* Posts by Maelstorm

53 posts • joined 14 Jun 2015

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IBM loses mainframe docs down the back of the web, customers cry 'sabotage'

Maelstorm
FAIL

And once again...

...we are met face to face with the main issue of software development here in the USA. Companies are so keen to get their product out the door as quickly as possible, testing is either minimal or non-existent. This is why commercial software (even open source in many cases) here in the USA is always in Beta. We write the software. You buy it to have the privilege of testing it for us. If you find a problem, we'll fix it in the next version which you have to also buy.

And it's not just software...it's everything tech. Even websites, as this case has shown.

2
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Atari accuses El Reg of professional trolling and making stuff up. Welp, here's the interview tape for you to decide...

Maelstorm
FAIL

Hey el Reg, you messed up some facts in your article...

This here is wrong: "We made no mention of the fact that there is every reason to believe that Atari's entire enterprise is being funded by hype and that the only way the company can afford to create even its first console is by persuading people to hand over their cash before the company itself has a working prototype."

This is by far not first console with the Atari name. Atari used to make consoles back in the 1980s. The one that most people remember was the Atari 2600. There were other consoles, and even some computers during that time. But then they got kicked out of the market and went to being a software only company. And before someone says something, there was a number of mergers and acquisitions as well.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atari

As for Atari, if they go through the trouble to get an el Reg reporter in there, then perhaps they should have shown more than some plastic. Instead, they just wasted everyone's time. el Reg called them out on it, and rightly so. If they want to get a product to market quickly, maybe they should get in bed with V-Tech. At least then it can be marketed to the Fisher-Price age group which seems to be about the same age/intelligence rating of the current executive staff.

"Atari is so full of crap that it should be labeled as a hazardous waste zone." LOL LOL LOL British humor at it's finest.

0
1

What's all the C Plus Fuss? Bjarne Stroustrup warns of dangerous future plans for his C++

Maelstorm

Uhggg Another C++ standard?

You know, we don't really need any new features to the language. In fact, there's a few features that probably should be removed. So yes, I agree with Bjarne Stroustrup. Right tool for the job really. I view C++ as the object oriented version of C, and I use C...a lot in my coding since I code close to the bare metal. C and assembler for my work.

C: Low level system stuff such as kernels, device drivers, libraries, etc...

C++: Higher level application stuff (especially on GUI platforms) or when using objects make sense...like the Abstract Syntax Tree that's generated from a parser and is fed into the code generator for a compiler. OOP makes sense here since the nodes are all the same, the data they contain is what differentiates what type of node it is.

Here's a little thing that Linus said about C++. Enjoy.

http://harmful.cat-v.org/software/c++/linus

0
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US-CERT warns of more North Korean malware

Maelstorm
Trollface

Re: Didn't get the memo?

Didn't the war with Oh Canada already happen some years ago in the movie Wag the Dog?

0
0
Maelstorm
Devil

Not surprising. For those of you who don't remember, NK was fingered for the massive hack against Sony/BMG a number of years ago. The motive was a movie they made called 'The Interview.'

Now if you have seen the movie, imagine if the roles of Kim Jong and Trump reversed.

5
1

Unbreakable smart lock devastated to discover screwdrivers exist

Maelstorm
Trollface

They finally did it...

They finally did it... They finally made a lock that every intelligence agency on the planet can fall in love with. I'll bet they won't use it themselves.

9
0

ICANN pays to push Whois case to European Court of Justice

Maelstorm
Black Helicopters

The problem here...

The problem here is that ICANN is not bound by EU regulations. They are only bound by US regulations because they have a contract with the US Department of Commerce (USDOC). So the way that I see it, ICANN can pretty much do what they want as long as two things are followed:

1. They follow US laws.

2. They uphold the terms of the contract with the USDOC which is not available publicly.

Since ICANN has sole control over a number of TLDs, and they also run the 13 root name servers, they can easily sanction any registrar who does not follow their rules if ICANN wants to play hardball. The best way to handle the situation would be to go through a treaty/international agreement to file a complaint with the USDOC.

In other words, the reality of the situation is that we have a corporation who exists entirely in one country, following the laws of that one country, who has the power and ability to dictate to the entire planet how things are done, regardless of what local laws/regulations say because of their unique position. The local governments do not really have any power to enforce their own laws in their own country because said corporation has no assets to leverage in that country. So the corporation can punish/sanction their members without fear of repercussions from those local governments.

So ICANN can tell the EU to pound sand, sanction EU registrars, and thumb their nose at any fines the EU may impose since a EU court decision is not binding inside the borders of the US. There is case law here in the US to support this viewpoint (mainly with France). I think the UN's ITU should take this over, but because of the aforementioned reasons, the US has to agree, and so far they haven't. The EU could form their own DNS system, but then we run into the situation where you now have two conflicting systems (TOR is an example).

I live in the US myself, and I don't like it, but this is the reality of the situation that the world is in. Because of our power and status in the international community, the US has a habit of ignoring UN directives.

4
13

Which? calls for compensation for users hit by Windows 10 woes

Maelstorm

My Windows 10 experience has been mostly positive. The major problems that I have had deal with updates. I have yet to install 1803. Considering the number of problems with it, I don't think I will. I usually download the updates from Microsoft and manually install them. Some of those updates can be quite large though...upwards of 1GB or more in some cases. As a result however, I do not run into the problems that others have had.

On the other hand, you have to be pretty sharp to be able to maintain it though. It's worse than maintaining a Unix box. I had to reinstall Windows on a friends netbook because she ran out of space on a 32GB drive and Windows destroyed itself. Yeah, that was Windows 10.

1
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Facebook and Snap jam Blackberry patent suit

Maelstorm

Re: Blackberry has a good case and chance to win...

Not entirely true. The USPTO, with the backing of Congress, has created a process called the IPR (Inter Partes Review), which was recently upheld as constitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court in a 7-2 decision. This came about because of a problem with patent trolls, which is what Blackberry has been mostly relegated to these days. So for a sum in the low 6 figures, you can have the PTAB (Patent Trial and Appeal Board) of the USPTO review the patent and see if it meets the mark or not.

Apple cites figures of USD $350,000 for a PTAB review vs. a USD $3,000,000 cost for a district court review.

5
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US tech companies sucked into Russian sanctions row

Maelstorm
Meh

What about US employees of the companies? Do they still report to work? Do they still get a paycheck? How does something like this work if you are employed by one of these companies?

Imagine this in a job interview:

"Why did you leave your last job?"

"The company was placed on the US sanctions list."

I'm sure that will raise a few eyebrows.

8
0

PETA calls for fish friendly Swedish street signage

Maelstorm

Re: Just let them fade into obscurity

The whole point of blackmarking them on mainstream media is so they get relegated to the fringe publications which are inhabited by people just as crazy as they are, if not more so. So in that case, let them have at it.

Back in the day however, PETA did do a lot of good in advancing animal rights. They got women to mostly stop wearing fur coats and such. That pissed off the furries, but oh well. A changing world means that you need to change with it or be left behind.

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Maelstorm

Just let them fade into obscurity

PETA - People Eating Tasty Animals. Now that's an organization that I can get behind.

All joking aside, since the relevancy of PETA is...well...none, articles like this give them what they want the most: attention. People who are completely vegan are in general unhealthy and have to take supplements because our bodies are not designed to process plant matter effectively.

PETA is nothing more than the brown stain on used bathroom tissue.

9
1

US regains supercomputer crown from Chinese, for now

Maelstorm

Well, It's about time...

...that we in the States have reclaimed the crown.

And now for something completely different:

In Star Trek: The Next Generation, it has been stated that Data's positronic brain has a top speed of about 60 trillion calculations per second, or 60 TFLOPS. So 200,000 / 60 = 3,333.33... So with one computer, we can have 3,333 and 1/3 Datas. That would constitute a lot of Star Trek technobabble. In case you are wondering, the two episodes (that I remember where it was mentioned) are "The Measure of a Man," and "Offspring."

Something else that bears mentioning is that if you have watched Animatrix, the second renaissance is about AI powered androids. A whole race of disposable people...artificial, but still... At what point do we call them "Lifeforms" and assign rights to them? Or do we continue to treat them as slaves since they are not alive? Based upon history, I don't see the future as bright.

0
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Hacking charge dropped against Nova Scotia teen who slurped public records from the web

Maelstorm
Trollface

So, accessing public documents on a public server is a crime in Canada? Interesting. I will have to remember that. At least here in the U.S., it's not a crime.

In Soviet Canada, you don't access the documents, the documents access YOU.

12
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Nvidia quickly kills its AMD-screwing GeForce 'partner program' amid monopoly probe threat

Maelstorm
FAIL

nVidia sucks all around

To you nVidia fans, I'm sorry, but they suck. They suck as a company, and their hardware sucks. Every nVidia product that I have had has failed within two years of purchase. Because the warranties are only good for a year, too bad. I have ATI cards that are 15 years old and they still work. Usually, after 10 years ATI cards fail for one reason or another, which is more than 5 times longer than any nVidia card that I've had. Of course, this is my personal experience and opinion.

As to their business practices, Microsoft got their hand slapped for doing something similar in the 1990's here in the US.

6
2

US citizen sues France over France-dot-com brouhaha

Maelstorm
Megaphone

Here in the US...

I read about this here in the US. Basically, a french court sent an order to Web.com to transfer the domain without notification. The com/net/org/edu/mil/gov domains are for U.S. use only. Because of this, and france.com, web.com, and verisign are all based in the U.S., U.S. law applies here. Because now a different registar has control of the domain, ICANN will probably have to get involved to get it back. Oh yeah, this is going to be a messy court battle...but then again, maybe not. Since the court that issued the order is not a U.S. court, the order is invalid inside the borders of the U.S., where all the main actors are (except France).

So basically, what we have is this: A foreign government (France) has taken U.S. property belonging to a U.S. citizen without a U.S. court order, which is in direct violation of the U.S. Constitution. It's basically the same thing as the U.K government sending a letter to Wells Fargo Bank to transfer all the funds from some individual in the U.S. to the U.K.'s general fund.

Um...yeah.

One other thing, might be a red herring, but the U.S. Government is specifically prohibited from owning copyrights, trademarks, etc.... So anything that the government produces (from an employee or officer) is considered to be in the public domain. Don't know about France, but since the french court order does in fact conflict with U.S. law on the face of it, France will probably lose the domain name.

The .com domain: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.com

1
5

Oh dear... Netizens think 'private' browsing really means totally private

Maelstorm
FAIL

Forensic Analysis

I have just completed a comprehensive forensic analysis of Google Chrome's incognito mode. And I have to say that it does as advertised. It does not save any cookies, history, etc... to the disk. However, if you tell it to save passwords, bookmarks, or download files, those it will keep track of...but ONLY ON YOUR OWN COMPUTER!!! I think that's where people are making their mistake. Nothing can prevent websites, or your ISP from tracking you on the web as that is outside the browser's control.

Interestingly enough, there are artifacts in RAM but that is required because if the browser isn't in memory, it isn't running. As a consequence, some of that memory gets swapped to disk. However, that is also outside the control of the browser. But a user can configure Windows to clear the swap file on shutdown using a registery tweak.

6
0

Developer mistakenly deleted data - so thoroughly nobody could pin it on him!

Maelstorm

And apache marches on....

Recently, I was a member of a web development team writing a custom application for a client using the LAMP stack. Part of the design was that web pages that requires a huge amount of processing to generate on the fly but didn't change very often was regenerated on request by a manager through the web application. A large amount of the processing entailed many SQL queries and server processing to match up all the data. So, a manager made this request. They changed some of the data, and made the request again. The second request failed with a filesystem error. You know when they say hindsight is 20/20? The manager came to us so we were looking at the generated file. We tried generating it and it was giving us the same error. Remember, this system wasn't online yet. So I tried to make changes to the file directly and we found that we couldn't save the changes either.

After a short investigation, it was discovered that the owner of the file is www. Then it dawns on me that since the file is auto-generated, the web server is the owner of the file, and we, the developers, didn't have permission to alter it. Additionally, for some strange reason, the apache web server software was configured to use a umask of 0222 instead of 022. We had a long talk with the sysadmin who set the server up.

It was minor, but still caused problems nonetheless. After this happened, I managed to get the root password of the server from a very reluctant sysadmin. Eventually, he saw it my way. I am not going to disclose the techniques that I used to get that password though in case he might be reading this.

1
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Maelstorm

Clients...

Recently, I had a client who runs a bunch of Macs for their business. This was an industrial outfit where they repaired industrial equipment. One of the ladies who *used* to work in the office screwed up the secretary's workstation (there was two). The complaint was that all icons on the desktop vanished. Being a Unix guru, I open the terminal program and go looking. I find that somehow, the owner of the desktop folder changed to a different user. Now mind you, this is inside the user's home directory. Furthermore, you have to be root to even be able to run chown, which the user account wasn't.

Once I logged into the terminal as root, I was able to change the owner back to what it was supposed to be. A logout and login later, icons were on the desktop again. Now I am no expert on Macs, but I'm still left wondering how that even happened since Unix systems (Which Mac OSX is, btw), is supposed to prevent something like that from happening.

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Knock, knock. Whois there? Get ready for anonymized email addresses after domain privacy shake-up

Maelstorm

What bothers me is how can the EU dictate how ICANN runs the global internet? ICANN along with IANA, is responsible for the technical operation, and is contracted by the U.S. Dept. of Commerce to run it. The EU only has jurisdiction within it's borders. To my knowledge, those companies who offer privacy services are actually not complying with the rules because the current rules state that the REAL information about a registerant is supposed to be public.

5
22

America yanked from the maws of cellphone complaint black hole

Maelstorm

Alternate facts?

A spokesman for the US telco told us: "Today’s decision on jurisdiction does not address the merits of the [FTC's] case. We are reviewing the opinion and continue to believe we ultimately will prevail."

I wasn't aware that wishful thinking was a legal theory. But then again, corporate litigators are paid to argue that 'wishful thinking' isn't what we think it is. Alternate facts anyone?

2
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Billionaire's Babylon beach ban battle barrels toward Supreme Court

Maelstorm

The problem with...

...this cunt is that he thinks he can get away with it. I'll bet you that after the election, there will be an imminent domain process initiation against him. After all, it is the taking of private land by the government for public use. It doesn't happen often, but it does happen.

Just watch. Someone is going to get so pissed off about it that they will hook the gate to their truck and drag it down the street. It will probably even bend or break the mounting poles.

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Maelstorm

This is going to end well...

...for the public. Ultimately, the US Federal Government owns the beaches, but it's delegated to the states to manage them. In California, nobody can own a beach. I already know how this is going to play out. SCOTUS is going to either not hear the appeal or will find in favor of the state as the state has a keen interest to maintain public access to a natural resource under the Public Use Doctrine which goes all the way back to the Roman Empire. He will be forced to pull the gate down or go to jail for contempt of court.

In the end, it doesn't matter how much money that you have. Nobody is above the law.

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3

OpenBSD releases Meltdown patch

Maelstorm

Re: Still concerning ...

"So yeah, MAYBE Meltdown can be patched in microcode. Unless you've heard different from Intel... ?"

Knowing how CPUs are designed, there's not much microcode in them these days. Certain complicated instructions like the string instruction are microcoded. However, in many cases, the control units for pipelined CPUs are basically just wired logic. Intel now uses a RISC core and the execution unit breaks up the instruction into several RISC instructions, or VLIW type instructions (Itanium anyone?). Privilege checking is done on the RISC side which does not use any microcode. However, some operations can be governed by the microcode. It depends on the specific design of the CPU.

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Maelstorm

Well...

...OpenBSD is actually respected as being the most secure OS in the world. Complement Theo de Raadt and he will thank you. Theo has some words to say about the Meltdown and Spectre flaws...aimed straight at Intel, and he was not too kind about it either...then agan, neither was Linus Torvalds. I found out 2 days ago that FreeBSD has been working on a fix. I was wondering if I had to code a fix myself and submit it.

4
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Guess who else Spectre is haunting? Yes, it's AMD. Four class-action CPU flaw lawsuits filed

Maelstorm

I'm actually surprised that it took this long. A hit of 0.99% on AMD stock is like what...20 cents? They were holding the info so the software vendors could fix the flaws.

Now lets get technical. The branch predictor is 2-bit state machine, which holds numbers 0 to 3. If the branch for a particular instruction is taken, the counter counts up. If it's at 3, then it stays at three. If the predictor misses the prediction, then it counts down to 2. If it misses again, then it count's down to 1 and starts predicting that the branch is not taken. There is one for each conditional jump instruction. For i386/amd64, that's quite a few instructions. Research has shown that the 2-bit branch predictor is the best compromise between reaction time and accuracy.

These newer CPUs has fine-grain multithreading with resource allocation systems where each instruction has a profile of what hardware resources it needs to execute. The different areas of the CPU operate more or less independently of each other like an assembly line. Each instruction is allocated the hardware resources it needs to execute. When it reaches the end of the pipeline, the result is committed. If the result is needed by the next instruction, then it has to wait until it is available, or is forwarded back to previous stages of the pipeline.

I can see how this could have happened. For a toy 16-bit RISC pipeline CPU simulated in Verilog, it took 2 people over a month to design it from the ground up. Yes, I was in that project myself, and it was for an advanced computer architecture and organization class. And yes, it also had a 2-bit branch predictor. With billions of transistors, you have many people working on the design in different groups who do not necessarily talk to each other.

And yes, they do teach this stuff in the classroom.

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Careful with the 'virtual hugs' says new FreeBSD Code of Conduct

Maelstorm
FAIL

As an insider...

As an insider....

Yeah, I'm a member of the FreeBSD community and you should have seen the uproar that it caused. Entertaining to say the least. There was no warning, no pretense, nothing to indicate that this was coming down the pike. It was just dropped into our laps by the core team admins with "Here you go." The thread started out with a blatantly insulting picture about the so called new CoC. DutchDaemon let the thread run for 8 pages before he closed it. He said there will be an internal discussion on the topic.

Personally, I do not give a rats ass about the so-called code of conduct. I will continue doing what I am doing which has worked for me for years: Treat people with respect until you have a reason not to. To quote one forum member "If a Joe wants to be called Jane, then call him Jane." Simple common sense.

El Reg, you are a week late to the party. You're slipping. Here's a link to the actual thread so you guys can read it for yourselves: https://forums.freebsd.org/threads/is-the-community-become-fragile.64690/

7
0

When uploading comments to the FCC, you can now include malware

Maelstorm
Trollface

FCC: We are a bunch of clowns...

It wouldn't surprise me if someone uploaded some NSA hacking tools to the comment system, or even better, the stuxnet worm. So if someone downloaded it and became infected, would the FBI throw the FCC in jail? Who knows.

0
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What did we say about Tesla's self-driving tech? SpaceX Roadster skips Mars, steers to asteroids

Maelstorm
Trollface

I think we just came up with a new kids show...

Anyone remember Muppets in Space? How about Cars in Space? We can make some personalities from the Cars movie franchise.

7
1

Beware the looming Google Chrome HTTPS certificate apocalypse!

Maelstorm
FAIL

What did they think was going to happen?

Issue a *.google.com certificate without Google's permission and the blast it all over the inet?

What did they think was going to happen?

Maybe I should drop Chrome and move to Firefox. At least I can audit the source code.

0
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Newsflash! Faking it until you make it is illegal in Silicon Valley: Biz boss pleads guilty

Maelstorm
FAIL

Fraud

Lying about yourself is not illegal. Sending fake wire transfer notices is. That's what they nailed him on. He can say all that he wants about himself having attended business school, working for a financial company, etc... As long as he doesn't try to use those lies to defraud people, it's perfectly legal.

9
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Spectre shenanigans, Nork hackers upgrade, bad WD drives and more

Maelstorm
Trollface

Re: WD vuln

Are we sure that this wasn't another NSA/GHCQ mandated backdoor that was found out? These G-Men must really like the rear entry.

0
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Nunes FBI memo: Yep, it's every bit as terrible as you imagined

Maelstorm

Let the investigation run its course

What I find interesting is that this was released over the Democrat's objections. It does make the FBI and DOJ look either incompetent or operating with an ulterior motive. Flynn was busted for lying to Mike Pence about meeting with the Russian ambassador. But they have been investigating this Carter person since 2013? So there are some interesting links that are being highlighted. It may give a basis for why Trump accused the Obama administration of wiretapping Trump Tower.

I do not like Trump, but I also believe that he should not be removed from office for political reasons. If he is guilty of a crime, then we will deal with that. So far, I see a lot of smoke. So it could be a fire...or it could be a smoke grenade to make people think there is a fire. At this point, we do not know. I'm for letting the special prosecutor complete the investigation and go from there. If nothing is found, then so be it.

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2

A tiny Ohio village turned itself into a $3m speed-cam trap. Now it has to pay back the fines

Maelstorm

Actually, here in the USA, nobody is above the law...not even the President of the USA (Who is currently the emperor with no clothes, Donald Trump.). So if the "civil servants" are doing something illegal, they either be fined, go to jail, or both, depending on the offense. A while back (2010 I think) in Bell, CA, city most of the city counsel was arrested for various things...like pay increases... You can find the news story online.

13
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SCOLD WAR: Kaspersky drags Uncle Sam into court to battle AV ban

Maelstorm

If that's the case, then every company out there can sue you if you don't buy their product or service. I think that this lawsuit will get tossed out because, after all, Kaspersky is a Russian company. The US is not exactly on friendly terms with Russia...

And there's that national security thing too...

0
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New click-to-hack tool: One script to exploit them all and in the darkness TCP bind them

Maelstorm

Anyone who scans me...

...will have their subnet automatically and permanently blocked at the firewall, Shodan included.

1
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Perv raided college girls' online accounts for nude snaps – by cracking their security questions

Maelstorm
FAIL

No Proxy

Those who don't use a proxy when doing nefarious things are just asking to get caught. The police's job would be much harder if criminals weren't as stupid as this guy seems to be.

1
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Crypto-jackers slip Coinhive mining code into YouTube site ads

Maelstorm

Would you like a cryptominer with that video?

Nothing surprises me anymore. However, the question that we should all be asking is why are ads allowed to use JavaScript in the first place?

9
0

Qualcomm sues Apple for allegedly blabbing smartphone chip secrets in emails CC'd to Intel

Maelstorm

I am not surprised as this is SOP for Apple. Yeah, they do invent stuff, but the original GUI? They ripped that off from Xerox. I can see Apple and Intel collaborating to kick Qualcomm to the curb. After all, Apple's computers are powered by Intel chips. I'm sure that if it gets really ugly, Intel will step in on Apple's behalf against Qualcomm. Help a customer and trash a competitor at the same time. This is not unheard of in the tech community. Some time ago, I recall Google transfered some patents to HTC so HTC could do battle with someone...I think it might have been Qualcomm.

0
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Butt plugs, mock cocks, late pay and paranoia: The world of Waymo star Anthony Levandowski… by his kids' nanny

Maelstorm

"Sounds more like a spy than a nanny."

She's a Google plant.

0
0
Maelstorm

What the hell?

I've read some crazy stories, but how does filing a legal action about various sizes of fake pricks benefit society? ...Other than showing that he has to warm up to being a huge asshole so he can take that size 14 boot where the sun doesn't shine... Perhaps he is trying to compensate for something.

Seriously, this is funny as all hell. License plates? Times and dates? This became an obsession for the nanny.

0
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We translated Intel's crap attempt to spin its way out of CPU security bug PR nightmare

Maelstorm

Re: Old is new again?

Actually, because of the design of the SPARC processor, it is immune to Meltdown. To be technical, unlike x86, SPARC processors have a separate TLB (Translation Lookaside Buffer) for kernel pages only. That's the source of the slowdown on x86. With the kernel fully removed from the process address space, a full context switch is needed because now you are fully switching address spaces, and the TLB contents are dumped. For a TLB miss, it takes 2-5 memory accesses to read in a page table entry, and at roughly 20ns access time compared to sub 1.0ns access time for a cache hit, you are looking at a performance hit that is two orders of magnitude slower than a cache hit. In case you are wondering, the TLB is the cache that is used by the memory management unit for translating virtual addresses into physical addresses.

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3

Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

Maelstorm
FAIL

A better question...

A better question to ask is what other flaws has Intel been hiding from us? They apparently knew about this for awhile. Evidence from Linux sources show as much since July or so when the developers started working on the fix.

Anyone remember the Pentium F00F bug? That's the one where any user in any operating mode can halt the processor in a denial of service attack. The only way to recover the system was to hit the big red button labeled 'RESET'.

Or how about the FPU bug where six entries from a lookup table took a permanent vacation and screwed up floating point calculations? That one cost Intel USD $400,000,000 to fix.

Intel's recent statement about other CPU vendors being vulnerable was pointed directly at ARM and AMD. ARM, to it's credit as stated that some of their chips have the problem as well. AMD has come out and flat said they are not vulnerable. It seems to me that Intel is trying to make others look bad (especially AMD) so they don't stink as much.

4
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Maelstorm

Re: Hmmm...

"did you mean, eh, crippling AMD ?? you bet, it will happen how come that AMD would be faster ? impossible !!!!11!!1!!!"

If that happens, I can safely guarantee that AMD will not be quiet about it. Lawsuit anyone?

19
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Maelstorm

Re: Intel Inside...

"Hmm, good timing... I bought a new PC just before Christmas and decided to go AMD after about a decade of Intel..."

Good call. I just bought a new laptop myself and went with AMD as well. It's going to be some time before updated chips from Intel come out as this is a hardware problem with speculative instruction execution on the pipeline. Hardware means that Intel will have to redo all the masks that are used for the fabrication process.

12
0

Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image. Repeat. Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image

Maelstorm

No, it's not

Calm down people. This is not a MS-BSD or a Microsoft version of FreeBSD. It is just Microsoft releasing Azure Cloud Services (ACS) software for the FreeBSD operating system. The same thing was said back a few months ago when they did the same thing for Linux. From what I understand, it's just a few device drivers so FreeBSD will run under Hyper-V, and the ACS software that runs on top of the kernel. They did the same thing with Linux, specifying Debian Linux (although I think Ubuntu has made that list as well) as the tested and endorsed platform.

So, nothing to see here folks, calm down and move along.

5
0

Death to DRM, we'll kill it in a decade, chants EFF

Maelstorm

Re: Beware TTIP and other nasty treaties

And the moment that someone is unable to play a 1990's era DVD or a home video on said device, all hell will break loose.

0
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Slander-as-a-service: Peeple app wants people to rate and review you – whether you like it or not

Maelstorm

Here in the US....

The moment someone is denied a job based on this...app...there will be a line of lawyers waiting.

2
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It's alive! Farmer hides neglected, dust-clogged server between walls

Maelstorm

Re: Seen it too

Watch it. We still have a AMD Athlon 700 MHz Slot A computer that is still running. Rock solid hardware even though it's severely dated. Nowadays, it's running Linux and is being used as a test bed for software builds before deployment onto the network. It's had a couple of new HDDs over the past 15 years.

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