* Posts by GrapeBunch

462 posts • joined 19 Apr 2015

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Firefox doesn't need to be No 1 – and that's OK, 'cos it's falling off a cliff

GrapeBunch
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Re: Finally!

"Vivaldi"

Yes, me too. Also based on the Chromium engine is Opera, which I also use every day. Also Sleipnir, which admittedly I haven't given much of a workout. Why would one use Chrome when the chromavixxen are so much better? Because it's there?, like using IE?

The third browser I have open at all times (on the laptop that can take the activity) is Firefox (54). I remember a few years ago that the author of the best-working extensions I had ever encountered, got into an argument with Firefox about their requirements for keeping the extension up to date with new FF versions. I don't understand or know the details of the argument, but the author just up and left, pulling the plug on his extensions, so it must have been an important dispute. That put the kibosh on any thoughts I may have harboured of using Firefox exclusively.

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DeepMind says it's given AI an imagination. Let's take a closer look at that

GrapeBunch
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Re: Hype

I don't think that Chess or Go players, when they are playing Chess or Go, are dumb enough to fall for that. But when a Chess player is playing poker, bets are off! I remember a pretty good chess player who was pretty good at poker and won money locally, but after he came back from Vegas, he admitted that he realized only too late that many if not all of the other elements at the poker table were there to fleece his local winnings. It's even worse online as everything is hidden from view and executed in nanoseconds rather than the "blink of an eye". The ease of using a chess engine to assist one's play is one reason that real money chess tournaments still take place largely in the real world.

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GrapeBunch
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Pint

Re: While El Reg editors analyze my post for Badthink tendencies regarding Trump etc.

I didn't know if you were joking. But whether the patent is real or not, yours was a good comment, so I upvoted it. Imagine, google, debaser of intellectual property, patenting the obvious. Even if it's just as a placemaker so that some even worse miscreant doesn't patent it first, there's always the possibility they could sell it to a patent troll, or it could eventually be picked up by a patent troll from google's floating carcass. Here's hoping that patent trolling gets maced before google expires.

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GrapeBunch
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Re: Hype

[...] "A human player, thus, would be well advised to plan moves ahead of time. The DeepMind agent, because it's capable of such planning too, is also well suited for this game, the researchers suggest."

That applies to Chess, or Go too. No creativity or AI needed.

Both "creativity" and "AI" are buzzwords. Marcel Duchamp, who must be considered one of the most creative of artists (otherwise what would his fame rest upon, technique?), gave up Art for over a decade and devoted himself to Chess, where he became good enough to represent France at the Chess Olympics, but never quite good enough to break into the world top-50. Duchamp wrote that chess players were the greater artists because they relied on the ultimate truth of their creation, whereas Artists, to be successful, had to curry favour among potential sponsors, sometimes devoting more ~creative~ juices to PR than to their Art.

Back in the days when computers were slow, Artificial Intelligence, which in those days was mainly trying to mimic the ways a human brain works, was thought by many (who I guess thereby became "AI exponents") to be the most productive way forward. Instead it was faster processors, multiple processors and eventually parallel processing, combined with extensive databases of both openings and endgames ("tablebases"), and even more with computer-friendly techniques for pruning the result trees, that made computers the strongest practical (under tournament conditions, where a game takes 5 hours or less to complete) players. So with the strongest players all computers, aspiring chess players in 2017 study the games played between them, right? No, they still study the games between the top human players, all of whom use computers for their preparation, but not during the game (that would be Cheating). Commentators frequently insert a computer-generated variation (often as in "you won't believe what the computer suggested ..."), but elucidation of a computer versus computer game is still exceeding rare. Why? Perhaps human games are more understandable. Perhaps they are more ~creative~.

Creativity, in the sense of "imagining and making real what is not", unfortunately is not always that different from plain old lying, nor from fraught new lying.

I took it that the innovation was to look ahead in the training period. It's a bit like, were you training Tic-Tac-Toe, telling you student that after >Centre, your move should be >Corner, rather than let it lose a million virtual times exploring >Side. If in a complex game they came up with the exact same or even better result (result=game-playing engine) through that cycle-saving, that is a non-trivial result (result=evaluation of training technique). To me, anyway.

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Fan of FBI cosplay? Enjoy freaking out your neighbors? Have we got the eBay auction for you

GrapeBunch
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The small bit of white powder on the vehicle? Or the larger pile of it on the ground? I don't think it's evidence gone astray. Might be owner-applied vehicle treatment (aka car wax) used to restore the vehicle. So glad didn't have to use quote marks, italics, or abrasive.

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Feature snatcher Microsoft tweaks OneDrive

GrapeBunch
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Re: "Fall Creators Update"

Fool Uptake Craters, Kilobaud EDition are we.

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Apple's 'KGB level of secrecy' harms its AI projects – but don't worry, it's started a blog

GrapeBunch
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Re: Of Buffer OverLodes ...... and Fanciful China Syndrome Meltdowns* in Surreal Life Events

I welcome our new Spanish-Italian-Chinese uberlord. Drive me to distraction, please, and make no Menai means about it.

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Watson AI panned, 5¼ years of sales decline ... Does IBM now stand for Inferior Biz Model?

GrapeBunch
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Re: Ask Watson?

"I'm sorry, you give the answer, then I ask the question."

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US laptops-on-planes ban now applies to just one airport, ends soon

GrapeBunch
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Second Amendment

Americans think it is normal for Americans to carry firearms on board airplanes. Yes, they understand that it makes other people nervous. They in turn are nervous about armed non-Americans. But they view the disapproval of loaded weapon carrying Americans (did I say that right?) as a kind of technical foul. Yes, it's wrong, but only a little bit. Don't do that again, sir.

Canada had bomb-checking of laptops decades ago, long before the Americans. They would swab the keyboard and other areas for traces of explosives. But AFAIR they stopped doing it quite some time ago. A sensible reason would be if they never after years found anybody carrying a laptop bomb. But in this wild world, it could just as easily be a nonsensical reason.

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Eggheads identify the last animal that will survive on Earth until the Sun dies

GrapeBunch
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Not Speckless Sky

I think we need to speak with the Water Bears' representatives about the fate of life on earth. I was not able to speak to any Waterbury's, but did achieve the next best thing. Jane Sea-Bear-y says I'd probably be famous if I wasn't such a good Waitress. Just about sums it up, eh?

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GrapeBunch
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Bearish

In reply to "What do you think about the future of life on this planet?", the answer: "I'm Bearish" would thus be optimistic, rather the opposite of markets. Come to think of it, markets are rather the opposite of nature.

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GrapeBunch
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Re: Instant space travel

The new you won't have any memory of the old you. Perhaps that's how life got to Earth in the first place. And of course you don't blast them into space naked, you put then into icy or rocky bodies that might become gravitationally attracted to a planet-sized body, out there. Search term: "Hoyle–Wickramasinghe model of panspermia"

For the here and now, the more profitable tack may be to offer, for a price, to attach somebody else's DNA to the junk DNA of a tardigrade.... and either to put it back in the ocean or send it to Mars. Offer not valid where prohibited by law.

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GrapeBunch
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Re: Pfft, the last living thing on Earth will be lawyers...

Not living, merely Undead.

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US border cops search cloud accounts? Ha ha, nope, negative, no way, siree – Homeland Sec

GrapeBunch
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Big Brother

Null promises.

1. They lie. We know this.

2. Based on that statement, they don't even need to lie. Will not search for data held only on remote servers? As we know, they copy Internet transmissions without limit. They have the data already, albeit in difficult-to-decrypt format. They can safely say whatever they want about data held only in the Cloud, because ¬∃ , within reasonable statistical approximation.

I'm wondering if anybody goes to the USA without phone or laptop, and upon being queried, tells the nice agent that the purpose of the visit is to buy a phone and a laptop. The agent might like that. Or Not.

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All hail AT&T! Champion of the open internet and users' privacy!

GrapeBunch
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Unhappy

There is no turbo button

"Would you like to turbo-fuck?" I asked Mrs. Bunch.

"With whom would you suggest I do that?" she smiled demurely.

Seeing that it was a longshot, I replied: "I saw it on television."

"Mister Oliver" she said, "has left the building."

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Funnily enough, charging ££££s for trashy bling-phones wasn't a great idea

GrapeBunch
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Coat

Re: "paying out the nose"

"No one would get that impassioned about an amateur game... You don't hear the Hockey fans belittle Polo much...."

Field Hockey is just an inferior form of Hockey played without ice and only one arm.

Polo is just an inferior form of Field Hockey played by arses riding large donkeys.

FTFY. Didn't want to, but you asked for it.

Mine's the one with the tuque hidden in the sleeve.

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Pastor la vista, baby! FCC enforcers shut down church pirate radio

GrapeBunch
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The Not So Jolly Roger

The Not So Jolly Roger, set on a pirate radio station, was perhaps my favourite episode of Danger Man. Apologies for the weak audio and video, but it was the (ironically pirate) version found. And an episode summary. The plot was corny, but the location fabulous, and so was Suzie, in all her glory, played by Patsy Ann Noble. Maybe the network economized with a 2-for-1 by getting her to be the actor and also getting to play her song, He Who Rides A Tiger. Ironic dialogue between the two, as Suzie, in what sounds to me like a BBC accent, asks John if he worked in Australia, whereas in real life she was from Australia.

Or perhaps my favourite Danger Man was the one where he pretended to be an effete culture-buff to win the confidence of a spy. With all the homo-erotic overtones they dared put in a 1960s broadcast, but thankfully not more than that. That was a nuanced performance by good old Patrick McGoohan.

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Juno beams back first closeups of Jupiter's unsightly red acne

GrapeBunch
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Re: Mistaken?

Sounds a bit like Percival Lowell spotting "canals" on Mars, this not being found by subsequent telescopic observers, and yet there are canal-like natural features on Mars. Perhaps he saw them under particularly auspicious angles of sunlight. If the current observations don't match the canal maps he made, then he was talking Baltimores. But if they do, he was (observationally) effing brilliant. I wonder if an observer of Earth, when the sun was shining bright on Sydney, could see the shadow of the Andes as a kind of canal.

Another one is Immanuel Velikovsky's prediction that Venus would be found to rotate in a retrograde manner. Again, that turned out to be true, and surprising. Doesn't mean we have to accept Velikovsky's far out theory as to how that came about. But hey, maybe a tiny quantum of sci street cred.

I'm posting this because I'm not convinced that the downvote mechanism is working properly at El Reg. Discovery awaits.

As to the red spot itself, both images we've seen look stonily like Artist Concepts. If "I could have done that", then some artist probably has, retrospectively saving NASA many meeellion$. <joke icon/> In the second image, I get the feeling that the top of the red is lower in the Jovian atmosphere than the top of the surrounding white clouds. That should be testable, by more than one means but certainly by bouncing signals and seeing how long they take to come back. In which case an alternative explanation could be "red spots, meh, they aren't unusual; what is unique is that the cloud cover above it has dispersed".

See how thoroughly I want to test downvoteology? You know you want it.

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An AI can replace what a world leader said in his video-taped speech. This will end well. Not

GrapeBunch
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Joke

Mein LangWocheWitzheit

I vill only belief it ven I hear präss for Liarbirdt frum a real Werld Leader sutsch ass Angela Merkel. Zeess could neffer happen in Tschurmany.

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GrapeBunch
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Joke

I'd like to say this about that.

So now they can show a Pat Paulsen speech and it will make sense? I'll never vote for him for President again.

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Blue Cross? Blue crass: Health insurer thought it would be a great idea to mail plans on USB sticks

GrapeBunch
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Re: The best worst idea

Credit him with the idea.

They might call it un-stoning a good turn.

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GrapeBunch
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Re: It's happened before. Should of known better

Should have Good

Should've Good

Should of No-no-no.

Apologies to Doctor Syntax.

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Golden handshakes of almost half a million at Wikimedia Foundation

GrapeBunch
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Meeellionaire$ at it again

This very morning, 2017 Jul 12, pop-over notices, for example:

"Dear readers in Canada, today we ask you to help Wikipedia. To protect our independence, we'll never run ads. We're sustained by donations averaging about $15. Only a tiny portion of our readers give. If everyone reading this right now gave $3, we could keep Wikipedia thriving for years to come. That's right, the price of a cup of coffee is all we need. If Wikipedia is useful to you, please take one minute to keep it online and growing. Thank you."

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Hackers able to turbo-charge DJI drones way beyond what's legal

GrapeBunch
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Talking Baltimores

Sooner than later, they're going to start talking about a back-door that civil authorities will be able to use to control / ground / destroy / disable drones, preferably only those that fly off own-airspace. Another idea is that if the owner has a low or no level of licensing, and if the signal of the owner's controller is weak (for example, not within easy eyesight), somebody else can control and pwn the drone. Higher level of licensing, fewer instances of control by non-owner built in to the controller chip. Implies standardization and socketing of the controller chip, so I'm obviously talking bollocks.

Another thought is to change the normal laws of property. When the drone is flying in my airspace, it belongs to the original owner as a liability, and to me as an asset, and then in both senses once I take control of it. Yup, "legalized theft".

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Jaw-boned: Wearables biz Jawbone shuts down

GrapeBunch
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Coat

Jolderbone

Can't hear me? Here, let's touch tin-foil helmets first, then I'll sing:

"The Rahman's connected to the Health Club

Now heeeeeear the word of Ja Bone."

Too loud? Sorry. Mine's the one with the battery charger in the pocket.

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Google Chrome's HTTPS ban-hammer drops on WoSign, StartCom in two months

GrapeBunch
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Stop

Whoa sign

Fellow regtards frequently ask for new icons. But The Reg in anticipation FTFY.

Thanks, Xièxiè, 谢谢 .

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Talk about a hit and run: AA finally comes clean on security breakdown

GrapeBunch
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Terminator

Re: How much longer is it going to take ?

"How much longer will we have to wait until CEOs ..."

Until jail time. Or is it gaol time? And personal liability when the delay is flagrant. Say 200% of the CEO's compensation for a particular year. IANAHBIPOOTI.

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Web inventor Sir Tim sizes up handcuffs for his creation – and world has 2 weeks to appeal

GrapeBunch
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Pirate

It's not piracy

It's not even "illegal copying" or "illegal sharing" until proven. It may be "unauthorized copying" or "unauthorized sharing", a bit like ^s or copying some text rather than the link in an email. And if I couldn't ^s a web page, I simply would omit to copy it, rather than buy an offprint or whatever.

IANALBIPAPOTI.

The piracy misnomer has given the words Pirate and Piracy a surprising cachet. The pirate party had the opportunity to collaborate in Government in Iceland recently, but they decided that the working would be too fraught. A cloak of caution that would not look bad on a copyright zealot. Let's not forget that piracy, real piracy, was OK for a victor government and it usually got a cut (of the profits, not of a rapier) as part of its licensing terms. Such a pirate was called a "privateer". "Do as I ... sauce for the gander" said no government ever.

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GrapeBunch
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Re: Sir Tim is 62

Hear, hear, Mikel. I think that Sir Tim should consider holding out for a little more. Internet History is littered with examples of copy protection that turns out to be unbreakable even for the playing client. From telephone numbers that you phone to obtain a key--until the company decides to discontinue the number--to servers that just go offline or companies that go bust.

Copyright and copyright protection is a social contract. Big publishers, together with their syruped allies in government, have been trying to dictate the terms of that contract in recent decades. Perhaps it's time to take back something for the little guy or gal.

Here is my idea. Yes, W3C agrees to DRM, on this basis: the stream or transmission includes a Basic version of the video, in a resolution that may be the same as terrestrial OTA TV reception from 1967. This version is freely copyable and recordable. The DRM resides in the paid portion of the transmission, which provides higher resolution / higher bitrate audio. Yes, I'm proposing Communism of a low-res version of every program. A bit similar to the way you can see many TV programs in a partial screen and with distorted audio on Youtube. It's already there. Former users of dial-up internet will remember when still images could be imperfectly rendered in a second or two, and then would sharpen with time. It even happens sometimes today on broadband. I don't know if this same concept is implemented in video streaming, but with multiple cores it should be no harder than stills were in 1989. I could make the argument that it's good (marketing) for publishers to give away a low-res version of everything, but instead I will say that it's a reasonable balance for the inventors of the Internet to seek, in favour of humanity. And if the damn verification server disappears, the purchaser will at least have something, even though he knows he paid for it and others did not.

Yes, the publishers can ignore it. Hell, they could have ignored the Internet from the beginning, and I would not complain.

If you have read this far, thank you very much. A lot of BS on the Internet surrounds the partial circumvention of copyright. I'd like to clear away the BS. Readers may note that in Canada, Bachelor of Science is BSc; I'm not talking about that.

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Microsoft boasted it had rebuilt Skype 'from the ground up'. Instead, it should have buried it

GrapeBunch
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No retro haven

I was hoping that by using Skype in retro installations, I would be able to spend the last few Skype dollars in the account and then happily move on. First up, Windows XP. Yes, I know the First Rule of running an out-of-date version of Windows: shut down every possible MS feature and software. Please note that the version of Skype on this XP machine was pre-MS. Result: "Skype can not connect". Second, an iPod 2g. Result: hangs on next step, "Signing in ..." OK, that wasn't a fair test. After I turned Airplane Mode off, it got to the next stage: "Can't connect to Skype".

So, not surprisingly, MS has changed things so that the old software does not work. I was mercilessly downvoted earlier when I wrote that they do that, but oh well. They downvote because they care.

So, is there a way to get a refund check from MS for $7.67 ? Given bank charges and whatever I might not even cash it, but hold on to it as emblematic of a tie, a draw, a Mexican standoff, a stalemate--in an ocean of corporate victories.

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For all the chaos it sows, fewer than 1% of threats are actually ransomware

GrapeBunch
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Thumb Up

Re: iOS is seeing attacks decline

Hmm, 7 hours after your comment, there are no upvotes and no downvotes. I'd expect such an informative post to be heavily upvoted if correct, otherwise mercilessly downvoted. Call me an optimist. But don't let her know I don't pay.

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Extreme trainspotting on Britain's highest (and windiest) railway

GrapeBunch
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[Mountain icon]

Let's face it, "mine is bigger than yours" is a hollow victory when the Himalayas and Andes are not heard from. Here in British Columbia, we have Waddington as our most dire mountain, though in global comparison its 4,019 m (13,186 ft) is wimpy. But it does make up for its short stature in other ways. I doubt that, on this date in 2117, anybody will be writing about a funicular, whether real or planned, on this monster. More flavour here. Thanks to EL REG for allowing us to enjoy technologies recreationally.

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Samsung ploughing billions into boosting memory production

GrapeBunch
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Tender memory.

Yes, we need more chips. One says turn left. Other says turn right. Why can't we just get along? Life is the Art of Compromise. Memory says: please don't forget the brick wall forward. This Public Service Message provided by the makers of your memories. Awwww.

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So. A cross-Europe cyberwar simulation. Of ransomware

GrapeBunch
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Controlling the smart meters themselves will be more work, but so much more rewarding for those intent on raising havoc.

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NASA: Bring on the asteroid, so we can chuck a fridge at it

GrapeBunch
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Door

I guess they're assuming that nothing is living inside the Asteroid. Just in case we haven't had enough Science Fiction today, or any day.

When I read the article, I thought that they would land their equipment (softly) on the larger of the pair and then use that as the base to launch the fridge at the smaller. Thus the momentum of the pair would be maintained. That's not what the video showed. And depending on how the larger is rotating, it could introduce uncertainty into the question of whether they'll hit the smaller at all. English probably needs a new expression for poor aim, because: "What's a barn, Daddy?"

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Google DeepMind trial failed to comply with data protection – ICO

GrapeBunch
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Re: I'm looking forward...

If you do wrong one to nine times, that's a crime. If you do wrong ten to a trillion times, that's business.

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Wanna tap 3 MEELLION phone calls? All it takes is one measly warrant

GrapeBunch
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Headmaster

Re: Wrong numbers

I still think 39% may be overstatement. Conversations involve at least two people. So each successful wiretap investigation should result in 2 or more convictions. Given that they're not shy about charging people only peripherally involved (don't hose down that car, you might get nicked for aiding and abetting a bank robbery after the fact), the figure should be much much lower.

To a previous poster, there are dry countries such as Saudi Arabia, but I think you mean dry counties. </pedantic> That's why they tap us, right, to catch pedants? "I'll show you your rights."

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GrapeBunch
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Coat

Re: War on drugs?

I'm sure we've had the Canadian equivalent of shootouts and murder over coffee. Angry looks, raised voices.

Here is the transcript of a conversation found to be non-incriminating:

"I've got it." "Expect a visitor."

And the redacted transcript of a conversation found to be incriminating:

"Did you see [a TV reality show]?" "Yeah, those [deprecatory adjective] [deprecatory noun]. [Copulatory verb] 'em. [Copulatory verb] 'em all."

Crime: Counselling sexual acts with adults not responsible by reason of mental deficiency.

Mine's the shovel with two kilograms of ash.

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Dead serious: How to haunt people after you've gone... using your smartphone

GrapeBunch
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Alexa, buy local newspaper.

Alexa, look in obit section.

Alexa, am I there?

If yes, trigger [doomsday machine]

Else, make coffee;

Repeat daily 7 am until [doomsday machine].

Just sayin', another way to get away with stuff is to become terminally ill with an expiry date. If you commit a messy crime but have only two months to live, will they even bother to try you?

Also, it seems in the interest of the company to deliver none of the messages. If a message is damaging, they might get caught up in messy legal muck. "We just did what we were told" may not cut it. Contrariwise, the person to sue them for non-delivery is a dead hand. And foot. IANALBIPADOOOTI

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Photobucket says photo-f**k-it, starts off-site image shakedown

GrapeBunch
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( ! )

Colleagues south of 49 may say that the remedy to: bait and switch, is: point and shoot. Or not.

In the old-fashioned world of web pages, the move would be fairly easy, with a bulk search and replace of /oldserver.com/funnydirectory with /newserver.com/seriousdirectory, then re-up the pages. Old days, old ways.

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Spies do spying, part 97: The CIA has a tool to track targets via Wi-Fi

GrapeBunch
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Pint

Re: Misuse

egészségedre!

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Europol, FBI, UK's NCA ride out to Ukraine's cavalry call

GrapeBunch
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I like to think of it as h

It's not cyberterrorism if there's a state behind it. It might be an act of war. We know that one state is behind it, USA, in the form of its NSA. But USA are merely the creators of the weapon. As everyone knows, the hardware (which is actually software, but indulge me) vendor is not responsible, even when the hardware is used against an unintended target, according to international law as arranged by hardware vendors. It's not stated explicitly, but many are suspecting Russia of revamping the hardware they were handed.

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Looking for an Ubuntu Unity close cousin? Elementary, my dear...

GrapeBunch
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Re: Open source users *are* freetards

Maybe there should be a Freetard Foundation, benefiting authors of free software. Freetards could donate or even leave money in their Wills. By then it's too late to complain, pointless to hold back. There can be no update, so far as Freetard X is concerned. The foundation would take care of different pay-in methods, tax receipts (if appropriate), apportioning. The money could go either to specified authors (these would probably not earn a charitable donation receipt) or to a generalized fund based on need. Bigger complication is the multiple jurisdictions. And of course you'd need careful rules so that Google, Amazon, MS, Apple etc couldn't start claiming funds. Some authors are adamant that they should not be paid and that too needs to be accommodated.

There may be a need for such an overarching foundation even at more organized levels. For example, people all over the world are interested in helping the Internet Archive (especially after they fix the bug where pages are hidden due to a post hoc robots.txt that has a completely different purpose), but they are a charitable donation only in the USA.

None of this will help the poster, but oh well.

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Search results suddenly missing from Google? Well, BLAME CANADA!

GrapeBunch
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Turnabout is fair play.

I welcome this ruling, because discussion about it will start discussion about extraterritoriality. USA arrogates its laws in many fields and jurisdictions, including inside Canada. The discussion might not come to anything because they pwn nukes and all your data. But oh well.

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Australian govt promises to push Five Eyes nations to break encryption

GrapeBunch
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Re: Conspiracy theory...

In a recent study of White Rhinos, researchers used fake poos to influence the herd. QED.

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Anthem to shell out $115m in largest-ever data theft settlement

GrapeBunch
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Re: "a full third of the package [..] has been earmarked to cover attorney fees"

Anthelmintic resistance. The lawyers have been in the gut of Justice, doing what they do, for so long that, even though we know what they're doing, they just do what they want, ethical outrage has no effect.

Anthem, Anthelmintic, pure happenstance. Just a memory aid.

In the generalized case, class action lawyers who agree to a modest settlement with substantial full-rate fees to themselves from said settlement, could turn around and also receive under-the-table kickbacks from the wrongdoer (oops, they never admit they goofed). The settlement is a "negotiation" where only one side of the dispute is at the table. I wonder if the Panama Papers have been scanned with an eye to this sort of possibility, though maybe even Secret Banking is considered too open for such a transaction. Even if such happened only once: comped privileges at a country club or wholesale pricing of a company's product; it is a monstrous breach of trust.

Kickbacks or none, courts, which are good at picking holes in and nullifying poorly thought-out legislation, are overdue for retooling the class action aspect of their own existence. IANALBIPOOTI.

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GrapeBunch
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It's not just about the money ...

About $1 per person, after deductions. I'd say the emotional trauma is worth a lot more than that, per person, even if no identity theft was in fact perpetrated. A modest settlement.

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Florida Man to be fined $1.25 per robocall... all 96 million of them

GrapeBunch
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I'd like to see the Conservative Party of Canada fined 11,000 yankee dollars for every dodgy robocall made on their behalf in the 2011 federal election. Search terms: "robocall scandal".

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GrapeBunch
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Knock knock

Who's there?

TripAdvisor

Trip Advisor who?

TripAdvisor Hoo is where the dark ages Suck sons buried their gold, and I did too.

I could probably go on for hours, but you get the idea. I call Time on knock knock jokes.

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GrapeBunch
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Knock knock

Who's there?

NSA

Look, matie, either I'm Scottish or I'm Canadian, not both. So fuck off with your Innis, eh?

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