* Posts by hellwig

389 posts • joined 3 Mar 2016

Page:

OpenBSD disables Intel’s hyper-threading over CPU data leak fears

hellwig
Silver badge

Hyperthreading and Compilation

We turned hyperthreading on because it seemed to improve our compilation efficiency. If we have a 6-core 12-thread machine, we compile with 12 parallel processes. In theory, most processes are waiting for the source file to be read from the disk (or the object file to be written to the disk), that's a lot of downtime when that same CPU core can be used to compile another file that has already been loaded. You have thousands of source files and that time adds up appreciably.

We don't do any heavy computing on our PCs.

This always made me wonder about AMD's older "FX" architecture where it had two integer cores that shared an FPU. So '8 cores' meant 8 ALU cores, but only 4 FPU cores. Seems fine for most jobs, but if you had a lot of math, it had to be terribly inefficient.

0
0

Whois? Whowas. So what's next for ICANN and its vast database of domain-name owners?

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Rejected one year moratorium oddly similar to 12 months they say they need to devise a new model

ICANN won't even WhoIs my .US domain, so I don't know what you Europeans are complaining about.

1
0

Windows Notepad fixed after 33 years: Now it finally handles Unix, Mac OS line endings

hellwig
Silver badge

Emacs... no Vi.... no Ed!

Yeah yeah, but when you just want to view the text of a file, it's nice that Notepad will now at least just display it.

Wordpad's biggest problem is line wrap, which makes test almost more unreadable than not understanding the line endings.

If I want to edit a file, then yes, Emacs, N++, TextPad, UltraEdit, whatever the the editor-du-jour happens to be at my employer.

9
0

Nvidia quickly kills its AMD-screwing GeForce 'partner program' amid monopoly probe threat

hellwig
Silver badge

NVIDIA doesn't make Radeons?

I know when I'm in the market to spend $300, $500, $1000 on an NVIDIA GPU, I couldn't be assed to read into and research the products I buy. I just find a gpu that matches the price best and buy it. Then when I install my NVIDIA drivers and can't get the card to work in my games, I RMA the card and buy then next one. Oh and you KNOW I leave one-star reviews on those shitty products that just don't work.

But seriously, I'm in the AMD crowd. NVIDIA's been a dick for a long time. Their proprietary TWIMTBP games (the way it's meant to be played) were just an attempt to screw over AMD/ATI. AMD made their standard open (though I'm sure they're no angels).

4
0

Ahem! Uber, Lyft etc: California Supremes just shook your gig economy with contractor ruling

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Employee to Contractor

There may be cars with both Uber and Lyft stickers, but I think the drivers would have good evidence to show Uber was essentially driving them to exclusivity with Uber.

Uber has done illegal things to make Lyft driver's lives hell, including encouraging employees to reserve Lyft drives and then cancel them. If Uber is messing with Lyft's business to prevent people from driving for them, that doesn't help Uber's case.

0
0
hellwig
Silver badge

No Mention of Gentlemen's Clubs

Different from UK clubs, we're talking the ones with naughty bits here in the US.

For ages these (mostly) ladies have complained that they are being treated unfairly as independent contractors. But it seems they may be lifted by this decision. The clubs dictate schedules for the dancers and dictate prices for performances (dances and private sessions). Technically I don't think they are restricted to only working for one club, so there's not necessarily exclusivity, unless all the clubs in an area are owned by one company.

I know this situation is making news in New York if not other places as well.

0
0

Chinese boffins on 3D XPoint: If it works like phase-change memory, it's probably phase-change memory

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: I can see why Intel is keeping it secret

Cut executive bonuses? Hah, that's funny.

9
0

How 'parasitic' Google's 'We're journalists!' court defence was stamped into oblivion

hellwig
Silver badge

This is just Censorship

Sure, you have the right to your own opinions, but good luck sharing those with our totalitarian regime controlling what people even know exist. Go ahead and post something to the internet, but we control what the indexing sites display so no one is going to see your information.

Of course, do people actually even use Google for information anymore? The last US election showed us most Americans (at least) only get their information from Facebook.

If the court's reasoning in this case is that linking to the article without the context that the guilty party "served their time and seems honestly remorseful and thus the article is no longer applicable" , then the same reasoning should be used to pull conspiracy theories and other false articles from Google. If someone searched "earth" and was linked to a "flat earth" website, they wouldn't have the context necessary to know that it's total B.S. So shouldn't the EU protect ALL citizens from information like that? If they will edit the internet to protect ONE citizen, surely that power could be better put to use to protect ALL citizens at once.

The EU is setting a VERY dangerous precedent between Right to Know and flat-out censorship of the information the Government doesn't think you need to know. Imagine if the EU had climate change deniers and you could see how bad this could get. Relying on your politicians to remain intelligent and competent is really not a good method of governing if the past several thousand years of human history has shown us anything.

2
2

Anon biz bloke wins milestone Google Right To Be Forgotten lawsuit

hellwig
Silver badge

The Government has Decided what is Relevant to You

Mr Justice Warby ruled that one of the results, a national newspaper story, was “out of date, irrelevant and of no sufficient legitimate interest to users of Google Search to justify its continued availability

That's what I got from this whole thing. Let Big Brother decide what you need to know.

Good luck with that.

18
7

eBay has locked me into undeletable Catch-22 trap, complains biz bod

hellwig
Silver badge

Copyright and Trademark?

If eBay effectively cut this man off from his company's portal telling him it is no longer his, wouldn't they be in violation of any copyright/trademarked material contained within the site? The profile name, logos, etc...?

Effectively eBay is not operating as this man's company without his consent. Sounds illegal to me.

2
4

What a hang up: US big box biz Best Buy kicks Huawei to the curb

hellwig
Silver badge

Huawei has no Brand Recognition

Huawei may be one of the largest phone manufacturers, but they have no recognition in the united states.

What's their flagship? How does it compare to a iPhone X or a Galaxy s9 or a, is there another phone model that says "high-end performance"?

Sony, LG, Motorola, Nokia, HTC, these companies are not doing so hot, I wouldn't be surprised if Best Buy dropped one of them soon too.

Heck, I walk into a T-mobile store and I barely see anything besides the top-end Apple and Samsung options. You have to ashamedly ask for the other brands/models.

"Um, sir, may.... may I see the... um... reasonably priced phones."

Clerk: "Speak Up!"

"Um, please, anything under $400?"

Clerk: "UNDER $400?! JIM, CHECK OUT THIS POOR ASS BITCH!"

14
1

Anyone fancy testing the 'unlimited' drive writes claim on Nimbus Data's 100TB whopper SSD?

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Where's your bottleneck?

These drives seem perfect for online consumer backups. Assuming the price per GB to run these is cheaper than HDDs (energy costs, space, cooling, etc...), it seems like a perfect fit.

Companies like backblaze don't care about speed, just cost and durability.

5
0

Google to 'forget me' man: Have you forgotten what you said earlier?

hellwig
Silver badge

What DOES the EU Want Google to Be?

On one side, the EU keeps punishing Google because they feel Google is abusing it's power as the arbiter of the Internet (in that most people find information on the Internet through Google). "Shame on you, Google, for trying to make money by listing your own ads over 'Joe's Local Internet Services'".

Then, the EU says "Google, you MUST police the Internet for us, only YOU have that power!".

So Google HAS to list everything with equal priority EXCEPT the data the government decides Google should not list.

I wonder if one of the Newspapers whose article is being delisted could then sue Google for hiding their news results, thereby abusing Google's position as the arbiter of the Internet to promote other news agencies' stories over the delisted news agency.

Quite a Catch 22 there.

24
10

China ALTERED its public vuln database to conceal spy agency tinkering – research

hellwig
Silver badge

Well, the NSA discovers their own vulnerabilities and simply doesn't report them. They don't scour company databases, find important vulnerabilities, and then force the public DBs to remove or hide those vulnerabilities from the public.

China is operating under the guise of openness, by offering to scrub numerous databases to create a centralized public database. But they are instead using the vulnerabilities already reported by others, seeing if they provide value to their spying programs, and if so, hiding them from the Chinese public.

So in theory, the Chinese citizens and companies would know about these public vulnerabilities as soon as the rest of the world if the Chinese government were not doing this.

When the NSA hoards an exploit, in theory (their theory), only they know about it. The NSA's actions can hurt the world. So see, the US is doing it better.

5
0

Pasties in SPAAAAACE: Cornwall hopes for slice of £50m spaceport cash

hellwig
Silver badge

Pasties in Space?

Ah, when the real title and porn title are the same.

Pasties does not mean the same west of the Atlantic as it does over there.

3
0

23,000 HTTPS certs will be axed in next 24 hours after private keys leak

hellwig
Silver badge

Google Apologists?

Cynics have suggested the Brit reseller ordered the revocation of its Symantec-umbrella certs so it could drive its customers onto Comodo certificates, and thus avoid the looming Google Chrome HTTPS certificate apocalypse without losing many, if any, punters. In effect, website owners have been caught up in a turf war between Trustico and DigiCert.

So Google and Symantec got into a fight and Google revoked their certs. But you blame Trustico and DigiCert?

Seems to me, Trustico wouldn't need to replace DigiCert's certs if Google hadn't blanket-banned Symantic.

Lets put blame where blame is due. Google and Symantec.

2
1

Google: Class search results as journalism so we can dodge Right To Be Forgotten

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Fahrenheit 451 (My parents used to fostered hundreds of troublesome teens )

That's why many nations have laws about expunging criminal records of youth (and maintaining their anonymity during court proceedings).

Is a 40-something businessman really naive and should his past transgressions really be forgotten? Just because he served his jail time doesn't mean he's "Fixed". That's a false concept of the criminal justice system. If these people aren't getting better, why are we jailing them or releasing them? The government can't (or won't) answer that so we just ignore the fact that many criminals repeat and pathological urges cannot be cured by small stints in jail.

What you refer to (being dragged through the mud) is not journalism, and we really should fight that problem. Too much sensationalism and not enough fact reporting. Isn't it weird that if the problem is a fame-seeking journalists, Google is the one who has to purge the internet of those records? We're hiding the facts because isolated individuals decided to be asshats with those facts.

People deserve the right to know. Maybe you were caught up in some bad financial dealings 25 years ago, that's your fault. I think anyone willing to invest in a new venture with you deserves to know that, right? And is their only recourse to go to each newspaper and county clerk's office and do a manual search of the records?

10
4
hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Fahrenheit 451 (Google, take some fucking responsibility for your actions!)

Maybe Google should submit a request to be forgotten so we can't keep bringing this up and making them look bad. It doesn't seem fair afterall.

3
0

Unlucky Linux boxes trampled by NPM code update, patch zapped

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Update vs Install

Aren't you referring to "Uninstall" and "Install". Aren't those already two separate but supported actions of basically any installer?

Does the installer have to have special logic to support that action, when whatever is calling the installer could easily do two steps instead of just one?

Not a NPM user, but with apt-get and whatnot, uninstalling "unused" dependencies is optional, right? So "installing" to "tear down and replace" seems like a kluge.

0
0
hellwig
Silver badge

Update vs Install

If I already have something installed, I'm going to update it. If I don't have it installed, I'm going to install it.

If your system is any more complicated than that, it's a completely shit system and you should find something else to do.

1
0

Cryptocurrencies kill people and may kill again, says Bill Gates

hellwig
Silver badge

Tabs?

When I code I use tabs because you want the columns to line up,

What does that even mean? Even Microsoft's IDEs can line-up code based on context. It can align your variables in a multi-line declaration, align values in a table, etc...

A Tab is just a variable-width space (but a constant width across the document). So what's the difference between inserting one tab or 2/3/4 spaces? If you don't keep the white-space at the beginning of lines consistent, it doesn't matter which you use. So consistency is key. I like spaces because they DON'T get f-ed up when you open them in a different editor. If you use 2-space tabs and a coworker uses 8-space tabs, after a couple levels in indentation, your co-worker's gonna need an ultra-wide display to view your code.

So I guess if you're writing code in Wordpad (I had a professor in high school that did that), keep using tabs.

Otherwise, if an IDE is smart enough to figure out Python, it will easily insert spaces into more-sensically laid-out languages.

2
3

America's broadband speed map is back! And it doesn't totally suck!

hellwig
Silver badge

I find it odd that some country-ass areas around me have 4+ providers, while I'm lucky to have two or three (U-verse is offered, not sure it's of any value). I don't think counting re-sellers is terribly effective here. It might help on price (which, again, is not detailed), but if only Comcast has copper in your area, you're effectively stuck with Comcast, right? And you're stuck with Comcast's network-level decisions, like throttling and other non-neutral practices, right? And lets be honest, a lot of re-sellers are total shit. There's a reason they're cheaper, because their support is terrible. I was locked in to a re-seller at an apartment complex once, we were HAPPY to see Comcast take over. Nearly cried tears of joy, THAT'S how terrible some re-sellers can be.

4
0

Samsung left off Google's new official Androids-for-biz list

hellwig
Silver badge

Motorolla a Chinese concern

Maybe Google shouldn't have bought them and effectively shut them down. Then maybe they'd still be an American company (probably making their phones in China like everyone else).

Regarding the US government's suggestions, Google doesn't only do business in the US afterall. I imagine if Google wants to do business in China, they need a chinese partner like Huawei.

1
0

A dog DNA database? You must be barking

hellwig
Silver badge

Laws only stop dogs who follow the law.

Criminal dogs will always find ways to avoid the database and murder livestock.

And maybe it's different in the UK, but wouldn't the primary culprit be feral dogs? If you could round all those up to collect their DNA, why re-introduce them into the country side?

I rather suspect this sort of action to be the first step in a mass purging on undesirable breeds. So many communities already forbid "dangerous" breeds like German Shepards, Pit Bulls, Chows, Rottweilers, etc... Imagine the police coming to your house and saying: "sorry, your dog's great-great-great-great-grandsire was 1/4 pit bull, we have to put-down your dog".

2
4

IBM Java CTO: Devs shouldn't have to learn Docker, K8s, 30 other things to deploy an app

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Call me a Colonialist Curmudgeon

Some of us have ground our teeth to nubs on C and Ada to this day. Some things fancy, non-deterministic REs and VMs will never be able to replace.

I wasn't ambulatory for the days of punch cards, but I cut my teeth on Assembly too. Ask any kid these days if they understand what that line of code they just wrote in some fancy 18th gen language compiles down to, and they'll probably just look at you funny. Do they understand that eventually everything still runs on the CPU?

I actually had a depressing conversation with a couple folks about how a real-mode CPU code can only run one thing at a time. There's no magic that lets the OS or JVM sit live in the background monitoring what you do, because it's all just a single stream of command words sent to the CPU. That was a concept they couldn't quite wrap their heads around.

1
0
hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Hear fucking hear!

Sorry boothy, but what world are you living in? Remember when that guy pulled his "add spaces" package from NPM and broke half the internet?

Not only do people point to a public server and forget it, they use libraries and packages they could easily write themselves in five minutes, but OH, that wouldn't be trendy.

2
2

FCC inspector general sticks corruption probe into chairman Ajit Pai amid $4bn media merger

hellwig
Silver badge

I figured Pai would go back to Verizon with his repeal of net neutrality. It was a feint. He gestured at the internet, but was really working the other end for traditional media. Brilliant! When was the last time a corrupt[Ed: redundant] FCC chairperson wasn't focused on the Internet, ISPs, cable, etc...?

Over-the-air TV is truly a return to form. Maybe this is a double feint, and he's working something else regarding radio for ClearChannel? What more could they want?

4
0
hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Clearly a new definition of "Drain the swamp"

Overflows and blows the levees, then floods the entire surrounding area. The original swamp is drained, but all the surrounding land is just swamp now.

It's brilliant!

5
0

Former ICE top lawyer raided US govt database to steal aliens' identities

hellwig
Silver badge

"The Government" is composed of regular people.

"The Government" wonders why we don't want them snooping around in our private details, installing backdoors, monitoring everything we do.

While the concept of a moral, benign "government" might seem nice, it's pure fantasy. The Government, at all levels, is staffed by normal a-holes like anything else. Even if you think a top-level official is above reproach (HAH!), the actual work gets done by underpaid morons. Think about every individual you have to give personal information to (clerks at just about any government office). It's not even just the government, think about medical professionals. When was the last time an MD asked for your personal information (potentially including social security number)? It was probably some untrained clerk working the reception desk.

Trust no one, and you'll never be surprised.

4
0

Apple to devs: Code for the iPhone X or nothing from April onwards

hellwig
Silver badge

Why the notch?

Apple Devs! Apple Users!

I have a question, do you feel the notch has improved your lives in any way?

That's really the ultimate question. Why the notch?

Apple can't answer that.

YES, the notch is where the cameras live. NO, there's no real reason to add a little extra screen to either side. Imagine if your TV had a notch so they could put the IR receiver (or worse, speakers) in the screen. Pointless.

And rather than admit a mistake (Apple does not make mistakes, that's the Steve Jobs mantra), they'll just force people into it. Years from now, no one will be saying "Wow, that notch was so wonderful!", they'll say "You know, the notch doesn't hurt as much as it used to." And to Apple, that's success.

5
1

Violets are violet, roses are... rosy, Dell just got $145.8m for selling Mozy

hellwig
Silver badge

I do have to question how it's profitable for most of these companies. I use BackBlaze for my own computer, and it's like $60/year. It would cost me more money to buy a single HDD of the appropriate size, and BackBlaze has hashing/encryption and redundancy. So maybe what, 80% storage efficiency, and then even just double-redundancy, means I have to remain a customer of theirs for several years just for them to recoup their hardware costs (I don't care how many HDDs they buy, we're still talking several $$ per TB).

So unfortunately, I see this as a continuing trend. Consolidation, and then price raising.

1
0
hellwig
Silver badge

Re: This makes me twitchy

For corporate, there are few alternatives.

We were told to move away from CrashPlan, to a "back it up yourself if it's that important to you" option with Box.

It was quickly realized that this was A) stupid and B) not always legal depending on what we were storing, so back came CrashPlan, even if it's too expensive.

0
0

Blackbird shot down, patent nuked by judge in Cloudflare legal battle

hellwig
Silver badge

Go CloudFlare Go!

that is all

24
0

US Senate mulls giving Huawei and ZTE the Kaspersky treatment

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Then again

Yeah, China knows how to come out on top.

US company, PLEASE bring your tech over here!

Wait, first, you have to do it through a Chinese Company. That company has to own the IP.

....<few years later>....

Hey US company, GTFO! BTW, we're keeping your IP.

2
0

Brit regulator pats self on back over nuisance call reduction: It's just 4 billion now!

hellwig
Silver badge

60 a year? The UK Sounds like Paradise!

I just don't answer my cell phone unless it's a number in my contacts. If it's important, they'll leave a voicemail.

We have a free "land line" from T-Mobile, but we don't use it, no one knows the number, so the several calls we get a week are entirely spam. We did notice that T-Mobile at least started marking some calls as "potential scammer", which is nice. It's also easier to just unplug the thing and move on with our lives.

Even a small fee (a few cents a call) would basically put an end to this B.S. wouldn't it? I know people have proposed that for email before. Make exceptions for A) contacts that I choose [none of that pre-established business relationship B.S.] B) government entities and C) nope, I think that's about it.

Maybe I can sign up for a 900 (toll) number for my personal use?

3
0

Beware the looming Google Chrome HTTPS certificate apocalypse!

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Maybe I'm just Dumb

My point was that Google Chrome is NOT the only arbiter of what is and isn't acceptable. And that relying solely on Google to police the internet is the last thing ANYONE should be advocating for (of course, posting as an AC, I can ONLY assume you are a Google shill).

If the entire industry came out and said "No Symantec Certs", that might mean something. But this article only calls out Google and Mozilla. Where's Apple? Where's Microsoft? Web Browsers (and Android I assume is also distrusting the certs) are not the only way to access the internet.

If only a portion moves to distrust the certs, nothing is solved.

So WHICH highly paid experts should we listen to, the ones with apparent bias (Google's domain was hit) or the ones that haven't flat-out distrusted the certs yet?

What AV are you running on your Chromebook? Shill!

2
4
hellwig
Silver badge

Maybe I'm just Dumb

But can't we just add an exception for Symantic certs into our OS's "keystore" and bypass Google's whiny-ness?

After-all, why would we trust our web browser to be the final arbiter of what is and isn't acceptable on the internet, when so many other applications can just directly connect in the first place?

Long ago I pointed out that Google starting their own CA would be the end of privacy on the internet. If you use Chrome, there is nothing stopping Google from becoming a MITM attacker. You stupidly use their browser which by default is set to trust their own CA.

Google has gone from "Don't be Evil" to "Trust Us!".

1
8

Of course a mystery website attacking city-run broadband was run by an ISP. Of course

hellwig
Silver badge

When the old FCC auctioned off America's greatest assets (spectrum), it did so while reserving a specific portion to handle future rollouts of rural broad-band wireless. The ISPs were supposed to work on using the new spectrum to supply that service as part of their agreement when they bid on new spectrum allotments.

That service has not materialized, and I suppose the new FCC doesn't really care (the fact that they decided 10/1 wireless is NOT broadband after all blew my mind).

So don't hold your breath, although I assume you weren't anyway.

3
0

Uber quits GitHub for in-house code after 2016 data breach

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Eh?

Why spend the money unless someone makes you?

Where I work, we have very strict guidelines on what can be put where, because we deal with government contracts.

Uber is only trying to protect their own IP (and some of Waymo's), so why not use something "free" like GitHub? What could go wrong with nothing but a flimsy password between your code and the whole internet?

0
0

Uber: Ah yeah, we pay women drivers less than men. We can explain!

hellwig
Silver badge

I'm with you right up until "those are overwhelmingly women".

And replace annoying with dangerous.

0
3

Why is Bitcoin fscked? Here are three reasons: South Korea, India... and now China clamps down on cryptocurrencies

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Nowhere near corrected

If you are a business with a bottom-line, why would you hold-on to bitcoin? At regular intervals, you have to pay suppliers, employees, etc... Sure, sell a $20k car for a couple bitcoin, but that same model car will still sell for $20k tomorrow, will it still be worth the couple bitcoin you got for it today?

Unless the whole system starts to accept bitcoin (at which case, isn't it just a normal currency like anything else?), it HAS to be converted to money somehow.

A government-backed currency like the US dollar or Euro has security. Bitcoin has nothing, and you'd be a fool to depend on it (like a company depends on their revenue). It might have made a good investment, but anyone trying to feed their family with it is a fool.

6
0

$14bn tax hit, Surface Pro screens keep dying – but it's not all good news at Microsoft

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Misleading

Do they get charged interest on the outstanding amount over that period like your ordinary Joe would?

LOL, no.

6
0

Eggheads: Cities, don't woo rich Amazon with sweetheart HQ deals

hellwig
Silver badge

When the tax breaks end, Amazon will Flee

Happens all the time. Companies like Verizon promise thousands of jobs, if only those pesky taxes didn't get in the way. Local community passes a deferred tax agreement. Verizon builds a call center, operates for a few years tax-free. Tax agreement ends, and oh look, Verizon moved.

If you PAY the company to move to your city, they won't have any problem getting someone else to pay them to move later.

As others have pointed out, multi-billion dollar sports franchises do it all the time.

6
0

PC not dead, Apple single-handedly propping up mobe market, says Gartner

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Hardware lasts

I ran an overclocked AMD Athlon x2 dual-core between 2008 and 2014. None of the games I was buying required more processing (multi-core support wasn't really catching on).

In 2014 I rebuilt with an 8-core CPU AMD-FX CPU. Bought an 8GB GPU in 2016.

I figure I might need to upgrade my whole computer again sometime in 2020.

4
0

Firefox to emit ‘occasional sponsored story’ in ads test

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Final Nail In Coffin!

Yeah, What are they? JK

What about Midori? Comes loaded on my Linux distros. (whatever I just put on my RPi)

1
0

Google slaps mute button on stupid ads that nag you to buy stuff you just looked at

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Does Google really not get it? (clicking ads)

So, who clicks ads? Probably bots and scam networks, or even competitors with no intention of buying, but driving up their competitor's advertising costs.

Why do companies pay for the ads? Well, someone is clicking them, so it must be working right?

It's the same with the Bitcoin bubble. Why did the price go up? Because people kept saying the price would go up, so more people bought bitcoin, driving up the price. Then when people stopped seeing their returns, they sold off/stopped buying, lowering the price, priming it for a nice price increase, assuming people start buying bitcoin again in the anticipation of increased prices.

I could go on, but you see the pattern, right?

1
0

You publish 20,000 clean patches, but one goes wrong and you're a PC-crippler forever

hellwig
Silver badge

This is the last straw

I mean, I've never used malwarebytes, but, yeah, come on now.

This seems to accidentally happen a lot to security suites. The question is, how does the company not power-on a PC a notice they can't do anything with it? How does this escape quality testing?

I mean, why wouldn't you roll this out to your company's own computers first? Are your employees not using this software on their personal machines at home? So many avenues this could have been discovered BEFORE your paying customers got screwed over.

I should just switch to Mac, they don't get viruses.....

HAH!

4
0

Here we go again... UK Prime Minister urges nerds to come up with magic crypto backdoors

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Cyphers

True, so recruiting people online from other countries might be hard, which is where traditional methods of contact come into play (phone, post, pigeon, all the P's), and why these security agencies still need to do the old-fashioned leg work.

Basically, if I was fighting against the "western powers", I would already not trust the technology they produce.

6
0
hellwig
Silver badge
Big Brother

Cyphers

Correct me if I'm wrong, but people have known how to secretly communicate in the open for a long time now. Blanket keyword searching only catches people stupid enough to use the keywords.

A message about grandmas oatmeal cookie recipe could easily be code for some nefarious plot, but good luck detecting that with your fancy AI that can barely read a Wikipedia article.

Heck, the AC posts on this site might actually be some underground terrorist organization plotting their next attack.

3
0

Europe slaps €997m antitrust fine on Qualcomm

hellwig
Silver badge

Re: Poor little intel

Intel is competing (unsuccessfully) with Qualcomm in the modem market. Their product is shit (people don't like using it). Qualcomm produces almost a full range of mobile chips, while no one is using Intel CPUs, thus Intel is having a harder time breaking into the mobile market. So Qualcomm can squeeze a bigger profit from an entire phone, even by reducing the costs of the individual chips (or in this case, just bribing Apple). Intel (and other competitors) can't offer the same discounts, so that's not fair (cue EU pity police).

Of course, Intel did EXACTLY what Qualcomm is doing, with Dell and AMD (paying Dell not to use AMD). They paid a few billion to AMD and signed an agreement for information exchange to drop the lawsuit. Which I assume is the sarcasm in the original post.

2
1

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018