* Posts by Ken Moorhouse

767 posts • joined 26 Jul 2007

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Men charged with theft of free newspapers

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: All they have to do

This is all about quantifying.

I can just imagine the Defence solicitor standing up and ask "is it ok for me to take this one free paper?"

The next question will be ""is it ok for me to take two free papers?"

The next question will be ""is it ok for me to take three free papers?"

"How about four free papers?"

etc.

At what point do you draw the line, and why there, at that particular point? Oh I can imagine a good defence lawyer in his element, particularly if he/she has an audience (aka jury).

If they "borrowed" them, the converse questions are "how long is it acceptable to borrow them for?"

"One minute?"

"Two minutes?"

etc.

and "at what point can I remove all copies from view without problem?" My local Waitrose has a big pile of Friday Standards by the door on Saturday morning.

Those that live in London will probably be aware that The Standard is not produced once, and that's it, it is rolled out often as at least two different editions with different headlines as news gets updated. So the "Final" is not always the final version, there's often a "Final Extra". Depending on who you are you could argue that bulk removing old copies was a good thing (if you're a commuter looking for the latest).

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Ken Moorhouse
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so I wrote it as a personal gift

So long as I don't get the police knocking on my door saying it is not really a gift and I'm being charged with theft.

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Research suggests UK consumers find 'fibre' advertising misleading

Ken Moorhouse
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Amazon will sort this mess out...

Once they've completed their purchase of Whole Foods.

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Software dev bombshell: Programmers who use spaces earn MORE than those who use tabs

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: Cor, multiple pissing contests going on in this thread!

There's those that use spaces.

There's those that use tabs.

Then there's those who bought Kernighan & Plauger's Software Tools who used utilities therein to convert between the two ("entab" and "detab"). If you got to the end of that book my guess is that you probably also enjoy the films of Éric Rohmer.

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Ken Moorhouse
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If this were to do with the number of spaces...

...used by one coder, and the number of spaces used by another coder, then I can see how it would relate to quality, and hopefully then salary.

Using less spaces either means:-

* That the programmer is putting code into procedures rather than having lots of nesting, which increases the overall number of spaces used

* Or the programmer uses no indenting at all. I suspect programmers that don't use any formatting aren't likely to write long programs, so if an automated leading space count were carried out on a typical programmer's output then (all other things being equal) the ratio should be fairly indicative of the quality of code contained therein.

(45 years of coding experience: started off with systems that printed out on wide music rule paper - however IIRC the GEC 4080 only allowed about 80 columns of that to be used)

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TalkTalk customers complain of being unable to load Amazon website

Ken Moorhouse
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the delivery time should not exceed 40 minutes.

The snag is that the recipient has to be home when they're delivered. Don't expect too much of the gift wrapping service for such items either.

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Tesco Online IT meltdown: Fails to deliver THOUSANDS of grocery orders

Ken Moorhouse
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but forget that society has changed since then and it has come to meet a need.

I agree up to a point. But most people actually get a better deal if they were able and willing to do the work themselves*. These solutions are there not so much for the majority of the population, they are there for the people that need it. However, because the originators of these ideas make more money by convincing all sectors of the population to follow suit (economies of scale), they make compelling reasons to get everyone on board, resulting in almost total dependency.

*In my case, doing the shopping myself means that I get to pick the items I want, rather than what the person despatched to fulfill my order feels like picking, which is likely to favour the supermarket's policy of FIFO without benefit of the in-house discount you get on short shelf-life items.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: Microsoft... Has to be involved in this mess somewhere.

Dear Sir, your order for Foie Gras could not be fulfilled. Instead we will be despatching a team, complete with mouth clamps, to install Windows 11 on all your hardware. If it borks hardware such as your Windows XP pc you may find the attached catalogue of Windows 11 hardware devices useful. Supplied with this item is a complimentary Windows 11 Readyness kit, which consists of a pair of rubber gloves.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: A bit mean!

With services such as this there should be a sign-up question along the lines of "are you totally dependent on this service?" Of course you're going to get able-bodied people answering "yes", and disabled people who don't want to cause trouble answering "no".

Maybe there is a need for - something along the lines of a "coupon code", issued by the local GP indicating reliance on a service.

For those who have to drive miles to buy pork chops, as opposed to diy food preparation using pigs in the local farm, their inconvenience factor could be deduced from their postcode.

So when there is a melt-down such as this, these people get priority, everyone else should get a canned email (rather than the beans they were expecting) explaining that if they came in-store there would be some compensatory incentive.

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Ken Moorhouse
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It took their servers nearly an hour to send an order change confirmation email last night.

What was on the order? You didn't rearrange "sweets pear drops" to read "drop sweets" did you?

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Microsoft admits to disabling third-party antivirus code if Win 10 doesn't like it

Ken Moorhouse
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"we first temporarily disabled some parts of the AV software"

Surely that is a weakness baked right into the OS? Because if the OS can launch that call, surely other software can too, which will defeat any Anti Malware application that sits above it?

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Oops! Facebook outed its antiterror cops whilst they banned admins

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: to prove his position

There has to be a heirarchy where people higher in the tree can see who you really are. I was a moderator in a forum where moderators had a completely separate identity to their regular profile. In one thread I saw a moderator siding with a user who was clearly in the wrong. On drawing this to the attention of the higher echelons it turned out that the user and the moderator were one and the same person.

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You'll soon be buying bulgur wheat salad* from Amazon, after it swallowed Whole Foods

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: How does one eat 'healthy'?

Peel slowly and see. That's why they have Pale Blue Eyes.

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Ken Moorhouse
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In other news...

Amazon are experimenting with bulgur wheat to power their delivery drones.

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It was bound to happen: Amazon launches first grocery store

Ken Moorhouse
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Amazon to buy Whole Foods

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40306099

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Ken Moorhouse
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Warehousing of books, etc.

...is one thing, but dairy, and other food items are on an entirely different level.

Having to go through the compliance hoops of ensuring that food is kept at the correct temperature, is properly stock rotated, and within BBE guidelines, has no burst packaging or pest infestation issues, is not exposed to other food items containing allergens, means staff have to be properly trained, and stock management needs extra tables/fields for these extras, all of which costs.

The likes of Ocado and Sainsburys have food hygiene built into their stock management already, and flogging tv's etc. is the icing on their cake for them, whereas Amazon are approaching from the opposite direction.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Do they substitute products if unavailable?

Like if they don't have Granny Smith's they'll send a kilo of iPhones instead.

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Microsoft dumps docs.com cloud file locker, sets December death-date

Ken Moorhouse
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Wherever I lay my hat...

Hey where's me hat gone?!

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Cabinet Office minister Gummer loses seat as Tory gamble backfires

Ken Moorhouse
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It is looking obvious that we're not in a position...

...to negotiate our way out of a paper bag at the moment, let alone negotiating with 27 other nations to leave the EU.

Clearly we should stop the clock on Article 50 until we're ready to continue.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: "Tony Benn..preface his oath of allegiance with "Speaking as a committed republican"."

It's got to be true... no mention of it on Snopes.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: "she's going to find out what real hardliners are like."

Snaps fingers.

That's it...

Give the DUP the role of negotiating the whole Brexit process, from start to finish.

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I fought Ohm's Law and the law won: Drone crash takes out power to Silicon Valley homes

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: threw a bicycle into the substation ... how times have changed

The current method would involve 50 bicycles per second (60 in the US).

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Has riddle of the 1977 'Wow!' signal finally been cracked? Maybe...

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: Where do you publish comet research?

http://www.dailycomet.com/news/20101022/did-you-see-something-unidentified-in-the-sky

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In detail: How we are all pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, debriefed or numbered – by online biz all day

Ken Moorhouse
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Cat Videos

I can sell you the ultimate privacy cloak. How it works is that all your browsing is carried out steganographically in an endless stream of cat videos.

Your Credit Rating is guaranteed not to be affected. Your Street Cred will be instantly reset to zero.

The downside is that if your name is Bruce Schneier your "cat video susceptibility score" will be zero and the powers that be will suspect that you are steganographically browsing using an endless stream of cat videos to cloak your real activity.

Which takes us to the ending credits where McGoohan is back in his "prison", ready for the next episode...

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Japanese cops arrest their first ransomware-slinging menace – er, a 14-year-old school boy

Ken Moorhouse
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for i:=1 to 9999999

showmessage('I must not write ransomware');

Press F9 and sit at the keyboard until program has finished.

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Amazon granted patent to put parachutes inside shipping labels

Ken Moorhouse
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People who ordered these dumbbells...

...Also ordered this Crash Helmet.

Do you want all items to be delivered at the same time?

No, I would like the crash helmet to be delivered first please.

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Google to give 6 months' warning for 2018 Chrome adblockalypse – report

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: boobys

Some here might suggest you are a bit gullible.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: ...and then take & make payments appropriately.

Has "served-up web page site content" been contested legally? (What You See Is Not What You've Got due to the ability of the Web Designer to detect the device being used to view content, and to serve up appropriate content).

Let's say a person browsing made payment for something and then claimed that they did not agree to the contract as seen on the page served up to them. I can imagine an expert witness for the defence running rings around this thorny question, simply by pulling apart the CSS and Javascript. If your browser had NoScript or similar installed, and part of the contractual agreement were obfuscated by javascript gobbledegook, I'm sure the case would fail as not being clear as to what the agreement was.

The Ad-Blockers just need to go the "extra step" of blocking some element of the "If you block the following content, you will be charged" agreement. If payment is taken then your defence is that you didn't see the contractual agreement. The Ad-Blocker could even mischievously press the I Agree button for you.

Sounds silly, but that's how silly it is to stick sticking plaster over sticking plaster in the first instance.

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Seminal game 'Colossal Cave Adventure' released onto GitLab

Ken Moorhouse
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I cheated... [SPOILER ALERT: Look away now]

Happy Memories*. The version we had was installed on an Intel 8080 Development System which had 8" floppy disks, and lots of fancy add-ons such as ICE and a Coral Compiler.

My work colleague was having trouble getting past the snake.

"No problem" I said, typing in: "Kill snake".

On screen response: "What! With your bare hands?" to which I replied yes.

(I'd been looking through the data files and had stumbled across "congratulations, you killed the snake with your bare hands.")

* Measured in kilobytes.

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BA's 'global IT system failure' was due to 'power surge'

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: Early adopters of data centre infrastructure management (DCIM) software

Ah... Could this be the problem?

Storing all the documentation in a folder called DCIM that they found on drive D of their pc, then wondering where it all went when they'd finished charging up their iPhone.

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Ken Moorhouse
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BA's problems putting planes into the Cloud[s]

Alternative [clickbait] headline?

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Pirates hack was a hoax, says Disney boss

Ken Moorhouse
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You know when pirating and corruption have gone too far when...

...the parrot on your shoulder starts squawking "Pieces of Seven. Pieces of Seven."

(That's a Parroty Error, for anyone who hasn't heard that one before).

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Life is... pushing all the right buttons on the wrong remote control

Ken Moorhouse
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one got sabotaged by budgie excrement

I don't think Budgies can be programmed using a Harmony, and you're supposed to wave at it from a distance to see if it responds accordingly.

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IT firms guilty of blasting customers with soul-numbing canned music

Ken Moorhouse
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Zen Internet used to have inspiring MOH...

...performed by a relative of one of the company founders, I believe.

The reason for generic muzak is it is Royalty Free, otherwise you may get a call from the Performing Rights Society. Vivaldi is out of copyright (hence his popularity), but the orchestra playing it are generally still entitled to a cut because the recording is generally still within copyright.

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You'll get a kick out of this: Qualcomm patents the 'Internet of Shoes'

Ken Moorhouse
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Fine, now we've all got to be able to Triple Click to go Home

Dunno what I'm talking about? One word clue: Dorothy.

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Dell kills botched BIOS update that murdered punters' PCs

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: Dell Orange is the new Blag

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor_plague

Still the number one thing I look out for when opening up a stricken Dell pc.

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What could go wrong? Delta to use facial recog to automate bag drop-off

Ken Moorhouse
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Will it still recognize you...

...if you arrive with less teeth than you departed with?

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MP3 'died' and nobody noticed: Key patents expire on golden oldie tech

Ken Moorhouse
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MP3: May you now no longer RIP

Surprised to be the first to say it.

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WannaCrypt 'may be the work of North Korea' theory floated

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: Unlatched

I suspect the word is "unpatched".

And the next version of Windows is, of course, "unhatched".

Many here will no doubt wish to discuss at great length the words "unmatched" and "Windows" in the same sentence, which is where I go get the popcorn...

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74 countries hit by NSA-powered WannaCrypt ransomware backdoor: Emergency fixes emitted by Microsoft for WinXP+

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: @Ken Moorhouse.

AHEM.

I (a on-man band) have written software for NHS Trusts (and other large organisations) - and NOT as a sub-contractor either.

And why not? So long as there is a mechanism for dealing with the situation where I get run over by the proverbial bus, everyone benefits. There is supposed to be an obligation for organisations such as the NHS to allow small companies such as myself to win business that would hitherto go to monolithic corporations with (i) no enthusiasm to do the job properly and (ii) on a Cost Plus basis.

If software does the job that it is set out to do, and all parties involved with it are happy with it - why should it become obsolescent? Is the newer version actually any better? In many cases, I think not.

Old pc's should not find their way into landfill, but nevertheless there is an ecological cost involved in salvaging the materials in order to reuse them.

"You just don't have the developer resources." The problem often is that everything is tested on a platform that is supposed to be rock solid. Developing for Windows environment is a bit like trying to build a castle on sand. This doesn't just affect one-man bands such as myself - it affects the big-boys just as much. What kind of "version-control" does Windows offer that interlocks with software written by third-parties?

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: Why connect to the killswitch server?

Full analysis here by MalwareTech:-

https://www.malwaretech.com/2017/05/how-to-accidentally-stop-a-global-cyber-attacks.html

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: Why connect to the killswitch server?

The revised explanation for the purpose of the killswitch was on (I think) bbc.co.uk. The purpose of the domain lookup was to somehow detect whether or not the malware was installed into a virtual machine. If it was then it was to shut up and not do anything, the thought being that in a VM environment then it was being reverse engineered.

Could someone here explain the difference between making those (presumably) zone edit calls within a VM and making them in a normal environment because I can't see how that would make a difference. There must be easier, non-spoofable ways of guaranteeing whether an app is executing within a VM or not. (EDIT: Unless it is working on a TTL basis, if the hop count is low perhaps then that indicates it's locally registered).

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: So, what would you suggest that I do here?

I think Microsoft treat their developers very shoddily. The irony is if third party tools had been chosen your app would likely run on much later OS'es. I still have programs written pre-millennium which are still in service. I went the Borland route (Turbo Pascal) and have stuck with them and successor Embarcadero ever since. Over the years I have had to make changes to some programs written as far back as Delphi 1 and so long as there's no wacky components used (a perennial problem for many types of developers) migration is painless (notwithstanding refactoring lol). I've spent a lot on tools over the years as it is my livelihood, but casual developers can use tools such as Lazarus with similar results.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: iuqerfsodp9ifjaposdfjhgosurijfaewrwergwea

It was second on their list as llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogochuchaf.org.uk was already taken

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: nothing in the writeup to indicate blind reuse

It was the following sentence that prompted me to say what I did:-

"Now someone has taken that tool and strapped it to ransomware"

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Ken Moorhouse
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Killswitch

This intrigues me. The code went walkies earlier this year.

(1) People involved with writing that original code should have immediately thought "aha, we've put a killswitch into that code, let's register that domain right now to minimise damage, should it be expolited 'as-is'."

(2) "As-is". Whoever took that code and wrapped it into ransomware couldn't have pulled the code apart to any great degree, otherwise they would have changed and obfuscated in some way the killswitch domain.

(3) Now that they know what that killswitch domain is, and its purpose in the code, they can now go through and change and obfuscate it in some way or, more likely, remove it completely, then release Mk 2 to the waiting world.

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Microsoft is on the edge: Windows, Office? Naah. Let's talk about cloud, AI

Ken Moorhouse
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"Data available on all your devices, yet dispersed"

Taking this assertion literally, this means that data posted on one device is instantly available on all your devices, regardless of location.

Replication is a well-known difficulty with such topologies, historically (and in those days, security of data was less of an issue than it is today). Will the user have any say in how data is replicated? If they are, then straight away that simple assertion becomes horrendously complicated for users to define. If they don't, then how do you know that your data is not stored in, or passes through a land that breaks your commitment to data protection laws in your region? And what happens if part of the "behind-the-scenes" connectivity breaks (which has happened)? How can data be guaranteed to be the latest version and not some old version that has somehow got to your device before the correct version?

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