* Posts by Voyna i Mor

2755 posts • joined 3 Nov 2015

Want to know what an organisation is really like? Visit the restroom

Voyna i Mor
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Re: It's not a sink

"I wonder if it's the same people who pronounce scones as scones instead of scones. Crazy people."

And it's so easy to remember. Just memorise this helpful verse:

I asked a waitress in Athlone to bring to me a buttered scone./The silly girl has been and gone and given me a buttered scone.

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Did you even sweat, tho? Plaintiffs told to amend claims in Apple headphones suit

Voyna i Mor
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Re: Simpler solution.

A different company? But what different company has a fruit logo and a vast marketing budget?

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OnePlus smartmobe brand modelled on 'a religion', founder admits

Voyna i Mor
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Re: Slavish copying to the last

"Well, no. Because how many Apple fanbois do you see smashing up their phones just to get the next iPhone for $1?"

Actually I'm aware of more than one person (in Sales) who managed to "lose" their corporate BlackBerry once iPhones became an option. Add in the higher level execs who simply were able to demand them.

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Lawyers for Marcus Hutchins: His 'I made malware' jail phone call isn't proper evidence

Voyna i Mor
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Re: I'm sure...

You're wrong. With the frantic desire of the current British government to give oral pleasure to the US President in the hope of avoiding tariffs post-Brexit, any US citizen in such circumstances would be deported very quickly.

If he was a member of their armed forces, he'd simply go home without any comment from the British government.

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And THIS is how you do it, Apple: Huawei shames Cupertino with under-glass sensor

Voyna i Mor
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Re: Are biometrics safe?

The Sony solution seemed the best possible because putting the sensor on the side power button meant that there's no real chance of your accidentally leaving a nice oily fingerprint that worked right on the sensor button.

Sadly they've now gone the way of everybody else.

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Android devs prepare to hit pause on ads amid Google GDPR chaos

Voyna i Mor
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Re: Consent

"As per a quote I heard: "Half the money spent on advertising is wasted; the problem is working out which half.""

Lord Lever. Obviously got it right as Unilever is still a big thing.

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Airbus windscreen fell out at 32,000 feet

Voyna i Mor
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Re: Last time this happened...Also I call them bolts.

Oh dear, typical Vogon never wrong...

I used the term "screw thread". That's what they are called. Bolts, studs and machine screws all have screw threads.

Generally a bolt is something that screws into a nut, i.e. it has a head at one end and a separate nut at the other.

A machine screw is like a bolt but is designed to screw into a threaded hole in a piece of metal. I suspect that the fasteners of an Airbus windscreen could well be machine screws.

A stud has a thread at both ends and usually a non-threaded bit in the middle. One end screws into a piece of metal; the other end takes a nut. Cylinder heads are usually held down with studs. Rocker covers are usually held down with screws. Thin pieces of metal are usually bolted together as there isn't enough depth in either piece to thread it.

I completely fail to take your point about the size of the head. Usually standard screws (or bolts, to keep you happy) have a given head size for a given thread diameter. The reasons for this are (1) to keep the number of spanner sizes sane and (2) because there's a relation with thread diameter and shearing force, so the head size should ideally reflect the flats or whatever being of a size to resist the maximum safe load while not being so big that a slightly clumsy mechanic will keep shearing heads off.

There also tends to be a limited range of pitches because if there isn't enough difference sooner or later someone will try to insert a 0.95mm pitch thread into a 1mm pitch hole using BFI, and this will not be good.

Mine is the one with the copy of Machinery's Handbook in the pocket.

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: Blown or sucked....

"and, then, of course, there's Bernoulli, who converts blowing (at the correct angle) to sucking"

I guess after the end of this year you'll have to prove you are 18 or over before looking at an illustration of that.

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: Hero ? @Khaptain

"Well irrespective of the definition of the word 'Hero' this chap continued to do his job in appalling conditions, with an injured crew, missing instruments and landed his aircraft without further incident or injury."

I like Brecht's observation (from Galileo, translated):

"Fortunate is the country that has such heroes"

"No, unfortunate is the country that needs them."

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: Last time this happened...

"And the point that the windows should probably not be using a screw of the same diameter but a different length is a good one"

Are you aware that screw thread and head designs are standardised, and for very good reasons? If we had to have unique screw diameters for everything that might be at all safety critical, it would be rather difficult to implement. Especially as you can always put a smaller diameter screw in a given hole.

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You've got pr0n: Yes, smut by email is latest workaround for UK's looming cock block

Voyna i Mor
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Re: What's next?

"Where do you draw the line with pornography, as it is not something that every single person would agree on the definition of."

And this is the real crux of the matter.

I personally draw the line at representations of nonconsensual sex (which by definition includes animals and children as well as assault, rape and people without capacity, so includes drunks and people on drugs.) Others would draw it somewhere else.

I suspect that the government, urged on by the Daily Mail, simply draws the line at nudity. The Mail website (before I blocked it with Tea & Kittens because people would shorten links to it) included pictures of underage girls in sexualised clothes, which to them was obviously OK but falls under my definition above since they could not give informed consent to the use of the pictures.

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: What's next?

Art, obviously. After all, that was the solution from the Renaissance on. Paint bare ladies and gentlemen, call it art. In Victorian times, apparently, it was not uncommon for the upper classes to put the more interesting pictures in the bedrooms of their visitors, a kind of pre-wifi service. Perhaps it was assumed that the servants wouldn't notice them.

There is a story that on visiting one country house Mrs. Disraeli complained to her hostess "I find our room contains an indecent picture. I have been up all night preventing Disraeli from looking at it." She did not explain what stratagem she had employed to prevent him.

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First SpaceX Falcon 9 Block 5 rocket lobs comms sat into orbit

Voyna i Mor
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Re: Betting against Elon Musk?

"I don't know *how* many times I've dropped that Tennyson line in project meetings, and no one has clued to it"

He has also got a rather sarcastic one about the world "spinning forever down the ringing grooves of change" - suggesting that we don't really have much control over it, and it keeps coming back to repeat the same stuff. That surely describes the evolution of software.

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: Betting against Elon Musk?

"There are plenty of animal species that have been around for hundreds of millions of years. Ever heard of sturgeon, jellyfish, sharks?"

Although this is OT my pedant mode causes me to want to correct this. Sharks and jellyfish are major animal groups, not species. Sturgeons are a family. Before long it will be a very small family because most species are critically endangered.

Within groups species arise and depart. Looking at us, we're really very recent - Neanderthals are a bit older and they've already gone. Most of the stone tools you see in museums were not made by our species, but by previous human species none of whom would have been capable of building rockets.

This is part of the famous misunderstanding of Darwin - that we are descended from apes. No. At some point we had a common ancestor species. Then we diverged. The ancestor species was not any species of modern ape.

One of the biggest shocks to the Victorian world, and it preceded Darwin's publication, was realising from the fossil record that species go extinct, and thus the idea that they were created ab initio by God, a few were drowned in the Flood, and then all the rest survive - was wrong. It was extinction not natural selection that really put the kybosh on Creationism (except in the more backward parts of the world). Tennyson knew about it and suddenly realised that Nature far from being a kindly product of a beneficient creator was quite ruthless with her children. "From scarped cliff or quarried stone/she cries "A thousand types are gone,/ I care for nothing, all shall go."

If something gets off this damp rock and visits other planets, it is quite possible it will be a species that isn't us, which is why human exceptionalism is quite pointless.

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: A half complete network of Iridium satellites...

"Elon Musk should look at commissioning a set of photographs using the 104-year-old Graflex 4×5 view camera to capture the next launch of the Falcon Heavy"

No need, with a 4 by 5 what matters (assuming the box is solid and light tight and the ground glass aligns to the plate) is the lens and the film. There are plenty of Super Angulons about. And plenty of people who know how to use a view camera. I suspect there are loads of them in Florida.

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NASA will send tiny helicopter to Mars

Voyna i Mor
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"Wonder if they've thought of using a rechargeable Dremel to power the rotors? 15,000 RPM should do nicely."

See my other post. The rotor tips can't exceed the speed of sound.

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: DRAMATIC MUSIC!!!

Well, think about it like this.

The gravity of Mars is about one third that of the Earth and its atmosphere is about 160 times less dense. In very rough terms that means that helicopter blades have to be designed in such a way that on Earth they would have 50 times the lift they do on Mars.

That means, again in rough terms, that if we could have a blade 5 times the lift and rotating 10 times as fast as for a terrestrial helicopter, it would do the job. The power needed, of course, should be much less because of the reduced gravity.

The limitation on a rotating wing is the point at which the wing tips reach the speed of sound, which on Mars is about 240m/s.

At 3000 rpm (50 revs/sec) the wing tips reach the speed of sound for a circumference of about 5 metres which means a blade length of 0.8 metres. So if we started with a Chinook with its 9 metre blades, limited to around 300rpm on Earth... it's only going to reach around 220 rpm on Mars. The blades, in fact, would be too small and slow by a factor of around 600.

So, if I've understood it right and my back of envelope approach is even within an order of magnitude, no practical Martian helicopter is ever going to be more than a few kilos.

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Sort your spending habits out, UK Ministry of Defence told over £20bn black hole

Voyna i Mor
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"Coupled with MOD SA's homework checkers endlessly rejecting documents for missing a full stop"

If that's a decimal point in the wrong place, just as well they do it.

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: A truly excellent plan.... There's ample "spare" energy to power a steam catapult.

Genuine question: AIUI the waste heat from efficient turbine and Diesel plants is relatively low grade so that the steam pressure raised from waste heat boilers is not high. Is this still correct nowadays and if so what is the implication for steam catapults? The numbers I've seen suggest around 30 bar for a steam catapult, and for waste heat boilers around 6.

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Voyna i Mor
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Big Brother

Re: Another wee problem - particularly if you manage to be vaguely efficient about defence

So basically we should outsource defence procurement to China and Russia instead of buying that expensive US kit? At least we could probably get stuff serviced a bit closer than Turkey.

Yup, St. Petersburg's quite a bit closer than Ankara, and much further from politically unstable areas.

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: Simple solution

"And the Danes, and the Vikings, (bloody vikings!) and the Normans, and the Huguenots (Farage!)"

Well, that's me stuffed then. Just include Jewish immigrants from the Netherlands and I'll have to be sent back where I came from in quite a lot of pieces. My wife gets to stay unless the Beaker People get to have a say in the matter.

Though don't forget a lot of the Normans were really Vikings who had spent longer in Northern France than expected on their European tour.

Come to think of it, if you send everybody back where they came from the defence budget will be a lot smaller owing to the shrunken population. But it should pay for quite a lot of spears and woad, which might even be more useful against realistic threats than the F35.

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Mobileye's autonomous cars are heading to California. But they're not going to kill anyone. At least not on purpose

Voyna i Mor
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Re: Too many "accidents"

In Russian, it's an "unfortunate event", with no assumption that it was some kind of inevitable thing that just happen. But then there are some very educational videos on Youtube that tell you than driving in Russia or Ukraine is not to be recommended unless you have an APC, and possibly not even then.

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: well..

"In my experience, the central premise of driving is "I'm a great driver, everyone else is terrible"."

But not in Sweden.

Seriously, a study by psychologists showed in US trials that a majority overrated their driving skills, while in Sweden a majority underrated them. US != the world.

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Bombshell discovery: When it comes to passwords, the smarter students have it figured

Voyna i Mor
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"Then he resets the password everytime he wants to log in."

Provided nobody else has access to his email account, that isn't too insecure.

But how does he log in to his email account?

For a few annoying companies that I trade with perhaps once a year and that want me to set up an account, I admit I often do this. But then the email account I use follows good password practice.

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Zookeepers charged after Kodiak bear rides shotgun to Dairy Queen

Voyna i Mor
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Re: Typical, Tight-Ar-e Canadian Civil Servants

"It’s illegal to skinny dip in Bancroft, Ontario;"

Umberto Eco says somewhere that you can always tell what a society does a lot of by what's illegal. The amount of water in and around Bancroft is enormous, so perhaps this law is to deal with the uncontrollable urge of much of the population to throw off their clothes and enter the nearest body of water, on the basis that it prevents a lot of hypothermia in winter.

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Make masses carry their mobes, suggests wig in not-at-all-creepy speech

Voyna i Mor
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Not to be too rude but...

One problem with lawyers (who are not criminal barristers like Ken Clarke), council officials and civil servants is that their understanding of modern technology is a bit limited, and their understanding of the criminal mind more so still. This is how councils can think that a notice saying "Keep off the grass" when they have no park-keepers left will magically stop people walking on the grass.

I can remember when many senior barristers did not have mobile phones at all, but their clerks did. Then the iPhone came along and was simple enough to be kind-of understood by people whose minds were, frankly, elsewhere. How it works, security implications, charging and the like - clerk deals with that.

Therefore, the fact that a senior judge really hasn't got a clue in the matter is unsurprising. He's got as far as the idea that mobile phones can be used for surveillance but hasn't got as far as understanding why this isn't going to work for precisely the people he wants to surveil. He hasn't even got as far as understanding that many people have multiple mobile phones. Where am I at the moment? Google doesn't know whether I'm at home or in town. It just knows where both my phones are that have access to my main account. (It doesn't even know if I went into town by car or in the bus I was following.)

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Can't wait for Linux apps on Chrome OS? And you like stability? We'll see you in December, then

Voyna i Mor
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Re: So are there no development solutions that don't involve installing stuff?

The development of Windows (and MacOS) started with very standalone computers and then the networking steadily improved until we have the present hybrid state where most of the stuff is on the machine and some of it is cloud-based.

The development of Chrome has been the other way round, starting in the cloud and extending into the machine as it proved desirable.

I'm not sure that "the whole point of a Chromebook" is cloud computing. I think it's more that the cloud aspect should be seamless, which it certainly isn't with Windows. Windows 10 is getting there but the file access system is a complete mess.

I think any success of Linux-on-Chrome will be related to how Google solve the storage issues. Nobody has really completely solved the problem of security versus easy to understand for any current OS, and Linux is one of the more opaque as soon as you need to do anything remotely nonstandard.

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Peak smartphone? Phone fatigue hits Western Europe hard

Voyna i Mor
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Re: Nokia delivers

"As Samsung is the entrenched king of the Android phone market share now, Nokia can only hope to snatch market share from the likes of LG, HTC, Sony, Huawei etc."

I fail to follow the logic. Surely it's easier to take sales from the company with the biggest sales volume? Assume Sony have 1% of the market and Samsung have 40% (I don't know if this is anywhere near right but it's an illustration).

To gain 1% of market share you have to persuade every Sony buyer to buy your product, or one Samsung buyer in 40. The 1% who still buy Sony probably have a reason for doing so, beyond just being contrarian. A lot of the Samsung buyers may simply have window shopped.

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Every major OS maker misread Intel's docs. Now their kernels can be hijacked or crashed

Voyna i Mor
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Re: PC 2.0

"It can be done. Apple have changed architectures twice, in the same amount of time all MS has managed to do is flail about with a schizophrenic UI."

This is related to the old joke about how God created the world in only 6 days but it took IBM years to do an OS upgrade. Because God didn't have to worry about the installed base.

Apple were able to change architectures three times (four if you count the one with the 12 bit CPU) because nothing really mission critical ran on their hardware. Once MS were in the server room for real, things got a lot more difficult.

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: PC 2.0 - The VAX had instructions for EVERYTHING

The only thing lacked by the VAX was a Temazepam dispenser to deal with the stresses caused by all the tape swapping at month end.

In those days we had adequate CPUs but inadequate RAM and storage devices. Now everything is adequate and a flashlight app can root a phone containing a supercomputer larger and faster than a lot of earlier Crays.

Progress!

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: I'm impressed

"But if the documentation was as good as you say why would they need to ask?"

Because the existence of good and accurate documentation does not imply the existence of a developer sufficiently intelligent and wide-ranging to understand it without further help.

It's a kind of version of the Watchmaker Fallacy in reverse; the existence of a design manual does not in fact imply the existence of a designer.

Disclaimer: I am terrible at understanding documentation without sample code.

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Intel CEO Brian is a man living on the edge

Voyna i Mor
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Re: He's NOT the messiah!

We want more and better information, and to that end we need more data points. What we do not need is to keep storing more and more noise.

The example of data reduction in science is a good one. Unfortunately there are a lot of people who have a thoroughly OCD attitude to the stuff being collected, ending up with vast redundancy. It's good for server and database vendors, but it rests in terabytes that will never be accessed. I think the main reason is the reluctance to do proper analysis of what is being collected at the start, and working out how to store it most effectively.

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Google's socially awkward geeks craft socially awkward AI bot that calls people for you

Voyna i Mor
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Re: I am beginning to think

Taking you seriously...

The Amish do have some good points. Those I have met have been without exception nice people. Their precautionary principle approach to technology is in many ways admirable.

But their way of life isn't actually sustainable for a large population. If they continued to have large families and expand due to the availability of modern sanitation (reduces infant mortality) they would eventually come up against severe land use pressure and eventually you'd get Amish resource wars, infanticide or probably both.

That they don't is largely because the rest of us have adopted the modern technology that they don't use.

Also see Quakers still being around in the UK because the rest of the population didn't adopt their attitude to non-violence in 1939.

An in-between is needed and some of the Amish are adopting it. Personally I would like to see a lot more regulation of social media and AI. The problem is finding anyone I would trust to regulate it - and I certainly wouldn't trust myself. Too many media proprietors hanging from lamp-posts makes things untidy.

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: Very impressive

The main real world use case I can see is "better" spam phone calls.

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: Waymo at Google I/O

"I was hoping to see a self-driving car drive on to the stage and run over the CEO. But it was not to be"

Wrong company.

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Microsoft vows to bridge phones to PCs, and this time it means it. Honest.

Voyna i Mor
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The Airdroid app for Android has been around for a good many years

Gets very mixed reviews, contains ads. Would not use, unfortunately.

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Yes, people see straight through male displays of bling (they're only after a fling)

Voyna i Mor
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Re: Really?

The cost of the average US new car is, I believe, about $25000. The average for all four wheeled personal transport is around $35000 because so many of them need F150s to commute.

And these are American undergraduates.

I'm not sure what the study proves. That they don't know how much cars cost once you've added on sales tax and the essential extras?

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UK's Royal Navy buys £13m mine-blasting robot boat

Voyna i Mor
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Re: rule 2(b) et al. - So does its programming include rule 2(b) ? Or not 2(b)?

I would hope that it has one of these fancy new AI processors which has been fed with that essential navigation manual, How to Avoid Huge Ships.

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Voyna i Mor
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Re: Don't remember that scene from Hot Fuzz

""I 'it it with me 'ammer" was his reply."

Mt father's first command in the last Anglo-German misunderstanding before the current one was a minesweeper. I was surprised to learn that when you had rounded up the mines on the surface, correct procedure was to retire to a safe distance and shoot them with the object of causing them to fill with water and sink. They very rarely went bang.

Many WW2 minesweepers relied on rather primitive technology. At least this one doesn't require coaling.

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Where to find dark matter? $34m says go look 2km under Canada

Voyna i Mor
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Re: Slac wimp detector

"I wouldn't be so picky. Just make it PE teachers (psychopathic is a tautomerism)"

I think you must be a chemist.*

Actually it isn't quite a tautology [sic] because in later life I did meet a PE teacher who was a thoroughly nice chap. But he left to go and work for an oil company because so many parents assumed he must be thick, and it got him down.

*Also detectable by their pronunciation of unionised and periodic.

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Voyna i Mor
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Slac wimp detector

That's what our PE master thought he was in the 1960s. As a result my only real prejudice is against Welsh rugby players who become psychopathic PE teachers. Because I was a very slack wimp.

Fortunately the Head agreed with me and he was asked to find alternative employment, but not until after he had put me off school games for life.

If they'd opened up his skull I'm sure they would have found plenty of very dark matter indeed, (And I'd have offered to operate the trepan.)

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Heir to SMS finally excites carriers, by making Google grovel

Voyna i Mor
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Re: Don't Want - Next thing they'll be trying to deprecate phones that can handle voice.

Without naming, to avoid potential fanboy downvotes, my extensive testing suggests some phone makers have been trying to do that for a long time.

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IT systems still in limbo as UK.gov departments await Brexit policy - MPs

Voyna i Mor
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But the population problem will be solved!

Before long Poland and Romania will have an influx of hard working British plumbers, electricians and builders, and we'll be going to Germany and France to buy cheap second hand cars to get the spares we can no longer afford. So long as we can get back into the UK again, which seems increasingly unlikely.

Is there by any chance a Conservative MP or candidate named Fuster-Cluck? Because the odds on them being the next PM will be very short.

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Voyna i Mor
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subject matter of an Oxford University <b>humanitarian</b> degree graduate

While I agree with much of your post I'd just mention that it's "humanities". If you think Johnson and Rees-Mogg are humanitarians you might also want to invest in my Bering Strait Bridge project.

Cameron (and Miliband) did PPE - a bit of philosophy, a bit of politics and a bit of reconomics while spending much of your time down the Union scoring debating points. Fine when politics was an amusing pastime for sons of the peerage too clever for the Army but not clever enough for the Church.

Johnson did classical literature - reading books from a time around 2000 years ago when slavery was fine, women were oppressed but we're supposed to look up to them because of nude statues and an empire. He managed to get a 2:1, which hardly makes him a genius,

And Rees-Mogg did history, I'm afraid I can't be bothered to dig out his grade.

Not one of them therefore has the slightest in-depth knowledge of a real subject which might cause a little humility faced with an unfamiliar subject.

Kipling 1899:

"Far called, our navies melt away/on dune and headland sink the fire/lo all our pomp of yesterday/is one with Nineveh and Tyre." He was right.

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Voyna i Mor
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Flame

Re: La la la la

Simple answer: Go back to pencil and paper systems operated by the extra million or two unemployed we're going to end up with as a result of leaving the EU.

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Pentagon in uproar: 'China's lasers' make US pilots shake in Djibouti

Voyna i Mor
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"The number of available laser frequencies is small and goggles with narrow cut filters for all of them should not be too hard to arrange."

Ah, well that is where you are unfortunately completely wrong.

Narrow cut filters for one frequency still have quite a high density at other frequencies. If you have to have a series of filters for, say, 4 frequencies, you're getting into welding helmet territory.

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Voyna i Mor
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"It's not like there is anyone else in that area of the world that doesn't like them."

World population about 7 billion.

US population about 300 million.

Top 1% of the rest of the world align themselves to US because, money and power.

That leaves on my calculation about 6.6 billion people who might not like Americans in military aircraft.

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Google Pay heads for the desktop... and, we fear, an inevitable flop

Voyna i Mor
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Re: As for mobile wallets...

"I don't know what percentage of Android phones have NFC at this point, but none has that I have owned to date. "

I don't buy expensive phones and I have never owned an Android phone that hasn't. The 4 we currently have all do and only one cost as much as £300. A number of Chinese phones don't.

But to my mind the advantage of phone payments is this; you can turn NFC off. You can't turn a card off except via a tinfoil wallet.

Also, the account used by the phone is a step removed from your actual credit or debit cards.

Whether that's a big enough reason I can't say but it works for me.

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