* Posts by Robert D Bank

75 posts • joined 15 Jun 2015

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Should AI get to choose a topping in a two pizza team?

Robert D Bank

Re: What is he talking about?

absolutely on the money with that...it's about money and nothing else. It's dressed up as 'delighting customers', 'making a better place to work', even 'helping the community' blah blah, but it all comes down to reducing cost and making more money.

Of course all 'customers' are complicit in the process whether they know it or not, or whether they care or not.

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Robert D Bank

by nature humans will get used to AI & ML performing various functions and take their eye of it. The algorithmic learning that continues quietly could skew in unintended ways over time and gradually embed things that you really don't want. If this happens subtly over time and is not noticed then it could reach a point where it is impossible to undo it.

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IBM: About those agreed voluntary redundancies ... we were just kidding

Robert D Bank

Re: So many shores.....

Fore-Shore

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Serverless: Should we be scared? Maybe. Is it a silly name? Possibly

Robert D Bank

Applicable

That's what I'd call it

As someone that couldn't code to save my life (and yes to lazy/stupid to learn as it's not an interest) it sounds interesting as a means to bring a great commercial idea to life, and maybe generate an income stream. In terms of the scalability, security and performance I expect Cloud providers might come to the party on that to help and bring more customers on board. You might see deals available where you get the service at a price offset by the Cloud provider taking a cut of your revenue stream. Both parties win on that score.

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DevOps: Bloody hell, we've got to think about security too! Sigh. Who wants coffee?

Robert D Bank

it's all about standards..

Security is so much easier when you have really good well thought out standards that are properly enforced. If you start from a position of excellent standards then you should be able to have much more generic security that is applied by default rather than having a bespoke approach every time.

Any function that is commonly used and that presents any security risk should be very closely scrutinised and managed by only very qualified and trusted people, and as much as possible isolated from bespoke code that calls the service. Sharp focus needs to be on identifying high risk areas and investing in that specifically so other users of that code know they're protected from creating risks and can concentrate on whatever they're creating.

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IBM turns panto villain as The Reg tells readers: 'It's behind you!'

Robert D Bank

Re: How long would IBM last if

This sort of shit has become so common, across the world and in almost every sector. It just gets worse, especially as bigger companies absorb smaller ones. Barely a week, or at best a month goes by without hearing about another huge bunch of poor bastards being spat out of the grinder.

There's likely to come a time soon, maybe we're very close as automation increases rapidly, where most people have nothing to lose (except debt) and fuck all to look forward to. In fact by far the majority of the worlds population is already in that position, the difference to us is it is coming to the west. Some will probably just get depressed and take enough smack, alcohol or whatever and fade away, but there WILL be a very sizeable and very angry mob with a lot free time and ingenuity to be exercised.

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NHS: Thanks for the free work, Linux nerds, now face our trademark cops

Robert D Bank

NHS Brand value

given the determination to run the NHS into a wall so the inevitable privatisation becomes more palatable (forced by no choice) for the masses, the NHS brand will probably have a massive amount of value for the massive insurance or whatever corporation that will probably inherit it. Having some upstart like this having anything to do with it just wouldn't do, would it.

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Causes of software development woes

Robert D Bank

Re: In all my years in software, I have leared...

bloody cards, remember them well, not fondly, for example when you have 7 tray loads to input and you drop a tray, having to resort them which often meant more than one pass, or one or more cards jam and get munched in the middle of the load or punch output.

A programmer at the time though was telling he used to program on an actual board of pins that you had to physically make wire connections between, so not to complain!

When you have that sort of back-ground you REALLY understand how critical requirements gathering is. It shouldn't be any different now. Sure there's a lot more readily available sources of information to work with and it's immeasurably faster to collate, but it doesn't substitute for laziness or lack of wholistic and critical thinking.

Recently seen some vAgilister posting some cr4p about 'don't do this, don't do that, just start!' I would love to give that prick a car without a steering wheel or breaks and say the same thing to them.

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Remember those holy tech wars we used to have? Heh, good times

Robert D Bank

ooooh touchy! LOL You're probably not to far off in a lot of cases, but our stinking carcasses will be invading your hipster noses for some time yet though I'm afraid Or do you have an 'app' for that?

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Robert D Bank

I enjoy mentioning Z/OS occasionally to annoy the bigots because it's always there at the top of the table for most large scale businesses collecting, processing and serving the data out to the other platforms to play with and get all 'GUI' over. Unix (of whatever collective flavours) is at the other end of the table and they enjoy a good food fight occasionally, while still getting the actual work done, without the need for attention seeking or much in the way of thanks for the last few decades.

.

(lob's it over the wall and saunters off)

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What do we want? Consensual fun times. How do we get it? Via an app with blockchain...

Robert D Bank

needs a live feed to change the status of the consent as you go...

fit-bit to app, yeah I'm up for it, fit-bit to app, I just want to sleep. fit-bit to app, I'm hungry (for food), fit-bit to app, I need a dump, fit-bit to app, nah..to many people on this train...

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No wonder Marvin the robot was miserable: AI will make the rich richer – and the poor poorer

Robert D Bank

The ultra wealthy will see immense benefits in increased income, incredible medical advances, greater unfettered control over huge populations both financially, mentally and through physical means as a result of AI combined with elimination of regulations that don't serve their purpose.

If they themselves are 'enhanced' with AI and advanced gene editing they will effectively become a new species that others cannot compete with. They likely will view those without enhancement with ever more contempt, like we view animals now. They will happily watch 'humans' depopulate at a massive rate. The fit and strong may be retained for some amusement value.

Look around, that's been the model for quite some time even without AI. It has a thin veil over it called 'democracy' in some places (if you can afford it), but I think that veil will be lifted over the next 5 years.

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Missed opportunity bingo: IBM's wasted years and the $92bn cash splurge

Robert D Bank

Re: The Innovator's Dilemma

Absolutely spot on. And the problem is mavericks can rarely prosper in any large established company because they're 'not on message', and are prepared to take well calculated risks. And not forgetting that innovation rarely comes from people who have tenuous employment, they go for the safe route because they can't be targeted for that. Equally, it rarely comes from those entrenched and comfortable cadres, the magic circles within the company who control the narrative and are never to e questioned. They can be both technologists and management.

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So you're 'agile', huh? I do not think it means what you think it means

Robert D Bank

Re: "Code"

sorry, but I think 'RTFM' (or the Agile fucking bible) should not apply to you at all because you've obviously OD'd on them and should keep your hands on the table. Original thought please, backed by practical experience and use cases that are quotable and proven.

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Robert D Bank

Re: The main issue are those who turned it into a sort of religion...

I think the struggle is to understand how you meld all these 'potentialities' into something coherent that can safely go through Integration and QA testing before delivery. It's like having 10 balls in the air as you juggle your options. If you have many iterations of a given piece of code along with many other teams who have another 10 balls of 'potentialities' it just seems to create a huge amount of risk, especially if documentation is minimal. Sometimes you might get lucky and others you may not. I'm sure there are 'tools' around to assist with this, but even then they ultimately require competent people to manage them with honest input to them to make them work.

PS: I am not a developer. Just curious to understand this current phenomenon

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Robert D Bank

Re: Agile

I think you have nailed this really well, the PM's are absolutely CRITICAL, but on their own are not enough. You still need Devs and supporting areas right through testing to implementation that are CAPABLE and willing. Reducing things to 'bits that matter' actually takes skill to identify, not just by the PM but from the techies right through to business. And this often (usually) requires a greater understanding that these 'bits that matter' may mean fuck all to someone else whose 'bits that matter', matter more to them, and then onward to the support or operations people who may or may not see either of these being 'bits that matter'. And then the management at multiple levels, and then the business at various levels then have another view of 'what matters'. It's a case of understanding connections and being able to prioritise, and make an entire organisation dynamically move behind that. Bringing all this into line is incredibly difficult in a large 'business' of whatever form (less so much with small business). So the underlying issue is it becomes what the business wants to deliver to meet a customer requirement, which the customer may not even know they require, if it's a new thing. Will it deliver value? It may in the case where some very specific customer gripes have been identified and these can be addressed. It may not if things have moved on (as they inevitably do) and some other company has come up with something even 'better' and taken fickle customers with them.

So thinking this through I can see the value of the Agile approach, with supporting DevOps. But, it needs to be kept in mind very strongly that this approach does NOT apply to everything an organisation does. Identifying where it does needs some real honesty and clear understanding by everyone in the delivery chain. And if that can be done you can build an Agile infrastructure and process around just that, in a properly focussed way without this nonsense of trying to make the whole organisation try and find Agile process where it might actually be dangerous and damaging and delivering nothing but a tick box for a managers bonus

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It's a decade since DevOps became a 'thing' – and people still don't know what it means

Robert D Bank

Re: Just a mindset? Technology change is also business change

It's definitely about relationships, no doubt. For the last couple of decades there has been a relentless push to create 'silos' which has destroyed many generalists that could understand the bigger picture and would have good networks in business and technology to understand and support the aspirations of both. I was quite heavily involved in Storage, System programming, CICS, DB2, Security, Disaster Recovery, scheduling, Operations and working with Developers in design and testing who were happy to share the business requirements to understand what technology could offer. Most of those applications are still key to the business and are very functional and solid platforms. As each area became more silo'd this sort of relationship gradually broke down because each became some ladder climbers little fiefdom. It's really dysfunctional, and kills any dynamism around making changes or innovating because the isolation means not understanding each other or even worse being pitted against each in a blame culture. This has put the whole industry into a kind of hiatus in a lot of ways, and these 'new' developments seem to be just a way to build connected teams again. That is a good thing, I'm fully for that and it holds a lot of promise. But when the 'team' is split over large geographical areas of different cultures it really is pushing shit uphill with a toothpick. Then throw in all the Outsourcing companies with their own agenda's, the Cloud providers, the internal politics. It's a pretty toxic mix really and needs some very clever and charismatic leaders to make it work, even partially. A good place to start is trust, and that is a very rare commodity, especially when people are not being given a straight story and living with precarious job security. It's a real 'long run' proposition, 5 to 10 years depending on the organisation, and there'll be a shit load of carnage on the way. Whether a Phoenix arises out of this or some overweight chicken with three feet, no beak and carrying a shed load of anti-biotic resistant bacteria emerges I don't know.

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Robert D Bank

My teams role involves design, estimation, testing & development environment config and running support, recoveries, production config and implementation support, and system configuration. We have continued to develop a lot of semi or fully automated process to make it easier, quicker and better quality. We understand support each other out of necessity to reduce the stress, 'try' to keep people off our backs, with bureaucracy doing it's best to hinder at every stage. We have to evolve, you can't keep still because nothing and nobody else does.

Now with all this back-ground you might think it would qualify us somewhat to contribute to ideas and discussions (even peripherally) around 'DevOps' given that it seems to roughly fit how it is described? Well you'd be wrong it seems. Since the Agileisters and DevOps mania has invaded we've been sharp elbowed and talked over or totally dismissed. Not because we did anything wrong or failed to deliver within the tight parameters we work within. It seems more that it's because we don't speak their smug condescending 'inclusive' (except us) language which they endlessly foist upon us. We don't tremble like breathlessly excited children and wet ourselves every time a new Agile or DevOps 'bible' book hits the shelf, or some LeanAgileScrumDevOps 'guru' gives yet another presentation.

Now, all the chancers are jumping in, being given massive budgets to buy off the shelf solutions for processes we had to painfully develop ourselves because there was 'no budget, we're cost cutting'' whenever we asked. You realise there is an entirely parallel operation evolving that is the favoured one, while the yours is left to whither. You see endless rounds of conferences you're not invited too, and nauseating self promotion from the talking heads and their sycophantic side-kicks. You see wild often unfounded optimism all around, like protesters in front of the tanks in Tianamen Square.

The chancers, despite these canned solutions manage to often make a mess of it because of lack of experience, and the fact they never ask for advice at the early stages where deep knowledge helps embedding of standards that will set you up right for all that follows. Oh no, they want all the glory for themselves. 'I have my new 4x4 and I know how to mount a kerb thank you very much, I'm the expert here'. 'Mind the people and bollards though' you say as they accelerate on. Regularly you find they're on your shoulder all friendly for a 'minute' (which often becomes a considerable amount of effort), wanting you to help when they're floundering, even if you're working your bollocks off to support stuff that is actually working. ('Yes you're busy with that old stuff, but MY stuff is so much more important'). There will be no mention of your contribution to fixing it. Ever. But if you don't help, you'll marked down as 'negative', 'not supportive' and even further side-lined, if that is possible.

Eventually the parasite will consume the host, and find they have rely upon themselves, suffering the consequences of whatever they created, good or bad. In later years the ones that actually stay will become disillusioned as they're no longer the bright young things getting all the attention because the 'next best thing' will appear. They will then be at my paragraph two above. .

Of course the more 'Agile' parasites will have fled the ailing host well before this. They always do.They leave well sated, looking up at the maggots scrotum as they pass to a new host and start again.

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Leaky-by-design location services show outsourced security won't ever work

Robert D Bank

Re: DEFAULTS

bugger, very true. Needs a button or something simple so it can be an instant choice when downloading, Bluetooth sharing or whatever. I give up. Beyond me.

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Robert D Bank

DEFAULTS

Every manufacturers settings for photos should include a mandatory meta-data tag with the creators choice of encrypted password set on the device creating the image whether meta-data is available to viewers of the image regardless of the viewing technology. So it should be by conscious CHOICE that any meta-data is shareable or not, with 'not' being the default, hardcoded as an industry standard, so it cannot be accessed unless the creator has tagged it as shareable. It must, if necessary be supported by legislation with harsh penalties for non-compliance. This 'choice' tag MUST be carried over by any copy technology so that if the meta-data share flag is missing the default is non-shareable. If the creator is doing the copy then they know the password and can again make the choice on sharing for the copy.

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Staff at Steria gov shared services centre offered voluntary redundo

Robert D Bank

SopraSterius breaks out in Whitehall...shit

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Royal Bank of Scotland culls 1 in 4 branches, blames the interwebz

Robert D Bank

Re: Tood bad real life isn't like your imagination

those making these decisions, along with moving thousands of other UK jobs to India, will be very richly rewarded, so yep, really difficult

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Report: Women make up just 17% of IT workforce, paid 15% less than men

Robert D Bank

They're the smart ones then

I've worked in IT since the mid seventies and believe me it has changed beyond recognition. It used to be a really enjoyable but challenging job, even if hours were sometimes difficult. We had a good degree of autonomy and were trusted to innovate (remember being trusted?), and from my experience really good co-operation between colleagues regardless of gender or disability etc (without being coerced). You could end a day knowing you have achieved something.

Now, apart from it being quite reasonably paid, it has become a shit job most of the time and getting rapidly worse. Apart from just having to fight to keep your job which is always in danger of being off-shored or outsourced, you have the situation now where 'doing' is outweighed at least 60/40 with having to wade through endless regulatory and other internal process crap just to try and change 1 bit in a file for example. It is soul destroying. IF you finally get past the hand-wringing by several layers of lame management and have the go ahead to 'shudder', change something, you have to do it at the time of night when you're at your lowest ebb and most likely to cock it up. Quiet often this is done under the spotlight of management constantly asking what you're doing, how long will it take etc etc to the point of distraction. If it goes wrong then your life is not your own anymore until you've explained the same thing 100 times to different people in writing, on the phone conference and to yourself in fitful sleep several hours later. And then it starts again the next day and carries on through the route cause analysis, waterboarding and re-planning and extra hyper governance nightmare on steroids to the point where you try again. Great. And it affects your home life as well. Getting calls in the middle of the night doesn't just wake you up but those next to you as well. And then the grumpiness from lack of sleep and stress just carries it on, often resulting in illness.

And don't get me started on dealing with off-shore people. With seemingly few notable exceptions they are fucking useless, and I mean moronically stupid. The number of times every day when myself and colleagues can be seen holding heads in hands just aghast with the ridiculousness of things they come out with. For example, a simple request, 'please do the needful and copy the dataset'. That's it. Nothing else, just that. No file names. So you start on that forlorn process to prise out something meaningful to work with. You think you finally get there after several inane to's and frow's and you start working on it, and then they'll chuck in something completely left field such as 'the copy is not a copy actually'. FFS! What does that mean? Response after an hour, 'to create file that just looks like other file'. But it WILL look like the other file if I copy it! Silence for 2 hours. 'I have asked my senior, we want the new empty file and no data'. Grrr. Look at the source file, which is you've guessed it, IS empty, so same result. Head explodes. Every fucking day, several times a day, for year after fucking year until you have trained someone else to take your job, off-shore.

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A certain millennial turned 30 recently: Welcome to middle age, Microsoft Excel v2

Robert D Bank

Rrs

Can't restore Excel 3.1 onto my Vista laptop...wants some registry update. So much for that investment

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Boss made dirt list of minions' mistakes, kept his own rampage off it

Robert D Bank

the big red button

I worked at a place which had two main processing centres and a number of satellite mini-centres around the country. One of the mini-centres at the time actually shared the building of one of the main centres, albeit on another floor, but was being decommissioned. It finally reached the point where decommissioning was complete, and all the dayshift operations staff were standing in the main centres machine room talking about it with our manager 'Terrydactyl' (he was a bit old fashioned in management style). He took it upon himself to push the 'big red button' on the pillar next to him to officially power the satellite centre down. Everyone around him shuffled nervously in their shoes. The whole main processing centre went down immediately. Funniest thing to see his face when the lights came back on!

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'Do the DevOps?' No thanks! Not until a 'blameless post-mortem' really is one

Robert D Bank

ffs

Agile - with knob in hand

DevOps - Agile with a sledgehammer in hand

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UK.gov told to tread carefully with transfer of data sets to NHS Digital

Robert D Bank

Re: Opt out good until 2020?

my thoughts exactly. I opted out. End of.

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Samsung shows off Linux desktops on Galaxy smartmobes

Robert D Bank

Agile

a look into the future, 40m Indians doing Agile development on their phones, deploying from the toilet. Oh..

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Boffins' bonkers fibre demo: 53 Tbps down ONE piece of glass

Robert D Bank

Re: Ah, but in terms of resilience...

if the Taupo caldera blows then fibre cable will be the least of your concerns!

The Taupo Eruption was the most violent eruption known in the world in the last 5000 years. It is possible that ash from this eruption was the cause of red sunsets recorded by the Romans and Chinese at that time.

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Londoners: Ready to swap your GP for an NHS vid doc app?

Robert D Bank

One great stride to privatisation of the NHS

I wonder if that Mr 'unt has invested in this firm?

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Malware hidden in vid app is so nasty, victims should wipe their Macs

Robert D Bank

Re: Z/OS .... $64,000/$64Trillion Question

Mainframes support z/OS, z/VM, z/VSE, Linux, and z/TPF operating systems (and VOS3 in Japan).

You can also run a Z/OS emulator called zDT on a Linux platform, or host multiple Z/OS's under the z/VM hypervisor.

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Robert D Bank

Re: Z/OS

dunno, I don't play computer games, no interest when reality can be so much more entertaining. If Crysis runs on Linux it probably can though, given Linux runs quite happily on the mainframe. Either way, not bothered. When you grow up we could talk about it down the pub.

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Robert D Bank

Z/OS

Never, ever, heard of a hack of IBM Z/OS operating system, despite roots dating back to the 60's, or any of the associated firmware for that matter. And it's backward compatible virtually all the way. System z roots may be many decades old, but MS, OSX, Android etc have a looong way to catch up, in so many ways. Meanwhile Z/OS has advanced beyond the shadow of prejudice to support anything the other O/S's can provide. Maybe not perfect, but which of these others even come close?

Possibly annoying for some on this thread, but true nevertheless.

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In a surprise to no one, BT and TalkTalk top Ofcom's whinge-list

Robert D Bank

BT, awful, just awful

had months, literally months trying to get BB dropout issues resolved. It was blindingly obvious it was a water ingress issue because it was worse every time it rained without fail, which was confirmed only recently when a decent engineer finally turned up. But try and explain this to the robotic script repeaters on the help lines, NFC. And then all the false promises of follow up calls etc. If 4G providers could price more sharply they could take a huge slice out of the physical BB market I'm sure.

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Erik Meijer: AGILE must be destroyed, once and for all

Robert D Bank

Re: What a revolutionary idea agile seems

Thank you Eric, yours is the very first mentions I've seen some of the unspoken side effects of Agile, one that the Dev's and Mgmt refuse to acknowledge until forced. All of this grandiose methodology has to be supported by Operations and Infrastructure teams who in my experience are run on a shoe string, and run ragged. They support Dev, Testing, and Live most of the time as well, often at shitty hours of the day while others sleep, or at least are able to hand over to another shift. They don't appreciate at all that none of their crap will work without the underpinning infrastructure and operational support until it's not there for some reason, and then all they do is vilify you, even if they couldn't be arsed to identify their massive requirement that broke it at the design phase. Oh no, they'll make sure it is known as an 'infrastructure problem', which sticks; the more you defend it the louder they hum. You have to deal with Dev's, PM's, Business, Mgmt and other infrastructure teams all at the time to manage all the unrealistic expectations that emanate from each separate faction who thinks the world revolves around them.

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'We've nothing to hide': Kaspersky Lab offers to open up source code

Robert D Bank

Annoying either way

Such a boring merry-go-round of twattery, headed by state actors/crims of near-do-well intent. I class them all the same, they just dick wave each other to see who can wave the biggest 'wand'. Fucking twats. Let honest people live their lives without constant threat, get a life FFS.

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You may not know it, but you've already arrived at DevOps Land

Robert D Bank

cultural exchange?

I'm old enough to remember when DevOps ACTUALLY existed, when a Dev programmer would come around to Operations at early design stage and actually talk over their proposal and explain the customers requirements. Very quickly a consensus and understanding would be reached to provide the optimal outcome, perhaps talking to the customer again to ensure their expectations are suitably met. And no management would be anywhere near it most of the time. They would be there to defend and support you for the decisions taken using your experience and skills in each relative area, and otherwise leave you to it. Because you'd all been a part of this you would own it and make every effort to ensure it was a success, and then celebrate it together. This is what DevOps really is, and it did exist up until perhaps the mid 80's.

From around the mid 80's the world changed. It became the world according to bean counters. And as things have scaled up it has been ripe pickings for the ladder climbers to create all their little fiefdoms and shutdown open communication, collaboration, innovation, risk taking, ownership. Finally, perhaps they realise that these were things of value. But, they they want to try and bring this back packaged as 'Agile' or 'DevOps' with no effort or understanding of how to get there. The newer recruits have never experienced the wonders of actual, real DevOps so cannot really understand it. For all the wonders of communication tools etc today it is still an almost impossible task to bring together people across hugely different geographic and cultural divides to create true DevOps. All they'll do is meet via some 'tool' and 'process' foisted on them and which they have to slavishly follow. Great.

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El Reg was invited to the House of Lords to burst the AI-pocalypse bubble

Robert D Bank

Intelligence is not consciousness

so without consciousness AI is only an I/O supervisor, making decisions in isolation based on it's inputs. It can iterate many possible outputs and learn which might be optimal within certain parameters, but is not aware whether those might not be optimal for those using it for whatever purpose. If a self driving car for example decides to drive off a cliff to save driving over 30 cyclists that cannot be avoided, is that optimal or not? From a conscious drivers point of view a whole slew of decisions would flood their mind, taking into account a lot of 'unconnected' things that an AI wouldn't. Should I sacrifice myself for the greater good? Should I steer into the rock wall on the other side so I might have a chance of surviving? Do I actually care about the cyclists that much?

Just a thought.

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Atlassian kills God, rebrands as a mountain, a structurally unsound 'A' or a high five

Robert D Bank

Arse up!

New logo looks like someone bent over ready to take one from behind, how Agile.

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VW engineer sent to the clink for three years for emissions-busting code

Robert D Bank

applied elsewhere

Data Protection Act - I bet a lot of those pontificating here have been involved in copying/testing using personalised data either unwittingly or otherwise. When the people you have to 'trust' who say it is not personalised are offshore and out of DPA jurisdiction and basically don't give a toss, where do you stand then? There could be a lot of testing of this under the new EU laws...and an awful lot of people are going to be feeling very uncomfortable

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WANdisco sticks Fusion into Amazon's Snowballs for mega-petabyte data pelt

Robert D Bank

nothing new here

I've been involved in two datacentre moves involving trucking disk in 1998 and 2001. It was the only feasible option. First used IBM dual copy and the next used IBM XRC. The second one had 3 dry runs abd worked a treat.

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Welcome to the Rise of the Machine-to-Machine. Isn't it time to 'block off' some data ducts?

Robert D Bank

its not our decision to make?

I suggested some time back on el reg that the web would likely fracture into perhaps three parts. Its a logical progression, even more likely with all the increased security risks emerging. There'll be gov't and mega-corp and essential services web, business level web and a pleb web. There may also be a comms web to allow more granular control over data exchange. TPTB are not going to allow their plans to be compromised as clearly revealed here.

www.monbiot.com/2017/07/21/missing-link/

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No way to sugarcoat this: I'm afraid Uranus opens and closes to accept particle streams

Robert D Bank

I wonder if there's a brown out when it opens?

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Homeland Security: Putin’s hackers tried to crack electoral networks in 21 US states

Robert D Bank

Look closer to home

The reality is there's more tinkering of voter registration going on internally to the states than from any external player. The journalist Greg Palast has been pursuing this since the 2004 election when he found out about these 'scrub lists' that each state maintain. Thousands of people's votes are illegally nullified through these lists, certainly enough to swing election results. And the people affected are completely unaware of the fact.

QUOTE: 'We estimate that before the last election, 1.1 million voters were removed from voter rolls in sates where Crosscheck was being used. Crosscheck is the flawed-by-design, racist vote purging system instigated by Trump’s Vote Suppressor in Chief, Kris Kobach, who this past week was appointed as the Vice Chair of the Presidential Commission for Election Integrity'

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Break crypto to monitor jihadis in real time? Don't be ridiculous, say experts

Robert D Bank

Re: Selective crypto? - unfortunately........

Admitting ignorance is a chance to learn and understand the world that little bit better and update my views accordingly. If you can't do that you're part of the problem.

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Robert D Bank

Re: Selective crypto? - unfortunately........

LOL - my ignorance confirmed! Your explanation was very helpful thank you. (walks away tail between legs)

The terrorist issue seems like a really intractable problem to most people and Gov't is using this a yet another way to introduce draconian laws and put the shits up people. It would do more to ensure their communities have high levels of employment to keep them busy, financially secure and have more outside influences to counter the garbage they're being fed.

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Robert D Bank

Selective crypto?

Hands up I am completely ignorant about this but something occurs to me...

If the Gov't have this 'watch-list', can they not pass this to the companies that apply crypto, and the said companies then apply a backdoored version to the comm's of the only the suspect individuals, rather than some blanket application affecting everyone? I'm not a fan of this but if the individuals have been confirmed to have suspect behaviour then screw them. I do understand the dangers and flaws in this, but we're in a situation of all or nothing at the moment which doesn't seem to serve anyone. It would require proper international cop-operation between Gov'ts to ensure the watch-lists were up to date and accurate of course, because the companies applying crypto are international. Yes it may be possible these watch-lists might be leaked, but in some ways that may not be a down-side, it would make the individuals very paranoid and less likely to use these channels. So they might resort to having to meet, or send snail mail, which would slow down their communication and also make them more visible.

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How the Facebook money funnel is shaping British elections

Robert D Bank

Big money influence..

just finds a new vehicle...

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/may/07/the-great-british-brexit-robbery-hijacked-democracy

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Who really gives a toss if it's agile or not?

Robert D Bank

Re: 'What's Real and What's for Sale'...

Yeah, so what have you specified here in any way that doesn't take away from:

'I can't see how Agile is a good idea except for the smallest trivial projects'

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Just how screwed is IT at the Home Office?

Robert D Bank

I wonder if she has all her toes?

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