* Posts by JDKelley

5 posts • joined 23 Nov 2015

Confirmed: How to stop Windows 10 forcing itself onto PCs – your essential guide

JDKelley

Brilliant.

The two Registry keys live in non-extant subfolders on my system, and my system won't let me create them (unless I'm missing something.)

Should I just take a trip up to Redmond with a box of hammers to throw? I've already put about six hours into killing this damned nag (several times, now...) and I'm about to send those idiots a bill for my time!

Tell me - is there something I'm missing? Because this is driving me batty (yes, I know the nag will "go away" on its own in a few months, but I'm damned near ready to blow shit up NOW because it won't go away! I don't want to have to wait a few months for it to go away on its own, I don't plan on getting Win10 anyhow.

Hell, I think Win2K was where they should have stopped. Win7 is acceptable, I didn't much care for XP, I can't stand 8, reports from the field on 10 are uniformly negative, ...

Dry those eyes, ad blockers are unlikely to kill the internet

JDKelley

Your car example may not be so good - for those of us who are just SO damned tired of all the feature creep in cars (being saddled with "safety systems" that do little more than allow/encourage drivers to abdicate thought, diagnostic systems that catch errors sometime /after/ I repair them, "creature features" that I neither want nor need, &c, &c,) that there's a subset of us who are simply disinclined to purchase a vehicle made w/in the last 35-40 years anyhow.

Expanding the universe: HDTV? I don't see that well, don't have cable, and don't watch sports anyhow (that always seems to be what is marketed in hi-def.) Blu-Ray? I didn't get interested in that until I could buy a burner for data discs - again, I don't see that well. $4,000 bed? I don't sleep that well or that much - doesn't matter what on (or with what prescription.)

How about taking all that brainpower (since I'm sure /some/ gets used writing all of those noisome adverts, yes?) and turning it toward more productive, useful ends? Bring manufacturing jobs back from China. Get fuel, food, and property prices back under control. Find out why politicians are such imbeciles. Find out why our President is /not/ willing to fight those arsewits in the Middle East, but they've managed to piss off France - fucking FRANCE! - enough to start bombing.

Stuff like that.

JDKelley

Re: People who use adblockers...

I would be less bothered by advertisements online IFF:

- They would stop trying to make me spend money I don't have on things I neither need nor want.

- They would stop being insulting to my intellect

- They would stop being insulting to the meanest of intellects

- They would be appealing to more than the basest of intellects

- They would make much LESS use of flashing graphics

- They would /not/ autoplay sound and/or video and interrupt whatever I was doing

- They would /not/ pop over or pop under in the middle of my screen, in the way

- They would /not/ pollute my system with tracking cookys, malways, Trojans, or other crap that causes firewall hits

- They would /not/ have virii riding sidecar with them.

Me? I use an adblocker? I don't need the adverts I don't want to see, "monetizing" every damned email account I have, clogging up my bandwidth. Perhaps if everything weren't so busy being "monetized" (another neologism that needn't exist,) the economy wouldn't be in the shambles it's in?

Yay, more 'STEM' grads! You're using your maths degree to do ... what?

JDKelley

Re: If you can't calculate the angles on a 50-cent coin...

Are you talking /consciously/ calculated, or /intuitively/ calculated? It makes the examples different.

/Consciously/ calculated:

- Nearly any stable trade will use at least some small amount of trig and/or geometry (your plumber? ever hear of a "drain slope"? Last I heard, it was right around a half-inch to the foot. That's trig, you're just not figuring the ratio, but you're figuring the ratio between the legs of a right triangle.) Electrical layouts can be done the same way, as can any field reinforcement/repair work (electrics/plumbing/carpenter/engineer/architect/&c.) Those examples are legion, I shall leave their discovery for the apt pupil.

/Intuitively/ calculated:

- Your "supermarket drone"? If he's bagging goods, he's got to know where to stop so the bag doesn't rip out, yes?

- Your "insurance salesman"? A constant "risk/benefit" analysis is running in the back of his mind - both on behalf of his client (how much is he willing to risk for how much potential benefit?) and for himself (how much does he think he can make?) This is done largely by intuition on his part.

- Your bouncer? He's intuitively calculating quite a bit, mostly ballistic objects (powered and unpowered - thrown objects, fists, feet, &c, &c.) You don't honestly think blocks and kicks "just happen," do you? He may have never been taught the maths that go into planning that motion, or the laws that govern the motions, but he can analyze the motion and STOP it.

- Restaurant Staff: Ever carry one of those heavy serving trays? Interesting exercise in physics, that. Cooking? Those shelves get crowded on busy nights, but they don't drop a plate. Bussers/dishwasers? Same sort of thing, on the other side.

As far as dredging up your "contrived examples" like the falling brick - you think that's /not/ exactly what happens, just without the numbers & graphs? You see the object falling. You make rapid calculations of path, mass, density, surface, speed, risk of injury, &c. You decide whether you should:

- Catch it

- Move out of the way

- Interpose an object so it doesn't hit /you/

- Interpose an object so it doesn't hit /someone/ /else/.

And a driver makes dozens of "calculations" every second - he's just not aware of the fact that he's doing it. Nor, really, will he be - unless he's trained in a field, that has him making calculations normally (as an MET, I'm aware of the calculations that I make while driving, how they change with the vehicle I'm driving and/or how it's loaded, how my vehicle's handling envelope is affected by the people who are in it with me and their locations, &c, &c.)

Your "contrived examples" are nowhere near as "contrived" as you want to think they are, and your mind does far more on an intuitive level than you are aware it does. Ever hear of a principle called "negative feedback"? Look it up sometime.

Then, next time you pick up an egg, realize just how much of a balancing act it can really be...

JDKelley

Re: If you can't calculate the angles on a 50-cent coin...

It may have been in a few places, but I seem to recall it best from _Starship_ _Troopers_ - "... a man who doesn't know maths isn't a man, he's merely a domesticated animal who has learned to wear shoes and not make messes in the house." (Or something in that vein.) This was given as the reasoning for the protagonist to continue to study - at least his maths - when he was sure he's muffed his 'prentice cruise as a "Temporary Third Lieutenant" and was heading back to post.

While I am somewhat inclined to argue that philosophy is wholly useless (it depends on just what sort of philosophy we are talking about here - logic, symbolic or otherwise, is always useful; and solipsism makes for wonderful extended sessions of mental gymnastics...) my mother and grandfather (her father) were of two different - yet related - schools of thought on basic education:

- (Mum) If you can read, you can figure out anything else you need to know. (For this reason, I was taking the newspaper to /kindergarten/ on a daily basis, because I never have napped well. The teacher stopped quizzing me the third day, because I was reading, understanding, and retaining.)

- {Granddad) If you can do maths, you can figure out anything else you need to know (he'd kickstarted me, extended sessions in his workshop with his textbooks or in the city library saw me working my way through first-year calculus by age twelve.)

Another quote from Heinlein, speaking in the person of Lazarus Long: "A man should be able to: " (at which followed some two pages of disparate tasks which a man ought to be able to do well. This was closed with what I have come to call 'Heinlein's Dictum') "Specialization is for insects."

This last has been a guiding principle of life for me.

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