex drone snapper dealt with by police for steamy train photos

gypsythief

Ha, haaaa, ha ha ha! Ha, ha ha! Hee ha, ha *cough* *splutter*, ha ha ha ha ha!

"If you witness what you believe to be a dangerous use of a drone please contact 101"

Where upon you'll get some bored operative who'll tell you "well, if we see it again, we might do something about it. But only if we see it again..."

They couldn't give a flying drone fart.

12
1

German Firefox users to test recommendation engine 'a bit like thought-reading'

gypsythief

Re: "I looked again at Vivaldi..."

@ Jonathan Richards 1

"...but their script blocker didn't seem to have the functionality of NoScript"

Vivaldi does not supply a script blocker. However, being based on Chromium gives you have access to the Chrome Web Store for extensions, including many different script blockers. I use uBlock Origin for script blocking (you need to enable Advanced Mode) which I personally find just as powerful as No Script, but I do accept that No Script is considered the pre-eminant script blocker.

"and the killer is that they don't support nested bookmark folders. Heck, I've got bookmarks nested five and six deep"

I'm not sure what happened with your nesting, but if you see the linked screenshot, you'll see I've nested them 8 deep, with no sign of not being able to go further.

Screenshot of nested bookmark folders in Vivaldi:

https://i.imgur.com/rQecsYJ.png

0
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Hipster disruptor? Never trust a well-groomed caveman with your clams

gypsythief
Facepalm

Re: Climate change

"One eats a banana. Another slowly munches the scraps from a mammoth bone"

Where does Mr Dabbs write "woolly mammoth"? Woolly mammoths lived in the chilly north, yes, but their hairless cousins lived throughout Europe, Asia and North Africa.

You know, where bananas grow.

14
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Drunk canoeing no longer driving offence in Canada

gypsythief

Have an up vote!

(@Arty Effem)

Too subtle by 'arf!

3
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IKEA flat-packs TaskRabbit to crack assembly code

gypsythief

Re: Kit Cars

Kit Cars are certainly legal in the UK; Caterham sell them for £17k, (http://uk.caterhamcars.com/cars/self-assembly) which given that they go like greased shit off a lightening shovel is somewhat of a bargain compared to that over-priced Italian nonsense.

I regularly see them (well, sunny Bank Holiday weekends, anyway) blathering along the B roads around where I live, and judging by the flies in the teeth of the drivers, they are rather good fun.

2
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Yahoo! must! face! the! music! over! data! breaches! judge! rules!

gypsythief
Coat

There once was an almighty stink,

At a Palace that's Purple, (not pink).

She lost all our data,

Oh! How we do hate her,

But now Marissa is off to the clink!

12
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Headless body found near topless beach: Missing private sub journalist identified

gypsythief

Re: Impounded submarine?

They lugged it away on a low-loader, there is a picture of that here:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/21/missing-journalist-died-in-submarine-accident-inventor-tells-police

The follow-up article has a picture of it dumped in what looks like a weedy corner of the police station carpark (2nd picture down):

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/23/danish-police-confirm-torso-found-copenhagen-journalist-kim-wall

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Voyager antenna operator: 'I was the first human to see images from Neptune'

gypsythief

"...uses a Solaris workstation running version 8 of the OS"

Which according to Wikipedia was released in February 2000.

A few years ago, I was talking to an RAF engineer, who told me that they still used Windows 95 as it was the last version of Windows capable of running the originally-written-in-the-70s code, used for diagnosing and configuring the Tornado's on board systems.

Is it the same thing here? Are they relying on a 17 year old OS as the only thing that can still run the 40 year old code written to communicate with Voyager?

8
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Toshiba must allow Western Digital access to joint-venture assets

gypsythief

I've never got my head around Economics...

I've followed this saga from the beginning, and there is something I don't quite get...

Toshiba lost a shed load of money when their Westinghouse Electric subsidiary underwent a Total Inability To Support Uranium Power ($8bn I think?)

They want to sell their memory business to recover these losses, and seemingly would like the IP not to leak to the Chinese.

Whoever buys the memory business for enough money for Toshiba to recoup their losses, must be confident of making enough money to both cover the purchase and then make a profit.

If the memory business is so profitable, surely it's better for Toshiba to hang on to it? And if they need money now, can they not get a loan from the national bank (who I think are involved in a consortium to bid for the memory business from Toshiba (to keep it from Chinese hands)), and pay the loan off with profits from the apparently lucrative memory business?

As I said, I've never got my head around economics...

1
1

Trapped under ice with no oxygen for months, goldfish turn to booze. And can you blame 'em?

gypsythief

Oh, you amateurs!

Just squeeze your goldfish in to the top of your bottle of vodka, put _that_ in your freezer for a few hours, and bingo! Instant(ish) alcoholic frozen goldfish.

Mmmm, tasty.

1
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Geek's Map To Britain

gypsythief

Re: Geek's Map To Britain

2017.07.29 Added Postal Museum

2
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gypsythief

Geek's Map To Britain

So, I was planning a little tour of Scotland this summer, and thought I'd check out which Geeks Guides I could have a mosey around whilst I was there.

It turns out that on the Geeks Guide to Britain page, (https://www.theregister.co.uk/science/geeks_guide/) none of the article summaries mentioned whereabouts the article was set: I was going to have to grep through each article to find out.

And if I was going to do that, I figured I might as well record where they all were, and bung 'em on a map for easy future reference.

So without further ado, I present the Geek's Map to Britain:

http://www.gypsythief.org.uk/GeeksMapToBritain/ *

All the little pins are clickable-on, and include a link to the relevant article on El Reg.

Oh, and bonus points for spotting the easter egg (although it's quite obvious!)

* Don't worry, hosted on Git Hub Pages, quite safe...

8
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Adobe will kill Flash by 2020: No more updates, support, tears, pain...

gypsythief

Re: "one vector"?

You're a pedat.

There, that feels better.

1
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gypsythief
Joke

Won't Somebody Please Think of the Children?

Every year, at Halloween, we hang a semi-transparent white sheet in our living room window, then project a spooky pumpkin / graveyard animation at it, to let passing greb-finks children know that they can raid us for sweets.

The animation, of course, is done in... **cue moaning ghosts, rattling bones...** Flash!

What will the poor children do*, when I can no longer let them know that they can raid our home for sweets?!?!?

*Go to the dentist less, probably...

5
1

Reg reader turns Geek's Guides to Britain into Geek's Map of Britain

gypsythief

So why is Dunsop Bridge on the list?

Huzzah! Congratulations, you earn the bonus points!

Dunsop Bridge was the little easter egg I referenced in my forum post.

Q: "So why is Dunsop Bridge on the list?"

A: "it's the exact centre of Britain"

Many years ago, my brother and I were cycling through Dunsop Bridge. For some reason long lost to the mists of time, he'd heard about this whole centre of the known universe Britain thing, so we stopped to admire the little brass plaque that had been installed inside the phone box by the bridge to commemorate it.

Plonking a plaque in phone box in the middle of nowhere to mark the middle of Britain is one of those bits of pointless science that I find to be great fun, so I thought I'd bob it on for the kicks'n'giggles.

8
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gypsythief
Pint

Thanks everyone!

An entire El Reg article about my map is certainly an honour!

Right, I'm off for those beers now (leaving do for someone at work; always a good excuse to start early!)

26
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Iranian duo charged with hacking US missile simulation software biz

gypsythief
Coat

Arrow got broken?

Is that, like, a broken Arrow?

I don't know what's worse; the fact that you lost your rocket simulation software, or that it happens so often, you have a name for it.

0
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Insurers claim cyber calamities could cost more than Hurricane Sandy

gypsythief

It's no good; I can't take it any more

" ...emerging cyber insurance industry."

"Estimating cyber losses is an inexact science... global cost of cyber disruption... "

"...'serious cyber attack' are quantified."

"...understanding of cyber risk exposure... global cyber risk market is worth between $3-3.5bn."

"... as well as taking out cyber insurance."

"... two devastating cyber calamities..."

I was going to write a long diatribe here, but on reflection realised it would do no good. It's become engrained. But to get it off my chest:

Cyber, from cybernetic, from Greek "kybernētikós", to guide, control with feedback.

Cyber: you keep using that word, I do not think it means what you think it means.

4
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The curious case of a Tesla smash, Autopilot blamed, and the driver's next-day U-turn

gypsythief

I strongly suspect Tesla involvment here...

"I had engaged the autopilot system but then I had disengaged it by stepping on accelerator" qouth the chap involved, after stating things like "I know I was pretty shook up..." and "To the best of my recollection...".

Knowing that he disengaged the autpilot by depressing the accelerator seems a very specific thing to know, when you're shook up and struggling to recall things; not something you would necessarily know if you were sufficiently distracted to not see a sharp left hand bend looming in front of you.

Rather, I think the chap involved genuinely thought he had autopilot on, and was not lying to the best of his knowledge when he spoke to the cops claiming thusly. However, somewhere in the panic of "Oh my goat! There's a corner!" (or just before) he accelerated sufficiently to disengage the autopilot, without being aware of this.

Tesla then spotted it in the logs, had a small "Woohoo, were off the hook!" moment, and a few lawyerly phone calls ensued.

11
3

The AA's copped to credit data blurt, but what about car-crash incident response?

gypsythief

Okay, figured it out.

"Medical data, information on sexual preference or trade union membership are defined as sensitive information under the current Data Protection Act but this characterisation doesn't apply to credit card info and the like."

The law was made by politicians. They all have herpes*, like choir boys*, and (although not quite a trade union), are members of the Masons, or Knights Templars, or some such*. None of which they want public.

The credit card they used to subscribe to that porn channel on Sky though? Well, that was a work one, paid for by the public. Who cares if the numbers for that leak!

*allegedly

0
1
gypsythief

What planet is the Data Protection Act from?!?!

"Medical data, information on sexual preference or trade union membership are defined as sensitive information under the current Data Protection Act but this characterisation doesn't apply to credit card info and the like."

I'm mildly asthmatic, have an odd rash on my right leg, am heterosexual, and not a member of any trade unions. There.

Now, my credit card info? Bog right off!

0
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Dark web souk AlphaBay outage: Users fear they've been scammed

gypsythief

Re: Sorry, what did they do again?

Well, apparently the "King of the Paphs" referenced in the picture caption, or "Paphiopedilum rothschildianum" as it's more commonly known, only grows between 500-1200m[1] on North-East facing slopes of Mount Kinabalu in Malaysia, that are near ravines rich in Serpentine rock[2]. As a result it is highly endangered, and Orchid fanciers pay up to $5000 per cutting[3], which I suspect is a) highly illegal, and b) highly profitable.

Hence being sold on the dimmer, darker, dodgier corners of the webernets.

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paphiopedilum_rothschildianum

[2] http://huntingtonblogs.org/2012/04/king-of-orchids/

[3] http://thehigherlearning.com/2014/07/25/why-are-people-paying-as-much-as-5000-per-stem-for-this-orchid-photo-gallery/

2
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Constant work makes the kilo walk the Planck

gypsythief

Re: Lego?

And besides, what's all this mucking about with planks? Since when was wood[1] suitable for measuring weight?

Everyone knows 1kg is already nicely defined as 0.2381 Jubs.

Sheesh, scientists today!

[1]And no tittering at the back about getting wood with the jubs!

14
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Not Apr 1: Google stops scanning your Gmail to sling targeted ads at you

gypsythief

1.. Never

Because as the article points out, Google have so many ways to gather data on you already. With 80% of the world using Android, with all its horrendous built-in data slurping, they don't need to read your emails, because they already know, well, everything.

I suspect that the data gathered from Android is probably much more useful anyway: with location awareness, adverts can be much more focused: passing a MacDonalds's: "Hey, two for one on burgers in MacDonalds's! Limited time offer, only whilst you're our b*tch! "

This, therefore, is simply a "Look at us, we're not evil anymore!" whilst still being as evil as an evil thing on an evil day in Evilsville, Evilsee. With an evil friend, evil cat, evil dog, and an evil cherry on top. A bit of sham to appear to be good to the masses. The ads will continue in the continuing free gmail, and the data will continue to be slurped.

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1

Watch out Facebook, Google – the EU wants easy access to your data

gypsythief

And that's why...

...I've spent the day setting up my own email server, at _my_ house, on _my_ computer, with an ISP who has a Snoopers Charter warrant canary up.

Slurp that, you bastards.*

*Although they probably will, as my data potters down BT's backhaul. Oh Hum. Antarctica, anyone?

1
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Intel to Qualcomm and Microsoft: Nice x86 emulation you've got there, shame if it got sued into oblivion

gypsythief

I believe that the reason for this is that x64 is an extension of x86, not a drop-in replacement.

As a result, x64 processors based on the AMD64 architecture can still run x86 software, in contrast to Intel's IA64 architecture (the infamous Itanic Itanium) which was 64bit native and incapable of running 32bit software.

This does mean however that there is an unremovable dependancy on the x86 bits of the processor.

4
1

The nuclear launch button won't be pressed by a finger but by a bot

gypsythief

Origami X-wings!

I made one!

http://i.imgur.com/9cNSIEg.jpg

5
0

Qualcomm names its Windows 10 ARM PC partners

gypsythief
FAIL

Stop me if this sounds familiar...

Windows, running on ARM devices; all day battery life, full Windows App eco-system support. Sounds familiar. But where have I heard of it before...

Let me think, it's on the tip of my tongue... nearly got it...

Oh yes! Windows RT! That was it!

And look where that ended up. I got burned by it first time around. It's going to take several years of success for this new attempt before I stray too far from x86 again where Windows is concerned.

12
9

Hi! I’m Foxy! It looks like you want to run Flash. Do you need help?

gypsythief

Re: NoScript: already solved

uBlockOrigin provides a good alternative to NoScript for Chrome. You have to enable its Advanced Mode, which gives you access to some nice fine grained script filtering.

I've bobbed a screenie of it action on the The Register here:

http://i.imgur.com/nRyteQu.png

7
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Mi casa es su casa: Ubuntu bug makes 'guests' anything but

gypsythief

Re: Flaky guest account

"A systemd-related change perhaps?"

Yay! Poettering's Law* invoked by the second comment!

*Poettering's Law: the idea that as an online discussion grows longer about a flaw in Linux, eventually _someone_ will blame systemd**

(**Not that I like it either.)

15
2

Microsoft sparks new war with Google with, er, $999+ lappies for kids

gypsythief
Joke

"Great tshirt"

"Girls can do anything!"

Except write their name in the snow...

1
1

Brit behind Titanium Stresser DDoS malware sent to chokey

gypsythief
Joke

Well,

his name is mudd!

4
0

We're 'heartbroken' we got caught selling your email records to Uber, says Unroll.me boss

gypsythief

Even Google Aren't That Bad

Google aren't as bad as that (yet!). As I understand it the way it works with Google is that they read your emails, and see, for instance, that you have a bunch of emails back and forth with your friends about a trip to Benidorm.

The Benidorm Tourist Board then says to Google "Can you run this advert for us, and show it to people who are interested in going to Benidorm?"

You then see an advert for hotels in Benidorm alongside your emails. The critical bit with this system is that Google do not allow the Benidorm Tourist Board access to your emails, or even let them know who is interested. The system anonymises the data, and hides you (the product) from the customer (the advertiser).

This bunch of cowboys* however seem to be simply selling peoples actual emails to third parties, lock, stock and subject line.

*With no offence meant to the fine cattle ranchers of the Wild West.

20
11

McAfee is McAfee again, promises security with kum ba yah

gypsythief

Re: Perhaps someone with Photoshop skills...

Here ya go!

http://imgur.com/je29Nfz

1
0

SpaceX wows world with a ho-hum launch of a reused rocket, landing it on a tiny boring barge

gypsythief

Curiosity's Landing

The problem with landing on Mars is that the atmosphere is thin enough that parachutes don't work very well, but still thick enough to heat things up to vapourisation point; Curiosity made it but as you point out, it required "heatshields and parachutes and rockets and skycranes". And cotton wool. Although I'm not sure about the skycranes bit.

Many other landers of course did not make it (*cough)Beagle(*cough).

A working land-by-reverse-rocket solves the problems of the Martian atmosphere nicely: its thinness is irrelevant to rocket braking, and helps with not as much heating.

Of course, if Elon does get us humans there, it will be interesting to see how long it is before the colonist become dark, with golden eyes.

3
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Now THAT'S a landslide victory: Astroboffins snap avalanche on a comet in science first

gypsythief

Correction...

"The crack was extending – indicating that the comet may split up one day. And we discovered that boulders the size of a large truck 0.0216 Olympic-sized swimming pools could be moved across the comet's surface a distance as long as one-and-a-half football fields 10.8472 double-decker buses."

There, that's better.

10
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'Sorry, I've forgotten my decryption password' is contempt of court, pal – US appeal judges

gypsythief

Already incriminated by a witness.

With the usual "I am not a shark lawyer" disclaimer, it would seem in this case that there are reasonable grounds to force a password confession despite the Fifth Amendment, as the police have a reliable witness, the defendant's sister, who has testified as to seeing the images on the external hard drive.

Whilst this is one person's word against another's, I would have thought such testimony was sufficient existing evidence that "the defendant would be incriminating himself" would no longer apply as it is the sister who has incriminated him with her testimony.

And why on earth, if you were in possession of such images, would you show them to your sister?!

3
7

Nokia 3310 'Supremo Putin' edition goes on sale in Russia

gypsythief

Re: outmoded Nokia for outmoded regime

I have a soviet-era detritus watch: a Vostok Komandirskie with a perpetual mechanical movement.

It's got a hell of a lot longer battery life than those new-fangled iWatch thingummies, I can tell you.

2
0

The last time El Reg covered IBM Domino we used a chisel

gypsythief

Re: That's not a brontosaurus

No, it's a Chilesaurus diegosuarezi, also known as the Platypus dinosaur due to it's odd collection of features.

When Captain John Hunter first sent descriptions and drawings of the Platypus back to Europe he was accused of having faked it: that he had stitched a duck's bill to a beaver.

Now we have Sapho stitching a "micro-app" onto Domino, so perhaps the choice of dinosaur wasn't a bad one after all.

2
0

XSS marks the spot: Steam vuln dangles potential phishing line

gypsythief

Yes.

... and a lone tumbleweed blows gently through the silent wasteland...

0
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Facebook ad biz comes under scrutiny in MPs ‘Fake News’ probe

gypsythief

It's all fake anyway

"I don’t believe what I read in the papers

They’re just out to capture my dime..."

Sang Paul Simon in 1975. The picture in the article looks even older.

Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose...

4
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PS4 Pro woes: Random display blackouts caught on camera

gypsythief

Re: Never had a single problem...

And neither did millions of Samsung Note 7 owners, who used their phondle slabs happily day after day.

The same can not be said of the unfortunate few...

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/09/09/florida_man_burned_by_samsung/

If you are fortunate, try being thankful instead of snarky.

3
0

You know what, maybe Tabby's star ate a planet, ponder space eggheads

gypsythief

Roche Limit

Gravitational stress as the planet neared the star can be sufficient to cause break up; the boundary at which this starts to occur being the Roche Limit. As the planet nears the star the gravitational stress caused by the star overcomes the forces holding the planet together and so it starts to disintegrate, with the planetary remnants being pulled into a nice twinkle-causing spiral of debris around the star.

Mars's moon, Phobos, is thought to be currently undergoing this unfortunate demise.

16
0

Dotdot. Who's there? Yet another IoT app layer

gypsythief
Joke

Somewhat ambiguous naming...

Marketing Drone: And the name of our new thing is ...

Boardroom Lackey: Well, come on, don't keep us in suspense! What's it called?

4
0

Non-existent sex robots already burning holes in men’s pockets

gypsythief

Odd, as from El Reg's "House Rules":

Currently we allow: ... and [span class="strike"]stricken[/span] ([strike] was dropped in HTML5).

But does your way work? No it doesn't! Yes it does!

So that'll teach me to always never RTFM.

9
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gypsythief

“it could be imaginable that clients who pay a lot for sex robots are aware of the fact that robots are non-human, which could prevent their ejaculations from falling into the uncanny valley.”

Assuming the "uncanny valley" is the same as Leonard Cohen was talking about when he wrote

"Those holy hills, that deep ravine"

Of course, that was followed by the line "I was never any good at loving you..." which doesn't bode well for a happy <span class="strike">finish</span> ending!

3
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MH370 hunters call for new search of extra 25,000km2

gypsythief

Metadata is more accurately "data that describes the structure of data"

Not always; it is broader that that. Have a read of:

http://www.niso.org/publications/press/UnderstandingMetadata.pdf

which lists three types of metadata: Descriptive, Structural, and Administrative. About Descriptive Metadata, the article states:

"Descriptive metadata describes a resource for purposes such as discovery and identification. It can include elements such as title, abstract, author, and keywords."

Which clearly covers things like MP3 header tags.

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