* Posts by Ken Moorhouse

1129 posts • joined 26 Jul 2007

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Swiss sausage sizzler 4.0 hits 200 bangers per hour

Ken Moorhouse
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“it could be used in the bedroom!”

In my youth the question would be along the lines of "Would you like to see my etchings?"

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Brit Attorney General: Nation state cyber attack is an act of war

Ken Moorhouse
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Sounds like a good way...

...to shutter many forms of IoT development.

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Finally: Historic Eudora email code goes open source

Ken Moorhouse
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Eudora

There's a rumour going round that it will come back rebranded as Brexitora, but as its designers can't seem to agree on what kind of borders should separate the different folders and the message content, there may be a long wait for it to be released.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Pegasus

I have a customer I support that uses Pegasus. They were Netware users and that was a compelling reason for that choice at the time, as Pegasus integrated with NDS, so hot-desking was a doddle.

Pegasus is still a reliable alternative to Outlook. The user interface is traditional, there is no need for continual updates, and the scope for catching nasty infections appears to be less.

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Tesla inches toward GPL compliance in low gear: Source code forcibly ejected into public

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: Remind me...

...to stay well clear of the Stonebridge Park area whenever the Ace Cafe hosts Tesla Modder's events.

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Slurp up patient data for algos that will detect cancer early, says UK PM

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: AI?

The most useful thing about AI is to vastly improve one's Scrabble score.

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Your parents love you, Cortana. That's why we bought you an upgrade

Ken Moorhouse
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Annabelle the Sheep

Had more personality.

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Brit ISPs get their marker pens out: Speed advertising's about to change

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: I have Virgin Media 350mb and get .....

These being millibits per second?

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Want to know what an organisation is really like? Visit the restroom

Ken Moorhouse
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Posh Place Advisory

When using the sink in such places you should always look at BOTH taps as "C" doesn't always mean what you think it should mean. Au contraire - which should give some clue as to pourquoi.

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Password re-use is dangerous, right? So what about stopping it with password-sharing?

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: So let me get this straight

No need, already done for you.

If you remember, for one, AVG's controversial previewing of all the links on the page currently being browsed (their reasoning being to see if it should pre-emptively warn the user of any problems). Such tactics effectively announce your upcoming visit to their website. AVG supposedly ditched that service after complaints, not just from users of their product, but also website owners for generating false visitor data.

I seem to remember getting a phone call from a company that had trawled through their logs and contacting me from that information. I had never expressed interest in their product and my only knowledge of them was my visit to their site. They freely admitted that their only knowledge of me was from my visit to their site.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: any organism higher up the evolutionary tree than a prawn

Red Herrings might constitute a disruptive influence.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: the third part of the puzzle.

What granularity would be used for this third (temporal) part of the puzzle?

Arguably anything finer than "which date?" would be impracticable due to time zone imprecision. Even this could be problematic for someone creating a login on 31st December or 1st January in a Pacific location, which could potentially fail even a century comparison test.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: Remember the Disabled

The problem I have encountered recently with e.g., Microsoft is that, if their password strength policy changes, they do not use the "grace login" principle to allow you to login once using the insecure password, then insist you change it before logging out.

My recent experience (mentioned in another thread here) is that the user is frozen out of their account and then forced to go through all sorts of hoops to establish their identify (Subjects of emails, passwords used before, people in your address book, etc.) before they give you that "grace login" opportunity.

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Ken Moorhouse
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A site might know if two visitors to that site have the same password

Because the hashed value stored in the password field matches that from someone else.

Arguably, that is not good. The algorithm for password salting should include the username in the hashing process so that, even if everyone on that site used the same password, none of them would appear to be the same on inspection of the password field content.

However, if a hacker had access to the resultant password field, they could get valuable insight into the algorithm used for the hashing process by flooding the site with different usernames but identical passwords.

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Ken Moorhouse
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How would two sites know that passwords are the same?

The actual password should not be accessible for comparison with anything else, only with a salted hash of it.

The only way that e.g., Twitter and Facebook would know that two passwords were identical would be if they are using the same salt and an identical hashing technique.

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MPs petition for legally binding target of 95% 4G coverage across UK

Ken Moorhouse
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Bars

Where to go to get the best signal:-

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/europe/united-kingdom/articles/uk-town-pubs-per-square-mile/

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: "95 per cent of the UK's landmass by 2022."

So this is the agenda then: lop off big swathes of the UK landmass before 2022.

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Hacking train Wi-Fi may expose passenger data and control systems

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: some goddamn basic firewall rules and a couple of VLANs

In my days at LUL, those concepts would never be entertained unless there were optoisolators separating circuitry.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: before geranium transistors were obsoleted.

Watering them caused too many side-effects.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: Digital Railway (Yes, really)

I've worked on both sides of the industry (signal engineering and train-borne equipment), albeit a long time ago. (Your name rings a bell for some reason, have you worked for LUL?). The fail-safe principles underlying the Victoria line equipment (correct me if I'm wrong) are based on resonant frequency circuitry. If a well-defined pulse of a certain frequency is received then it effectively energises a switch enabling a train to move within a certain speed range, or to coast. Without the code being detected, the train stays where it is. If code is lost, the brakes are applied. Unlike car traffic where the driver of the car behind takes a chance on the bloke in front braking suddenly, the railway signalling system is designed to ensure that there is adequate distance for the train behind to brake with no chance of hitting the other train. This is all automatic, even if the driver were to collapse at the controls, safety is assured.

I seem to remember the ETT (Experimental Tube Train) planned to use Intel 4040 CPU's, because I remember trying to suss out the Assembler code for it. LUL were extremely cautious about microprocessors in those days to the extent of insisting that whatever CPU was used for production systems was 2nd sourced by a different manufacturer, so there was not total reliance on Intel. I think IBM was a second source for early 8-bit CPU's. The use of TTL was frowned upon by the development section I worked with (spiky, high-current, electrically noisy), with preference for CMOS for its higher noise immunity. Usually anything involving CPU's was "front-ended" with relays (train-borne equipment) or with mechanical interlocking frames and/or relays (trackside signalling). Even the frequency of the relays used for trackside use were specially designed to run on 125Hz (33Hz previously) AC. 125Hz being not harmonically related to the industrial 50Hz standard - meaning high noise immunity. The principle of electricity flowing = potentially ok (sorry, tripped over a pun there), no electricity = Whoa! Stop! was engraved into everyone's sub-conscious.

In summary, the Underground is an incredibly safe way to get from A-B.

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Your software hates you and your devices think you're stupid

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: "Haynes"

Do they give ideas on uses for the spare nuts and bolts left over after installation?

(To put your minds at rest: No I don't touch cars, and I'm not keen on taking apart laptops for the reason implied above).

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Ken Moorhouse
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"The way you squeeze that button baby..."

If the Random button didn't work properly for some reason it would be conceivable that you will be permanently listening to:-

"The Song Remains The Same".

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Don't try and beat AI, merge with it says chess champ Garry Kasparov

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: They learn by making mistakes and correcting their errors.

I would be more inclined to say:-

They FUNCTION by making mistakes and WEIGHTING their errors.

Many of us here will have written programs that "learn" how to win at Tic Tac Toe. Trivial perhaps, but anchors one's imagination as to how AI "works".

If Deep Mind had been forced to play chess where White starts by moving the Kings rook pawn, then black does the same, then every combination from there, then it would never have got to the nitty gritty of beating Kasparov, there would be just too many meaningless moves in its database. So it was no doubt primed with thousands of classic openings which set it on the correct learning "tree structure".

If Kasparov had gamed the system by starting with a non-standard opening, that would have forced Deep Mind to throw away its entire Opening Move catalogue and force it to play from scratch, which would have put it at a big disadvantage.

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Chap charged with fraud after mail for UPS global HQ floods Chicago flat

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: The girl in Finance

You really should have checked whether she wore a wedding ring before making propositions such as this.

"The girl in Finance said after one had gone missing they'd have investigated and I wouldn't have even got out of Pentonville to view properties."

(FTFY)

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Ken Moorhouse
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mail letter validating the move to the original address, not clear what happened to that letter

Well d'uh, it was probably redirected.

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Astroboffins spot the first perfect exoplanet free of clouds

Ken Moorhouse
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There's not much data available about the planet at the moment...

Researchers have found no evidence of leaky buckets that can be hacked.

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T-Mobile owner sends in legal heavies to lean on small Brit biz over use of 'trademarked' magenta

Ken Moorhouse
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I wonder if..

http://blog.mellowmonk.com/2008/10/mobile-tea-cottage.html

has received a cease and desist letter yet...

I see trouble brewing...

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Ken Moorhouse
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Is this a CYK joke?

That I can no longer buy Magenta cartridges for my laser printer?

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Windows app makers told to think different – you're Microsoft 365 developers, now

Ken Moorhouse
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JavaScript + AI + Excel = ...

I mentioned on another thread that AI (by definition) does not necessarily mean that you get the best deal. On average (whatever your definition of that term is), things may go well, but there's going to be cases where a Sum Range misses an important cell, someone presses Reply To All (if Outlook were included in this scheme) or JavaScript has some unintended consequence. Mistakes are a part of the pathway to intelligence, that process called learning. Whereas in the past you could blame the Key Caresser, but now the scapegoat is right there in front of you. All very well for it to show a sad face with a "Whoops" caption, but your only redress is to kick the 'puter out the door and get one that is better trained.

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Warren Buffett says cryptocurrency attracts charlatans, AI won’t change investing

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: predatory mortgages

Thank you for posting that insight.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: If everyone invested rationally

What investors are doing is to forecast the future. Everyone's perspective on the future is different. Someone who likes to take risks might put their money into Musk's ventures. Opportunity for growth could be out of this world (sorry), but conversely the risks are immensely high too. Someone who wants a steady income with low risk might pile on into the National Grid (sorry), but is that really such a safe investment? In fundamental terms NG might be considered overvalued, and if Corbyn gets elected then there might be a rerate of the shares. At the end of the day even rational choices become fraught with complexity. If everyone's perspective were the same then indeed there would be no arbitrage situations arising and the profit opportunities would be small, meaning that gilts/bonds might be just as effective, with less risk.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: Perhaps, if you don't know what you are talking about, it's better to STFU

Eh... If you had read ALL of my post, you might have seen this:-

"or just stick to fundamental valuation principles for the long haul - totally ignoring AI altogether."

I think this is the "formula" Buffett tends to find useful, which is based on common sense, rather than the magic recipe stuff dreamed up by tipsters.

P.S. It was NOT me that downvoted you.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Investment Formulae can work...

...but only in the short term. Once everyone uses that technique then a contrarian strategy would serve you better, or just stick to fundamental valuation principles for the long haul - totally ignoring AI altogether. AI has to have a portfolio of strategies with random selection of choice built in which prevent "lock-in" which would otherwise ultimately be the death of that strategy. AI cannot therefore give a specific person an advantage (in a similar way to the way that evolution works). Following an AI strategy to the letter might cause a severe loss for this reason, but on average the strategy for most followers might be gainful. This has already been demonstrated with automated trading rules which have caused mayhem on the big Stock Exchanges.

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Cookie code compromise caper caught and crumbled

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: sexual innuendo

You can tell when web designers have had a good time - there's a liberal sprinkling of .js everywhere.

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Ken Moorhouse
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The whole minification thing...

...is surely an ideal way to hide illicit code?

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Ken Moorhouse
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One of the reasons why compiled exe's are arguably better than browser-based apps

More control over what libraries are being called: repeatability and traceability.

For this to happen on a pc app we are into the realms of the Rootkit.

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TSB boss: We know everything's working, you just can't see that

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: First, let us consider the scenario where we have a perfectly spherical ball of cash in a vacuum

Things can go awry even with that scenario...

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1554632/Thief-stole-90000-from-supermarket-tubes.html

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: We really should have more classics graduates running our banks.

TSB, or not TSB, that is the question:

Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer

The slings and arrows of outraged customers,....

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That Brexit in action: UK signs pact to let Euro court judge its patents

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: Hottentot

And there was I thinking that this witty interpretation was correct (apologies for quoting in full).

Once I was a waiting man who lived at home at ease

Now I am a mariner that ploughs the stormy seas

I always loved seafaring life I bid my love adieu

I shipped as steward and cook me boys on board the kangaroo

I never thought she would prove false or either prove untrue

As we sailed away from Milford Bay on board the Kangaroo

Think of me oh think of me she mournfully did say

When you are in a foreign land and I am far away

And take this lucky thrupenny bit it will make you bear in mind

This loving trusting faithful heart you left in tears behind

Cheer up, cheer up my own true love don’t weep so bitterly

She sobbed she sighed she choked she cried till she could not say goodbye

I won’t be gone for very long but for a month or two

And when I return again of course I’ll visit you

Our ship it was homeward bound from manys the foreign shore

Manys the foreign present unto my love I bore

I brought tortoises from Tenerife and ties from Timbuktu

A China rat, a Bengal cat and a Bombay cockatoo

Paid off I sought her dwelling on a street above the town

Where an ancient dame upon the line was hanging out her gown

Where is my love? she’s vanished sir about six months ago

With a smart young man who drives the van for Chaplin Son & Co.

Here’s a health to dreams of married life to soap suds and blue

Heart’s true love, patent starch and washing soda too

Ill go into some foreign shore no longer can I stay

With some China Hottentot I’ll throw my life away

My love she was no foolish girl her age it was two score

My love she was no spinster she’d been married twice before

I cannot say it was her wealth that stole my heart away

She was a washer in the laundry for one and nine a day

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tE0wa7NjwxU

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Apple's magical quality engineering strikes again: You may want to hold off that macOS High Sierra update...

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: You re-installed Windows 4 times before realising...

In the good old days one could perform an FDISK and Format which pretty well guaranteed vanquishing any [software] demons in there. Nowadays with UEFI etc. I can well understand starting with toe-dipping, moving on to walking on hot coals only if absolutely necessary.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: one of my machines has entered a loop of bricking and unbricking itself

Get it into the unhalfbricking state and then you can perform an autopsy on it whilst pondering who knows where the time goes.

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Facebook privacy audit by auditors finds everything is awesome!

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: ...has released an audit of Facebook's privacy practices...

Maybe PwC held out two envelopes and asked the US FTC to pick one of them.

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Government demands for people's personal info from Microsoft reach all-time low

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: Government requests for people's data from Microsoft fell

Maybe there is no longer any need for it to be "requested".

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Windows Admin Center: Vulture gets claws on browser-based server admin

Ken Moorhouse
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Re: is some features it's using will be desupported and removed

I've had a spate of instances recently where people are unable to login to their [Microsoft hosted] data. Reason being is that MS changed their minimum password requirements without informing the customer ahead of the change. Whatever happened to the checkbox "Enforce password change at next login"? Nope, these situations involve going right through the entire gnashing of teeth process of "tell us examples of email addresses in your address book", "think of subjects that you've written to others about", "previous passwords", "date of birth", etc etc.

The great saviour in many cases is the fact that you've also got a device logged into the same account where you can read off some of those answers, but FFS don't logout of that device otherwise you may need to really remember these things.

Typical example of not thinking things through from concept to roll-out.

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Ken Moorhouse
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Re: browser-based administration is a logical step

IMHO The World should be going in the Opposite Direction. Just reading the latest US-CERT email which includes strings to watch out for in network traffic, it strikes me that the problem we're up against with browser traffic (where unencrypted) is that there are so many variations on what could be typed in in order for a hacker to circumvent packet matching.

There should be a facility baked into browsers which forbids the translation of strings which may arrive in upper case, lower case, hex strings, ascii cardinals, etc., etc. and in any permutation thereof. Until that is enforced on all browsers surely it is far safer to have the conventional coded style of control panel interface (CLI) which only accepts exactly the strings typed in, defeating spoofing and injection attacks, and as an easy way to control the size of buffer used to hold the typed-in content (no buffer overflows).

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Go away, kid, you bother me: Apple, Google, Microsoft, Mozilla kick W3C nerds to the curb

Ken Moorhouse
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WHATWG

Sounds like some rather borderline review site.

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