* Posts by John Geek

124 posts • joined 12 Mar 2015

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Crispest image yet of Ultima Thule arrives on Earth, but grab a coffee while the rest downloads

John Geek

for some silly reason I keep wanting to call it Thulsa Doom. Musta read too much pulp scifi/fantasy as a kid.

Americans' broadband access is so screwed up that the answer may lie in tiny space satellites

John Geek
Facepalm

What does the FCC have to do with GPS *recievers* ? if a reciever wants to pull in Galilleo, the more power to it, the FCC can only regulate transmissions.

Chinese biz baron wants to shove his artificial moon where the sun doesn't shine – literally

John Geek

and don't forget to at least double your illumination numbers to account for the perpetual smog haze overlaying Beijing...

I find your lack of faith disturbing, IBM: Big Blue fires photon torpedo at Pentagon JEDI cloud contract

John Geek

Dabbb asks.... Does AWS use SuperMicro boards ?

and that would be negatory. they use their own greatly cost reduced boards. they don't need all the enterprisey IPMI kinda stuffs, just cheap CPU + RAM + storage.

Send up a satellite to zap space junk if you want Earth's orbit to be clean, say boffins

John Geek

Shades of the anime series Planetes and the manga its based on.

DNSSEC in a click: Cloudflare tries to crack uptake inertia

John Geek

I used this cloudflare 'secure' dns for a few days til one of my favorite websites, NASA Worldviewer, kept blowing up, and I found a bunch of DNS errors in nasa.gov only on the 1.1.x.x servers not on other public servers like 8.8.x.x

Here's a fab idea: Get crypto libs to warn devs when they screw up

John Geek

my experience is, crypto APIs are incredibly complicated, hard to use, and poorly documented. this especially applies to openSSL.

OK, so they sometimes push out insecure stuff, but software devs need our love and respect

John Geek

I recently had OWASP brought to my attention, someone was trying to use their security hardening guidelines for the postgresql database server... trouble was, that guide was written 10 years ago and hasn't been updated, while postgres has undergone steady and constant enhancement, with a major release about every 18 months, minor releases every month or two...

Git365. Git for Teams. Quatermass and the Git Pit. GitHub simply won't do now Microsoft has it

John Geek
Devil

"MicroGit"

The cybercriminal's cash cow and the marketer's machine: Inside the mad sad bad web ad world

John Geek
Mushroom

and don't forget...

...cryptomining.

a moderately popular web forum I'm on currently is infested with some sort of trojan that as long as you've got the site open, it eats 100% of one CPU core, and taps a WebSocket at a .ru host every few seconds with a encrypted message/response ... googling the .ru host name shows it on various lists of coin miners.

natrually the javascript coming out of the site's advertising farms is way too obfuscated to trace, 180K blobs of hash being executed

death to spammers!

AT&T sends in startup shill to shake up Cali's net neutrality safeguards

John Geek

and today, there's a news story that some committee head forced a pre-dawn vote on a massive rrewrite of the bill that turns it into the exact opposite of what it was supposed to be. the bills authors and primary sponsors are livid but are being steamrolled.

Are your IoT gizmos, music boxes, smart home kit vulnerable to DNS rebinding attacks? Here's how to check

John Geek

its scanning a subnet I don't even use, 192.168.1.0/24, wtf ? my home stuff is all on 192.168.0.0/24

Calm your conspiracy theories, latest glimpse reveals Planet Nine may just be a pipe dream

John Geek
Pint

at a 'astronomy on tap' beer-n-astrophysics event last month, a couple of the post-docs said pretty much exactly the same thing, that its turned out the orbital fluctuation measured were either erroneous or could be explained by existing phenomena.

Open Internet lovin' Comcast: Buy our TV service – or no faster broadband for you!

John Geek

Agreed, as long as they have a 1TB/month cap on their service, faster is useless.

Spoeedtest claims I'm getting 180Mbit/sec now, yet I rarely see any ACTUAL uses go much over 10MB/s

US schools' IT systems drop out after weekend firmware update misery

John Geek

hey, if this is their only downtime, they can claim 99% uptime for the year! wooot.

Audiophiles have really taken to the warm digital tone of streaming music

John Geek

no interest? I'm 63, and I use Spotify extensively. My collection of 1000s of CDs is collecting dust. wrangling my MP3 'rips' onto various player platforms was getting just too annoying.

now, my FAVORITE way of listening to music is live, at concerts, primarily at places where listening is the norm as opposed to partying/drinking/yelling.

Fake news is fake data, 'which makes it our problem', info-slurpers told

John Geek

"Data lake"... hah, more like 'data cesspool'.

Programming languages can be hard to grasp for non-English speakers. Step forward, Bato: A Ruby port for Filipinos

John Geek

I can't wait for (pick your language) reimplemented in Chinese Han pictograms :-/

World's biggest DDoS attack record broken after just five days

John Geek

Re: ISPs could mitigate this

re; mitigation, ditto ISP's could filter traffic from outside that claims to be from their own address space.

Biker nerfed by robo Chevy in San Francisco now lobs sueball at GM

John Geek

Re: @kain preacher

THIS WAS A CITY STREET, THREE LANES, ONE WAY.

street view of area of accident,

https://www.google.com/maps/@37.7739495,-122.4313417,3a,75y,75.14h,90t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1slVB1-aUcs5K1fWyTjBZtYg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

John Geek

this was a city street, not a highway. 3 lane one way streets, quite frequently the left lane is full stopped because someone up ahead is making a left turn and waiting for pedestrians, are you saying the other two lanes have to stop and wait for the left lane to move before they can proceed? HAHAHAAHAHAHHA, right.

Seagate: Happy Xmas, staff – thanks for everyth... um, you 500. Can we have a word?

John Geek

Re: SSD

re; SSD

the cruel joke is, SanDisk *WAS* a Seagate company... but they were spun off as part of the LBO privitization 15 or something years ago.

Seagate SNAFU sees Cisco servers primed for data loss

John Geek
WTF?

Re: I heard...

battery backup (or on newer RAID controllers, flash backed writeback cache using supercaps) only protects the write cache in the RAID controller. we're talking about write cache on the DRIVES, whihc is something desktop drives often have in write-back mode, but server drivers should always be write-through.

First cardboard goggles, now this: Google's cardboard 'DIY AI' box powered by an RPi 3

John Geek

Pixel has sold poorly? odd. Pixel is backordered at many vendors, they can't make them fast enough. Numerous online review sites declare it the best Android phone ever.

Headphone batteries flame out mid-flight, ignite new Li-Ion fears

John Geek
Facepalm

there's no elemental/metal lithium in these batteries. from Wikipedia, "...electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries consist of lithium salts, such as LiPF6, LiBF4 or LiClO4 in an organic solvent, such as ethylene carbonate, dimethyl carbonate, and diethyl carbonate."

John Geek

now I'm having second thoughts about my Motorola Buds brand bluetooth 'collar' thing. :-/

Amazon's AWS S3 cloud storage evaporates: Top websites, Docker stung

John Geek

amazon's own webpile couldn't deliver my order history a hour ago....

I love the CIO's that mandate all internal critical systems are running on high availability high grade hardware, with redundant fiberswitches, multipath network connections, san storage, etc, then decides its all too expensive so outsources things to the likes of Amazon and Google, who are using the *cheapest* of commodity hardware they can get away with.... The irony of this escapes the suits.

'Exploding e-cig cost me 7 teeth, burned my face – and broke my sink!'

John Geek

1st, Chinese off-brand (UltraFire, etc etc etc) 18650s that claim 3700 mAH or whatever rarely even have 1000mAH. I've tested several batches of these and found no more than about 800mAH discharging to the 2.5V minimum safe voltage at a one hour discharge rate.

2nd, ANY device like this should be using the slightly more expensive PROTECTED 18650, NOT the unprotected ones. these usually have a button on the + end instead of a recessed contact, and are slightly longer. Unprotected LiIon batteries are only safe if they are permanently installed in a system with a integral protection circuit. the protection circuit prevents overcharge, over-discharge, and limits the max current output.

McDonald's forget hash, browns off security experts

John Geek

that picture on the front page teaser of this story in no way resembles anything ever served by any mcdonald's I've ever had the displeasure of visiting.

Oracle finally targets Java non-payers – six years after plucking Sun

John Geek

so what exactly are the files we're supposed to remove from JRE installs?

CIA: Russia hacked election. Trump: I don't believe it! FAKE NEWS!

John Geek

to register to vote, you have to certify that you are in fact a citizen, and to do so incorrectly is felony perjury. nowhere is a drivers license accepted as proof of citizenship.

American supremacy, space, liability, funding, openness – AI gurus lay it all out to US senators

John Geek

I've always assumed AI stood for Artificial Ignorance. Nothing I've seen or heard of to date has dissuaded me.

Stay out of my server room!

John Geek

many many years ago (ok, was about 1975), I was working for a small computer company who had a customer that was a exotic steel alloy mill. the factory was full of these enormous arc furnaces being used to make fancy aerospace alloys. the computer was in a portable building on stands in the middle of this factory. we had to cover the whole porta building with copper sheeting, soldered together and grounded at multiiple points with 2" wide braid, heavy copper screens over the windows and door, to keep the EMF from crashing the system. we had to isolate the power with a motor+generator where the outside power grounds were NOT connected to the copper cage, only the generator was (and massive ground stakes). thankfully this was before networking was common, so there were no external connections to this room, not even modems. lets not even get into the problems we had caused by microfine metal dust getting through the ventilation filters and into the systems, those were mostly mitigated by stacking multiple air filters and changing them weekly, and keeping positive pressure in this room by way of enormous fans (outside the faraday cage, powered by the building power).

Hackers electrocute selves in quest to turn secure doors inside out

John Geek
Devil

Re: They're still alive after electrocution?

you beat me to the same comment.

shocking.

Freeze on refrigerants heats up search for replacements

John Geek

Re: Liquid CO2?

CO2 will liquify under sufficient pressure (a bit over 5 atmospheres)

John Geek

one of the best refrigerants is.... Propane. you can drop it right into an existing R12 system and it works just fine, better than R12 to R134a conversions, even.

FreeBSD 11.0 lands, with security fixes to FreeBSD 11.0

John Geek

Re: FreeNAS

freenas 9.10 is based on bsd 10.3. FreeNAS 10 will have a all new UI whihc is behind schedule, so they mashed the old UI onto 10.3 underpinnings, and it works quite nicely.

Don't panic, but a 'computer error' cut the brakes on a San Francisco bus this week

John Geek

btw, in those old days, at least, those trolley busses didn't have any batteries on them, when the trolleys jumped the wire, the bus lost all power and lighting. hydraulic DRUM brakes didn't need any sort of servo assist, thats a feature of disk brakes, and I suspect those old busses would have had drums. I have no knowlege of what they run now, I've not ridden on the Muni since about 1970...

John Geek
Coat

Noone in SF calls it the MTA or SFMTA, its been The Muni since I was a kidlet in the 1960s and took the 22 Filmore or 24 Divisadero to school. Fun fact, circa 1964, I lived about 1/2 block from the intersection of this accident.

I know my Muni card is in ONE of these pockets.....

Zilog reveals very, very distant heir to the Z80 empire

John Geek

there's also the Rabbit processors, now owned by Digi International... The Rabbit's core instruction set is very close to Z80, although its not binary compatible, it is assembler source compatible, same registers etc, but with many extensions and enhancements, as well as a 32 bit mode.

OMG: HPE gobbles SGI for HPC. WTF?

John Geek

Re: It was games wot done for it

exactly. hpe bought rackable. I deployed a couple dozen of their 3500 storage servers (the 36 drive 3.5" 4U servers), which were thinnly rebranded supermicro kit.

John Geek

Re: Hewlett Packard

um, the arrow goes the wrong way on Compaq. the current HP is really Compaq more than it ever was Hewlett Packard.

John Geek

this should be fun. modern SGI x86 systems are heavily supermicro based.

UK copyright troll weeps, starts 20-week stretch in the cooler for beating up Uber driver

John Geek
Devil

priceless. "Get used to your life being different"

SOHOpeless Seagate NAS boxen become malware distributors

John Geek
Holmes

I'd hazard to say that many of them were blinking 12:00 12:00 not because the owners were too stupid to find out how to set, but were tired of resetting it every time the power glitched, as the two-tiny-button time set procedure was incredibly tedious.

Software-defined networking is dangerously sniffable

John Geek

why does this not surprise me in the least ? all these reinventions of the wheel under the guise of software-defined-_____ seem to be designed by people without the first idea of security.

Microsoft: Why we had to tie Azure Stack to boxen we picked for you

John Geek
FAIL

let me edit this article a bit for you, its really too wordy.

"Microsoft can’t guarantee Azure will work properly."

there.

Video surveillance recorders riddled with zero-days

John Geek

the vendor undoubtedly outsourced software development to the lowest bidder, and has no infrastructure or staff capable of ongoing development.

Larry Ellison's Oracle swallows Larry Ellison's part owned Netsuite for $9.3bn

John Geek

k, read article, googled netsuite, read a bunch of PR, and I *still* don't know what they actually do other than sling around cloudy buzzwords.

Flame Canada, flame Canada ... Botched govt payroll computers spew smoke ahead of probe

John Geek

yeah, parliamentary hearings outta fix their IT problems, real good.

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