* Posts by Maelstorm

84 posts • joined 14 Jun 2015

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Couldn't give a fsck about patching? Well, that's your WordPress website pwned, then

Maelstorm

Re: These scammers do not like me.

Oh, it's hilarious. It's been my new form of entertainment for about 3 months now. I learned how to do it by watching youtube videos. Some have links to the tools that they use too.

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Maelstorm
Devil

These scammers do not like me.

Why? Because one of my hobbies is to trick them into thinking that I am in need of their 'services' when in actuality, I am scamming them. The longer they stay on the phone with me, that is time they can't scam someone else. In some cases, they downloaded and ran programs off my VM that they were connected to and ended up destroying their computer. WannaCry anyone? Hey, if they were legit, they wouldn't be downloading fake word documents titled banking_details.doc.exe with the extension hidden and a word doc icon.

These fake tech support scammers will syskey your machine and then you have to pay $200-300 to to get the password to unlock your machine. That is how they make money. And a lot of them use iTunes gift cards, and they are mostly out of India...at least that's been my experience.

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No, that Sunspot Solar Observatory didn't see aliens. It's far more grim

Maelstorm
Trollface

Maybe, just maybe...

Maybe, just maybe he was using the telescope to spy on naked kids taking a bath through their bathroom windows. With a telescope that big, you could almost see through walls.

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DraftKings rides to court, asks to unmask 10 DDoS suspects

Maelstorm
Facepalm

Hmmm..

I second the concerns raised here. Malware is rampant on computers these days, especially Windows PCs. Yes, the IP addresses that they have are the ones that attacked them. However, was it the person who is actually sitting at the computer doing it, or was the computer commanded to do so because it belongs to a botnet.

These guys do know what a botnet is, right?

A valid defense is that when the machine is examined, if malware is found, then what? Are they going to continue to sue an innocent person who had no idea that their computer was infected?

"You were complacent in the attack because you allowed your computer to participate in it, even if it was without your knowledge and/or consent."

That will go over real well in the courts and the media.

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Security bods: Android system broadcasts enable user tracking

Maelstorm
FAIL

They failed again...

What the?

So why is it the application developer's responsibility to mask this information?

Netowrking is system level information that only the system should be aware of. Giving the responsibility to keep it private to the apps guys is like putting the personal details of government employees on the web and hoping that China/Russia won't steal it. Because as we all know, not app developers are created equal. This is a big glaring security hole if you ask me.

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No do-overs! Appeals court won’t hear $8.8bn Oracle v Google rehash

Maelstorm

Interoperability

There's been some cases dealing with similar issues that have already been decided. The cases are as follows:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chamberlain_Group,_Inc._v._Skylink_Technologies,_Inc.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lexmark_International,_Inc._v._Static_Control_Components,_Inc.

A copyrighted file is a copyrighted file regardless of what it contains. However, APIs are key for interoperability and should not be copyrightable. As someone else said, if SCOTUS rules that APIs are copyrightable, then all software development will be driven out of the country which will bring the country down. There are literally hundreds of thousands of independent software developers out there whose livelihoods are being threatened by this decision.

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Windows 0-day pops up out of nowhere Twitter

Maelstorm
Joke

Microsoft's *REAL* Response

That Microsoft Guy:

You are all mistaken. What is referred to as the ALPC bug is actually an obfuscated feature that we put in at the request of the NSA. It allows a user to gain system level privileges without having the the password to the Administrator account. It is to be used by users to perform admin tasks on the machine without actually bothering the admin. Eventually, we plan on expanding this feature so that the end users will be able to administer the networks they are connected to without needing a password. Therefore, lazy system administrators will be rendered redundant and can be laid off saving the company the unneeded expense of paying a dedicated person to administer the network.

So what can possibly go wrong?

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Fire chief says Verizon throttled department's data in the middle of massive Cali wildfires

Maelstorm
Childcatcher

What will it take?

What will it take to reign in these greedy corporate bastards? Someone dying because of their action or inaction. Granted, in THIS case, Verizon owned up to their mistake and made a public apology. Thank God nobody was hurt as a result of their screwup though.

However, during the late 1990s, US West (before they were bought out by Quest Communications) had a work stoppage (aka strike). During that strike, 911 service went down and a 9 year old child died as a result. The next day the FCC told both US West and the Union (Communications Workers of America) that the strike was over and ordered the workers to return to work. US West was almost fined into the ground for that because ultimately, it was their responsibility to maintain service.

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So phar, so FUD: PHP flaw puts WordPress sites at risk of hacks

Maelstorm

This smacks of a security flaw caused by a lazy programmer. In fact, either it's someone who is lazy, doesn't care, or they do not know how to fix the problem since it was first reported to Wordpress Feb 2017.

The simple fix is do not allow regular users to upload. Leave that for an administrator. Problem solved.

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SentinelOne makes YouTube delete Bsides vid 'cuz it didn't like the way bugs were reported

Maelstorm
Devil

Streisand Effect?

Interesting, if anyone downloaded it, it should be popping back up pretty soon. Now that they have done this, they will never be able to take it off the net.

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Bitcoin backer sues AT&T for $240m over stolen cryptocurrency

Maelstorm
Trollface

Stinking Stocks

AT&T stock has been stinking lately. Now it's going to stink even more regardless of the outcome of this case. Time to move my investment somewhere else. Oh, and stinking is not a city, county, or state in the USA.

Seriously though, AT&T has had problems with employees in the past who took bribes or did not follow procedures which then enabled further security breaches. The person who did this will most definitely lose their job, and may even face prosecution if it can be proven that they took a bribe. ASSet Protection (also known as Corporate Security) is staffed with former FBI agents who conduct these investigations internally.

I have a few stories if anyone is interested.

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You won't believe this but... everyone hates their cable company: Bombshell study lands

Maelstorm
Facepalm

Conspicuously Missing...

One company that I do not see at all on any list is AT&T. I have AT&T Uverse and the quality is pretty good, and good customer service. They aren't cheap though. They are using IPTV with custom set-top boxes, so you have to get the boxes from them, but they will replace them on a drop of the hat if there's a problem. And the internet service, although slower than Comcrap, has better performance during high congestion periods.

However, to be fair to the cable companies, the bills are high because the cable channels that are carried charge the cable companies to carry them. This is especially true for sports channels. The cable companies only own a handful of channels. The rest are owned by media conglomerates such as Big 10 Networks and such which charges an arm and a leg. They charge an outrageous amount for each registered subscriber. I don't really watch sports, but I have to get it because the FCC killed off the 'al-la-cart' proposal because then nobody would get smaller TV stations and they would go under. I don't speak Spanish, I don't watch sports, so those channels are useless to me, but we are forced to pay for them anyways. So the high prices it not entirely the cable companies fault. I know, because I used to be an insider...which leads to the following:

Disclaimer: I used to work for AT&T.

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Space, the final Trump-tier: America to beam up $8bn for Space Force

Maelstorm
Trollface

With this news, we will soon see Winnebagos flying around in space.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9QhUoOwHN8

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Facebook insists it has 'no plans' to exploit your personal banking info for ads – just as we have 'no plans' to trust it

Maelstorm
Mushroom

Well now...

Well now, I can safely say, that here in the USA, that won't happen (for the time being anyways) because there a quite a few laws on the books that say that banks must keep your financial information private... I guess nobody told Experian this when they got hacked last year.

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Internet overseer ICANN loses a THIRD time in Whois GDPR legal war

Maelstorm

Not legally binding...

Unfortunately, for the EU, any court decision against ICANN is not legally binding. You have to sue them in the district where they are, and that means the USA. I can see ICANN eventually just disallowing European registrars from registering domain names, which will kill the internet in Europe.

With these policies and it's own obtuse and arrogant behavior, Internet governance should be taken over by the UN-UTI or even the World Network Council (WNC).

Either that, or put ICANN back under the direct purview of the US Government.

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Blast from the past: Boffins find the fastest exploding non-supernova star

Maelstorm
Boffin

The story of Eta Carinae

Eta Carinae has an estimated mass between 90-120 M☉. Unlike our sun which will for a white dwarf and a planetary nebula, Eta Carinae will go out with a bang: A Type II Supernova. This type of supernova is a core collapse supernova. What happens is that the star rapidly burns through it's fuel to offset gravity, forming heavier and heavier elements until it starts making iron. During the nucleosynthisis process, the elements form shells around the core, similar to a Russian nesting doll. This is due to the fact that the specific gravity of the elements in question have a certain density. Since Iron is the heaviest, it sinks all the way to the center of the core.

Iron will fuse, but it will not produce energy when it does, so the star is robbed of the energy it needs to support itself against gravity. Then the core collapses. If the core mass is > 1.4 M☉ (the Chandrasekhar Limit), it will form a black hole. The star is then eaten from the inside out, and the black hole will spin up rapidly, throwing matter out through the poles at very high temperatures and energies (aka the gamma ray burst). To produce gamma rays, the matter must be heated up to billions of Kelvin.

This is a very simplified version of what happens. In case you are wondering, Astronomy is an interest of mine and I have taken a number of courses on it. In fact, Type II Supernovas was the subject of my thesis paper in my writing intensive class which was Astronomy. So, when it comes to Astronomy, you probably could group me in with the boffins.

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Build your own NASA space rover: Here are the DIY JPL blueprints

Maelstorm
Trollface

Re: Add-on item

"Does it have an option for adding a beverage tray?"

It doesn't come with one, but I'm sure you could use an old CD/DVD drive to add a retractable one.

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Qualcomm demands blueprints to Intel chips used in Apple iPhones

Maelstorm

I find it strange that Intel is holding out until at least September before handing documents over to Qualcomm. That implies that there might be something to Qualcomm's argument that the chips are infringing to some extent.

Now why is QC suing Apple for patent infringement again? Apple didn't make the allegedly infringing chips, Intel did. So why isn't QC suing Intel instead for patent infringement? In my mind, going after Apple who just uses the chips is libel to backfire right on QC's face because then you have to prove that Apple knew that those chips were infringing. Proxy suit?

I don't particularly like Apple or their viewpoint, but I'm with them on this one. QC should be going after Intel.

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The internet's very own Muslim ban continues: DNS overlord insists it can freeze dot-words

Maelstorm

Re: Too late

Well, the Bible is a real book (As is the Koran and the Torah), and churches are a real place (as is mosques and synagogues). However, Christianity is a religion, and so is Islam and Catholic. I can see that .catholic is a strange one because that religion is centered around what the Vatican (which is a separate country in and of itself) says and does. This is similar to .judaism because Israel is the only Jewish theocracy in the world that I'm aware of.

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Maelstorm
Boffin

A few issues

All that I see here are issues with no solutions. Well, maybe one...

1. Fracturing the DNS root system is not a good idea because that is how someone from the US like me, can read and comment on these forums. It will be like the .onion TLD which was never approved but is in use on the dark web and requires a special browser to access.

2. This issue started when ICANN was under the purview of the US-DOC. But now that they are on their own, they have gone completely out of control. If they will not follow their own bylaws, then it makes me wonder if they will follow a court order issued by a judge in a court of law. I know they probably won't if the court is in a foreign jurisdiction, but even in the US...

3. Currently, ICANN's regulations that the registrars must follow are in direct conflict with the laws of some countries. Case in point is Germany, which puts the registrars between a rock and a hard place. Either follow your country's laws and risk your status as a registrar or follow ICANN's regulations and risk getting sanctioned by your country's legal system.

4. The fact that this as been going on for six years already makes me ask the question Why? According to the article, they are disobeying their own bylaws, which a judge in the US should be able to make them follow with a court order. This just demonstrates the abuse of power they are committing since they are no longer under the purview of the US Government.

In the past, I was against making internet governance part of the UN-ITU. However, seeing how ICANN has been abusing their authority lately, that may not be such a bad idea considering that every man, woman, and child is a stakeholder in the global internet which crosses international borders.

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How hack on 10,000 WordPress sites was used to launch an epic malvertising campaign

Maelstorm
Devil

Waiting for a response...

"El Reg invited AdsTerra, AdKernel, AdventureFeeds and EvoLeads to comment. We'll update this story as and when we get a response."

And there's some more to add to the DNS block list. I need a full list so I can block all of them. Ad block software not needed, and it's not detectable since it's running on my own server.

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Politicians fume after Amazon's face-recog AI fingers dozens of them as suspected crooks

Maelstorm
Trollface

Accuracy?

Hmm... It sounds like the software is not working correctly with a 95% error rate. All 535 members of Congress are crooks...they just haven't been caught yet. Which means that the ACLU has it backwards.

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Some Things just aren't meant to be (on Internet of Things networks). But we can work around that

Maelstorm
Facepalm

Re: No...

"Wi-fi uses photons, not electrons."

Neither, actually. It uses radio waves just like most other wireless communications systems not dependent on line of sight (which rules out infrared which is still an electromagnetic wave).

Wrong. It is photons. A radio wave is a photon. Go look at your electromagnetic spectrum chart. Visible light is on it.

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Maelstorm
Trollface

"For the Wifi I changed the SSID and set it to not broadcast"

"This provides you very nearly no additional protection."

What if I put a condom over it? I hear that Trojans are the best protection that you can get, and it feels like nothing at all.

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All that dust on Mars is coming from one weird giant alien structure

Maelstorm
Alien

So it wasn't...

So it wasn't the face on Mars that's responsible for all that dust then?

Man, I thought it really was the aliens.

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Google Chrome: HTTPS or bust. Insecure HTTP D-Day is tomorrow, folks

Maelstorm
Mushroom

What right does Google really have to dictate to independent websites on what protocols they can use? Especially on an intranet where both endpoints belong to the same entity? This is Google becoming the North Korea of the internet.

As for getting a cert, just self-sign your own. That's what I did. I became my own CA and rolled the cert out to all machines on the LAN. It's a pain in the arse, but what can you do when you have a company who thinks they can dictate internal company policy.

Time to dump Chrome and go for a different browser...I hear that Opera is pretty good.

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Crypto gripes, election security, and mandatory cybersec school: Uncle Sam's cyber task force emits todo list for govt

Maelstorm
Trollface

In other words...

...God forbid that the average citizen has the ability to lock down their data so that spooks, spies, and government agents on fishing expeditions (or otherwise) cannot access it. After all, a citizen who can enforce their privacy rights is an enemy of the state, right?

Or to paraphrase a quote from Putin in The Hunt for the Red October "Privacy is detrimental to the well-being of society..." or something like that.

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Y'know... Publishing tech specs may be fair use, says appeals court

Maelstorm
FAIL

Um...Yeah

The Georgia one is a real winner. You cannot get the official state code without paying US $23,000 or some outrageous amount for it because it's copyrighted. I can see it now:

Defendant: Your Honor, I had no idea that there was a law saying that I could not do that.

Judge: Ignorance of the law is not an excuse.

Defendant: But your Honor, how am I to know what the law is if I cannot get access to the text of the law? It's not available publicly, and I can't afford the fee to get access to the law.

Judge: Not my problem. Ignorance of the law is not an excuse.

The big issue with this and cases like this one is that it fosters secret laws and the double standard. The law must be available freely to the public. Otherwise, you can end up in jail for violating a law that is on the books, but nobody but a select few is allowed access to the books.

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Irish fella accused of being Silk Road admin 'Libertas' hauled to US

Maelstorm
Mushroom

Extraditing random people?

I'm not familiar with the Silk Road case, other than the fact that it was on the dark web. Where was the server located? If it was not located in the US, then what authority is the US claiming to have for his extradition?

It is beginning to sound like if a citizen in another country violates US laws, then the US wants to throw them in jail, even if it's legal where that person is.

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Apple fanbois ride to the aid of iGiant in patent spat with Qualcomm

Maelstorm

That was actually my question as well. As someone already mentioned, Qualcomm can go after end-users for licensing fees if they so wish, but that will be very bad PR for them. Assuming that Intel manufactured the LTE modems, shouldn't both be sued? A number of years ago, Qualcomm violated Broadcom's patents and the latter won an ITC ruling that banned the import of devices using the offending chips.

Besides, Apple and their little spat with Samsung, Apple needs to be brought down a couple of pegs.

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Software engineer fired, shut out of office for three weeks by machine

Maelstorm
Trollface

The Bastard System Operator From Hell

Oh that story brings back memories. It's quite a read. Do yourself a favor and enjoy it here:

http://bofh.bjash.com/

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IBM loses mainframe docs down the back of the web, customers cry 'sabotage'

Maelstorm
FAIL

And once again...

...we are met face to face with the main issue of software development here in the USA. Companies are so keen to get their product out the door as quickly as possible, testing is either minimal or non-existent. This is why commercial software (even open source in many cases) here in the USA is always in Beta. We write the software. You buy it to have the privilege of testing it for us. If you find a problem, we'll fix it in the next version which you have to also buy.

And it's not just software...it's everything tech. Even websites, as this case has shown.

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Atari accuses El Reg of professional trolling and making stuff up. Welp, here's the interview tape for you to decide...

Maelstorm
FAIL

Hey el Reg, you messed up some facts in your article...

This here is wrong: "We made no mention of the fact that there is every reason to believe that Atari's entire enterprise is being funded by hype and that the only way the company can afford to create even its first console is by persuading people to hand over their cash before the company itself has a working prototype."

This is by far not first console with the Atari name. Atari used to make consoles back in the 1980s. The one that most people remember was the Atari 2600. There were other consoles, and even some computers during that time. But then they got kicked out of the market and went to being a software only company. And before someone says something, there was a number of mergers and acquisitions as well.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atari

As for Atari, if they go through the trouble to get an el Reg reporter in there, then perhaps they should have shown more than some plastic. Instead, they just wasted everyone's time. el Reg called them out on it, and rightly so. If they want to get a product to market quickly, maybe they should get in bed with V-Tech. At least then it can be marketed to the Fisher-Price age group which seems to be about the same age/intelligence rating of the current executive staff.

"Atari is so full of crap that it should be labeled as a hazardous waste zone." LOL LOL LOL British humor at it's finest.

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What's all the C Plus Fuss? Bjarne Stroustrup warns of dangerous future plans for his C++

Maelstorm

Uhggg Another C++ standard?

You know, we don't really need any new features to the language. In fact, there's a few features that probably should be removed. So yes, I agree with Bjarne Stroustrup. Right tool for the job really. I view C++ as the object oriented version of C, and I use C...a lot in my coding since I code close to the bare metal. C and assembler for my work.

C: Low level system stuff such as kernels, device drivers, libraries, etc...

C++: Higher level application stuff (especially on GUI platforms) or when using objects make sense...like the Abstract Syntax Tree that's generated from a parser and is fed into the code generator for a compiler. OOP makes sense here since the nodes are all the same, the data they contain is what differentiates what type of node it is.

Here's a little thing that Linus said about C++. Enjoy.

http://harmful.cat-v.org/software/c++/linus

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US-CERT warns of more North Korean malware

Maelstorm
Trollface

Re: Didn't get the memo?

Didn't the war with Oh Canada already happen some years ago in the movie Wag the Dog?

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Maelstorm
Devil

Not surprising. For those of you who don't remember, NK was fingered for the massive hack against Sony/BMG a number of years ago. The motive was a movie they made called 'The Interview.'

Now if you have seen the movie, imagine if the roles of Kim Jong and Trump reversed.

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Unbreakable smart lock devastated to discover screwdrivers exist

Maelstorm
Trollface

They finally did it...

They finally did it... They finally made a lock that every intelligence agency on the planet can fall in love with. I'll bet they won't use it themselves.

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ICANN pays to push Whois case to European Court of Justice

Maelstorm
Black Helicopters

The problem here...

The problem here is that ICANN is not bound by EU regulations. They are only bound by US regulations because they have a contract with the US Department of Commerce (USDOC). So the way that I see it, ICANN can pretty much do what they want as long as two things are followed:

1. They follow US laws.

2. They uphold the terms of the contract with the USDOC which is not available publicly.

Since ICANN has sole control over a number of TLDs, and they also run the 13 root name servers, they can easily sanction any registrar who does not follow their rules if ICANN wants to play hardball. The best way to handle the situation would be to go through a treaty/international agreement to file a complaint with the USDOC.

In other words, the reality of the situation is that we have a corporation who exists entirely in one country, following the laws of that one country, who has the power and ability to dictate to the entire planet how things are done, regardless of what local laws/regulations say because of their unique position. The local governments do not really have any power to enforce their own laws in their own country because said corporation has no assets to leverage in that country. So the corporation can punish/sanction their members without fear of repercussions from those local governments.

So ICANN can tell the EU to pound sand, sanction EU registrars, and thumb their nose at any fines the EU may impose since a EU court decision is not binding inside the borders of the US. There is case law here in the US to support this viewpoint (mainly with France). I think the UN's ITU should take this over, but because of the aforementioned reasons, the US has to agree, and so far they haven't. The EU could form their own DNS system, but then we run into the situation where you now have two conflicting systems (TOR is an example).

I live in the US myself, and I don't like it, but this is the reality of the situation that the world is in. Because of our power and status in the international community, the US has a habit of ignoring UN directives.

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Which? calls for compensation for users hit by Windows 10 woes

Maelstorm

My Windows 10 experience has been mostly positive. The major problems that I have had deal with updates. I have yet to install 1803. Considering the number of problems with it, I don't think I will. I usually download the updates from Microsoft and manually install them. Some of those updates can be quite large though...upwards of 1GB or more in some cases. As a result however, I do not run into the problems that others have had.

On the other hand, you have to be pretty sharp to be able to maintain it though. It's worse than maintaining a Unix box. I had to reinstall Windows on a friends netbook because she ran out of space on a 32GB drive and Windows destroyed itself. Yeah, that was Windows 10.

1
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Facebook and Snap jam Blackberry patent suit

Maelstorm

Re: Blackberry has a good case and chance to win...

Not entirely true. The USPTO, with the backing of Congress, has created a process called the IPR (Inter Partes Review), which was recently upheld as constitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court in a 7-2 decision. This came about because of a problem with patent trolls, which is what Blackberry has been mostly relegated to these days. So for a sum in the low 6 figures, you can have the PTAB (Patent Trial and Appeal Board) of the USPTO review the patent and see if it meets the mark or not.

Apple cites figures of USD $350,000 for a PTAB review vs. a USD $3,000,000 cost for a district court review.

5
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US tech companies sucked into Russian sanctions row

Maelstorm
Meh

What about US employees of the companies? Do they still report to work? Do they still get a paycheck? How does something like this work if you are employed by one of these companies?

Imagine this in a job interview:

"Why did you leave your last job?"

"The company was placed on the US sanctions list."

I'm sure that will raise a few eyebrows.

8
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PETA calls for fish friendly Swedish street signage

Maelstorm

Re: Just let them fade into obscurity

The whole point of blackmarking them on mainstream media is so they get relegated to the fringe publications which are inhabited by people just as crazy as they are, if not more so. So in that case, let them have at it.

Back in the day however, PETA did do a lot of good in advancing animal rights. They got women to mostly stop wearing fur coats and such. That pissed off the furries, but oh well. A changing world means that you need to change with it or be left behind.

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Maelstorm

Just let them fade into obscurity

PETA - People Eating Tasty Animals. Now that's an organization that I can get behind.

All joking aside, since the relevancy of PETA is...well...none, articles like this give them what they want the most: attention. People who are completely vegan are in general unhealthy and have to take supplements because our bodies are not designed to process plant matter effectively.

PETA is nothing more than the brown stain on used bathroom tissue.

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1

US regains supercomputer crown from Chinese, for now

Maelstorm

Well, It's about time...

...that we in the States have reclaimed the crown.

And now for something completely different:

In Star Trek: The Next Generation, it has been stated that Data's positronic brain has a top speed of about 60 trillion calculations per second, or 60 TFLOPS. So 200,000 / 60 = 3,333.33... So with one computer, we can have 3,333 and 1/3 Datas. That would constitute a lot of Star Trek technobabble. In case you are wondering, the two episodes (that I remember where it was mentioned) are "The Measure of a Man," and "Offspring."

Something else that bears mentioning is that if you have watched Animatrix, the second renaissance is about AI powered androids. A whole race of disposable people...artificial, but still... At what point do we call them "Lifeforms" and assign rights to them? Or do we continue to treat them as slaves since they are not alive? Based upon history, I don't see the future as bright.

0
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Hacking charge dropped against Nova Scotia teen who slurped public records from the web

Maelstorm
Trollface

So, accessing public documents on a public server is a crime in Canada? Interesting. I will have to remember that. At least here in the U.S., it's not a crime.

In Soviet Canada, you don't access the documents, the documents access YOU.

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Nvidia quickly kills its AMD-screwing GeForce 'partner program' amid monopoly probe threat

Maelstorm
FAIL

nVidia sucks all around

To you nVidia fans, I'm sorry, but they suck. They suck as a company, and their hardware sucks. Every nVidia product that I have had has failed within two years of purchase. Because the warranties are only good for a year, too bad. I have ATI cards that are 15 years old and they still work. Usually, after 10 years ATI cards fail for one reason or another, which is more than 5 times longer than any nVidia card that I've had. Of course, this is my personal experience and opinion.

As to their business practices, Microsoft got their hand slapped for doing something similar in the 1990's here in the US.

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US citizen sues France over France-dot-com brouhaha

Maelstorm
Megaphone

Here in the US...

I read about this here in the US. Basically, a french court sent an order to Web.com to transfer the domain without notification. The com/net/org/edu/mil/gov domains are for U.S. use only. Because of this, and france.com, web.com, and verisign are all based in the U.S., U.S. law applies here. Because now a different registar has control of the domain, ICANN will probably have to get involved to get it back. Oh yeah, this is going to be a messy court battle...but then again, maybe not. Since the court that issued the order is not a U.S. court, the order is invalid inside the borders of the U.S., where all the main actors are (except France).

So basically, what we have is this: A foreign government (France) has taken U.S. property belonging to a U.S. citizen without a U.S. court order, which is in direct violation of the U.S. Constitution. It's basically the same thing as the U.K government sending a letter to Wells Fargo Bank to transfer all the funds from some individual in the U.S. to the U.K.'s general fund.

Um...yeah.

One other thing, might be a red herring, but the U.S. Government is specifically prohibited from owning copyrights, trademarks, etc.... So anything that the government produces (from an employee or officer) is considered to be in the public domain. Don't know about France, but since the french court order does in fact conflict with U.S. law on the face of it, France will probably lose the domain name.

The .com domain: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.com

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Oh dear... Netizens think 'private' browsing really means totally private

Maelstorm
FAIL

Forensic Analysis

I have just completed a comprehensive forensic analysis of Google Chrome's incognito mode. And I have to say that it does as advertised. It does not save any cookies, history, etc... to the disk. However, if you tell it to save passwords, bookmarks, or download files, those it will keep track of...but ONLY ON YOUR OWN COMPUTER!!! I think that's where people are making their mistake. Nothing can prevent websites, or your ISP from tracking you on the web as that is outside the browser's control.

Interestingly enough, there are artifacts in RAM but that is required because if the browser isn't in memory, it isn't running. As a consequence, some of that memory gets swapped to disk. However, that is also outside the control of the browser. But a user can configure Windows to clear the swap file on shutdown using a registery tweak.

6
0

Developer mistakenly deleted data - so thoroughly nobody could pin it on him!

Maelstorm

And apache marches on....

Recently, I was a member of a web development team writing a custom application for a client using the LAMP stack. Part of the design was that web pages that requires a huge amount of processing to generate on the fly but didn't change very often was regenerated on request by a manager through the web application. A large amount of the processing entailed many SQL queries and server processing to match up all the data. So, a manager made this request. They changed some of the data, and made the request again. The second request failed with a filesystem error. You know when they say hindsight is 20/20? The manager came to us so we were looking at the generated file. We tried generating it and it was giving us the same error. Remember, this system wasn't online yet. So I tried to make changes to the file directly and we found that we couldn't save the changes either.

After a short investigation, it was discovered that the owner of the file is www. Then it dawns on me that since the file is auto-generated, the web server is the owner of the file, and we, the developers, didn't have permission to alter it. Additionally, for some strange reason, the apache web server software was configured to use a umask of 0222 instead of 022. We had a long talk with the sysadmin who set the server up.

It was minor, but still caused problems nonetheless. After this happened, I managed to get the root password of the server from a very reluctant sysadmin. Eventually, he saw it my way. I am not going to disclose the techniques that I used to get that password though in case he might be reading this.

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