* Posts by GrapeBunch

557 posts • joined 19 Apr 2015

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Facebook puts 1.5bn users on a boat from Ireland to California

GrapeBunch
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Cheery heering

So, if you're Australian and you want GDPR protection, do you just tell FB when you sign up that you're Danish? It's who you are, not your IP address at the moment that counts, right? FB would not know for sure which you are. If it does not accept your statement that you are Danish, and applies the looser Australian non-protections, it risks consequences from the EU authorities. Is that right?

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Google to add extra Gmail security … by building a walled garden

GrapeBunch
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Minority rebort

Shoot me (downvote with an explanatory message) if I'm being too naive, but isn't google's business model based on them selling targeted advertising based on the data they hoover/slurp? If they sold the data itself, they'd be endangering their source of income. Plus if that came out, it would ruin their reputation, such as it is.

A company that does not have the targeted advertising gravy train, that company would be more thoroughly tempted to sell your data to crims, to govts, to business--no matter what their privacy policy might say.

I'm not praising google, just saying that they have reason$ to respect your identity, reasons that a lot of other companies lack.

NSA and its ilk have unlimited access to your online activity, google or no google, especially if you are not a USA citizen. You might think that SSL and encryption protect you, but if they're bothered to find you, neither of those will be any help.

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Terix boss thrown in the cooler for TWO years for peddling pirated Oracle firmware, code patches

GrapeBunch
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Moderate, as ever.

"Thanks for your post. Our moderators will get to it as soon as possible."

I've made a lot of posts here, and a lot of them have been bol^H^H^H^H intentionally humourous. But I don't remember receiving that message before. Is it because I used the acronym for a collectivity often reviled? Or a segment of all caps to mimic the message on a fire alarm?

What I really wanted to know was how to insert a line break (not a paragraph break) in text. <br> and its variants don't work here. And to centre / center a snippet of text on a line. For the sake of Art, as always.

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GrapeBunch
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......................... The Humanity

IN CASE OF

SOCIETAL COLLAPSE

BREAK MIRROR

So when family friends have computer problems, the particular EULA will say whether I will go to jail for helping them.

What could possibly go wrong?

PS I live in a different country. However, national boundaries are to protect and enrich large corporations, not for the good of mere fleshly beings unprotected by eternal aegis.

Coming soon to a Universe not so far far away ...

Sorry, Aunt Hermione, I am not allowed to touch your computer. Only a licensed mcse may do that. That's the advert that goes: "Put some McSizzle in your life." What was that? Fanciful? You know you can't say that, Auntie, it's a registered trademark of that continental agribiz. No, for the record, "Put some McSizzle in your life" is not fanciful. It is exactly what it says on the tin. Fix your computer? Quickly? Well, you should count on a couple of days' work to assess what the problem is. After that, it's really the druck of the law. Yes I love you too, but I don't even want to know how to spell the name of that place. Thanks for calling.

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Law's changed, now cough up: Uncle Sam serves Microsoft fresh warrant for Irish emails

GrapeBunch
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Re: Cloud providers can now point to a clear obligation

Yes. I would even use a fictitious Russian company, which I will call rooble, that offered the same facilities as the biggies, and offered decryption for which I and only I held the key. I don't know why every road leads to a USA company. It's just code, otherwise the Internet is, or should be, a level playing service. Why aren't there non-US equivalents? I'm not angry, just puzzled.

Hackers of many independent nations could do this in their sleep.

I just checked, and, unbelievably, rooble.com is not taken. rooble.ru is parked and for sale. rooble, like the Russian currency, but also like google with changes in two letters, just so everybody gets it. My apologies to 99% of those who have read this far. And thank you.

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Europe dumps 300,000 UK-owned .EU domains into the Brexit bin

GrapeBunch
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Chips & Stakes

Give them enough years of stasis, and even bureaucrats can become creative. They just created a bargaining chip, favourable only to EU, where there was no chip before.

What's the closest thing to .eu ? Why .fu, of course. I foresee some creative DNS-ing and address translation.

UK needs more new bargaining chips. What could the UK dump on Brussels, something that everybody would normally be thankful that they did?

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Microsoft patches patch for Meltdown bug patch: Windows 7, Server 2008 rushed an emergency fix

GrapeBunch
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Re: Testing?

@JakeMS. I'm sure that the patch did exactly what MS wanted it to do.

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SAP Anywhere is gonna be absolutely nowhere: We're 'sunsetting' this service, biz tells punters

GrapeBunch
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So much easier to poison a well wot's got its lid gone.

Thank goodness they aren't like other software companies that, instead of burying the zombie, keep giving it strychnine and fentanyl in just the right amounts to keep the customer in stasis, and then--AI Conference? I'm not here for an AI Conference, young lady. Though I did bring Bessie. In the trailer.

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Corpse! of! Yahoo! drags! emails! of! the! dead! case! to! US! Supreme! Court!

GrapeBunch
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Deep trust

I'm suspicious of the wording "court-appointed estate administrators" who might not be working in the interests of the heirs. They might troll through e-mail accounts searching for words such as "download" (it takes only a second to go through years of e-mail) and counting on earning a commission from a rights-holder or rights-holders shell companies for some sort of out-of-court settlement against the deceased's estate. Illegal? If you can imagine a lawyer doing something, some lawyer has done it. I'd be more favourably inclined if the estate itself or the main heir were to have the access to the account.

I wonder why this is an issue only for Yahoo and not for other e-mail purveyors.

Finally, for other oldsters, do you remember Usenet groups? And how so many groups had FAQs? Every month an updated FAQ would be posted. I noticed in one group that the FAQ was continuing to get posted, but did not contain new info. It was not difficult to find out that the FAQ poster had in fact died more than a year earlier, and that his auto-mailer was continuing to send out the latest FAQ every month. A peculiar legacy.

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Due to Oracle being Oracle, Eclipse holds poll to rename Java EE (No, it won't be Java McJava Face)

GrapeBunch
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Bottomless. Might appeal to the multiple entendre crowd. Like everybody.

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Newsflash! Faking it until you make it is illegal in Silicon Valley: Biz boss pleads guilty

GrapeBunch
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Nil-potent

Lying about your education? When I was graduated with a Maths degree more than four decades ago, I got two sealed transcripts, foreseeing that I would need proof. I managed to lose one, and the other I still have, unopened. Nobody cared. "A Primary Ideal is the kernel of a homomorphism in which every zero-divisor is nil-potent." See what a good mathster I am? But I might have memorized that, before entering Uni.

It was the wire fraud that did for him. Lying, meh. Business degree? It's all funny business.

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Lenovo spits out retro ThinkPads for iconic laptop's 25th birthday

GrapeBunch
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Re: Might be a worthy replacement

Not sure why you need to upgrade the W520, which has the blue "ThinkVantage" key and the screen light, with an otherwise identical keyboard layout to the 25. With 24 or 32 GB RAM, it runs just fine. It won't drive a 4K display at 60 Hz is all.

While the 700C was the first Thinkpad, the most iconic was the 701C which came out not long after. OS/2 was sweet and, of course, the butterfly keyboard. The main weakness of the 701C was the hinges. That would have been a fitting machine to honour.

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Adobe: Two critical Flash security bugs fixed for the price of one

GrapeBunch
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Windows

Re: C'mon, seriously?

The first thing I do in IE / Edge on a new machine is disable it.

Exactly. The first thing I do on a new computer is delete IE and Edge, or at least delete their shortcuts, which is usually enough to encourage the user to browse with something else.

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$14bn tax hit, Surface Pro screens keep dying – but it's not all good news at Microsoft

GrapeBunch
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Bravo for FlickerGate.com

I hope they didn't have to buy an already-existing domain. Like the one where Henry Louis Gates tells a celebrity that his ancestor was a horse. No, no, that was his cousin. And it's not Flicker, it's Flicka, pronounced Fleet-ska. Gates of Murder, already taken, my preshisssssss. There couldn't possibly be any other Gate or Gates referenced, could there be?

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To hack Australia and learn its secrets, buy second-hand furniture

GrapeBunch
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What's this Telstra thing?

A Frisian Kangaroo ? Therein lies a tel.

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Tech biz boss slipped Detroit's IT chief bungs in restaurant bathrooms to bag software deals, prosecutors claim

GrapeBunch
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Re: Really?

Wouldn't taking a client out to dinner or other entertainment be a legitimate and deductible business expense? Whether the civic official was allowed to accept it would still be in question. It was the cashness of the payment that made it a no-no. And at less than one-half of one percent, a bargain. Or am I showing up myself as an ingenue in the World of Graft (American meaning)? Suggests a title for a video game, MeinGraft.

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Eggheads: Cities, don't woo rich Amazon with sweetheart HQ deals

GrapeBunch
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Re: How do they get away with it?

corporate welfare bum a term coined in 1972 by Canadian labour leader and politician David Lewis (1909-1981). No slight was intended towards hobos, I am sure.

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It's 2018 and… wow, you're still using Firefox? All right then, patch these horrid bugs

GrapeBunch
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Windows

Re: Firefox really is the worst

I must really have been using an old version. Had to upgrade 4 times to bring ff to current level 58. Sad to see one of my favourite add-ons "Faviconize Tab" (allowed each tab to be thin down to the width of a favicon) gone. FF 58 "kindly" allows you to list legacy add-ons no longer supported, then "helpfully" suggests that you may search for replacements, but when you press the button, it's just a dumb old list of all add-ons.

To be even-handed in criticism, Opera hasn't had its most distinctive and useful feature since Opera 12 (2011?). The feature was "Create Follower Tab". This opened a new, initially blank tab. Whenever you clicked in the current tab, it displayed the content in the Follower Tab, and the current tab stayed loaded. Usually way more handy than the now ubiquitous "Open Link in New Tab". Even then it was buggy to the extent that it didn't remember Follower Tabs between sessions. In the new session, the Follower Tab became a tab like any other. I like to say that "It ain't Opera until it has Follower Tabs". Vivaldi also doesn't have it.

I use Opera developer, Vivaldi, Firefox, simultaneously (24GB RAM helps) with lots of tabs open. Certain sites work better with one than with an other. Multiple accounts at the same site, easy this way instead of logging out and in. I use Sleipnir a bit. Otter rarely. Installed Pale Moon recently, but lightly used. Uninstalled Chrome years ago as hopeless. It must have improved a lot for people to be using it in 2018. My Security Prime Directive is never to use MS products in Windows unless absolutely necessary, because "undocumented features"; so no Edge, and no IE for decades. Guilty secret: I use Process Explorer. Lame excuse: it isn't "really" an MS product. Finally, Lynx. Sorry, it's difficult to get back to a text-only interface. But it's been used in the last couple of years, for sites blushed by the deepest scepticism, but profoundly wanting to be read.

Sorry, there isn't an icon for "Prepare for boring, me young buckaroos."

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Firms pushing devices at teachers that let kids draw... on a screen? You BETT

GrapeBunch
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Coat

Their new product: Etch-0A-Win. Or is that Eeeeeech-a-Win ?

Mine's the one with the turtle in the pocket.

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Two things will survive a nuclear holocaust: Cockroaches and crafty URLs like ғасеьоок.com

GrapeBunch
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Re: Fix it in-browser

trigger a security warning in the address bar if encountering, for example, mixed Latin and Cyrillic,

Your heart is in the right place, but

РЕАСЕ.СОМ

for example, is 100% Cyrillic.

My wife got one of these just last week "but they're going to close our account!". Just like the main story, it had English syntax errors and the URL had for example the Russian К rather than the Latin K. Delete, now! For the Люб of Бог !

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You GNOME it: Windows and Apple devs get a compelling reason to turn to Linux

GrapeBunch
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Re: "I would *REALLY* *LIKE* to see more evidence of that"

Say it ain't so, AnCo.

Surely there's no such thing as a sales engineer. Real engineers bristled at the term "software engineer", I guess because it was often self-referred and not the result of a course of study at a recognized school of engineering and subsequent professional qualification. But maybe they worked out the objections. The idea that there could ever be a sales engineer is at best a joke and at worst an insult to engineering. At least, that's what it says in this here book, "Word Neurosurgery".

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US border cops told to stop copying people's files just for the hell of it

GrapeBunch
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Holmes

Blushing Bride of Bwedemocrasula

They admit to 30K device searches per year, but I submit to you, ladies and gentlemen, that the real figure is at least an order of magnitude higher.

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Here come the lawyers! Intel slapped with three Meltdown bug lawsuits

GrapeBunch
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Re: Back in the day....

What you would have there, is a failure to communicate. Insert obligatory movie reference here.

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GrapeBunch
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Re: MINIX anyone ?

Is it time to dust off our 5.25" floppy disk copies of Concurrent CP/M and/or OS/2 ? Did they handle the problem better ? We live in a particularly irony-prone universe ... did some OSes fail commercially because they were properly designed relative to this problem?

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GrapeBunch
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In one article I read that the problem affected all Intel processors manufactured since 1995. Or is it Intel 64-bit processors since 1995? Or some other subset?

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Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

GrapeBunch
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Phlogiston

Normally I would apologize for not reading the preceding comments, but with over 400 and counting, I will stay shtum on that account. Still, in my heart, I apologize. Thanks to El Reg for a highly educational article; were I a "real" systems analyst, I might have understood it all !

I'm wondering if the bug applies to 32-bit Intel processors. The article says x86-64, but a comment mentions that all Intel x86 processors get patched in Linux. So I'm wondering if my now fairly ancient Thinkpad T60, Intel 32-bit Core Duo T2400 laptop running XP is, with care, as secure as or more secure than a contemporary machine running Bo Derek. If it is, well, chortle.

We all know that Microsoft the OS-maker introduced undocumented features and that Microsoft the application-maker exploited said undocumented features to stay ahead of the application competition. Yes, from experience, I am expecting to get downvoted for that. Go ahead, fill your buffers. I am wondering if any parallel could be drawn with the current case. I'm not after the obvious, that Intel was trying to keep ahead of AMD and, ah, jumped the shark.

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Hyperledger 3 years later: That's the sound of the devs... working on the chain ga-a-ang

GrapeBunch
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Re: no real use case ?

A possible solution: cryptohash only during heating season in the computer's locale.

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Astroboffins say our Solar System could have – wait, stop, what... the US govt found UFOs?

GrapeBunch
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Angel

Re: Alien UFO's are Real - True / False...

We are sorry. The Great Mouse you clicked has already been chosen by another user. Please select another large mouse.

We are sorry. The large mouse you selected has been eaten by an ancient Egyptian cat Deity. Please consult your Anubis. Your après vie has been truncated.

We are very sorry. There's cakes in the oven, there's cheese on the shelf. If you want any more, you can sing it yourself.

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GrapeBunch
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Re: Alien UFO's are Real - True / False...

We are sorry. That Deity is no longer available. He / she / it was downvoted by the wultures. Please choose another myth.

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This week in 'Bungles in the AWS S3 Privacy Jungles', we present Alteryx – and 123 million households exposed

GrapeBunch
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Where I live, I can't see the gov't copy of a much-removed cousin's birth certificate until 110 years have passed. To protect identities. I suppose the excuse for releasing 2010 census info is that it is anonymized. So the company put the census results together with other scrapings and thus de-anonymized it. Shouldn't that be illegal?

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Fridge killed my baby? Mag-field radiation from household stuff 'boosts miscarriage risk'

GrapeBunch
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Peanuts are harmless to most, but deadly for others. Allergies in general can have a sensitization process--and even sometimes a desensitization process. My father loved oysters, but was violently allergic to them. After a couple of decades of abstinence (desensitization), he tried again, and no problem.

Anyway, I think EM reactions may be like that. A double-blind test on an EM sensitive person (or a selection of them), with the person reporting back every 10 minutes on their reactions, would confirm or refute the hypothesis put to me that many EM-sensitive persons react quickly to these stimuli. The ethical question: if the hypothesis is true, then you are torturing the subject--may be a thorny one, but to their mind, life in civilization is torturing them every day.

If the result is negative, then it's time to test whether EM works like slow environmental toxins, such as lead in the paint or arsenic in the wallpaper.

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Mozilla's creepy Mr Robot stunt in Firefox flops in touching tribute to TV show's 2nd season

GrapeBunch
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It's like letters and packages from somebody you don't know, though in a language you do know. It made me angry. Turned out it was a gift--that was supposed to be an adventure--from the missuz. It must have hurt her worse than it hurt me. That's where the parallel breaks down. Mozilla never hurts, it blithely continues.

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Language bugs infest downstream software, fuzzer finds

GrapeBunch
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Re: This is a perennial problem

Original provable output:

I am having one wonderful day.

Real world compile:

I am having 0.9999999998 wonderful day.

Real world compile with work-around:

I am having one wonderful day.

Real world compile with work-around, after compiler bug fixed:

I am having 1.0000000002 wonderful day.

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UK government bans all Russian anti-virus software from Secret-rated systems

GrapeBunch
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Re: I guess NOFORN doesn't apply anymore?

"When IRA-ish Eyes are pwning

Sure they steal your ***** away."

Everything I've read in the past year makes me think that the old model of applying patches and new signatures every morning is hopelessly inadequate. Surely a secure model for an Internet-exposed machine will have VMs, or something like them, at its heart.

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Voyager 1 fires thrusters last used in 1980 – and they worked!

GrapeBunch
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My first computer in 1979 had a Z80, like an 8080 on sugar (steroids as a meme had not been invented yet). So, STOSB ? But I'm guessing that NASA preferred military-grade cosmic-ray hardened.... if the manufacturer was neither Intel nor Zilog but something like Fairchild, I wouldn't be surprised.

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Guilty: NSA bloke who took home exploits at the heart of Kaspersky antivirus slurp row

GrapeBunch
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Holmes

I wouldn't say he's being punished for be unlucky... more like stupid. Stupid to take work home and run it on an insecure personal computer. The guy was moron to do that.

Considering the value of the prize, I'd say that any internet-connected personal computer is sufficiently insecure. I can understand him wanting to look at work after hours so he could experience karoshi at home. But why would he put it on an internet-connected computer? The only purpose I can imagine is to deploy the NSA malware in his possession. Say it ain't so, Pho.

I suggest that a fine and retirement is a more suitable treatment than the slammer. But if that's what NSA wanted, why did it become a court case? Surely this isn't good for the image of the NSA. Slightly good for the image of Kaspersky, but not the NSA.

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Munich council finds €49.3m for Windows 10 embrace

GrapeBunch
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Re: Doomed from the Start??

It has been mooted that Mun could have saved the Lin experiment by switching from OO to LO. My own experience is that while OO did not properly render a heritage Word doc (with, gasp!, images), neither did the most recent LO. By "not properly" I mean "dog's breakfast". Forget even that MS booby traps its office software to make the default save format incompatible with the current best compatibility effort that open software can make. "It don't go out the door, until DR-DOS don't work no more." This was a pretty old document.

So I think the Linux people need to examine what happened, carefully and dispassionately. I wish them well.

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Sci-Hub domains inactive following court order

GrapeBunch
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Re: re. Martin Eve

Welcome to the scenic Veil of Eve sham.

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GrapeBunch
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alt.pub

Please send your paper, along with three box tops and fifty cents, to my academic journal Neture. If you're lucky, they'll think it was a typo.

Mine's the one with the really big prestige in the front pocket.

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Healthcare insurance cheat-bot bros Zenefits cough up $1m to make SEC probe go away

GrapeBunch
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Devil

... I'd wager (were I ...) that the policy EULA (or whatever it's called in the health insurance biz) specifies that you can't sue 'em for malfeasance. And, for good measure, that any argy-bargy is in a company-friendly jurisdiction / forum.

E pluribus unum sure covers some crazy shit, but I wonder if Caveat emptor might be a more fitting national motto.

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'Israel hacked Kaspersky and caught Russian spies using AV tool to harvest NSA exploits'

GrapeBunch
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Black Helicopters

Seriously, though. Is it better to run a Russian, a USA-ian, a Chinese, ... a Nork-ian, and why not an Israeli anti-virus, live and simultaneously ... or is there a role for running no Anti-Virus, doing everything in a VM (a virtual machine), and checking what you might want to save from that Virtual session in a stately (meaning calm and collected, not governmental) manner?

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Google touts Babel Fish-esque in-ear real-time translators. And the usual computer stuff

GrapeBunch
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Re: Dropping phones in toilet?

"They could break a bowling ball."

1. Fill 2.5 cm holes with liquid. 2. Cover holes with water-impermeable USB 3 adapter. 3. Post to Canada in January.

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GrapeBunch
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Re: Pixie Buds

" man bribing a tax official and Google translated it as he was BITING the tax official"

La mordida de mi tio está afuera del asno de la tarifa.

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GrapeBunch
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Re: Sounds like a good way to go insane

"some kind of pendant with battery"

Education need never end, in the thrall of a pedant with a battery.

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GrapeBunch
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Re: Please translate:-

"My food is problematic".

No problema, mango mio. Bromeo.

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GrapeBunch
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Re: Please translate:-

"I seem to be having tremendous difficulty with my lifestyle"

La moda de vida que dispongo, está dentro de la caja de Satanás.

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Mozilla extends, and ends, Firefox support for Windows XP and Vista

GrapeBunch
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Angel

Dead as a doorhinge

A handful of snarky comments about Windows with 14 upvotes and no downvotes. Whenever I write something snarky about Windows in these parts, I collect a goodly number of downvotes. I wonder if there's something related to time zones at play ...

Since XP Pro is now dead to MS, I wonder if that's a chance for somebody who is not MS to release a security package for it that will close down (or at least make not the default option) every ~ last ~ leaky ~ or ~ vulnerable ~ feature. A kind of Extreme Unction. Every executable file association, every talking paperclip. Or is it a dog? Since XP is no longer a moving target. Make a virtue out of its corpse. Why bother? Because lots of perfectly capable computers lack the processor or RAM capacity to run Win10. It's to keep them out of the landfills a bit longer.

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White House plan to nuke social security numbers is backed by Equifax's ex-top boss

GrapeBunch
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Devil

Canada

In Canada we have SIN. It's not Original, it's the Social Insurance Number, since the 1960s. For a little bit, it threatened to go the way of the SSN, but the Federal gov't throttled it back. For example, for a while your Provincial medical number (also confidential, right) might have been a version of your SIN. But they stopped that a couple of decades back. AFAIK, SIN is now used only for income tax-related matters and pensions. Somehow fitting that, as, "the wages of SIN is death". Which must mean that the number is no longer useful to you once you've popped yer clogs.

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GrapeBunch
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Re: Obscure number

That one stumped me, too, for about 8 seconds.

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Developers' timezone fail woke half of New Zealand

GrapeBunch
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Megaphone

Aukward moment

Let me dissent. The NZ authorities did not say that the timing of the test message was a mistake. The time zones excuse was hearsay. Developers in any country could not be that stupid to wake people in the middle of the night. If you can program in BASIC, you can know what time it is. The multi-million claxon was either intentional, or it was the convergence of bad planning and an accident, such as the classic "cat walked across my keyboard".

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