* Posts by Updraft102

1113 posts • joined 31 May 2015

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People hate hot-desking. Google thinks they’ll love hot-Chromebooking

Updraft102
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Re: Mainframe?

Than somebody'll reinvent the PC to be disruptive.

Indeed.

Sales and marketing guys love to have something new and awesome to sell and promote. It doesn't matter what we have now... it's never as good as what the sales guys want us to buy today. If it was, why would anyone spend all kinds of money on it? Sell, sell, sell! It doesn't matter that the new thing we're supposed to buy now is the same thing that we abandoned when whatever it is we have now came along. That was ages ago, and most people have forgotten. What's old is new again, and what used to be new has gotten old. Just give it a shiny new name, like "cloud" or "thin client", and go out there and sell it!

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Updraft102
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I don't see where it suggested anyone would love it

Google says it imposes this upon its employees, and that you, as a PHB, can impose it on yours too. Doesn't suggest that they will like it (as with hot desking), just that you can make them do it.

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It walks, it talks, it falls over a bit. Windows 10 is three years old

Updraft102
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Re: Could Windows 10 spell death for Microsoft?

Poor Quality Assurance has killed many a large corporation, and the way Windows 10 is going could ruin Microsoft.

While the rest of the world continues to see them as "the Windows company," MS no longer sees itself in that way, and it appears from their behavior that they are doing their best to get out of the Windows market as we've known it. Windows is just a bit player in terms of MS profits these days, and it takes a disproportionate amount of resources to eke out that profit compared to the cloud stuff, and those development resources don't scale down as sales drop. With the PC sales numbers in decline and MS showing no evidence that they have even the slimmest bit of faith in the continued utility of the platform, no doubt they have predicted a date where under the old way of making money with Windows, it would cross from being a mild profit maker to a break-even, then into loss.

With "cloud first, mobile first" Nadella, this had to be a sign that Windows as we'd known it had outlived its usefulness to the company. Either it was going to have to be monetized in a big way, or it was going to have to die. Or both!

If this was the plan, MS would have to bring their full monopoly power to bear against their customers, forcing users of previous Windows versions into the line of fire so that they can be plundered mercilessly. MS has never been shy about wanting as much money as they could possibly extract from their customer base, but this was a line they would never have crossed back when they saw Windows as the golden goose.

That was always the thing that made me wonder, ever since the early days of GWX. How can a company behave this way and expect to keep their customers? Surely they must understand that you can only push people so far before they overcome vendor lock-in and inertia and look for shelter from the abuse dished out. The only conclusion that made any sense was that they had no intention of keeping their Windows customers. The aggressive forcing of Windows 10 in order to get people onto the monetization platform, and the merciless monetization of users once they succumbed to the Windows 10 pressures, would result in significant short-term revenue gains at the eventual cost of the Windows platform as we've known it. The monetization would continue until a tipping point was reached... eventually a suitable replacement for Windows would be found (whether something Googly or a Linux distro or both, or neither), and the few early movers would become a trickle, then a torrent, and finally all of that pent-up resentment at MS would trigger a mass exodus.

At that point, MS would be free to become the cloud services company Nadella wants them to be.

I question how well this would really work. Cloud services are inherently platform-agnostic, but if it is Google that ends up being the vendor that takes over as far as the local OS maker, they will have just infuriated all of their Windows-using customers who will have just welcomed Google representatives into their premises to oversee the changeover right at that moment when trust of MS was at an all-time low... and Google is also a cloud-services provider.

MS may want to shed their "Windows company" legacy, but if they do, they also shed their primary feeder into their own cloud services. Sure, MS cloud services are making money now, and lots of it-- but from whom? Windows customers, I would think. They may not have made as much as they wanted on the front-end, but the front-end drives the back-end. Getting rid of the front-end because the back-end makes more money just seems really stupid to me.

To the computing public, MS will always be the Windows company. If Windows is seen to be in decline, people will infer that MS is in decline, even if they hear that MS profits have never been higher. There was a point that AOL profits were never higher too, yet they were already doomed, even though neither they nor the investors knew it yet. If you take away people's natural on-ramp to the cloud services world and give them the idea, however mistaken it may be, that MS is in trouble, that could be all the prompting needed to drive customers into someone else's cloud.

Time will tell, of course. Maybe I am wrong about MS wanting to kill off Windows as we have known it (as a general purpose operating system), but I can't see any other way that treating their own customers like they have makes any sense at all. If MS could have abused their customers and monetized them mercilessly to improve the bottom line and keep the Windows platform strong and vibrant, why didn't they ever do that in the Gates or Ballmer eras? Did MS have higher regard for customers before now, or did they just not like making money as much as they do now?

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Updraft102
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Re: Windows 8

No hotpoints = no way to do anything!

I only used Windows 8.1 for a year and a half before moving almost completely to Linux, but I've never used the corner hotpoints. I disabled them on the first day I used it with Classic Shell.

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Updraft102
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Re: "the Windows 7 hold-outs should finally feel able to make the upgrade"

it was "please, I beg you, as a friend and ally, please do not use LTSB as you'll miss out on all this great stuff".

That's the idea!

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Updraft102
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Re: "the Windows 7 hold-outs should finally feel able to make the upgrade"

JohnFen writes:

I would also be thrilled to have actual window borders back.

That's just a theme, at least as far as the "desktop UI" bits go. Even though MS puts more restrictions on these than kernel drivers (themes have to be signed by Microsoft, a service they refuse to offer at all to third parties, while the far more dangerous kernel drivers only have to be signed by some recognized CA), it's quite possible to do. I haven't found any MS theme to be acceptable as-is since Classic, personally.

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Updraft102
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Re: "the Windows 7 hold-outs should finally feel able to make the upgrade"

"It fixes a small amount of the problems, but the vast majority are still there brand new."

FTFY.

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Updraft102
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Re: "the Windows 7 hold-outs should finally feel able to make the upgrade"

There is no "modern" (read:metro) interface.

What about "Settings"? That's in the UWP style, and with the control panel being removed bit by bit, it seems unavoidable. Must accommodate those mobile devices that don't exist, you know!

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Updraft102
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Not an apology

Windows 10 is not an apology for Windows 8. It's retribution for our rejection of Windows 8!

Windows 8, unlike Windows 10, can be redeemed. Classic Shell to get rid of the start screen and to block the corner hotspots (bye bye charms), Old New Explorer to get rid of the ribbon, a custom theme to get rid of the flat look, and if you're a scorched earth type like me, a script with install_wim_tweak to forcibly evict all the apps, including Windows Store.

After that, Windows 8/8.1 become a really decent OS. One that doesn't force updates, one that doesn't break at least twice a year for feature upgrades that no one asked for anyway, and that doesn't try to monetize you at every turn. It doesn't screw up your carefully chosen drivers or uninstall things without asking, and it doesn't change your settings. There's no Candy Crush installations or ads in it.

All of that bad stuff is new since Windows 8.1, and makes Windows 10 far, far worse than 8 ever was. It's ridiculous to have to use Classic Shell and other such programs to get a usable UI, but you still do with Windows 10 too. They just shrunk the dumb start screen down, but it's still full of those stupid touch-oriented tiles.

Windows 10 isn't a compelling anything other than a compelling reason to abandon Windows. It's not any better than it was three years ago, because the most profound things wrong with it are still wrong with it. Windows 7 hasn't had the equivalent of a feature update (SP1) in 7 or 8 years, and it's still more popular than Windows 10, and that's with Microsoft's unprecedented and ongoing effort to force 10 on everyone, without which it surely would have flopped so badly that Windows 8 would look successful.

You want to talk feature updates, MS? Stability is a feature, and so is having control over my own PC. Keep your timeline and Acrylic and gaming mode... I want the kind of control over my own PC that I had with every other version of Windows (over updates and everything else) and maybe I will have a reason to reconsider. Otherwise, you and Windows 10 can go hand in hand while you take a long walk off a short pier (and for extra points, tie an anchor to Windows 10 first).

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PC shipments just rose, thanks to Windows 10

Updraft102
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And how many of those installations get wiped because the computer was purchased for the purpose of putting some other OS on it?

I've done that three times this year so far. Windows 10 is just like all the other crapware that comes on there... off it goes!

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Forking hell. It's summer, and Windows 10 is already thinking about autumn

Updraft102
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Re: Why use Edge?

After working in computer security for 25 years I avoid browser addons like the plague as they increase the surface area to an unquantifiable extent and so diminish security.

Ok, you do that, and I will continue to use NoScript and uBlock Origin, and we can see which of us is more susceptible to security threats. Ok?

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Updraft102
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Windows 10 venerable?

Did you mean abominable?

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Updraft102
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Re: Why use Edge?

Unless it has the breadth of addons that pre-Quantum Firefox had and Waterfox has, I know it won't even come close to being good enough. Oh, and it only runs on 10, so... pass.

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GitHub given Windows 9x's awesome and so very modern look

Updraft102
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A

But gosh, weren't all you clever young things supposed to use CSS to make the content work properly with whatever consumer platform the readers wanted to use?

There's a lot of wiggle room within the word "properly." For someone who never used a desktop PC or laptop with a decent UI, Windows 10 in the state it's in probably seems pretty good.

Maybe the problem was that none of the clever young things actually had a desktop with which to test the responsive design. It seems that any testing was probably limited to starting the desktop UI and shrugging the shoulders while saying, "Looks okay to me, I guess." Testing complete, QA stamp of approval given!

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Updraft102
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Re: Web 3.0 look

Yes, but mobile screens are usually portrait. Remember, "mobile first" is the current development fad. Mobile first, desktop worst.

That made a little more sense (but only a little) when MS was still trying to use their desktop monopoly to gain a foothold in the mobile market. Now that they've given up on mobile, it's rather pointless to pursue "mobile first" when they have a desktop monopoly and no mobile presence. At least before it seemed like a rational thing to do, even if it was a major long shot. Now... I just don't know. What motivates MS now? Stubbornness and unwillingness to admit they were wrong?

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Updraft102
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Re: That boring grey is good for your eyes!

I have been using gray backgrounds since the days when Windows UIs were built around utility rather than some designer's foolish idea of what's pretty (with no concern about usability or function). The white backgrounds were bad enough on CRTs, but when LCDs came along, it got even worse.

It used to be easy to change the UI colors in Windows, but since 8.1 (when the optional classic theme was no more), having a background that doesn't give you snow blindness means hacking the system to make it stop blocking non-MS approved themes, or using one of the supremely ugly (and ironically named, given the circumstance) high contrast themes.

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Nostalgic social network 'Timehop' loses data from 21 million users

Updraft102
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Social media?

Are people still doing that? I would have thought that fad would have ended by now.

(I don't think of posts on sites like this to be social media, since they're based on something real and substantive.)

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Snooping passwords from literally hot keys, China's AK-47 laser, malware, and more

Updraft102
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It's a cute surveillance technique, but one can't help wondering about its practicality.

Indeed.

If you're able to aim a camera at the keyboard while the intended victim is typing in the password, you would, of course, be better off just using a standard video camera, as the article suggests. The apparent value of this technique would be to take a look at a PC, ATM, or other device while unattended, and to get an idea of the password or PIN from the thermal residue on the keys (along with a rough estimate of which order they were pressed in, though that would fail on any key that is repeated in the sequence).

If we are talking about a PC, all the victim would have to do to mitigate the attack would be to... not log in and then immediately get up with the PC unattended. Most people log in when they are about to use the PC, so as soon as the login is complete, they then start doing something with it. That often involves the keyboard, so just a few seconds of typing will render the thermal snooping irrelevant. Even if the person doesn't type anything for a while, it only would take 45 seconds of the person using the PC before the keys cool to room temperature, and the odds that the person will not leave the PC unattended for the first 45 seconds are pretty decent.

In terms of the ATM example, it means nothing unless you also have an ATM card to connect to the PIN, so you've got to hit the victim on the head and steal the card too. It might make more sense just to threaten the victim with this and get the card along with PIN in that manner.

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A fine vintage: Wine has run Microsoft Solitaire on Linux for 25 years

Updraft102
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Re: !Linux can and does offer applications to perform the same task"

being often far less integrated than macOS and Windows...

Far less integrated in some company's scheme to make money at the expense of their users, also. It's not that Linux people necessarily think Linux is so far superior to Windows or MacOS that everyone should be falling over themselves to use it, but that it is good enough and that it frees its users from the whims of someone else's corporate moneymaking scheme. "Windows as a Service" comes immediately to mind here.

There are clearly areas that Linux lags behind Windows, but with Windows 10... that crap isn't worth using for free, let alone paying through the nose for it. If you want a black-box OS with a rapid update schedule so its maker can put in gaming mode and other inane features no one asked for, and to massively destabilize the OS with these biannual huge updates just as they've tripled the pace of the rollout schedule, using consumers (who never use/test enterprise features, since they're consumers) as beta testers because they downsized the actual beta testers for cost savings, and all the while imposing ongoing training costs as they keep changing things in their touch-UI oriented OS that 99% of people use with a traditional mouse/touchpad and keyboard, then by all means, Windows 10 is for you. Well, it's not really for you... it's clearly for Microsoft. Everyone else is on their own.

One would wonder how badly people have to be beaten and abused by MS before they finally overcome their Stockholm syndrome and move on. Yes, surely it will be painful for a while, and especially for the first movers, but it has to be done. MS has clearly communicated its intent to everyone... it is going to keep forcing its sub-mediocre crap down our throats and monetizing us without mercy, and that shall be that. I think that the bewildered Windows users out there are still thinking this has to change, that the dark times will pass, but the purveyor of those dark times has already told us that they won't. MS wants to be a cloud services company, so the two possible outcomes of the Windows 10 pain train are (1) people sit there and allow themselves to be monetized without trying to escape, in an apt demonstration of learned helplessness, or (2) people will eventually move on to some other platform, which means MS can stop with Windows completely and be the cloud provider it wants to be-- and all those former Windows customers are welcome to still be Microsoft customers from someone else's OS, since cloud services are inherently platform-agnostic.

Either one of those outcomes is just fine with Microsoft. Going back to the old way, where monetizing Windows was only about collecting licensing fees, where Microsoft's fortunes appeared to be headed downhill along with PC sales (while the fixed costs of Windows development failed to scale down with the customer demand), I would think it is safe to say, is out of the question. The cloud guy who is killing Windows is presiding over a Microsoft with soaring share prices while writing books about how awesome he is and how he got Microsoft's groove back by abusing the core customers who got MS to where they are today. We're not going back to the old model (with that nasty, mean Microsoft of the Gates and Ballmer eras, which I keep hearing was so much worse than it is now), and the Windows 10 pain has just begun. Best to start planning the exit now rather than later... it's going to have to happen, but how much is the company going to be fleeced by MS in the meantime?

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In huge privacy win, US Supreme Court rules warrant needed to slurp folks' location data

Updraft102
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Re: something missed...

He should vote to overturn Roe v. Wade. It was a classic case of legislating from the bench-- the job of the SCOTUS is to interpret the Constitution, and you can bet the framers of the Constitution weren't thinking of protecting abortion rights when they wrote it, let alone penumbras and emanations.

I'm as pro-choice as they get, but Roe v. Wade was and is an abomination. If you want a law or a constitutional right to abortion, we have means for doing that, and it's not "let the SCOTUS declare it's in the Constitution even though we all know it's not."

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Updraft102
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Re: Orin Kerr is posting on the subject.

Wish I could upvote you more, Bob.

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At last! Apple admits its MacBook Pro butterfly keyboards utterly suck, offers free replacements

Updraft102
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Re: No, No... It's The Liquid Sensors

So if something other than the "liquid sensor" fails under warranty, it enables a claim for a repair under warranty. But if the "liquid sensor" fails, it cancels a claim for a repair under warranty. A second failure that cancels their liability for the first one, without any chance you can refute it!

Wow. Over on the PC side, so many are considering Macs for the first time because of Windows 10, and so many on the Mac side are fleeing the shoddy Apple construction and the "you're holding it wrong" attitude...

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Updraft102
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Re: Hey, what's this quality control thing?

Apple are going to lose their core base quickly at this rate.

With Windows 10 being unusable rubbish, people are saying the same thing about the Windows platform. Where are the Apple people going to go? Linux would be good, but there's still a lot of people who need to run software that comes in Mac and Windows form, but not Linux. If only Apple would offer MacOS as a standalone product...

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Updraft102
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Re: Er, this Doesn't Really Fix the Problem...

Not only is the keyboard design crap, but the idea of riveting them to the case is crap too. The laptop I am using now is 10 years old and I wore out the keyboard... $20 for a new OEM keyboard and a five minute install and it was back in tip top shape. I know Apple devices are meant to be thrown away and not repaired (despite costing considerably more than my repairable Asus laptop), but that's just ridiculous.

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Have YOU had your breakfast pint? Boffins confirm cheeky daily tipple is good for you

Updraft102
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Re: Doctor, doctor

There is no pleasure so guilty that it is worth giving up for an extra 6 years in a Nursing Home

Not an extra six... you will just get there younger.

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Intel CEO Brian Krzanich quits biz after fling with coworker rumbled

Updraft102
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Re: Similar thing at HP

Who can say if relationship is consentual because the underling feared being fired?

The underling. If it was consensual (no t) and the underling changes his/her mind, that's the risk you take being an overling who consorts with underlings.

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Trainee techie ran away and hid after screwing up a job, literally

Updraft102
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Re: Key word is "Trainee"

But someone has to get the tea so it might as well be the one whose time is least valuable in terms of the work being paid for.

Drinking tea is a part of the job?

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Microsoft CEO wades into ICE outcry: Cool it, we only do legacy mail

Updraft102
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Re: Avoidance

actually no since they still are arresting and taking kids from those that that come via a legal port of entry and ask for asylum,

If you don't like our terms, you can always go try some other country.

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Updraft102
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Parents who are arrested are always separated from their children, whatever the crime may be. Steal a car, get separated from the kids. Kill someone, get separated from the kids. Vandalize a store, get separated from the kids. Illegally crossing the border or overstaying a visa are illegal just like those other things, and if you choose to break the law anyway, you have only yourself to blame.

You can remain intact as a family all you wish if you remain in your country of origin or have the whole family gain legal admittance to the US. Don't break in and act like you have a right to be here because you brought kids on your dangerous, illegal journey. We have legal means for people to become permanent residents or citizens. Use those and there won't be any problems or separation... but if you act like a criminal and do criminal things, expect to be treated like one.

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It's time for TLS 1.0 and 1.1 to die (die, die)

Updraft102
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Re: TLSv1.1 is not insecure

It would be a good idea to get rid of it as far as the user of the hardware is concerned, but I object to any entity issuing an edict from on high that no one must ever use it because They Have Decided. Give me the facts and let me make my own decisions.

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Updraft102
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I've lived in California and still in the USA, and I've never had a car that was required to pass the current year emission standards rather than the ones in effect the year the car was made. People don't pay tends of thousands of dollars for a car that will have to be scrapped in a couple of years because the emission laws changed once again. That's just nuts.

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Meet the Frenchman masterminding a Google-free Android

Updraft102
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Re: Hmm

This is going to be as successful as Linux replacing Windows on the desktop.

It already has on the one I am using to read your message. That's enough for me. There is enough of an ecosystem to make it work for me, and while having more software developed for Linux would be great, there's already enough to make it a fully viable alternative to Windows, for me at least. It's up to other people if they want to stop being monetized on an OS they already paid for while they are and force-fed updates of subpar quality and all of the other bad things that come along with Windows 10.

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Updraft102
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Re: You are solving non existing problem

To the point i cant leave without them.

And we were all so hoping you would!

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Updraft102
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Cute.

I would much rather have random ads than ones that some algorithm thinks is relevant. They never actually manage to be anything I would want... I can't remember ever seeing a "relevant" ad that wasn't completely irrelevant. Stories abound about people being bombarded with ads for toilet seats for a week after buying a toilet seat on Amazon, as if the most common purchaser of toilet seats is a toilet seat collector, not someone who actually wants to replace the one that broke and get on with life.

I once saw an ad for Airbus when I had my adblocker off on Youtube (bad idea... how can people stand it?) I watch aircraft videos, so I got an ad for aircraft. Because all people who watch plane videos own airlines, I guess. Let me tell you, if I buy an Airbus, it's gonna be about ten inches long and be made completely of plastic. But it's a relevant ad, I guess, because it matched airplane viewer with airplane seller, right?

As it stands, there's no way in the bad place that I would ever own a smartphone. If this came to pass, I might at least consider it, but probably it would still be a no. Can't stand the things, or what they've done to the culture.

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User spent 20 minutes trying to move mouse cursor, without success

Updraft102
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Re: Sun optical mice, circa 1985

The Sun stations I used in uni in the early 1990s had those, but I mostly just ignored the Solaris and did my coding in vi (as opposed to a graphical text editor... we weren't using IDEs by any means in that class). Yeah, I was even a dinosaur then, as one of my classmates told me, which I interpreted as more of a compliment than he had probably intended!

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Updraft102
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Mine was the Commodore 1350, which was really more of a joystick with a ball inside.

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Updraft102
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Re: Not Millennials!

Indeed. There's a difference between "The stereotype is wrong!" and "They don't even exist!"

Think of all of the demographic groups that must not exist if that were not true... none of us would, since we're all stereotyped in one way or another.

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Updraft102
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Re: Keyboard ecosystems

Which is why we drank it instead of water in the middle ages.

How old ARE you?

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Updraft102
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Re: Keyboard ecosystems

Back in the day when keyboards cost considerably more than a tenner (in excess of £100 in some cases)

The one I am using now to type this goes for about £150 in the UK, and it's about three years old! Only the cheap ones are cheap.

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Updraft102
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Re: Speaking of which,

My mouse had the intermittent scroll wheel reversals too, until I got a can of electronic contact cleaner and (with the corded mouse unplugged) liberally sprayed it in to the area where the wheel position sensor would be (in this model, under the left mouse button). Roll the wheel around in both directions before the cleaner evaporates, and once it does, see if that didn't fix it. You could try the same on the mouse with clicking problems too (on the other side of the wheel, obviously).

If my mouse could be opened without destroying it, I would have done so for its cleaning/repair, but it has an aluminium base plate that is riveted to... well, something, and I don't want to drill the rivets out, 'cause I may not be able to get it reattached. I had to just spray it all around through the tiny hole where the axle for the scroll wheel enters the mouse body and hope for the best.

The mouse wheel worked better for a short bit, but then the reversing returned. Another dousing with the cleaner and it again worked flawlessly, and has been great ever since, for probably five months now. Since I could not see what I was squirting at, I was not even sure if I was going to get it in the right place, but I guess it did.

The stuff I used is CRC branded "Electronic contact cleaner," and it specifically says it is plastic safe on the can (which was important as I was about to shoot it into a partially plastic mouse). Of course, there are lots of kinds of plastic, but it has lived up to its billing so far for me. I've used it quite successfully on other things, including a laptop whose touchpad buttons (discrete buttons, like the all used to have back in the day) sometimes required excessive pressure to work. It sometimes works on the first try, but just as many times, it seems to require two (but so far, no more than that). It's good stuff to have around, but be sure to use it in a well ventilated area.

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Actual control of Windows 10 updates (with a catch)... and more from Microsoft

Updraft102
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It's a compound word. You know what 'per' means, and 'cent' refers to there being 100 of something. Ten per cent means, therefore, ten per 100, which is an apt description of what it is.

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Updraft102
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Re: Lowest of the low

The question: Processes and procedures allow me to effectively meet my customers' needs .

It would be a lot lower still if it said "...my customers' needs as defined by themselves." It's easier to meet someone's needs if you get to decide what those are, and MS is far too arrogant to ever think the customer has any insight into what he needs. He might even decide he doesn't need two new versions of Windows every year!

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Updraft102
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Re: Money

Windows protection racket. WPR for short!

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Microsoft says Windows 10 April update is fit for business rollout

Updraft102
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Re: Controversial opinion alert!

I do find all the people who claim to have stopped using "windoze" years ago commenting on how shit it is very amusing.

No version of WIndows has gotten any better for several years. All of them are demonstrably worse (7 and 8.1 because they had telemetry added and have been moved to the monthly cumulative rollup system, and 10 gets worse with each new build) than they were in late 2015, and 10 is worse than any version of Windows that preceded it, so there's absolutely no irony in stating authoritatively that Windows sucks and that you haven't used Windows in years. If it sucked years ago, in a given person's opinion, it sucks much harder now.

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Updraft102
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Re: least complaint-generating Windows ever

Or because people have learned that the Microsoft support is useless anyway.

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Microsoft tries cutting the Ribbon in Office UI upgrade

Updraft102
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Re: Icons are supposedly accessible?

"Dear Microsoft, icons are utterly useless to the blind"

So are road signs. Doesn't mean we shouldn't have them.

Blind people don't drive, but they do use computers.

There is nothing wrong with icons, but having only icons isn't good. Different people have different needs and preferences, so give us the Ribbon if you must, but have an option for the File, Edit, View menubar too.

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Updraft102
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Windows 3.0 did not have sound support when it came out. It wasn't until Windows 3.0 with Multimedia Extensions arrived (1.5 years after Windows 3.0) that Windows had sound support.

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First A380 flown in anger to be broken up for parts

Updraft102
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Re: This underlines one more thing

More comfortable in what way?

If it has anything to do with the seating, legroom, etc., that's the airline's doing, not the plane itself. As far as the speed, the 777 is listed as cruising at mach 0.84, while the A380 is listed at 0.85, so no real difference there.

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Microsoft pulls the plug on Windows 7, 8.1 support forums

Updraft102
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Re: I concur with those above!

"Like the good old days of being told to reinstall Windows at every turn."

Isn't that the standard advice for Windows 10 problems these days?

It works every time!

Er, wait, did it say "deinstall" or "reinstall"?

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In defence of online ads: The 'net ain't free and you ain't paying

Updraft102
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Ever thought that is precisely WHY they started to get in your face? Because the returns on static ads were too low?

When are the returns on any ad ever not "too low?" No matter what those returns are, more is always better. If the existing ad has worked so well that a manufacturing company is producing its product at maximum capacity and even then just barely meeting the demand, "better" ads would allow the company to raise its prices and still sell every one of whatever it is they make as soon as it leaves the assembly line. There's always more, better, higher, bigger.

As always, the question becomes one of how much advertising they can get away with before the revenues stop increasing and begin to drop as they annoy the advertising victims enough to chase them away. They don't care if they chase a small number away (or chase them into the waiting embrace of an adblocker) as long as the remaining ones allow themselves to be monetized enough to more than make up for the loss. They kept upping the ante with the ads to monetize the shrinking pool of non-blockers until they reached a critical mass of ad obnoxiousness that drove too many of the non-blockers away, and as someone mentioned before, once a person sees how nice the web is with an adblocker, there's no going back.

The problem they're facing now is that they've chased so many of us into the waiting arms of various adblockers that they're not making up for the loss, and they've long since convinced themselves that loud, obnoxious, heavy-weight ads with trackers are better than the static ads (whose returns were "too low," recall), so the thought of returning to that doesn't even occur to them. The entire modern web ad industry revolves around third-party, brokered ads placed by companies whose customers are the advertisers, not the end users of whatever the advertiser is selling, and none of them know (or appear to be interested in knowing) any other way of doing things, so the content providers resort to begging and adblocker blockers and paywalls.

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