* Posts by Updraft102

1187 posts • joined 31 May 2015

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In Windows 10 Update land, nobody can hear you scream

Updraft102
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Re: Windows 7 "outdated"?

The only thing obviously lacking in Windows 7 is a good touch UI for non-desktop use

That's not a bug, it's a feature.

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Updraft102
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Windows 8.1 is far, far better than Windows 10.

You can de-stupidize Windows 8.1. I'm a purist when it comes to UIs (Windows 2k is my reference for a nearly perfect UI), and even I liked Win 8.1 with Classic Shell (Classic style cascading start menu), Old New Explorer to ditch the ribbon, 7+ Taskbar Tweaker, lots of registry edits, app eradication via install_wim_tweak, and a custom theme (Classic in appearance, but uses WDM). Classic Shell has an option to block the Charms, and I used Metro Killer to make sure it never darkened my doorstep.

Once you scrape off that tablet crap Microsoft tried to tack on, it's quite solid. It sounds like a lot of work to get to a usable UI, and it is kind of stupid to have to fight MS so much to be able to be a happy user of their own product, but I had used almost all these things in Windows 7 anyway, even though 7's out of the box interface is far, far better than anything that came after it. If I was going to use all these tweaks anyway, why not use them on 8.1 and get three more years of support? (It turns out I didn't need them, as the migration to Linux that I started in 2015 is already done more than a year before 7 goes out of extended support, but I didn't know that would be the case at the time.)

Win 8.1 doesn't come with huge, time-consuming, buggy updates twice a year, and the updates that do come are fully controllable and don't cause the kind of issues the 10 updates pretty much always do. It shuts down when I want it to shut down and it can be left idle forever, and it still won't start installing updates. It doesn't try to serve MS or monetize me. It never uninstalls the programs I want installed or installs programs I do not want installed. It never removes my drivers and replaces them with whatever ones it thinks are better. It never changes my settings back to those that serve Microsoft... not to mention that it doesn't have 100 settings you have to change to get it to (partly) stop serving Microsoft. The telemetry MS backported to 7 and 8.1 is easily removed, since it was just kind of tacked on, not baked in as it is in Windows 10.

The loss of control over my own computer is the worst thing about 10, the real deal-breaker, so there's just no way that Windows 8.1 could be worse than that. I don't consider the 10 interface to really be any better than 8.1... they both boot to the desktop, not the start screen (option added in 8.1). One has a full-screen start menu with ridiculous tiles, the other has a partial-screen start menu with ridiculous tiles. Neither of them are any good, but I don't particularly see any big advantage in the Win 10 one. Win 8.1 and 10 both use the hated ribbon in File explorer, and they both have a ridiculous Settings app... though in 8.1, you can get by without Settings. There are only a few things moved to Settings in 8.1 (like Bluetooth stuff), but I have always found alternative ways of doing things. Not so in 10, where MS is gradually phasing out the good and desktop-appropriate Control Panel in favor of the bad and desktop-inappropriate Settings.

Windows 8.1, suitably modified, is the answer for people who can't migrate to Linux at this time but who want to keep getting updates for Windows beyond the drop-dead date for 7.

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Updraft102
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Re: Installing Windows 7 on Sky/Kaby Lake CPUs

Is Windows 10 so incredibly different that your brain can;t cope with the changes?

The computer's job is to serve me. I don't need to cope with the OS; the OS needs to cope with (obey) me. That's kind of the entire problem in a nutshell here-- Windows 10 doesn't try to serve the user; it tries to force the user to serve Microsoft. It's not that I can't cope with the changes, it's that I won't. I won't tolerate a computer that forgets who is boss. I won't tolerate forced in-place upgrades ever, let alone twice a year. I won't tolerate being told no, I can't turn off the telemetry or have total control over what is installed on my computer. I won't tolerate a ridiculous, ugly, inefficient UI that is a cobbled together mix of phone and desktop with no rhyme or reason. Won't do it.

If coping with change was the issue, I doubt I would have migrated to Linux rather than get on the Windows 10 pain train. That's just what I did, though... I haven't used Windows in months (aside from a VM), and I don't expect to again. I'll keep it on there for a while (I already paid for it, so why not), but eventually I will reclaim the space and Windows will live in a VM for those odds and ends that still require Windows.

Linux isn't perfect, but it's a hell of a lot better than Windows 10. An operating system that you have to pay for, and then tries to use you to serve the maker of the OS? Now that is outdated.

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Updraft102
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Re: Yes I understand Microsoft's problem ... and Linux...

Palpy writes:

So with all that taken, would it not make sense to be letter-perfect when applying updates to the desktop-laptop sector? Does MS really want to choke its only chicken?

Windows is far from their only chicken. Nadella's vision is for Microsoft to be a cloud services company, which is not surprising given that he's a "cloud" guy. Make a cloud guy the boss, get a cloud company. It's not hard to figure out how that happened.

Windows isn't the magic money printing press it once was. The PC market has been in decline for a long time, and we all know the reasons... the obsolescence rate has slowed to a crawl, people using smart phones instead, on and on. Less PC sales mean less OEM sales revenue, and MS seems to be convinced that the desktop platform itself is dying. If they had any faith at all in it, I doubt they would have released 8 and 10 being as stupidly inappropriate for desktops as they were. When you're the king of the desktop, why would you forsake that if you don't think it's dying? Even now that they have no mobile plan, they're still pushing this half-phone, half-desktop abomination, and each release moves it closer to the phone end of the spectrum, as more and more bits are stripped from the desktop-oriented Control Panel and moved to the touch-oriented turd known as "Settings."

I don't think MS even wants to develop Windows anymore. Not as a general-purpose OS, anyway. I think the blatant monetization attempts and the conscription of consumers for beta testing duty on a product they paid for are an exit strategy. Squeeze the users for everything you can in the short term, which impresses investors with how you've managed to make Windows more profitable, which they will interpret to mean Windows is vibrant and healthy, even though it is having its essence parasitically drained with each passing day. This illusion of health and Microsoft's assurances that Windows is here to stay will increase the odds that people will stick with Windows and keep hoping it will get better (against all odds and observable evidence)... but that can only work until people realize that it's never going to get better, and that will keep getting worse. Eventually, the never-ending pain train will drive the users away, but by then they would have been monetized for years. MS could then toss aside the withered remains of Windows and be all about the cloud, having sucked all of the juice out of their former desktop monopoly.

If your question is whether MS really wants to destroy Windows, I would have to say that it's the only reasonable explanation of how Microsoft is behaving. There are a lot of lines that have been crossed that never would have even been considered during the peak Windows years, and it's not because Microsoft didn't want money as badly as they now do. It's because MS knew that certain things would produce short-term profit but kill the golden goose over the long run. Now that's just what MS is doing. It's the cloud or bust.

For the people who say they can't go to Linux because reasons, so they have to stick with Windows, I'd suggest you're only postponing the pain, and that you are still going to end up leaving Windows just like we Linux people did, because Windows as we know it won't exist anymore. It may linger as a gutted front-end for MS cloud services, but it won't be a full OS for running the applications you want it to run (as opposed to those cloud apps MS wants you to run). Might as well start a migration plan now, even if you can't fully make the move just yet.

I don't see how any reasonable person can look at this Windows 10 trainwreck and think it's not going to go down in flames eventually. It's been three years plus since MS unleashed this disaster on the computing public, and the pain just keeps coming. At what point do you realize that this is what Windows is now, and that no amount of begging or pleading with MS is going to change it? It's not going to get better. If getting better was part of the plan, we'd have seen some sign of it in three years. This is the plan-- using Windows has turned into torture, yet the market share of 10 keeps rising relative to other versions because MS is using their monopoly power to force people to accept garbage. It's your choice... take what MS feeds you or don't.

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Updraft102
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Re: "It has been a hellish couple of weeks for the Windows giant"

Quoting Shadow Systems:

And people wonder why I say Win10 isn't fit for purpose?

I've used the same thing many times. I don't actually remember anyone objecting to it, though I have to say that I am not likely to find any such thing here. I think the people who feign innocence and ask, "What's with all the hate for Windows 10? It's great" are just trolling at this point. Even if a given person has managed to dodge all the bullets, it doesn't mean he is unaware of the existence of said bullets.

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Microsoft Windows 10 October update giving HP users BSOD

Updraft102
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As for the new features, why not let US decide what ones we want to download and install?

You mean MS should let you beta test whichever version of Windows you wish? That doesn't make any sense. They know which version they need tested, which is why they assigned you to the task of testing that specific version.

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Updraft102
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Re: Shove It Out The Door

The second world no longer exists. It was the Soviet Bloc, which ended when the Soviet Union ceased to exist.

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Updraft102
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Safe Mode is a really terrible design actually. It is supposed to only allow a subset of programs and drivers. But what if, like in this case, a keyboard driver fails? This happens in Safe Mode because, er, how else are you going to type?

Windows will load the generic keyboard driver in that case. It may not allow use of the special buttons, but it will be enough to let you fix whatever is wrong with the PC.

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Microsoft yanks the document-destroying Windows 10 October 2018 Update

Updraft102
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Re: 1809

What do I need to do in order to avoid losing any files in future as I can't roll back?

Nothing. The problem was with the installation of 1809, so once it is installed, that particular threat has passed. Other threats, though... there will be more.

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Updraft102
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Re: "were made available for other OS" @ defiler

The average person will wonder why one application looks so weird next to the others.

As opposed to Windows 10, where the application could have any one of three "design languages" in play, be they desktop/Win32, UWP, or UWP+Acrylic?

I see just as many Windows applications reinventing the wheel and using their own design widgets than I do in Linux, and ever since Windows 8, it's been a half and half OS in terms of UI, and now Windows 10 has a third entry grafted on top of that (Acrylic).

If you use one of the GNOME-derived desktops, it's actually more consistent than in Windows (in my experience at least), as applications using GTK+ (the most common kind) integrate seamlessly. If you use KDE, it's a mix of native Qt stuff (and Qt versions of things where available), and GNOME, with its ass-backwards buttons on everything.

Any arguments about UI superiority in Windows became irrelevant post Windows 7, I think. If Windows 7 was still representative of the direction Windows was going, I probably would still be using Windows myself. Windows 10, however, is unusable, and is unfit for any purpose by design.

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Updraft102
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Re: If this was an Apple product

no amount of testing will find all problems,

Therein lies the problem. Microsoft apparently took that statement the wrong way, because they perform no amount of testing!

They got rid of the paid testers to save money (which I am sure it does, just as it would save money if car manufacturers could skip all the safety testing. Who needs testing anyway?).

So now they push this stuff off to the Insiders for "testing," where they did find and report the bug, but because their bug fixing system is somehow a popularity contest, the data loss bugs didn't get enough upvotes to be fixed. It wasn't popular enough to be fixed!

I'd be a lot more inclined to accept the "can't find all the bugs" if Microsoft had made even the slightest effort to do so. It's not hard to see how an assortment of volunteers playing around with new builds in their spare time and reporting those bugs in the un-serious party environment of the Insider forum would end up finding less bugs than professional QA testers, and that's often the case. In this case, the volunteers did find and report the bug at least 14 times, and MS still chose to greenlight the build with the data loss bug still intact.

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Day two – and Windows 10 October 2018 Update trips over Intel audio

Updraft102
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I don't think MS actually thought at all about what Windows users wanted. It only thought of what it wanted, and what it could get away with.

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No D'oh! DNS-over-HTTPS passes Mozilla performance test

Updraft102
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Re: 8.8.8.8

DNS over HTTPS to 1.1.1.1 with their Linux "Cloudflared" applet works flawlessly too, once you account for the slightly incorrect installation (at least on my Ubuntu-based PCs). I don't remember exactly what the issue was or what I did to fix it, only that it required a little fiddling to get the service installed correctly and working. I'm no Linux pro, but I managed to figure it out!

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New Zealand border cops warn travelers that without handing over electronic passwords 'You shall not pass!'

Updraft102
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Re: Mission Creep

/It would be hard enough to find a needle in a haystack on a phone, but what about a laptop? Mine has a 1TB SSD... even at its maximum speed of 550MB/sec, it would take more than a half hour to dump my entire drive if they want to go through it in detail later. How many other devices come through in a half hour? It's unworkable to try to do, and it's equally as unlikely that someone can go through that enormous file system and try to find the one thing that they don't even know they're looking for. Are they going to verify that every file listed as a given type really is what it says? Are they going to watch every video and view every image to make sure they're (a) actually videos and images, and (b) that they don't contain some content they think is bad? Do they have any idea how many files can be on a 1TB drive?

Are they going to verify that all of the unallocated space on my hard drive actually is unallocated and not a hidden encrypted volume? Are they going to verify that the size of all my visible partitions plus the unallocated space adds up to the total size of the SSD?

That's assuming they don't try to install a rootkit or some other thing. My laptop runs Linux. Will their rootkit be able to work with that? Of course, any electronic device that was out of your possession and out of your custody even for a short time has to be considered suspect... does this effectively render the item devoid of value? Shouldn't they have to pay for making my laptop forever untrusted because of what they may have implanted in it?

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Windows 10 passes 700 million, Office Mobile in a coma and Intune, er, cracks time travel

Updraft102
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How is it underhanded?

Are you really asking how it is underhanded for Microsoft to use the Windows Update system to distribute a Trojan horse that slips into your PC under the guise of being an update that "resolves problems in Windows," but that really sabotages that Windows installation so that it can never get any more updates ever again? MS is intentionally exposing their own users to malware infections because they're not following the Microsoft marketing plan that says that new CPUs must only run Windows 10, and it's not underhanded?

If you think my use of the term Trojan horse is a little hyperbolic, it's not. It's dead accurate... a Trojan horse is a bit of malware that slips into the system pretending to be something positive or harmless, but whose real purpose is to do something malicious without the consent of the owner of the PC. That's exactly what the Windows Updates that break Windows update do. Microsoft is using the update system, which is supposed to be about protecting from malware, to distribute malware that makes the PC vulnerable to even more malware.

There's a difference between "not supported" and "we will go out of our way to fsck your system up if you try it." The first one means you are on your own, while the second one indicates malicious intent. It's underhanded that MS would not provide the necessary drivers for the various newer CPU functions to work, particularly in 8.1, which shares most of the kernel architecture with 10 and was still under mainstream support when 10 came out. That MS would try to use that as a stick to flog people into 10 is already unethical and repulsive (as is the company itself). I ran my Core 2 Duo and Phenom II PCs on Windows XP for years, and these CPUs were officially supported in XP, even though they were Vista era architectures. MS did not block their use on XP to get me to use Vista... there are some things that are too much even for "Micro$oft."

Well, not anymore, evidently. When it comes to abusing your own customers, the sky's the limit now. Oh, I sure do love that "new" Microsoft that everyone talks about as being so much nicer than the old Microsoft (the one that backported DirectX11 from 7 to Vista, since Vista was a close cousin to 7 and it was still under mainstream support at the time. Hey, that sounds a lot like the relationship between 10 and 8.1... still waiting for that DirectX12 backport on 8.1, Microsoft!).

People aren't "moving on" to 10 because it's crap. It will be time to move on when people who feel trapped in the Windows platform see an option better than Windows 7. So far, there isn't one. Windows 10 is not a serious operating system, and as far as I am concerned, it's not even worthy of the slightest consideration, as it fails in the most basic, fundamental role of an OS: To enable the user to use the hardware to perform the tasks of his choosing, and to serve the owner of the PC in the manner chosen by himself. Windows 10 doesn't even approach that standard... it clearly serves only its real master, which of course is Microsoft. That renders it unfit for (any) purpose, from an end-user perspective.

Of course, it's very fit for the purpose that MS made it for, which is taking control of your PC and monetizing it and its user mercilessly, pressing them into servitude to Microsoft in whatever manner they see fit. And this abomination is something that people are supposed to pay for? I wouldn't even take that crap for free. At least if it were free (including to OEMs), they could almost justify the level of monetization and the lack of control over one's own computer, as long as the paid (but affordable) version restored all of the control and single-minded service toward the PC owner (and no one else, not even its maker) that marks every decent OS. Sadly, that version doesn't exist... not even the enterprise versions meet that basic standard (a rather low bar, really). They come closer than consumer editions, but they're still unfit.

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Updraft102
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Re: Win 10 win by attrition

You can undo the Microsoft Trojan horse that sabotages updates on Windows 7/8 on newer architectures, but you may still be out of luck if you want to get everything working. I tried to put 8.1 on a newer laptop, and there appear to be no I2C drivers that work with the I2C on the laptop AND with 8.1. I can install I2C drivers in 8.1, but they don't work with the I2C devices listed in device manager, and I can install I2C drivers intended for 10 in 8.1 by force, the correct ones for the devices in question, but they won't work in 10.

That's just one example... there are others. Microsoft seems to have gotten to hardware manufacturers too, ensuring that even things as innocuous as Synaptics touchpads (if new enough) don't have drivers for versions of Windows that people actually want to use (and yes, I include 8.1 in that, since you can fairly easily strip the stupid stuff out of 8.1 and make it look and work like a real desktop OS). You can force install the Windows 10 drivers into 7 or 8.1 by any of the usual methods, but they simply don't work, and neither will the 7 or 8.1 drivers recognize the device in question.

Given the strong similarity of 8.1 and 10 beneath the user interface, I would guess MS and their servants (like Synaptics) intentionally made them incompatible, rather than to simply not list NT6.2/6.3 in the INF file (as was the case with the Intel integrated graphics driver for the Kaby laptop I set up).

If Windows 10 was any good, they wouldn't have to pull these tricks to get people to use it, obviously.

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Microsoft gets ready to kill Skype Classic once again: 'This time we mean it'

Updraft102
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'm pretty sure I remember Microsoft not listening under Ballmer either.

If you don't agree, explain Vista to me then.

Vista wasn't bad because it lacked the features people wanted. It was bad because it was already years behind schedule, so the marketing guys got the better of the company and they essentially released whatever it was they had at the arbitrary date-- and it wasn't ready.

Vista evolved into its very close sibling, the ever popular Windows 7, because MS listened to what people hated about Vista and fixed it. Vista itself got a lot better in time, but few noticed as everyone had already written it off by then, so their only memories of using it were from a time when it was still terrible.

Microsoft could have told people that Vista was the last version of Windows ever (so get on board, you have no choice) and sabotaged XP so that it would not work correctly with any architecture from Core 2 forward, but they didn't. They could have done a lot of things to force people to use Vista even though they hated it, but instead they corrected the problems and gave people a product that remains the most popular Windows version almost a decade later, and almost at the end of its extended support period.

If that's not listening to what people want, what is?

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Updraft102
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Re: Microsoft does not listen

some of the most requested items in the Win10 beta were ignored

The internal discussion probably concluded that the most requested items didn't, in any reasonable way, help to monetize Windows 10, so the people who requested them obviously weren't thinking straight.

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Sync your teeth into power browser Vivaldi's largest update so far

Updraft102
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Still has hardware video decoding hard blocked for Linux. There is a Chromium PPA that enables video hardware acceleration (just a compiler flag, as far as I know), and it works fine for some people at least, so why have hardware acceleration hard blocked so that _no one_ can enable it? They can simply leave set to disabled by default, as in the PPA build of Chromium. If people don't mess with the flags, there is no difference. If people enable it in the flags and it does not work, they obviously know that the flags exist, so they can set it back to disabled and be done with it. It's not that hard to figure out!

I am really tired of all of this blocking of features on Linux because some combinations of things don't work. The people using those combinations can disable it and keep going in a gimped, hardware-unaccelerated manner, but do the rest of us have to as well? Enable it on the platform, then have it disabled by default.

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Salesforce dogged by protests, leaked emails, and guerrilla blimps on first day of Dreamforce

Updraft102
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Re: Nothing Else Matters...apart from cash

Hey, if they can actually get people to pay £105 (or more), they have to be doing something people like. I would never pay that much (even for a pair of tickets), but if everyone agreed with me, I doubt the price would be that high. Either that or they're going to be playing to a lot of empty seats...

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Updraft102
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Re: El Reg now politically biased....you're outta here!

It's the parents of the children engaging in child abuse.

Breaking into places you are not allowed to go has consequences, one of them being arrest. When you're arrested, you're separated from your kids, and if there is no one else to take care of them at the moment, they become wards of the state until someone is found. That's how it works with _every_ parent arrested for any crime. If you break into a Wal-Mart with kids in tow, the same thing is going to happen... you will be arrested, and if no family or close friends can be found to take care of the kid, he's going to be a ward of the state for a while.

Don't like the terms? Don't break the law. It's a cause and effect... you know what the risks to your child are, but you decide to undertake the illegal action anyway. No one to blame but the lawbreaker.

The only ways to avoid this would be either a policy of incarcerating entire families when a parent is arrested, so they're not separated, or else having kids becomes a magic "get out of jail free" card, and no one with kids can ever be arrested, let alone sent to jail. Otherwise, you're going to have parents separated from their kids, and the fault for that lies with the individual who chose to disregard the law, not those charged with enforcing it.

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You're alone in a room with the Windows 10 out-of-the-box apps. What do you do?

Updraft102
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Re: When did a program turn into an app??

Then it's all 'hip' and 'cool' and 'new' and 'shiny' and sounds like your dad trying to use teen lingo when you're 15.

Perfect description. The only thing more cringe-inducing is those restaurant chains using "app" to mean an appetizer in their TV commercials. "Look, we're cool too!"

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Updraft102
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Re: "Notepad++ takes too long to start"

Don't how many plug-ins you load, but my Notepad++ start is instantaneous.

I've never used Notepad++, but I had to wonder what the deal was with everyone saying it takes too long to load. When I used to use Windows, I used Metapad in place of Notepad for years, and it has all kinds of features that were lacking in Notepad, like the CR/CR+LF ability. At 190KB, most of which is the embedded icon, the program (a standalone .exe) loads instantly. How much larger can Notepad++ possibly be?

I remember encountering the same kind of thing when I revisited KDE Plasma recently. Since Mint has dropped their KDE version, I tried Kubuntu, then converted that to KDE Neon (rebased 18.04) by swapping in the repo and updating.

Kubuntu comes with Kate as the default text editor, while KDE Neon uses Kwrite. Both are official products of KDE. Why two text editors? I looked it up, and apparently, Kate is so feature-heavy that it supposedly starts too slow, so Kwrite is offered as a pared-down version that starts much quicker.

On my systems, I can get out "one" of "one, one thousand" before Kate is ready to use. I never saw much point in switching to Kwrite to reduce that fraction of a second even further. YMMV if you're not using a SSD, but if the time it takes for a text editor (even a really heavy one) to start bothers you, you really should be.

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Linux kernel's Torvalds: 'I am truly sorry' for my 'unprofessional' rants, I need a break to get help

Updraft102
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Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

My interpretation of "rainbow haired pronoun crowd" doesn't imply anything about bigotry against women, gays, transgenders, racial minorities, etc. Straight, white males (who identify as such) can be (and often are) part of the "rainbow haired pronoun" crowd, while a lesbian mixed-race woman often isn't. It's about the people who put identity politics and virtue signalling in front of actually making a good product (*cough* Mozilla *cough*). That's the thing-- the "rainbow haired pronoun" crowd is the most intolerant group out there. Tolerance, in their view, only flows toward people they favor, not to those they don't... and there are LOTS of people they don't favor.

I'm all in favor of "live and let live." What kind of person you are attracted to, what you think about your physical sex, where your ancestors came from, etc., are not my concern. Are you a good person? Are you conscientious? Can I trust you? If it is a work context, are you qualified? Above all, do you do your job well?

Notice how being a straight white male doesn't even factor into that? It doesn't. I am prepared to judge the fitness of a given worker on the basis of their work-- a meritocratic approach. The thing is, that's not what the RHPC want or work toward. They'd rather put out a shit product but have all the right kinds of people working on the sinking ship as it slips beneath the waves.

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Updraft102
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Re: That's right Linux community... bend over...

I've read a lot about Linus' outbursts, and he's pretty much always right in his rants. It's true that his bombastic (ahem) style of delivering this feedback may be offputting to some (well, to all, if you happen to be the target), but I would imagine that those who work within the kernel project understand that if you try to submit shit to the project, you're going to get called on it, so maybe they won't be inclined to try it. He demands excellence, and if you aren't able to deliver, maybe you could go work for Microsoft, where excellence is not only not demanded, but apparently not permitted.

I know there are a lot of critics of Linus' style, and it's not the style I would use if I were in his place, but if I or any of Linus' critics were, would the kernel be as good as it is now? I can't say. No one can, including the critics who assure us that the product would be even better if he hadn't scared away talented programmers who happen to be a little less thick-skinned. It's possible that's true, but it's also possible that he's made the product better by accepting nothing that is not up to his standards.

Linus strikes me as someone who's probably on the autism spectrum, given his obsessiveness, his reclusive nature, and his social difficulties (not understanding or being concerned for the feelings of others is textbook). If so, whatever therapy he gets will have to be tailored to this reality, and trying to make a normal or neurotypical person out of a spectrumite is not going to yield good results.

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Google Chrome 69 gives worldwide web a stay of execution in URL box

Updraft102
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Re: With M$ Windows dead as a dodo

Windows 10 the most fit looking?

Did you mean shit looking?

It's the most ugly, disjointed piece of crap that I've ever had the displeasure of seeing. I avoid it like the plague it is, but when I do briefly find myself using it, I feel a deep, guttural revulsion that makes me want to get out of there and into something better post-haste. The white on white with a side of white interface, flat and featureless, not only hurts the eyes, but gives few cues about what it does. The UWP bits are flat and ugly too, but a different flat and ugly, not being bothered to follow the system theme themselves, but to impose their own. It's a mess... and if I were ever tasked with making an implausibly ugly OS, I would think the result would be far more attractive than what Windows 10 looks like. It takes real talent to reach those depths of ugly, and I don't have it in me.

When is this "you have to be a magician to keep it running" effect supposed to happen? I've admittedly only been using Linux for 3 years, but it seems like that would be long enough for any need for any magic to manifest itself. It hasn't been a problem... it just keeps working, day in and day out, without needing any heroic measures. Reading about the disasters that keep coming every 6 months from Redmond strikes me as more like what you wrote, with multi-hour upgrades that frequently break things that used to work (or that after having wasted hours of your time, it decides it can't continue, and without giving a shred of useful information, wastes more hours reversing itself, only to try the upgrade again as soon as the cycle is complete).

Windows may be yet alive, but it's not alive and well. It's alive and on borrowed time. You can't treat your users like crap and expect to keep them, and MS knows this. It's why they never went so far as to use their monopoly power to force Vista on people who refused it... there were lines not even "M$" would cross, back when they used to care about keeping Windows healthy and vital long-term. Quite evidently, they no longer do. They know what they are doing is slowly killing Windows, and nothing but vendor lock in and inertia is keeping it going now. It's utter shite, and everyone knows it, certainly including Microsoft. It's that way by design.

I don't know how anyone can like 10. I know some are paid to like it, but wow, even if I were being paid handsomely to pretend it's great, I don't know if I could pull off such a magnificent con.

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Docker fave Alpine Linux suffers bug miscreants can exploit to poison containers

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I know this IoT thing is getting out of hand, but Linux in trousers? Seems a bit excessive. <g>

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The grand-plus iPhone is the new normal – this is no place for paupers

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Re: Exchange rate

The consumer protection laws are not something I would want to lose

That's fine, of course, but they come at a price. When you take out 20% VAT, then convert to dollars, you're at about $1090 US, so you're paying $90 for the consumer protection.

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Re: Eff off Apple - Extra glue and price have worked really well for Apple.

I was told off recently by a cabinet maker for calling "glue". He says glue is what you make from inedible bits of horses. What Apple use is adhesive.

It's just like the car fanatics who bristle when someone calls the thing in the car that makes it move a "motor". "A motor is powered by electricity," they say.

As a motorist, I get in my product of General Motors and motor down the motorway, being careful to follow the Motor Vehicle Code, down to the place to have my motor oil changed, and then on to the Department of Motor Vehicles to renew my motor vehicle registration. A lot of people didn't consult the car guy before naming a lot of stuff!

An internal combustion engine is a type of motor, but not all motors are internal combustion engines. Mo- refers to motion or movement, -tor refers to a device that causes something. Since car engines cause movement, they're motors.

Similarly, "glue" is another word for an adhesive, generally applied in a liquid or semiliquid form. Super glue is cyanoacrylate adhesive, and is completely synthetic. Gorilla Glue is a polyurethane product, also containing no animal bits. Elmer's School Glue, too, is free of animal by-products. Then there's the hot-melt glue... you get the picture.

It makes no more sense to say that glue only refers to congealed animal tallows when used as an adhesive than it would to say that the stuff books are made of is not paper, since paper is the stuff made from papyrus plant stems cut into sheets and dried. It may have been the first form, but not the only one.

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Microsoft: You don't want to use Edge? Are you sure? Really sure?

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I really don't get it.

M$'s name ends in "Corporation".

...

Why should we expect it to act like a human being and put profit before morals?

I would complain if I was bitten by a snake too.

I know that snakes bite. It's kind of their thing, like making profit is for for-profit businesses. It is the expected thing for them to do. It still sucks to have it happen to you, and I'd still be in a bad state if it happened.

Microsoft was making profit when they released Win2k, XP, and 7 too, and while a lot of us had problems with their behavior much of the time, it wasn't the stabbing in the back to us, the users of Windows, the ones who are responsible for them being the huge juggernaut they are, that is Windows 10.

Microsoft clearly has lost interest in being an OS vendor, particularly in the consumer market. Nadella's head is up.... er, in the cloud. It's all about the cloud, and a Windows that doesn't force people into its cloud services only makes sense to CEOs who have the sense to recognize that if you push too hard with your sales pitch, you make people angry enough to avoid your product, and that destroying Windows (which I continue to think is Microsoft's long-term goal) doesn't leave them as the "pure" cloud services vendor they wish to be. It leaves them as a cloud services vendor without a natural onramp that Windows would have continued to be had they pushed a little bit less hard, with tons of extremely angry PHBs having to call someone else to get them set up with another OS... someone else that probably has cloud services, and hasn't just tried to light the way forward by burning all the bridges.

I don't think even Microsoft believes that they can treat their customers as they have and keep them as customers long-term. Short-term, the years they have spent ensuring vendor lock-in will keep their customers in the line of fire for considerable time... years. Even the biggest monopoly falls when they use that monopoly power to push crap on people. MS had 90% market share in browsers in the early XP years... where are they now? Having to beg and prod people to pretty please try Edge?

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Re: Reeks of desperation

Agree. They're clearly afraid of losing their Edge.

Indeed. If they're not careful, they might alienate their users. Either one of them could leave at any moment.

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Re: It's OK; you can set firefox as your default!

Of course the rest of us have to be forced to use 10 if we don't want to. How else are we going to be monetized? The entire OS was designed for that purpose, and the update system allows them to push out any more unwanted monetization efforts without our consent any time they wish.

I'd quit computing before I used 10. I'd quit a job that made me use or support it. Everyone has a line somewhere...

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Re: Block IE and Edge

you mean it took longer to install an update on a system that hasn't been updated for 6 months than on a system you keep up to date? What a surprise

Sorry to get in the way of a well-timed snark, but that's not how it works with Windows 10. Each feature update, the big ones that come twice a year, are full in-place upgrades to the new version, installing full Windows over the old one. It is going to take that long whether you've kept it up to date or not. The days of incremental service pack downloads that were relatively tiny if you kept up-to-date are behind us... now we're in the "Windows as a Service" model.

I'm glad the thing about Linux not being ready for the desktop was a bunch of FUD... it's been working really well on mine since I started transitioning over two years ago. It would have to be pretty bad to make it better to put up with Microsoft's nonsense. The businesses that are "locked in" would often be able to find ways to not be locked in if they actually ever tried it. They enjoy being Microsoft's whipping boy, though, so there's no accounting for masochism, I guess.

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Nokia reinstates 'hide the Notch' a day after 'Google required' feature kill

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Re: Black electrical tape will suffice for me

I've never had any interest in getting a smart phone (or a smart... anything, given that every single thing I see sold as "smart" seems really dumb to me), and I have to say that the design decisions they've been making with these phones doesn't make me think I may soon change my mind. Like Windows 10, they just keep getting worse and worse.

Louis Rossman (the component level Macbook repair specialist who hates Apple and Apple products, and also has a Youtube channel) made a good point when he remarked that these phones are designed for product reviewers (who get new products sent to them all the time, so they never have to worry about long-term things), not actual users. If you design products for people who coo over every new shiny but who don't ever have to worry about things like "what if I need a battery replacement down the road" or anything like that, you're going to end up with different kinds of products than what most people would actually want if given a choice.

I'd also want a smart phone that never spies on me and doesn't treat me like an infant and expect me to pay double for the privilege of being patronized, so I guess I'll have to continue not having one just as I have all along (and not once thought I was missing out on anything good).

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Microsoft sharpens its claws to cut Outlook UI excess, snip Ribbon

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Ten years on and people are still whining about the ribbon.

Because it's still there and it still sucks.

People are not not complaining about some corporate decision ten years ago... they're complaining about the way the program they used ten minutes ago has a crappy UI. The complaints are ongoing because the problem is ongoing!

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And what is this obsession with removing all lines and obvious cues to the eye where to look for stuff?

Old: Form follows function.

New: What's function?

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Microsoft gives Windows 10 a name, throws folks a bone

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LibreOffice only does a majority of what home users need?

I'd say it does a lot more than what nearly all home users need, and that it almost certainly does a majority of what office Office users need. Or are more than half of the features that a given Office user uses in a business setting missing?

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Mozilla changes Firefox policy from ‘do not track’ to ‘will not track’

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Yeah, but what happens when it's your bank that won't work anymore?

Then a new bank becomes "my bank."

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Re: It's about time

Yeah, well what about the fucking pile of poo called Gnome 3?

You mean upstream CInnamon? I had no idea people were actually supposed to use it the way it is presented. More idiots chasing the "one UI to rule them all" fantasy. At least Canonical has seen fit to drop Unity... now Microsoft and GNOME, we're waiting for you to realize that different platforms use different UIs for a good reason.

GNOME has gone to the menu-bar-less hamburger, and the X-apps project from Cinnamon devs patiently destupidize the GNOME "apps" (really programs) and turn them back into something usable. Forking can be a pain sometimes, but it's often a better choice than having to adapt to programs that just keep getting worse because their devs have lost the plot, as they so often do.

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Re: It's about time

Full-on skeumorphism is distracting and pointless,

If you refer to the extremes that Apple took it to before it embraced the flatness, I agree. You don't need to have faux paper pages with little rips and dogeared edges in pretend volumes with simulated leather covers. The point is to accelerate the identification of various functions of the UI in our minds, not to actually try to fool us into thinking that we are dealing with actual books (that are somehow still on a screen).

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Re: It's about time

If you remember being stuck with IE6

For the Windows XP updates, you mean?

That was all I was ever stuck with IE for. Never used it for anything else. I'd used Netscape since before IE came with Windows, and I wasn't about to switch then either.

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Re: It's about time

You've been clearly outvoted on the UI, move on to security.

That's just the problem. Bob, being a user of Firefox, never got a vote in the first place. They just do whatever they want, with very little concern for what their users want. They're hellbent on becoming Chrome, after all, so what better way to do this than to copy Google's "we know best" attitude?

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Judge bars distribution of 3D gun files... er, five years after they were slapped onto the web

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"We will not allow the federal government to endanger New Yorkers."

"That's our job!"

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You want how much?! Israel opts not to renew its Office 365 vows

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Re: I think you just put yours in the shredder

bob - there's video footage of IDF soldiers beating children, and shooting a nurse and disabled man in a wheelchair. That isn't propaganda. That's reality.

Has it been verified that the IDF soldiers were, in fact, IDF soldiers?

Hamas has long sacrificed its own people for the propaganda value. I wouldn't believe any video wasn't them in IDF uniforms unless the individuals could be identified positively.

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Re: Alan Brown

For me, in the end, it was cheaper to use MS Office than having to correct every document before sending it out.

Working as intended, says Microsoft.

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Re: Libreoffice is free and just fine.

A tip I received from a mate who is in recruitment always publish your CV in pdf format, not as a doc.

That is the purpose of .pdf, is it not?

The last time I used Microsoft Word for Windows (we called it "Winword" at the time; it was version 1.1b), word processors were used primarily to create paper documents, which was the thing that people other than the document's creator were going to be seeing. The saved files were meant to be reloaded later on the same program, generally by the same person, and often only on the same machine.

Given how often MS likes to change the formats to prevent forward compatibility to add exciting new features everyone wants, the only thing that makes sense is to distribute documents intended to be exchanged electronically in .pdf format, if at all possible (and a CV would be one thing that does lend itself to that). If you must save in an editable format for files intended to be used by others, don't use a proprietary format whose main/only purpose is to extract money from your company (or your self) and transfer it to Microsoft without any actual benefit to the extractee. I have to imagine MS Office is capable of saving in/exporting to open formats...

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Windows 10 July update. Surface Pro 4. Working fondleslab. Pick two

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Re: Successful update here

More fan running suggests more heat, which means more power was consumed, which would suggest shorter battery life. That would still happen even with passively cooled devices. Have you tested the battery run time to see if it is as good as it used to be?

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Use Debian? Want Intel's latest CPU patch? Small print sparks big problem

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What if we were talking about cars, not chips?

So would it be okay if a carmaker released a car that had a serious safety flaw, so much so that they had to offer (yet another) recall.. but then they told the owners of those cars they could only have the fix if they signed a contract restricting some of their previously-held rights, or whatever else the carmaker wanted?

Should owners of the defective cars have to concede anything at all to get their products fixed?

Intel is using their own crappy design as a hammer to force people to agree to terms that are not in their favor. How is it that all of these design flaws keep ending up benefitting the company that produced them?

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I wish I could quit you, but cookies find a way: How to sidestep browser tracking protections

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Re: Multiple layers

Some routers won't block HTTPS connections to domains on the blacklist. It's also possible that the site was accessed by IP directly and not by hostname.

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Google keeps tracking you even when you specifically tell it not to: Maps, Search won't take no for an answer

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Re: Firefox and DuckDuckGo

I've watched Netflix in Linux many times using Waterfox.

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