* Posts by Maelstorm

206 posts • joined 14 Jun 2015

Page:

Got $50k spare? Then you can crack SHA-1 – so OpenSSH is deprecating flawed hashing algo in a 'near-future release'

Maelstorm
Go

Re: Old devices

Sorry, but at some point you have to cut off support. It's the only way to move forward. If you have equipment with firmware that cannot be changed, then maybe it's time to upgrade that equipment. MS-DOS has been dead for years. They don't even make DOS boot disks for system maintenance any more. Much of the issues with different and strange limitations is compatibility with legacy equipment. The BIOS in PCs is a real example here. This is why UEFI was developed. If a piece of equipment is truly vital, I'm sure if the vendor/manufacturer has enough money thrown at them, they will figure out a solution...maybe even a new controller or new ROM that has the new protocols in it. Either way, this is a software issue.

Maelstorm

I remember in 2012...

I remember back in 2012 a worm was discovered on a computer in Iran. This worm was called Flame or Flamer. It literally spoofed the Microsoft software signing certificate using an unknown chosen prefix attack. This attack was different than the attack vector used in the 2007 paper. So whoever pulled it off used world-class cryptanalysis. What was the result of this certificate spoofing? It made the computer think the update was coming from Microsoft and installed it, no questions asked, when in fact it was malware.

SHA-1 has been vulnerable for a long time. If you have equipment that requires it, then I'm sorry, but you need to upgrade your equipment. As an alternative, why connect industrial equipment to the internet to begin with? That's just asking for something to happen. Best to have it on an air-gapped network so someone has to do an up-front intrusion to gain access.

You're not getting Huawei that easily: Canadian judge rules CFO's extradition proceedings to US can continue

Maelstorm
Terminator

Here's the thing...

I read somewhere recently that Meng is considered to be Chinese Communist Party (CCP) "Royalty." With that in mind, it makes sense that China is willing to go to bat for her. Lying to a bank to get transactions processed to a foreign country to bypass sanctions is a really big no-no. So, if convicted (more on this in a moment), she may face 10+ years at a nice federal resort with all expenses paid. She will get medical/psychiatric care, fed three times a day, read books, watch TV, and get free designer clothes all in orange. The only problem is that she will be spending 23 hours a day in a 5x7 foot cell.

As for getting a conviction by a jury of her peers, remember that she's "royalty." The CCP may send spies and other covert agents to either break her out of jail and whisk her out of the country, or kidnap/bribe/extort or otherwise leverage one or more jurors on her trial to get a favorable outcome. They have to come back with not guilty for her to be acquitted. If it's a mistrial, they can try her again, and again, and again. It depends on how much of her ass the U.S. prosecutors want. Even one trial will take a pretty good bite out of it.

Clearview AI sued by ACLU for scraping billions of selfies from social media to power its facial-recog-for-cops system

Maelstorm
Trollface

Re: The US produces a far superior strain of snake oil!

I bring you the white Bronco. I bring you ... FREEDOM!

That didn't work out so well for O.J. Simpson.

<ducks>

Linux-loving Windows 10 May 2020 Update squeaks in with days to spare before June

Maelstorm

Oh, Thank God!

I found Cortana less than useless. Takes up too much memory and the search feature sucks. I figured out how to kill it and keep it from starting back up...but then Microsoft made it so that the Start Menu wouldn't work unless it was running. Cortana was good for the Master Chief in the Halo game series...not good in real life. I haven't seen anything about compatibility issues with AMD hardware or ATI video drivers since I have an older ATI card (HD 5600 series). As others here have mentioned, I am quite keen to check out the new WSL2 features that are included in this update. Per my usual procedure, I'll wait 90 days before I upgrade.

Pablo Escobar's big bro and former accountant sues Apple for $2.6bn over FaceTime bug

Maelstorm
Stop

The reseller apparently assured him that the "iPhone simply cannot be exploited and will never be vulnerable to future exploits".

Damnit, I sprayed my drink when I read that. No software is bug free. Hell, even Hello World might have bugs in it if the underlying libraries have bugs. Nothing done by man is ever perfect. So the reseller lied to him. He should file the case against the reseller instead of Apple.

As for why people are after him, it's most likely revenge. Pablo Escobar was a really bad guy and ordered many people to be murdered. It's not surprising that one or more family members of his victims are looking for payback by taking their vengeance out on his family members. You can only kill someone once.

Maelstorm

Re: Special accountants rounding?

Actually no.

Here's how Escobar did the maths: The breach of contract itself has cost Escobar $100m to devote extra time and money to protect himself and his family after his location was accessed by miscreants. Apple's negligent misrepresentation of its product drove him to relocate, so that's another $500m in damages. Finally, the emotional and physical toll exerted on the former gangland bean counter also has a price of, erm, $2bn.

So it's 100m + 500m + 2b = 2.6b.

Linus Torvalds drops Intel and adopts 32-core AMD Ryzen Threadripper on personal PC

Maelstorm

Re: AMD vs. Intel: War Games v3.0

The problem that I've had with nVidia was not the performance, but the reliability of their products. Every care that I've owned that had an nVidia chip on it failed within 3 years. I'll go 10 years without replacing or upgrading the video card if it does what I need it to do. So for reliability, I go for ATI, and they have decent performance too. Hell, I still have some old 3dfx cards inside one of my server boxes. And one machine has a Hercules card in it.

Maelstorm

Re: AMD vs. Intel: War Games v3.0

Eh...I'll agree with you there. The thing about AMD though is that they definitely keep Intel on their toes.

Maelstorm

AMD vs. Intel: War Games v3.0

I'm not surprised by Linus's statement. AMD has always been the underdog to Intel, but with a superior product. I remember when the Athlon processor came out and decked Intel's clock. Furthermore, AMD chips, in general, execute instructions faster than Intel with a lower clock speed thereby reducing heat and power consumption. Since AMD bought ATI, AMD has been placing GPU cores on the same die as the CPU. This takes a byte out of nVidia's CUDA because having the GPUs on the same die as the compute cores means that the GPUs can get their data from the same highspeed buss that the compute core do, without the PCIe bottlekneck.

Hey Siri, are you still recording people's conversations despite promising not to do so nine months ago?

Maelstorm

Re: probably far beyond the ability of most people to configure

I've disabled BT on my mom's iPhone and it has yet to turn itself back on. Then again, BT is disabled on all devices.

Apple, Google begin to spread pro-privacy, batt-friendly coronavirus contact-tracing API for phone apps

Maelstorm
Terminator

Bluetooth

I've never used bluetooth. It's disabled on my phone, so the app isn't going anywhere. Besides, they can't force you to install an app if you don't want to. So this is doomed to failure anyways.

Maelstorm

Re: re: should be self-isolating

Well, I'm sure the government can find out who it is by getting the assigned phone number off the phone. However, with the latest changes in Android with respect to privacy, that might no longer be an option.

Now there's nothing stopping the PATRIOT Act allowing the FBI to slurp web-browsing histories without a warrant

Maelstorm

At least the machine that I have doesn't have a back door in the CPU. Still though, nobody really knows what is really in the CPUs of these newer machines except the CPU manufacturers themselves. Even then, the different groups of computer engineers don't really talk to each other. These capabilities have been marketed as a system management ability. So the intent is that if you have commodity hardware in a data center, you can remote manage the machine even if it's powered off. I have a Sun Server here which has that capability. I can turn the machine on and off by connecting to the ALOM and giving it commands.

Maelstorm
Flame

This just goes to show...

This just goes to show that our government (U.S.A.) is more dysfunctional that that of the U.K. This is a toe know to the FBI, and with the NSA's help, to expand warrantless surveillance of the American people. These people should be ashamed of themselves for violating our civil rights. It's bad enough that the corporations do it.

Total Eclipse to depart: Open-source software foundation is hopping the pond to Europe

Maelstorm

Re: Goodbye and good riddance

Absolutely not. Good software is good software no matter where it's written. I just don't like Eclipse software.

Maelstorm
Coat

Goodbye and good riddance

Hey Eclipse,

Goodbye and good riddance. Your crappy software will not be missed here in the U.S. (at least by me).

It is unclear why something designed to pump fuel into a car needs an ad-spewing computer strapped to it, but here we are

Maelstorm

Re: Huh?

If you top off the tank, you run the risk of getting liquid fuel in the EVAP system which is not good. It can saturate the canister and you can end up with a gasoline smell when the car is off. When running, the engine will run rich which can screw with the emissions, injector timings, etc.... The only fix if that happens is to replace the canister.

Maelstorm

Re: Huh?

It's the evaporative emissions control system, or EVAP for short. There is basically three lines coming from the fuel tank: the main fuel line, the fuel return line, and the vapor line. The vapor line connects to a canister filled with activated charcoal which stores the fumes from the gas tank when the vehicle isn't running. When you start the vehicle, the intake of the engine forms a vacuum. The computer opens the EVAP purge valve which connects engine vacuum to the EVAP system (charcoal canister, vapor line, gas tank). The collected vapors are drawn from the canister to the engine to be burned, and any subsequent vapors from the tank are sent to the engine as well. So while the engine is running, the gas tank is under vacuum. There is a sensor that monitors the pressure in the evap system. That's how the computer knows you left the gas cap off (and will light the check engine light) when you drive off. This system isn't really high tech. It's been around since the 1970's I think, definitely since the 1980's...at least here in the U.S.

Eclipse boss claims Visual Studio Code is an open-source poseur – though he would say that, wouldn't he?

Maelstorm

Re: Netbeans ftw

I tried Netbeans years ago and didn't like it. Now if you want a good lightweight editor on Windows, Notepad++ is quite good. Language neutral, but will do rules based highlighting, no limits on file size that I've ever reached, it's fast, and has a number of interesting features.

Maelstorm

Re: Eclipse... and the winner of thread twit is..

It comes down to use what you know. I have used vi for many years, so I'm used to it. I do most of my unix stuff on command line, so vi is king there. Vi is an editor, not a development environment. Vi, gcc/clang, make, gdb, and other tools is what makes the development environment. As for emacs, i get carpel tunnel syndrome just thinking about it. Not only that, I have product to ship too.

I stand by my statement. Eclipse is junk because it's slow. Takes too long to do things. Android Studio is much faster. Visual Studio is faster.

Maelstorm
Mushroom

Eclipse...

I have used a number of IDEs over the years, and I can say with absolute certainty that Eclipse is the shitstain of development environments. Eclipse is the piece of shit that was crapped out of a dog's ass. The problem is that it's written entirely in Java, which is slow to begin with. When I coded in Eclipse, my 8-core 4 GHz workstation felt like I was running a 486 under the hood. It's slow, sometimes taking several tens of seconds to process a command which in other IDEs (that are written and compiled for the platform that I'm using) processes immediately. Now imagine that delay when writing code. Then it becomes very annoying very quickly.

"Milinkovich's problem may be related to the fact that Visual Studio Code is used by 50.7 per cent of developers (with Visual Studio in second place), according to the latest StackOverflow survey. Eclipse, the developer tool platform for which the foundation was formed, has just 14.4 per cent usage. Theia does not yet feature."

Gee, I wonder why when your slow crappy product is written in a slow crappy language. Yes, I am proud to say that I use Visual Studio Code with the Vim extension for all web and some Unix/Linux development, Visual Studio for Windows development, and I use Android Studio when I need to develop mobile apps. I don't have a Mac, so iPhone is out. Most of my Unix/Linux code that I have written over the past 30 or so years was written in vi.

Some of the best DOS based IDEs that I have used were the integrated ones from Borland. Turbo Pascal, Borland Pascal, and Turbo C.

GoDaddy hack: Miscreant goes AWOL with 28,000 users' SSH login creds after vandalizing server-side file

Maelstorm

Re: And why...

The web sites that I develop uses the CHAP protocol so the plaintext password is never sent. The server sends a random binary string, salt, hash method, and hash rounds to the client. The computation is done in the client and that result is sent to the server. If they match then the password is valid. The random binary string changes for *EVERY* login request to thwart playback attacks. So even if SSL isn't used, the password is still protected. In this case, not even the server has the plaintext password stored. Furthermore, the ONLY time the server actually gets the plaintext password is when the user creates a new account, or they change their password. I have a project in the works to change that too.

Maelstorm
Holmes

And why...

Any why were the passwords not salted and hashed? Like their marketing campaign, their business, and their code, that flaw is so 1990's. It's what, 30 years on and they still haven't learned the lessons of the past?

Maelstorm

From the U.S. perspective...

From the U.S. perspective, you get what you pay for...caveat emptor comes to mind. Now here's an interesting fact that I want to share with you about GoDaddy: They are the registar of choice for fishing and fake web sites. More often than not, if it's a fake web site, then the registar is GoDaddy.

OK, so you've air-gapped that PC. Cut the speakers. Covered the LEDs. Disconnected the monitor. Now, about the data-leaking power supply unit...

Maelstorm

Re: In Langley, Virginia, USA...

Probably. It's just something that I was told. They didn't get into the specifics about it. Probably random white noise from a natural source.

Maelstorm
Trollface

Re: SecureFiles (TM)

Sometimes these security buffoons are just that...buffoons. If you toss the monitor and keyboard, then what's the point of having a computer? Can't use it.

Maelstorm
Black Helicopters

In Langley, Virginia, USA...

The CIA main headquarters in Langley, Virginia, USA has a building within a building. The outer "shell" is the normal perimeter glass...the inner building as well. However, the CIA plays music between the two buildings so someone with a laser bounce device cannot recover any conversation happening inside the inner building. I also understand that the inner building is a Faraday cage to suppress any and all signals.

It has been 20 years since cybercrims woke up to social engineering with an intriguing little email titled 'ILOVEYOU'

Maelstorm

I remember when...

I remember when the ILOVEYOU virus came out. I was working for the local phone company at the time. My workgroup was immune to infection due to the simple fact that we didn't have Windows PCs, but Sun Workstations. I think the very first (or one of the very first) computer viruses was called Cookie because it would randomly ask for a cookie (The user had to type cookie to continue using the program). That was almost 50 years ago. As for social engineering, let me introduce you to the master of social engineering: Kevin Mitnik. He wrote a book called The Art of Deception. Needless to say, it's a real eye opener which goes to show that no matter how secure you make a system, the weakest link is always the human who uses it.

Singapore to require smartphone check-ins at all businesses and will log visitors' national identity numbers

Maelstorm
Big Brother

In Singapore, 1984 has arrived.

George Orwell would be proud. 1984 has arrived in Singapore. They probably even have room 101 in the Ministry of Love to torture those who refuse to carry a smart phone.

Florida man might just stick it to HP for injecting sneaky DRM update into his printers that rejected non-HP ink

Maelstorm

Re: HP Printers are a Virus

From my understanding, dism can remove most things. There's also 3rd party software that can remove stuff as well.

Firefox 74 slams Facebook in solitary confinement: Browser add-on stops social network stalking users across the web

Maelstorm
Thumb Up

I'm surprised that...

I'm surprised that it's taken this long for somebody to do this. However, I came up with a solution some time ago that works pretty well without fancy addons and extensions.

1. Go into the settings of your browser.

2. Navigate to where the settings for cookie handling are located.

3. Turn on the option to delete cookies when the browser closes.

And that's it. Everytime your browser closes, if forgets any and all cookies that were set.

Spyware slinger NSO to Facebook: Pretty funny you're suing us in California when we have no US presence and use no American IT services...

Maelstorm
FAIL

Re: Class action suit?

Actually, they didn't admit it. They said that one of their clients is doing this. Plus the CFAA is a U.S.A. law which does not apply to any other country. And if it is a foreign government doing this, then nobody can really do anything to them. You can sue them, but good luck collecting on it.

We’ve had enough of your beach-blocking shenanigans, California tells stubborn Sun co-founder: Kiss our lawsuit

Maelstorm
Coat

California Law...Even Federal Law....

I laugh when I watch these house hunter shows where they say you own that part of the beach. Sorry, but it is a matter of federal law that a beach is a public resource and has delegated management of said resource to the states. People have had charges filed against them for trespassing even though it has been shown that there is a defacto public right of way that is being illegally blocked. These usually just get thrown out of court. Now that the CCC has filed suit, the judge can force him to remove the gate or face prison time for defying a court order.

Mayday in Moscow as devs will be Russian to Putin mandatory apps on phones, laptops, TVs

Maelstorm
Big Brother

And now the serious moment is at hand...

So, what's to stop people from uninstalling the government mandated spyware and installing Google's or Apple's spyware? From what I have seen, Russians are pretty adept when it comes to tech.

Maelstorm
Joke

And the joke is...

In Soviet Russia, you do not install the software, the software installs you.

Has science gone too far? Now boffins dream of shining gigantic laser pointer into space to get aliens' attention

Maelstorm
Big Brother

Question

One must question the wisdom of shining a big flashlight to attract possibly hostile life forms. Several movies come to mind....Independence Day, Battleship, Battle for Los Angeles, etc....

Amazon fails to stop ex-sales staffer winging it to Google Cloud

Maelstorm
Terminator

In California, U.S.A....

Here in California, such non-compete agreements are illegal and will not be enforced by the courts. Businesses have tried several things such as "this agreement is governed by the laws of such and such state." have also been rejected by California courts. If you live and work in California, then California laws apply no matter what the business may try to say otherwise. All they can do is wait and see if the employee's knowledge is used at the new company in such a way as to compromise the former employer's trade secrets. If that happens, then they can sue. The Waymo vs. Uber case comes to mind.

Blood money is fine with us, says GitLab: Vetting non-evil customers is 'time consuming, potentially distracting'

Maelstorm
Mushroom

I have said this before....

I have said this before, and I will say this again. If you are working for someone, then you have NO say in how they conduct business, unless they are doing something illegal. These people who are sounding off on Google's internal message boards? Fine, but don't protest your employer and expect no consequences. If I was running a business, and my employee's objected to who I was doing business with, my view is that if you don't like it, there's the door. I'll probably get downvoted for this, but fuck it. You're paid to do a job. Sit down, shut up, and do it.

Well, well, well. Fancy that. UK.gov shelves planned pr0n block

Maelstorm

Don't mess with people's right to get off to porn. These days, the kids are smarter than the adults. They will just head over to a U.S. site to get their fix.

How bad is Catalina? It's almost Apple Maps bad: MacOS 10.15 pushes Cupertino's low bar for code quality lower still

Maelstorm
Facepalm

And there's your problem....

"that Apple's marketing group overrides engineering concerns."

And there's the problem folks. Marketing shouldn't be in charge of anything...except marketing. Seems like the company has been going downhill ever since the passing of Steve Jobs.

Google takes sole stand on privacy, rejects new rules for fear of 'authoritarian' review

Maelstorm

Re: Privacy? Not on today's internet...

I'm often telling people a VPN only gives you some privacy from your ISP (who generally won't MITM your connection to remove that protection) and in the UK from the police & 20 odd other services who can see your ICR/Internet connection record for the last 2 years but there is nothing to stop them submitting a request to google for your email account, your search history and probably sites you visited anyway because they had ad-trackers on most of the sites on the internet.

That is if they can tie your browsing/search history to you. Besides the ISP cannot MITM your connection to a VPN if you are using SSL certificates of at least 2048 bits. They can record it, but it's encrypted between you and the VPN provider. And on top of that, make sure the VPN provider is outside of your country and not on friendly terms. Makes investigations much harder.

I realize that you guys in the UK have something where the police can demand you to show them your encryption keys, or force you to decrypt something, with a two year jail sentence if your refuse. But what if you can't? I always thought it unfair to put someone in jail for not being able to decrypt internet traffic because the keys are not available to the user, and are automatically generated.

Maelstorm
Big Brother

Privacy? Not on today's internet...

(tl;dr post)

I figure I'll be down voted for saying this, but true privacy cannot be accomplished on the internet unless one does all of the following:

1. (Most important) Use a VPN or Proxy server.

2. Use an ad blocker.

3. Disable 3rd party cookies.

4. Disable JavaScript.

5. Use a good browser like Firefox or Opera (Not the Google Chrome spyware).

I'm sure there are other things, but that's what comes to mind right now. Using a VPN or proxy server is very important because servers log connections. In those logs, you see what address was connecting, time/date of the request, what was requested, possibly even the user-agent string of the browser if the server is configured for it. What Apache logs (the web server software that I use) can be fully configured. Logging the IP address and the time/date is important in case legal action needs to be taken. With an IP address, you can find out what ISP someone is using. In some cases, if there is a reverse lookup record, a general geographical location can be deduced as well. So with some basic log analysis, you can tell which IP addresses requested which pages, and how long people stayed on those pages as well. And this is from just what the server software logs.

Many websites today make money by showing advertisements to us. Unlike the server logs which can only track what users do on the site or sites that the server controls, advertisers can track users from page to page, site to site, and server to server. Many websites use the same set of advertisers, so they will set a cookie on your browser and use that cookie to track you around the internet. Since your browser is connecting to the advertiser's servers, they are logging everything they can. So they can tie IP address, user-agent, and cookies together to create a unique identifier they use to accumulate information about you. This is why you should block 3rd party cookies. Although they can still track you via IP address and user-agent string, it may not be as unique. And let us not forget about the do-not-track setting in most browsers. I don't know of anyone who actually honors that, so it's basically a non-functioning feature. Most, if not all browsers, have a setting that disables the browser's ability to save cookies between browsing sessions (aka allow only session cookies). So closing the browser causes all cookies to disappear. Opening the browser again gives you a clean slate, cookie wise.

Although I did mention disable JavaScript, in this day and age, disabling JavaScript will break much of the internet. Many sites today utilize things like Ajax, jQuery, Bootstrap, etc... which requires JavaScript to function. Additionally, the current trend in web development is to not send HTML from the server, but to send JSON objects and offload everything to the client. This reduces processing on the server so more clients can be handled with the same hardware. When you request a page, you get an HTML document that the browser interprets. That will be the only HTML that the server will send. It tells the browser to go and download a bunch of style sheets and script files. From there, all document rendering data is sent via JSON and is processed on the client side. It used to be XML, but now JSON is king because it's easier for the client to process. No need for an XML interpreter.

Google Chrome is a very popular browser, but it reports everything back to Google. However, I did a forensic analysis of Chrome's incognito mode, and it is very good. Nothing is reported to Google, nothing is saved on the machine. No cookies, no history, nothing. The only thing you might find is some memory artifacts that have been saved to swap space. If your system is setup to clear swap on shutdown, or you are using an encrypted swap file, there won't be anything on the machine. So if you just use Chrome's incognito mode, then go ahead. It won't track you.

My final point though is this: Google does not want privacy on the internet because that will directly impact their revenue stream. Google built itself on advertisement. It charges those advertisers a lot of money for access to their platform. Additionally, Google also makes money by selling your data to those same advertisers. The same is true for Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.... It's all about marketing and getting you to buy something from one of their sponsors. So as you browse the internet, the data that is being collected on you is sold. But it's not just that, you are being monetized and sold as well. So it is in the best interest of these companies to keep privacy away from the internet for as long as possible.

How to fix the global slowdown in broadband rollout: Redefine what broadband means

Maelstorm
Mushroom

Rural Broadband?

The reason why rural broadband has never been rolled out is three simple words: Return On Investment (ROI). No company in their right mind is going to spend $500,000 on a fiber optic terminal if at most 10 people are going to use it, whereas in a suburban area you can have upwards of 50, or several hundred in a urban environment. I know people who live in rural areas who still have dialup for internet because the providers flat refuse install the equipment...and this was after said companies received government incentives to do so. So 4G and 5G wireless is quite possibly the only way to go for rural areas to get broadband. Back in the day, broadband was anything faster than dialup. So 384K was considered broadband. Nowadays, if you don't have at least a 3 mbps download, it isn't broadband.

Emergency button saves gamers from sudden death... of starvation

Maelstorm

Re: Well now....

It's been awhile since I looked, but the TOS doesn't even mention these issues. What is interesting though is that on the loading screen when you initially log in or cross over onto a different server has messages that are displayed to the user. One of them goes something like this: Have fun with your friends in Azeroth, but don't forget to have fun outside Azeroth as well. So, at least for Blizzard Entertainment, they do understand that people need a break. Back in classic, some 40-man raid bosses can take a full 8 hours to defeat.

Maelstorm
Devil

Well now....

They make extra-large Depends, but the intended use is for people who are incontinent. After a 48-hour gaming session, they probably need a crane to pick their ass off the chair will a full diaper because they were too lazy to unload their ammo into the loo. Seriously though, that is taking the game too far. I have heard of things like this when I was playing World of Warcraft, like people being found dead in front of their computers because they were chugging energy drinks and their kidneys failed.

US regulators push back against White House plan to police social media censorship

Maelstorm

Re: Except ...

What? The president doesn't regulate them, the law does. And I disagree with your little comment about accusing anti-fascists of fascism, because I have experienced it for myself. Now before you post your drivel about me being stupid, why don't you consider the fact that I am speaking from experience here...or are you one of those anti-fascists who are trying to silence all conservative voices?

Maelstorm

Re: Except ...

And Jesus said he who is without sin cast the first stone. The problem is that no matter who is in office, they are going to have some flaw or flaws because nobody is perfect. I have been on this earth for almost 50 years and I have never seen our politics like this before. It's a fucking circus. Now I am right of center, and I don't like Trump either. However, the amount of insanity that I see coming from the left is astonishing. The left is being taken over by these fascists who will try to silence you by any means necessary if you disagree with them (AntiFA). Unfortunately, this does extend into the news media and the social media platforms. So yes, they do need to be regulated. The U.S. Constitution needs to be applied to corporations, not just to government. Then all this nonsense might end, maybe.

I want to see Trump out of office, but I don't want a democrat in there either. So either the Republican Party will field a more viable candidate, or stick with Trump. And let's not forget the whole Russia collusion thing that wasted 25 million of the taxpayer's money, and the fact that two of the most anti-semantic congress women (both are Muslim) getting banned from Israel because of their active support of the Boycott Israel thing.

It's chaos, utter chaos, and I fear that I will not end soon.

We will hack back if you tamper with our shiz, NATO declares to world's black hats

Maelstorm
Mushroom

The Final Solution

So if a state sponsored actor hacks into another nation and causes wide-spread disruption of critical services like electricity and water supply, why not find where the hackers are, physically, and bomb them out of existence? After all state-sponsored cyber attacks against another country's infrastructure is an act of war.

Uncle Sam is asking Americans if they could refrain from slapping guns on their drones

Maelstorm

Well now...

I live in the U.S.A. and I thought that arming planes and drones was already illegal before the 2018 law...with the exception of law enforcement, the National Guard, and the military. But this has been depicted in those procedural crime shows where an explosive device was strapped to a drone and used to assassinate someone. Not too far fetched.

Page:

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR WEEKLY TECH NEWSLETTER

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2020