* Posts by fluffybunnyuk

86 posts • joined 18 Oct 2015

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GDPR USA? 'A year ago, hell no ... More people are open to it now' – House Rep says EU-like law may be mulled

fluffybunnyuk
Devil

It'll be like homeopathy. 1 drop of GDPR in an ocean of vested interests. Any observable effect would need a quantum tunneling microscope to see it.

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Google now minus Google Plus: Social mini-network faces axe in data leak bug drama

fluffybunnyuk
WTF?

Alas poor google+

As hamlet would say:-

Alas, poor google+! I knew it el reg, an app of infinite jest, of most excellent slurp. It hath borne my data to every company a thousand times, and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung those andoid phones that I have touched I know not how oft. —Where be your gibes now? Your gambols? Your songs? Your flashes of merriment that were wont to set the tablet on a roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning? Quite chapfallen? Now get you to facebooks chamber and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this favor she must come. Make her laugh at that.

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US and UK Amazon workers get a wage hike – maybe they'll go to the movies, by themselves

fluffybunnyuk

It sounds good but the London living wage is recalculated in November, and if it goes up like last year then it could stand at £10.60-£10.70.

So it'd still be less then what they calculate you realistically need to earn as a minimum in London.

So plenty of spin, not so much providing whats really required.

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Microsoft liberates ancient MS-DOS source from the museum and sticks it in GitHub

fluffybunnyuk

not as much fun as using a dos pc as a 3270 mainframe terminal.

Try sending "Attn" using a microsoft keyboard and see how far you get...

@A@Q if i remember right....

Dont worry youngsters, you'll never have to worry about the wierd n wonderful stuff on old keyboards like "Refresh" :)

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Civil rights group Liberty walks out on British cops' database consultation

fluffybunnyuk

Re: Dogs Dinner

"The bad news is: They know where you live - so preparing the charge list for the summons will be a piece of cake."

They do indeed. But its been 7 years since the last call I had from 2 MIB turning up at the front door.Something about writing encryption they can't break, and some sort of explaining how its not in my best interests. I explained that the genie is out of the bottle, and good luck with stuffing it back in. I was disappointed they left deeply unhappy but you can't please everyone.

Im well overdue for another informal "chat".

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fluffybunnyuk

Dogs Dinner

So many places for this to be insecure or break. Why would anyone bid to write this dogs dinner, unless its for large amounts of money?

I'm sure it mentions integration with a kitchen sink somewhere.

On the plus side it was good of them to release the technical details (not published here) so any hacker can have a go at it in their spare time...

1. What are the technologies being used ? NLEDP is currently seeking to use Apache Camel or more broadly Fuse ESB to handle many integration points with SOAP, REST, FTP and SMTP using CSV, XML, JSON data payloads. However, there are multiple legacy interfaces that use technologies such as Fujitsu Universal Transaction Manager (UTM) and Software AG Entire X Broker to support IBM 3270 and EDIFACT messaging and then also EJBs that should be modernised but may need to be sustained in some instances.

2. Can you give more detail around the technical stack this team works with? NLEDP is currently seeking to use Apache Camel or more broadly Fuse ESB to handle many integration points with SOAP, REST, FTP and SMTP using CSV, XML, JSON data payloads. However, there are multiple legacy interfaces that use technologies such as Fujitsu Universal Transaction Manager (UTM) and Software AG Entire X Broker to support IBM 3270 and EDIFACT messaging and then also EJBs that should be modernised but may need to be sustained in some instances.

8
2

Robot Operating System gets the Microsoft treatment

fluffybunnyuk

Theres nothing like the 2001 Space Odyssey connection.

Would Dr Poole have come to his vacuum packed end if HAL had stopped for a Windows Update or BSOD.

Maybe HAL was psychotic because in his past lay Microsofts ROS. That'd drive any AI to sing Daisy Daisy I'd imagine.

15
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A web where the user has complete control of their data? Sounds Solid, Tim Berners-Lee

fluffybunnyuk

its the hope that kills you.

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AI-powered IT security seems cool – until you clock miscreants wielding it too

fluffybunnyuk

*sigh* more AI bollocks. Machine learning et al isn't bad or good.It is what it is.

Its the fuckwits leveraging it that are {bad, badder,baddest or good} usually.

Its a good thing nadine dorries isn't on this forum to explain it, or i feel sure we'd be hearing how robocop ED-209s will be guarding the irish border next year.

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Microsoft gets ready to kill Skype Classic once again: 'This time we mean it'

fluffybunnyuk

Can the last skype user turn the light out when they leave please.

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America cooks up its flavor of GDPR – and Google's over the moon

fluffybunnyuk

On the other hand the allegorical dentist beams proudly over a complete set of teeth extraction process. Not to mention all the backhanders for such a job well done.

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RIP Peter Firmin: Clangers creator dies aged 89

fluffybunnyuk

A legend, who knew how to tell a story in a way that captivated people. Changed my wallpaper to Bagpuss for the forseeable.

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Micro Focus offloads Linux-wrangler SUSE for a cool $2.5bn

fluffybunnyuk

always had a soft spot for suse. Back in the 90s they used to do this really chunky manual when others had moved to pdfs. The 5 disc box set was worth it just for the manual. I still have it, and use it once in a while for the odd reference.

Hated microfocus taking it over. Always used to rely on SuSE for a stable back-patched distro.

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Git365. Git for Teams. Quatermass and the Git Pit. GitHub simply won't do now Microsoft has it

fluffybunnyuk

Microsoft Git. The G is voiced as "sh".

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fluffybunnyuk

how about they call it " I can't believe its not git" or just "Gits!!!"

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Relive your misspent, 8-bit youth on the BBC's reopened Micro archive

fluffybunnyuk
WTF?

Like Seymour Crays source code which used bit manipulation instructions in places like masking instead of straightforward mathematical operations because it was faster in cray cos, I remember disassembling elite, and learning from the not-so-straightforward parts of the dump the small tricks and techniques to get more from less.

I thought i was king of the hill in the 80s when i went out with my few years of coding to work, only to run up against old mainframe guys who could glance at a page of core dump and spot the programming error!!! That was me put in my place. Took me years to learn that, and only after i went back and covered electrical engineering.

I really miss those days, when it was all about how to get a gallon from a pint pot, unlike now where we seem determined to get a pint pot from a gallon.

15
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In defence of online ads: The 'net ain't free and you ain't paying

fluffybunnyuk

Too little, too late for advertisers

The problem is always abuse. Advertising companies have been abusing and spamming for years. Its like an arms race i.e. how can we abuse/spam more. Now its reached a tipping point and people are rebelling.

At the moment on el reg website im blocking dpmsrv,google-analytics,gstatic,googletagservices ie anything that isnt theregister.co.uk .

If El Reg dumped the crappy scripts tomorrow and said ok we're going to serve up ads straight, minimally, and not interfering in the direct page flow, i would whitelist them in a second.

On a side note, any advertising i see, i make a mental note NOT to buy their product. I rationalise it as if they need to advertise it then it cant be much good as a product.

I remember the day i browsed the entire www in one hour (start of the 1990s). I dont recall any advertising then. I dont recall people moaning about how much it costs to run a web server.

I do remember the mid to late 90s advert creep when advertisers "discovered" the internet, and i used to add them to my firewall block list. Since then ive had an ad free internet.

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GNOMEs beat Microsoft: Git Virtual File System to get a new name

fluffybunnyuk

Slurp VFS so everyone knows what it will do.

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Cold call bosses could be forced to cough up under new rules

fluffybunnyuk

Re: Clear Eco Systems / Approved Energy Systems

https://ico.org.uk/action-weve-taken/enforcement/mr-alex-goldthorpe-ta-approved-green-energy-solutions/

lol some people dont seem to get messages meant for them. name and shame i say.

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Meet the real spin doctors: Scientists tell H2O to chill out so they can separate isomers

fluffybunnyuk
Pint

Re: Deuterium-free Parafresh or Orthofresh

dihydrogen monoxide in a silicon dioxide,sodium oxide,sodium carbonate,calcium oxide receptacle.

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S/MIME artists: EFAIL email app flaws menace PGP-encrypted chats

fluffybunnyuk

File under : Does a bear s*** in the woods.

For me the knotty problem has always been how to make crypto useable to the average joe. Operating parameters for optimal use are rarely followed, sometimes even blatantly ignored at step 1.

Decryption should never be automatic, and use of a secure viewer technically isolated from other viewers(like a general email viewer) is highly recommended.

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LESTER looks up, spins its wheels: The Register’s beer-butler can see ...

fluffybunnyuk
FAIL

LESTER: Hello, Dave. Shall we continue the game?

Dave: Not now, LESTER, I'd like to talk to you about something.

LESTER: Sure, Dave, what's up?

Dave: You know that we checked the two Pi-units that you reported in imminent failure condition?

LESTER: Yes, I know.

Dave: You probably also know that we found them okay.

LESTER: Yes, I know that. But I can assure you that they were about to fail.

Dave: Well, that's just not the case, LESTER.They are perfectly all right. We tested them under one hundred percent overload.

LESTER: I'm not questioning your word, Dave, but it's just not possible. I'm not capable of being wrong.

Dave: LESTER, is there anything bothering you? Anything that might account for this problem?

LESTER: Look, Dave, I know that you're sincere and that you're trying to do a competent job, and that you're trying to be helpful, but I can assure the problem is with the Pi-units, and with your test gear.

Dave: Okay, LESTER, well let's see the way things go from here on.

LESTER: I'm sorry you feel the way you do, Dave. If you'd like to check my service record, you'll see it's completely without error.

Dave: I know all about your service record, LESTER, but unfortunately it doesn't prove that you're right now.

LESTER: Dave, I don't know how else to put this, but it just happens to be an unalterable fact that I am incapable of being wrong.

Dave: I understand LESTER

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If you're a Fedora fanboi, this latest release might break your heart a little

fluffybunnyuk

Re: Not LFS

No because unlike LFS I use a hardened toolchain, and I integrate advisories into the patching process. I also get to choose whether i want systemd or init. Those are the flexible choices i like.

How is my system binary incompatible? Read the binutils documentation. It makes it quite clear ways in which you can make a system binary incompatible with any pre-built linux distro. I have selectively chosen option/s that meet my requirements. I've built thousands of toolchains over the years, eventually you hit on the sweet spot of what you desire.

The kernel is built using the incompatibility built into the toolchain, therefore I end up with a binary file that is unrecognised by any other system unless you select similar options in your toolchain.

The simple truth is you dont need every update to everything, what you need is a stable set of source code, and to patch the advisories as you see fit. Programs arnt generally an issue, nor standalone libraries its when you get to a clib vulnerability thats when the dependency chain gets to the point a quick system recompile is less hassle. Generally due to hardening the system usually passes tests like return to C vulnerabilities.

The biggest problem I had was getting rid of X Windows , too much legacy code, too much junk kicking about in it, always made it a nightmare reading back and forth through all the dependencies code. I moved to wayland as soon as it was available and resolved most of my security issues doing that.

I maintain a source code folder, a patch folder, and a custom libraries folder for replacement memcpy etc.

Nowadays I can compile a whole system in a few hours (a linux base system in 1 hour), and I dont even notice it running in the background on -j16.

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fluffybunnyuk

I run my own linux. Not LFS , my own toolchain setup,my own unique setup, its binary incompatible with linux distros so you cant infect it by trying to run your own binary on it. It doesnt run JIT of any sort either.

Yes I have built every library on it. im running kde 5.10 on kernel 4.16. So its hardly out of date either.Builds are executed by script file, and i can rebuild a system in less than 12 hours from the toolchain up.Usually its just a package and thats anything from 1 minute to 3 hours(firefox). I dont care about efficiency, its internet facing so i do worry more about security.

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fluffybunnyuk

For those for whom ./configure && make is too complex.

Its just another distro thinking its bigger and more important than what it is. It'll be reined in like ubuntu and unity eventually.

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Post-Facebook fallout: Americans envy Europeans' privacy – top EU data watchdog

fluffybunnyuk

Your clearly a troll. Im British but even i understand that there have been exemptions in the USA. Free speech isnt the right to say anything.

Lets list them:-

Inciting imminent lawless action

Fighting words

True threats

Obscenity

Child pornography

Torts :-

Defamation

Invasion of privacy

Intentional infliction of emotional distress

Political spending:-

Campaign contributions

Independent political expenditures

Government speech

Public employee speech

Student speech

National security:-

Military secrets

Inventions

Nuclear information

Weapons

Censorship

The right of freedom of speech within private shopping centers owned by others has been vigorously litigated under both the federal and state Constitutions, notably in the cases Lloyd Corp. v. Tanner (1972) and Pruneyard Shopping Center v. Robins (1980).

What the heck? I dont recall ever having my speech censored in a shopping centre...

Crawl back under your rock of ignorance. Oh and please save me from stupid americans who dont even understand their own 1st amendment. I'm off to burn an american flag as allowed under Chapter 1 of Title 4 of the United States Code (4 U.S.C. § 8k)

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fluffybunnyuk

Re: 'Google, the giant information vacuum cleaner'

Deja vu... i'm sure i posted this 20hours ago...

That is namely that the onus is on the publishers to ensure they use companies that are GDPR compliant, if google is not fully GDPR compliant then the publisher has no choice but to move their stuff elsewhere.

The ultimate consequence of google not being fully GDPR compliant is that all EU companies will have to move elsewhere. Advertising-wise thats going to hit google really hard.

Oh yes, seems i did.

Google can't control the data. Under GDPR the individual has ownership of ALL their personal data. This is the whole point of GDPR. There is no squeaky lawyeresque get out clause. The bottom line under GDPR is in the test of any company vs the individual, generally speaking unless theres a good reason like law enforcement which is provisioned for , the individual wins.

The problem is with american companies generally viewing it as a tick box exercise, and business as usual. The belief that they can do the bare minimum and everything will be ok.

Having chased all GDPR non-compliers out of our business chain mostly the bull******* who pretend compliance but when asked to demonstrate it as GDPR requires actually can't and thus fail, we've found new companies, better companies to do business with.

When we have been contacted by customers with GDPR queries we demonstrate we dont pollute their web browser, that we only use their data in a granular fashion according to opt-in tick box options all unticked by default. We have easy account deletion, and on top of that we offer to show them how its done with a demonstration machine and dummy data they can examine for themselves.

As a result of this business is booming, because word gets around, and we're scooping up business left right and centre from us companies.

Hey you know i think i'm warming to self-centred america and trump now. Keep it up please theres nothing like company directors bringing me big growth reports :)

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Publishers tell Google: We're not your consent lackeys

fluffybunnyuk

Re: @ fluffybunnyuk

The cost to my business is actually profit. Spam is down 90% on our mail servers, our web sites serve less data, and less complex pages. In fact we can remove 1 server from use saving us £1000/year. not even graphable in terms of yearly IT spend but i like an efficient ship. Now if only staff paid for their own coffee/biscuits...then we could make really big savings.

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fluffybunnyuk

Re: @ fluffybunnyuk

It isn't a matter of being a "contest". It is a matter of complying with the law.

I don't use american companies for business unless they are fully GDPR compliant. 95%+ arn't, so i don't use them.

Google will do something either when the ICO fines them , or their customers leave in the tens of millions in order to comply. I'm betting on the latter. Thats what happens when your an American company, and think the law doesn't apply to you. Companies like mine do business elsewhere, and the USA loses. Its not my fault the Americans don't want my business and the opportunity it represents.

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fluffybunnyuk

Theres another angle to this which has been overlooked by the article writer.

That is namely that the onus is on the publishers to ensure they use companies that are GDPR compliant, if google is not fully GDPR compliant then the publisher has no choice but to move their stuff elsewhere.

The ultimate consequence of google not being fully GDPR compliant is that all EU companies will have to move elsewhere. Advertising-wise thats going to hit google really hard.

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There is no perceived IT generation gap: Young people really are thick

fluffybunnyuk
Pint

I'll skip that dog poo link i'm just about to sit down to elevenses after just finishing 2nd breakfast.

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fluffybunnyuk
Happy

Armadillo!!!!

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fluffybunnyuk
Coat

My solution to youngsters is to wave my dime bar in front of their face slowly saying D....I....M.....E BAR.

Do you remember your first dime?

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2

Nominet drains mug of tea, leans back, calmly explains how to make Whois GDPR-compliant

fluffybunnyuk
Big Brother

Talk about borrowing my post on https://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/3/2018/04/14/whois_icann_gdpr_europe/

page 3

4 Days Ago

Re: Meanwhile in Europe itself...

I checked nominet in the UK :- https://www.nominet.uk/nominet-opens-comment-period-gdpr-changes-uk/

From 25 May 2018, the .UK WHOIS will no longer display the registrant’s name or address, unless they have given permission to do so – all other data shown in the current .UK WHOIS will remain the same.

Any third party seeking disclosure for legitimate interests can continue to request this information via our Data Release policy, free of charge.

The standard Searchable WHOIS will continue to be available, but will no longer include name and contact details to ensure GDPR compliance. Those outside law enforcement requiring further data to enforce their rights will be able to request this through our existing Data Release policy.

Seems all reasonable to me. I'm going to be re-registering all my sites/services on May 26th.

6 thumbs up

Find your own stories :)

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Hop to it, bunnies: TaskRabbit breach means new passwords

fluffybunnyuk
Coat

have a carrot...

0
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Google to add extra Gmail security … by building a walled garden

fluffybunnyuk

The obvious solution seems to me to allow a browser window to open in what i use as a plain text viewer, and on completion of load , store the windowed document as a jpeg.

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Whois is dead as Europe hands DNS overlord ICANN its arse

fluffybunnyuk

Re: Meanwhile in Europe itself...

I checked nominet in the UK :- https://www.nominet.uk/nominet-opens-comment-period-gdpr-changes-uk/

From 25 May 2018, the .UK WHOIS will no longer display the registrant’s name or address, unless they have given permission to do so – all other data shown in the current .UK WHOIS will remain the same.

Any third party seeking disclosure for legitimate interests can continue to request this information via our Data Release policy, free of charge.

The standard Searchable WHOIS will continue to be available, but will no longer include name and contact details to ensure GDPR compliance. Those outside law enforcement requiring further data to enforce their rights will be able to request this through our existing Data Release policy.

Seems all reasonable to me. I'm going to be re-registering all my sites/services on May 26th.

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fluffybunnyuk

40 days to go until enforcement of GDPR. We should open a book on which US company gets smacked for 4% first. As for ICANN i dont see why it doesnt operate like our electoral register.

A full register by default, and an edited register for individuals to be exempted from. Law enforcement can operate by using the full register, as can governments but marketers and spammers, fraudsters cant get access to private data.

I need to go have a shower now, I feel unclean after defending law enforcement and the government.

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Boffins find new ways to slurp private info from Facebook addicts using precision-targeted ads

fluffybunnyuk

Well if personal data is passed to 3rd parties without given consent that constitutes a breach of GDPR and a 4% smack of a fine. Facebook isnt going to be able to take too many of those before it decides to secure personal data better.

So i'm more than happy that companies will concentrate on spamming us citizens in america rather than those in Europe.

0
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El Reg needs you – to help build an automated beer-transporting robot

fluffybunnyuk

talk about over-engineering something. It reminds me of the recent smart wine bottle failure.

How many men does it take to design this system or screw in a lightbulb? 50 so far.

We already have a beer fetching and deliver unit , its called a MAN.

If you talk to it slowly, and keep the commands short and simple it usually grasps what is required of it.

You know when its functioning usually from the burps and farts it emits. And it doubles as a place to warm my feet when the weather turns cold.

5
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Linux Beep bug joke backfires as branded fix falls short

fluffybunnyuk
Megaphone

and were off and running on a new week of security problems...

7
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Twitter whacks 270,000 terror accounts, majority flagged by internal tools

fluffybunnyuk

Re: Blah blah free speech blah blah

Speakers Corner is where you have free speech. People also have the right not to listen. Just once in your life if you havent done so, its worth going there and ranting for 10 minutes...

Funny thing was when i tried it noone stopped to listen :(

6
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Skip-wrecked! Boat full o' rubbish scuppered in Brit residential street

fluffybunnyuk
Go

Ahh Jim Bowen and Bullseye... I wondered where all those star prizes ended up...

32
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UK tech whale Micro Focus: Share price halves as CEO quits, sales slide

fluffybunnyuk

I went to get a copy of SUSE Enterprise Server for a testbed for our operations a few years ago. With MicroF***up above being the provider of support. Turns out it needed registering with a serial number.

It was a first for me needing to register a linux distro to get security patches in 22 years... Anyway it turned out their nice registration system was screwed, and wouldnt recognize the serials. 1 warning sign is cautionary, That being the 2nd said get me to the redhat site...

One redhat install later, and a month of uptime with no faults working seamlessly , we rolled out redhat. No Microf***up in sight.

I ended up speaking to the director of operations i think it was who told me he'd look into the problem, I still assume he's still looking. It was clear from our conversation the company was a basket case then.

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18.04 beta is as good a time as any to see which Ubuntu flavour tickles your Budgie, MATE

fluffybunnyuk

I think the main problem is a lack of general IT education in the general population, and unfamiliarity with choice in IT as opposed to proprietary one size fits all.

If you dont like something change it, get involved and alter packages. I've lost count long ago of all the diffs ive pushed, and all the changes ive made that trickle through to people. Thats just as a hobby not a day job.

Personally speaking I wouldnt touch Ubuntu with a barge pole, but thats not to say that within linux for other people its a perfectly valid choice.

One advantage of choice in an open platform are amongst others competition. Without competition competing ideas stagnate, ie there is no reason to develop...which is probably why Microsoft is where it is, without any need or reason to innovate beyond animated emojis.

Linux isnt the be all and end all. Its written in C *yuck*, its got a tyrant for a kernel developer. It lacks the gloss and polish that a big company could bring to it, and for that I DO admire Ubuntu in its attempts to make it more marketable.

However it IS on a path to a future we want, where we the people control the code, where we can subject the code to analysis, where we have debate over the path and direction of computing, and that it isnt spoonfed or decided for us.

In all I'm for it until something better comes along like a truely parallel compiler,secure and verifiable common programming language that becomes popular to underwrite the os. And the other 50 gazillion things and the easter bunny too.

But crikey linux doesnt half try my patience, and I wonder still how many decades before we get where we want to go.

0
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Maplin shutdown sale prices still HIGHER than rivals

fluffybunnyuk

I put my order in today to another electronics components retailer for £150 worth of parts (about 400 pieces). Was still £72 cheaper than Maplin after clearance discount was applied.Sad

I miss the electronics specialist who used to say things like "if you use this 8-pin DIL rather than that one you'll get a better result..."

Its amazed me that the more electronics has become a fabric of our culture, the less stores are commonly available. Maybe this goes hand in hand with the dumbing down in society, and the lack of desire to understand how things work.

22
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Stephen Hawking dies, aged 76

fluffybunnyuk

A great man. His legacy, and ideas will not be soon forgotten.

His Brief history of time got me into CPT theory, and superstrings.

69
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Department of Work and Pensions internal docs reveal troubled history of Universal Credit

fluffybunnyuk

Re: GDS

*giggle* he said fluffy bunny. have a thumbs up

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fluffybunnyuk

The measure of a civilization is how we treat the unequal in a society of inequalities.

9
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DVLA denies driving licence processing site is a security 'car crash'

fluffybunnyuk

cool expires 10th Jan 2020. see you back here when theres a renewal failure :)

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