* Posts by CliveS

90 posts • joined 15 Oct 2015

Page:

Pack your bags! NASA's latest exoplanet hunter satellite finds its first Earth-sized world in a habitable zone – and it's only 100 light years away

CliveS

Schuyler "Sky" Haussmann aka "H" from Redemption Ark? It was a stand-in who was crucified on Sky's Edge rather than Haussmann himself.

Take Sajid Javid's comments on IR35 UK contractor rules with a bucket of salt, warns tax guru

CliveS
WTF?

Re: Porkies

"The idea that someone is stealing your share is antisemitism"

That is complete and utter bollocks. Just that.

CliveS
Flame

Re: There's an elephant you're ignoring

There is so much wrong with that comment that it's hard to know where to begin. Simpler to identify the only reasonable, honest and factual elements. i.e.

"This is not a normal election"

and

"Boris is awful"

The rest is just unsubstantiated and refutable bollocks.

Oracle finally responds to wage discrimination claims… by suing US Department of Labor

CliveS
FAIL

Re: Ok...ok...

"I'm going to get ripped apart for this but..."

You are going to, so why continue?

"I don't want to sound like a twat"

Oh, I don't think you're being hard enough on yourself, you're going beyond mere twat-like behaviour. Try reading the article and understand the investigation and analysis done by third parties. Nothing arbitrary about it. One can but hope that you're never in a position to define hiring policy.

Irish eyes aren't smiling after govt blows €1m on mega-printer too big for parliament's doors

CliveS
FAIL

It's a digital replacement for an offset printer, so not just a colour laser on steroids, but more of an integrated, high volume, high quality print publication system. Presumably the idea was to save document publication costs in the long run by bringing the process in house. As if document publication is a core function of a government.

As pressure builds over .org sell-off, internet governance bodies fall back into familiar pattern: Silence

CliveS
Thumb Down

Re: Any word who trousers the cash?

"RPI= Retail Price Index, aka 'inflation'"

Not to be confused with CPI = Consumer Price Index aka 'inflation'. Or WPI = Wholesale Price Index aka 'inflation'. Perhaps its successor PPI = Producer Price Indices?

CPI excludes housing costs and is a geometric mean rather than RPIs arithmetic mean. CPI also tends to be lower than RPI, which is why the government links payments to CPI and receipts to RPI to ensure that increases in what is pays out increases at a lower rate than what it takes in.

PSA: You are now in the timeline where Facebook and pals are torn a new one by, er, Borat star Sacha Baron Cohen

CliveS
WTF?

Re: Using your free speech to limit other people's free speech?

"Invoking Hitler is exactly the case in point. You can be all high-and-mighty in hindsight, but I don't recall that "start a major war that kills millions, and exterminate parts of the populace" was front and centre of his election propaganda."

If you think that, then I'd suggest you look at Nazi propaganda from 1933 onwards. Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Diseased Offspring was introduced in July 1933 forced sterilization of "genetic undesirables" and was boosted by a substantial propaganda campaign; a vast amount was directed at forcibly reversing the Versailles Treaty losses; demonisation of Jews and other "undesirables" really kicked off in support of the Nuremburg Laws of 1935.

"The point of being really evil is that people don't notice until it's far too late."

One word, Kristallnacht.

CliveS
Unhappy

Re: the UK will go to the polls amid ongoing disinformation efforts supported by foreign powers

"Given the politically biased fact checkers such as Labour's The Insider, FullFact and the BBC's Reality Check"

I'd agree with The Insider (obviously, you'd have to be pretty dense not to notice insider.labour.org.uk) and - to a lesser extent - Reality Check (generally leaning to the right), but what's your evidence for FullFact's political bias? That some of it's funding comes from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, or the Esme Fairbairn Foundation? Perhaps "Journalist" Enza Ferreri's "articles (she's actually Press Officer for Liberty GB, a bunch of right wing, Christian counter-jihadists (seriously, that's how they describe themselves)).

"You'll be telling me next that Friday's Question Time was fairly moderated and had no Labour Party activists planted in the audience."

I don't know about Labour Party plants, but Ryan Jacobz is a Conservative Party activist for East Yorkshire Conservatives who keeps cropping up on Question Time (30/11/2017, 20/04/2018, 31/01/2019, 23/11/2019) wearing the same (or similar, he may have a wardrobe full of them) shirt. Also registered (along with Mark "Gammon" Francois) a subsequently rejected complaint regarding Jeremy Corbyn and undeclared expenses. So at least one Tory plant.

Part of me should probably be glad that the Conservatives appear so obviously shit at this, from the inept editing of the Starmer interview, the twitter rebrand, or the ease of spotting Tory plants on Question Time. But the ineptitude of some of their actions suggests that they genuinely hold a proportion of the electorate in such contempt that they feel they can get away with this. And - more depressingly - based on what I see locally, they're right, a lot of people are that gullible.

Close the windows, it's coming through the walls: Copper Cthulu invades Dabbsy's living room

CliveS
WTF?

More importantly, are the cables squamous and rugose because it sounds like they've been run through the walls in a non-Euclidian manner?

The eagle has handed.... scientists a serious text message bill after flying through Iran, Pakistan

CliveS

Re: My Favourite Birds

"I was horrified and got out my car to beat him up. He said, "What? Do you want some of them?" as he was gathering them up."

I seem to recall that it is illegal to eat roadkill unless you can prove that you didn't kill it. Not sure what the punishment would be, and how you'd provide proof, though perhaps dashcam footage could help with the latter.

CliveS
Coat

Re: what a journey!

Gwalior is a city in Madhya Pradesh, India, and thus extremely unlikely to fly in to Mordor to rescue Frodo and Sam. Not to be confused with Gwaihir, lord of the eagles of Middle Earth and descendant of Thorondor, mightiest of all birds of the First Age of Middle Earth.

As for simply flying in to Mordor with the Ring, there's a good reason why that was never an option. The Great Eagles, serve Manwë, Lord of the Valar. After the War of Wrath in Morgoth (Sauron's former boss) was overthrown, a large chunk of Middle Earth, Beleriand, was totally trashed leaving only the Blue Mountains at the extreme west of Middle Earth. The destruction was so great that the Valar decided that any future intervention would be indirect, and that salvation for Middle Earth would have to come from its own people. The Istari (of whom Gandalf and Saruman were members) were Maiar (lesser forms of "angel) were sent to Middle Earth to inspire and encourage, but not to act directly as leaders. And the Great Eagles flying the Ringbearer to Mount Doom would be direct involvement by the Valar and thus verboten under their own rules.

Mine's the one with the entirety of Tolkien's legendarium in the extremely large pockets

US games company Blizzard kowtows to Beijing by banning gamer who dared to bring up Hong Kong

CliveS
Mushroom

Re: couls gamers care less, really?

"Those middle agers are divorced three times (amazing they got married to begin with), living in their mommas basements again, hiding from child support mayments. ya, afraid of them truths you are"

This one is over 50, still married after 23 years to their first wife, living in a house they own mortgage free, with two children at university, and a 30+ year career in IT. Maybe *you* should consider coming out from under the bridge, growing a pair and not hiding behind AC (and your momma's skirts). You might discover a broad and diverse world if you opened your eyes, rather than remaining a contemptible, blinkered fool

Google sounds the alarm over Android flaw being exploited in the wild, possibly by NSO

CliveS
FAIL

"do not download any apps from untrusted sources"

What, such as the Google Play Store which has repeatedly been found to be hosting malware and other dodgy apps:

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/01/09/google_play_store_malware_onto_9m_droids/

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01/31/google_play_app_deletion_data/

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/09/15/malware_outbreak_googles_play_store/

Nominet continues milking .uk registry cash cow with 4 per cent price rise for... what exactly?

CliveS
Flame

Re: 5 members agreeing on prices via a quasi trade body?

Will draft my own complaint this evening, but would urge all concerned Commentards to also lodge a complaint.

The place to start is here:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/tell-the-cma-about-a-competition-or-market-problem

Hacker House shoved under UK Parliament's spotlight following Boris Johnson funding allegs

CliveS
Happy

Re: "an offshore company"

I believe the word you're looking for is "allegedly"...

First water world exoplanet spotted – and thankfully no sign of Kevin Costner, rejoice!

CliveS

Re: Thank you!

"How many rods, poles or perches is that?"

6.314x10e18 rods, poles or perches or, to be more accurate, 1.164x10e16 Devon Fatbergs

Fairphone 3 stripped to the modular essentials: Glue? What glue?

CliveS

Daughter had a Galaxy S5 where the USB port broke.

SpaceX didn't move sat out of impending smash doom because it 'didn't see ESA's messages'

CliveS

Re: correct me 'cause i am sure i am wrong

I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's peanuts compared to space.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson moves to shut Parliament

CliveS
WTF?

Re: Inaccurate

"For a year now they've voted down every single option, often several times."

Effectively May's deal voted down three times, After Dominic Grieve's amendment giving Parliament a vote passed on 13th December 2017. As a consequence, the First Meaningful vote on May's deal was scheduled for 11th December 2018 before being delayed until 15th January 2019. It was voted down. The Second Meaningful vote was on the 12th March 2019. It was voted down. The "No Deal" (Spelman) Bill passed on the 13th March 2019. On the same day the Malthouse Compromise was voted down by the Speaker's casting vote. We had the A50 Extension vote on the 14th March, followed by the Beckett and Letwin Amendments on the 25th March. On the 27th March we had the first round of Indicative Votes, one of which - The Customs Union proposed by Ken Clarke - was defeated by a mere 6 votes. Then the Third Meaningful vote on the 29th March at which May's deal was rejected for a third time. The second round of Indicative Votes occured on the 1st April, at which the Custom Union proposal fell short by only 3 votes. The third round of indicative votes were scuppered when the Cooper-Letwin Bill was defeated by a single vote on the 3rd April.

And that's it. Three votes on May's deal in two and a half months (15th Jan - 29th March), and 2 rounds of indicative votes in a week (27th March - 1st April). So you're wrong, Parliament hasn't voted every option down for a year. In the space of 3 months they voted May's option down three times, and were given only two opportunities to try and find a consensus that could command a majority.

That's not a failure of Parliament, that's a failure of the Conservative government to find a deal acceptable to Parliament or to amend the deal in light of its first defeat. You can't complain about Parliament failing to achieve in 2 days what the Government had failed to achieve in 2 years.

CliveS
FAIL

Re: About Time

Only if you ignore the 20+ agreements between the EU and the US that regulate specific areas of trade between them.

http://ec.europa.eu/world/agreements/searchByCountryAndContinent.do?countryId=6063&countryName=United%20States%20of%20America&countryFlag=treaties

CliveS
FAIL

Re: Inaccurate

Except he didn't refuse to comment. In one of the televised leadership debates he said:

"I think colleagues really are starting to come together, they are thinking about this in a very mature and sober way.

"I'm not attracted to archaic devices like proroguing.

"Let's get this thing done as proud members of a representative democracy that asked the people of this country a question, that received a very clear answer, promised faithfully to put that answer into effect - and now we've got to do it."

That was barely 3 months ago.

CliveS
FAIL

"ParLIARment have had three years to debate Brexit"

They debated the referendum as part of the 2015 Queen's Speech and the European Union Referendum Act[ in December 2015. But that was the enabling legislation, rather than the nature of Brexit after the referendum result was declared.

In terms of debating Brexit, it wasn't until December 2016 that Parliament debated the invoking of Article 50, the bill to support this receiving Royal Assent in March 2017. At that point Parliament, business and representatives of various sectors (health, business, agriculture, etc) should have all been engaged in the process of drawing up what was wanted from a deal, and what would be the minimum acceptable position. Instead one T. May, former Conservative Prime Minister decided to do her way. Parliament didn't get to participate until she brought her negotiated deal to the House late in 2018. So Parliament was effectively excluded from the process for the best part of two years. And now Johnson is trying to shut Parliament out again.

The failure has been on the part of David Cameron who used the referendum to try and resolve decades old divisions in his party and sideline the UKIP threat with no consideration of the possibility of losing. And on the part of Theresa May who took a majority in the House, threw it away and still persisted in ignoring the opportunities to find a national consensus. And now we have Boris Johnson trying to further marginalise Parliament.

We are in the current mess because of the ongoing failure of consecutive Conservative Prime Ministers. Point the finger of blame and opprobrium at the Tory Party before you cast blame upon Parliament.

One person's harmless japery can be another's night of LaserJet Lego

CliveS

Ah. So you're a masochist on a diet, are you?

People of Britain: You know that you're not locked into using the same ISP forever, right?

CliveS
Thumb Up

Re: Tip for VM customers - go business

300MBs from Virgin or 18MBs via FTTC (via lousy aluminium cable dating back to the 70s for the circuitous 1.5km to the cabinet which is a mere 250m as the crow flies) is a no brainer. Business broadband from Virgin at £30 with a guaranteed SLA (48 hours, but the only time there was an issue they were already fixing it when I rang), guaranteed compensation, and decent customer service (compared to their residential service).

SpaceX reveals chain of events that caused the unplanned disassembly of Crew Dragon capsule

CliveS

Re: Parasitic weight

"add a disposable escape tower system like the Boeing capsule has."

Pretty sure the Boeing CST 100 Starliner uses a similar approach as that adopted by SpaceX for the Dragon. It's the Orion capsule (Lockheed/EADS) that has a escape tower.

Queen Elizabeth has a soggy bottom: No, the £3.1bn aircraft carrier, what the hell did you think we meant?

CliveS

Re: Spurious, Curious

Yup, the gun was slung between two ruddy great girders which ran parallel to the barrel. There was about 10 degrees of traverse each side of the centre line, aka 2 shades of bugger all. They could also only be fired at between 22 and 45 degrees of elevation in order to spread the load. HMS General Wolfe holds the record for the greatest range at which a Royal Navy vessel has ever engaged an enemy target, which was a railway bridge near Ostende at a range of 33km or 1500 brontosauruses.

CliveS
Thumb Up

Re: Spurious, Curious

"(I haven't a clue what happened to the 18" ones from Furious)"

One ended up on HMS Lord Clive and one on HMS General Wolfe - both Lord Clive class monitors. The third was to have been fitted to another of the class, HMS Prince Eugene, but the war ended before work could be completed. After the war all three were used for testing purposes at Shoeburyness and Yantlet before being scrapped, two in 1933 and the third - lined down to 16" - in 1947.

CliveS
FAIL

Re: There it is...!

"The turbines use superheated steam, FYI."

No they don't. QE has 2 Rolls-Royce Marine Trent 30 gas turbine generator units producing 36MW, and 4 Wartsila diesel generator units (2 x 9MW and 2 x 11MW). The 3-phase electricity generated is used to power 4 GE induction motors (2 per shaft).

So no steam other than that from the kett;es, showers, coffee machines, and any irate crew members.

SQL Server 2008 finally shuffles into the home for retired relational databases

CliveS
WTF?

Ilya, you've been touting this line around various forums for years now. I remember you claiming that Amazon, Google, Ebay, Oracle, etc, were obsolete and will soon be out of business years ago. Why don't you build this excellent product that you keep eulogising about, and then see who comes knocking to make you rich beyond the dreams of avarice?

You're not Boeing to believe this, but... Another deadly 737 Max control bug found

CliveS
FAIL

"It may even be that 737 MAX has “inherited” some certs from its “predecessors” (same airframe?)..."

Boeing has relied on Grandfather Rights for the 737-Max and earlier developments. The fundamental certification for the 737-Max dates back to the original certification issued in 1967. That's a 50 year old certificate of airworthiness being applied to a plane that is fundamentally different to that originally certified by an FAA that is today effectively a different organisation. All in the interests of saving money.

We've Falcon caught it! SpaceX finally nets a fairing half after a successful Heavy launch

CliveS

Re: "the drone ship Of Course I Still Love You"

The "Gravitas" ship names were a running joke within the Culture. They were the result of another Involved civilisation which complained that such powerful and intellectually advanced beings as the Culture ship-minds should give themselves names with a bit more gravitas in light of their near-godlike powers. At least one Culture shipyard decided to give all its ships names on the "gravitas" theme, such as "Stood Far Back When The Gravitas Was Handed Out" or "Gravitas... Gravitas... No, Don't Help Me, I'll Get It In A Moment" or even "Absolutely No You-No-What". As I recall, Iain had a list of 20 or 30 "Gravitas" names.

"Experiencing A Significant Gravitas Shortfall" appears as a GSV in Look to Windward, and a GCU in Matter, and provided the inspiration for SpaceX's latest drone ship.

CliveS

Re: "the drone ship Of Course I Still Love You"

Given the subject matter and recent results, perhaps the CGU: Only Slightly Bent might also be appropriate.

CliveS

Re: "the drone ship Of Course I Still Love You"

Of Course I Still Love You is a GCU (General Contact Unit) spacecraft from Iain M Banks' Culture novel, The Player of Games. Elon is a big fan, which is why both SpaceX autonomous drone ships are named after Culture vessels.

ALIS through the looking glass: F-35 fighter jet's slurpware nearly made buyers pull out – report

CliveS

Re: Dreadnought of the skies

"so fantastically expensive that in war you probably daren't ever venture outside Scapa Flow in case you lose one"

Dreadnoughts of the Royal Navy were involved in several engagements in the North Sea between December 1914 (Scarborough) and August 1916 (after which the Germans abandoned the idea of using the High Seas Fleet and switched almost exclusively to submarine and torpedo boat actions).

In the Mediterranean the Austro-Hungarian and Italian navies did mostly keep their capital ships in port, mainly because there wasn't much to do with them. For these nations, possession of Dreadnought class vessels more more from national pride than any strategic requirement. Austro-Hungary did lose one of its dreadnoughts during an attempted surprise attack on Otranto in 1918.

Russian dreadnoughts saw action in the Black Sea on several occasions between 1914 and 1917.

French dreadnoughts operated in the Mediterranean throughout WWI, as convoy escorts and as enforcing a blockade on the Adriatic.

United States dreadnoughts also saw service, with both Florida-class ships seeing service on Atlantic convoy escort duties and alongside the British Grand Fleet.

It wasn't the cost and risk of losing them that was the issue, so much as the limited range of applications for dreadnoughts. 99% of the time they were overkill.

Please be aliens, please be aliens, please be aliens... Boffins discover mystery mass beneath Moon's biggest crater

CliveS
Mushroom

Re: Joking aside, it's a reminder we should be on the moon ...

"Talk about strong negotiating position!"

It worked for the Loonies when negotiating with the Federated Nations. Let's just hope it isn't built in secret in the region of Mare Undarum..

(icon for what happens when Loonies throw rocks at Cheyenne Mountain)

It's official! The Register is fake news… according to .uk overlord Nominet. Just a few problems with that claim, though

CliveS

Re: The problem with "fake news"...

"Great Britain includes England, Wales & Scotland but not Northern Ireland, which is on the island of Ireland (together with the Republic of Ireland)."

I guess that depends on whether - in this context - Great Britain is used geographically to refer to the island, or politically to refer to the entity formerly known as the Kingdom of Great Britain, but officially Great Britain.

If Scotland leaves the UK, then politically it would no longer be a part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. However the United Kingdom would still exist, albeit as the United Kingdom of England and Northern Ireland. As for poor old Wales, their existence as an independent kingdom effectively came to an end when Edward I defeated Llywelyn ap Gruffudd in 1282.

CliveS
Thumb Down

I took a look at that piece of snivelling sophistry from Howarth, and note that, just like Nominet itself, there is no way for anyone to leave a response as commenting is disabled.. Tosser.

That magical super material Apple hopes will hit backspace on its keyboard woes? Nylon

CliveS
FAIL

WD-40 is a brand. And in addition to their original multi-use product, they also do a contact cleaner...

https://wd40.co.uk/specialist/fast-drying-contact-cleaner/

Let's make laptops from radium. How's that for planned obsolescence?

CliveS
Go

Re: Paper Milk Straws

If you hear a noise with your milk and your bowl,

It must be the ten-thirty Humphrey patrol.

In slippers with pom-poms for creeping about,

Watch out, watch out, watch out, watch out, there's a Humphrey about!

One Hundred Humphreys soft as silk,

Off on their search for your Unigate milk.

Get extra pintas or you'll be without,

Watch out, watch out, watch out, watch out, there's a Humphrey about!

The 70s, when ads were real ads...

Taylor drift: Finally, a use for AI emerges? Cyber-smut star films fsck-flick in Tesla with Autopilot, warns: 'I wouldn't recommend it'

CliveS
Thumb Up

Re: Peeks or perks?

Filth, sir, pure and unadulterated filth. You should be proud of yourself...

Brit Parliament online orifice overwhelmed by Brexit bashers

CliveS
Facepalm

Re: @AC

"Since the default legal outcome now is to leave then the gov is in a binding position."

That may not actually be the case...

https://ukhumanrightsblog.com/2019/03/19/no-deal-brexit-may-be-unlawful-a-view-from-rose-slowe/

Brexit text-it wrecks it: Vote Leave fined £40k for spamming 200k msgs ahead of EU referendum

CliveS
FAIL

Re: Interesting dilemma

I wouldn't trust Paul Deaire Staines and Harry Cole to sit the right way on a lavatory seat, let alone tell the unvarnished truth. If they stuck to facts then that blog wouldn't be anywhere near as popular as it is. I know Paul, and have known of him even longer, and if you put your trust in him then more fool you.

How many Reg columnists does it take to turn off a lightbulb?

CliveS
Mushroom

Re: Fiat Lux

Saw your title and my immediate thought that Brother Kornhoer would have probably made a decent job of wiring hotel lighting, but the monks pedalling away in the corner might be a bit distracting.

Fiat Homo

Fiat Lux

Fiat Voluntas Tua

As the members of the Albertian Order of St. Leibowitz might well say.

SpaceX Crew Dragon: Launched and docked. Now, about that splashdown...

CliveS
Mushroom

Re: splashdown

Propulsive landing was the original intent, but the additional certification requirement, along with the lack of commonality with Starship would have incurred significant additional effort and expense. So the landing legs went, and the SuperDracos are purely for abort mode.

Artificial Intelligence: You know it isn't real, yeah?

CliveS
Unhappy

Re: self-thinking machine

Why would anyone chose to remember the dreadful Dune prequels written by Brian Herbert and Kevin J Anderson? Dreadful abominations that on many occasions directly contradicted Frank's original work. And don't get me started on the atrocities that were their sequels to Chapterhouse: Dune. Badly written, badly plotted, they have no redeeming qualities.

Plenty of better AIs in fiction than the dreadful Omnius and Erasmus, heck Wintermute and Neuromancer would be a good place to start.

Musk shows off the latest power plant for Starship, replaces Tesla CFO with a millennial

CliveS
Mushroom

Re: Methane?

Last thing I saw they were still going with Methane/LOx, with chamber pressure of a terrifying 300 bar and pre-burner (for turbo-pump) running at 810 bar!!

Um, I'm not that Gary, American man tells Ryanair after being sent other Gary's flight itinerary

CliveS
Facepalm

Re: Start cancelling the flights.

Many years ago one of my business phone numbers was very similar to that of a local massage parlour (last two digits swapped). Used to receive some very "interesting" phone calls asking what services we could provide. Managed to disappoint quite a few callers when letting them know that while we couldn't provide "bareback full service", we would be able to offer some data warehousing consultancy instead?

Ongoing game of Galileo chicken goes up a notch as the UK talks refunds

CliveS
FAIL

Re: Let's not question the EU

''At this stage, it's up to all parties to make the best of the situation - regardless of our individual positions on Brexit, we can't afford to make things worse for the sake of "I told you so".''

Well at the time I thought Brexit was a bad idea, was going to prove to be expensive and challenging and couldn't see any way of making it work well. As a slim majority of those who voted chose to leave then fine, so be it. I'm currently making the best of the situation - for myself. Don't bother asking me for any bright ideas on making a success of the whole flawed exercise though; I couldn't see any way then and I still can't now. So if you don't mind, I'm going to carry on trying to construct some sort of fabric money container out of this piece of porcine auditory appendage for the benefit of those who matter to me. Those who wanted Brexit can blooming well tackle the Gordian Knot themselves as I presume they had some great ideas about how things will pan out. Not going to gloat over the discovery by the Leave groupings that things aren't as simple as they thought, but only because I have higher priorities. "I told you so is a luxury only those who stand to profit either way can afford.

PS. Can we please drop all the "Brexidiot" and "Remoaner" bollocks while we're at it.

Blighty's super-duper F-35B fighter jets are due to arrive in a few weeks

CliveS

Re: re: anything to add

The Typhoon's origins go back to AST 403 in 1972, which was an Air Staff requirement for an air superiority fighter. This was a revision of AST 396 which was for a STOVL replacement for the Harrier and Jaguar, a requirement that 46 years later is being fulfilled by the F-35. AST 396 was superceded by AST 409 which gave us the Harrier GR5. The AST 403 requirement had the P.96 proposed fighter, then the Anglo-German TKF-90 fighter concept. This became the ECF (European Combat Fighter), then the ECA (European Combat Aircraft) for which Dassault, BAe and MBB all put forward various designs. Then the French took their bat and ball home, Aeritalia joined MBB and BAe to push forward with a concept for the ACA (Agile Combat Aircraft) which lead to the EAP (Experimental Aircraft Programme). Spain got interested and the French wandered back, the year was 1983 and they all sat around a table singing kumbaya and discussing the Future European Fighter Aircraft. Prior to this BAe had been working on the P.110 as another approach. The French take their toys home again and in 1986 Eurofighter Gmbh is established. In 2002 the name "Typhoon" is adopted, initially only for export.

tldr; Typhoon was always intended to be a multi-role aircraft covering the interception, air superiority and ground attack roles. The ground attack upgrades (initially P1E and P1Eb) were required before the Jaguar replacement role could begin to be fulfilled. I think this is where the misconception that the Typhoon was originally to be a fighter only comes from; the project being called the Eurofighter and the ground attack functionality coming as an upgrade. The original Tranche 1 Block 2 aircraft were air-to-air only, but the T1 Block 5 introduced the air-to-ground functionality. The RAF operates F2s (fighters) and FGR4 (fighter/ground attack/recon).

A navalised Typhoon was pitched to the Indians, using unassisted ski-jump and arrestor gear for STOBAR, but I think this added too much weight to the aircraft. Might still be an option for the Queen Elizabeth, though whether or not it would be any cheaper given BAe's meddling is another matter. Then there's talk that a naval Grippen could do the job.

The biggest concern still has to be the reliance on the Merlin/Crowsnest combo for AEW. The E-2 Hawkeye has been tested in STOBAR mode off lower angle ski-jumps, so perhaps a better solution would be to replace the 15degree ski-jump with something lower.

CliveS

Re: why didnt they..

Dropping against the dry side results in most of the blast being wasted as it is directed away from the dam. By attacking the wet side and placing the bomb against the dam takes advantage of the bubble pulse from underwater detonations. As a consequence a smaller bomb can be used. Backspin was applied to Upkeep to improve both stability and bounce, and to help the bomb stick to the dam wall as it sank.

Attacking the dry side would have required a massive bomb similar to a Grand Slam, but that required dropping from height and would have required more accuracy than was possible at the time. Additionally while Tallboy was available in 1944 and Grand Slam in 1945, neither was around in 1943 when Chastise took place.

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