* Posts by Paul Ward

10 posts • joined 1 Jul 2015

DXC: Everything is going to plan, too well in fact... we've chopped so many staff, our IT projects are now behind

Paul Ward

Re: So they acknowledge that they laid off too many people

<sarcasm on>Lawrie: Well we don't really need capable and experienced people do we? After all, everything they will do is documented in scripts and processes isn't it? We just need warm (and cheap) bodies.<sarcasm off>

DXC Technology asks field-based techies if they'd like to leave

Paul Ward

A few million here and there for C level people really isn't going to trouble the finances of DXC.

Wall Street just looks at the numbers, which from their point of view don't look too bad. The problem is that the numbers are achieved by cutting costs and offshoring every possible role,

I've said it before but it's worth repeating - a business cannot cut its way to prosperity. Cutting costs works as a short term measure but medium to long term it tends not to end well...

DXC execs to investors: It's say-on-pay time. Give us a bump, would you?

Paul Ward

Not quite true that HP Enterprise was spun off from HP, rather in 2015 the old HP split into two. PCs and printers went to HP Inc, and the rest, including Enterprise Services, went to HP Enterprise. The Enterprise Services bit of HPE was then merged in 2017 with CSC to form DXC.

HP Enterprise now seems to consist of PointNext (rebranding of the old HPE Technology Services division), servers and some cloudy stuff.

Das blinkenlights are back thanks to RPi revival of the PDP-11

Paul Ward

Brings back memories...

Of my first 'real' job in IT. It was on the Isle of Man working for a small company that did systems software ('C' compilers, assemblers etc). They had a PDP 11/23 and an 11/34 running RSX11 (? - it's been 30 years...). They had the PDPs to develop and test cross-compilers so you could code on a PDP11 and compile for a new-fangled 68K processor, for example. 'C' compiler used was Whitesmiths...

Happy days...

Take-off crash 'n' burn didn't kill the Concorde, it was just too bloody expensive to maintain

Paul Ward

Re: Memories

Indeed; early one memorable morning in the 1990s I drove past four of them parked in that maintenance area.

Paul Ward

Flew LHR to JFK on Concorde in 1996...

Albeit on a charter rather than a scheduled flight Back then Goodwood Travel used to charter it and offer weekends in New York - Concorde out on Saturday, two nights at The Plaza then back on a 747.

Cost was c.£2000 THEN but it was worth every penny. Wake up on Saturday and a civilised time, check in for a 12:40 departure. 3 hours 20 to JFK, so arrive 16:00 UK time. UK had gone to BST but US had not yet gone to Daylight Savings Time so six hour time difference so 10:00 in New York. The usual (for then) hour through immigration at JFK then into town, check into the hotel and was wandering down Fifth Avenue at 12:30 New York time having woken up in my own bed in the UK the same morning...

As others have said Concorde did not fly well subsonic and it was noisy in the cabin. No IFE but who wanted films/TV when you were on Concorde? Seat pitch wasn't that great either. I remember them lighting the reheats, two at a time, over the Bristol Channel resulting in two gentle nudges in the back. As the Captain said we were already at 45000 feet which was beyond was most airliners could reach. They then let Concorde 'cruise-climb', rising as it burned off fuel; we got to 58000 feet that day...

REALLY glad I did it...

Car-crash television: 'Excuse me ma'am, do you speak English?' 'Yes I do,' replies AMD's CEO

Paul Ward

Agreed. Never met the guy but anecdotally apparently he isn't the nicest chap...

Still, he's done well for himself as a pundit considering he never actually won a race.

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