* Posts by Claptrap314

309 posts • joined 23 Jan 2015

Page:

President Trump broke US Constitution with Twitter bans – judge

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

The Courts vs the US President

I was rather shocked to find that it is technically an open question as to whether or not a sitting President can be brought to trial. The consensus appears to be no.

While President, Thomas Jefferson was summoned as a witness in the aftermath of the Hamilton-Burr duel. He refused, writing that if the President could be compelled to appear before the courts, that he would become a lackey to them. Attorneys then negotiated a way for the President to provide the information needed without being summoned by the court.

There have been other cases, but the most recent President to make use of this claim was President Clinton. As mentioned above, the courts have never pressed this issue.

Of course, if the President cannot be compelled to appear before a court, then it is impossible for him to be tried.

The procedure would be impeachment (before the Senate) and removal followed by trial. The really interesting case would be for there to be an attempt to charge him for a crime alleged to have occurred while he was President after he is out of office.

In this case, the function of the Presidency is not directly impacted. OTOH, the problem of political decisions being criminalized would create a precedent that almost no one wants to have.

--

This is a separate matter from whether or not the President can defy the courts. As mentioned, Jackson did. So did Lincoln. It is interesting to note that in Marbury vs Madison, (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judicial_review_in_the_United_States) the Court merely declared than a act was unconstitutional. This act was, however, irreversible, so the issue was in fact moot. The Federalist Papers passionately argue that the Court is not bound to enforce or approve laws and acts which it considers to be contrary to the Constitution, but the idea that the Court is somehow the final arbiter as to what is Constitutional is nowhere to be found either in the Federalist Papers nor in Marbury vs Madison.

I expect that the idea would have been preposterous. The expectation was that each of the branches would exuberantly guard its prerogatives, and the Court "controls neither the sword nor the purse." Indeed, if the Court is the final arbiter of what is Constitutional, there is little need for there to be an executive at all. The entire point of having a separate executive is that the courts are not to be trusted 100%. In an egregious case, the executive protects the populace by refusing to carry out a decision by the Courts.

I really enjoyed reading Judge Dredd thirty years ago. But I don't want such a system of government.

0
0

Brit Attorney General: Nation state cyber attack is an act of war

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

What exactly constitutes war?

I consider that the Iranian regime has been at war with the US since invading our territory (the embassy) and taking hostages. They have certainly continued to carry out acts of war (including the attack on the USS Cole) directly and through intermediaries.

It has not been convenient for the US to respond during this time with its full military might. However, the development of nuclear weapons has been considered a red-line threat. Stuxnet was certainly an act of war. Entirely justified, and not because the US are the good guys, but because the Iranian regime continues to pledge to bring the end of the world with their bomb. I believe them. I cannot afford to disbelieve them and be wrong.

0
0

Microsoft, Google: We've found a fourth data-leaking Meltdown-Spectre CPU hole

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: Side-channel timing attacks on Humans

Funny thing happened when they analyzed those tests based on the political views of the takers. Turns out, conservatives & libertarians often show almost no bias.

Presumably, it is because we don't see people primarily as members of groups.

But yeah, if you want to fix it in yourself, stop being a liberal. :D

1
0
Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Spectre how & why

Despite my previous comment, I am not inclined to be overly harsh on the designers for these issues.

The thing to understand is the difference between architectural state (a-state) and microarchitectural state (m-state). The m-state of a processor is everything that is needed to determine, for any input, what the m-state of the processor will be in the next cycle. This is not a tautology or circularity. We see, for instance, that we need to know the state of the L1 cache to know what will be in the register file. Therefore, the L1 cache is part of the m-state, and we need to include everything that affect the L1 cache as part of the m-state as well. The a-state is everything needed to know the result of executing the next instruction. The difference between the two is mostly caches, but there is another matter. Given the m-state, and a set of inputs, you can know the final m-state. But the a-state is not closed. In particular, performance registers and clocks are part of the a-state, but they are not predicted by the a-state. You can load from one of these registers, but the final state of that register is know known. Therefore, the a-state is NOT enough to predict the result of a series of instructions. Did they teach you that in school? Probably not so that it stood out.

For consumer grade processors, the contract is strictly about the a-state. The m-state might be presented, but it is subject to change at any time. In particular, if a bug is found the a processor, a patch might be issued to the microcode in the processor to fix the bug. This fix is extremely likely to impact the performance of the processor under at least some circumstances. That is, the m-state behavior is thrown out to fix the a-state. Of course, manufacturers are strongly motivated to keep the m-state changes minimal.

Design teams have been told to deliver a-state promises at maximum speed.

Spectre is not a violation of the a-state promises. It is therefore not a "bug" in the sense that the processor is failing to behave as advertised. It is a failure to isolate state, and therefore a security failure in the presence of untrusted code.

Note that at the front of every manual I saw in the 1996-2006 timeframe, there was a big notice just inside the cover that the processor was not cleared for use with information classified "confidential" or higher. Perhaps they could have been a bit more explicit, but processor designers were disclaiming side channel-free products.

---

So, what to expect? 1) Variants of these bugs are going to continue to dribble out. The only way to avoid them on existing product is to entirely turn off speculative execution, which might not even be possible. If it is possible, expect huge drops in performance. 50x would not surprise me. 2) Designs to get around this issue are going to require huge reworking of the caches. Expect cache memory sizes to halve. This will be a major performance hit. 3) Given the size of the performance hit, I expect compute utilization to bifurcate. In trusted computing environments, the benefits of speculative executing are going to support a continuing market for speculative execution. In general computing, not. I anticipate this split appearing in the cloud.

---

In another discussion, someone mentioned targeting contention for execution units as a variant. Execution unit contention might even happen with designs that are merely pipelined. Defending against that would involve adding execution units sufficient to ensure that it cannot happen. Given my experience, don't hold your breath.

6
0
Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: Its quite depressing really

"Maybe I don't see these things as I'm not criminally minded".

THIS. This is the mentality that made my time in microprocessor validation so...fruitful. This is the same mentality I tried to beat out of my calculus students. It's not lack of criminality, it's lack of rigor.

I don't know how engineers are trained, but the important part of a mathematician's training is to find the edge cases that you missed the first time around. And the second.

4
0
Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: Removing speculative execution

There is a huge difference between turning off a core architectural feature on an existing product and comparing product A, designed with the feature and product B, designed without.

Turning off speculative execution entirely on a modern processor will be REALLY expensive. I would speculate > 4x slowdown. > 10x would not surprise me. Given the implementation parallels between supporting out of order execution and speculative, you might end up turning off OOO as well. If so, you could see slowdowns > 50x.

2
0

Senator Kennedy: Why I cast my Senate-busting vote for net neutrality

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Play to win

Leaving aside who or what is to blame, politics in the US has become much more partisan. Truly winning an issue therefore requires framing it for both sides, thereby making it "non-partisan". In the case of net neutrality, there are several different approaches that can be taken.

As a free-market conservative, I would go after the cozy deals that the cable companies have with local governments & the states. There can be no question of federal authority here, as almost all content comes from out of state (except for CA, where only most does). These deals are clearly anti-competitive. If eliminating/substantially limiting these does not bring in significant competition, that becomes prima facie evidence of collusion.

But breaking up the ISP monopolies does not solve the problem--it just changes the abusers. If ISPs become weak, then content providers become strong. The major providers then muscle the ISPs for preferential treatment---or else. Or, they just gobble the profits. Note that we already have non-trivial verticals forming between the major ISPs and the major Hollywood studios, for instance.

A lot of people talk about internet service as a utility. That might be workable--but who insures that upgrades happen in a reasonable fashion? I don't like the idea of potholes in the local internet...

1
0

IPv6 growth is slowing and no one knows why. Let's see if El Reg can address what's going on

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Google & IPv6

Google needs to go IPv6 because their INTERNAL network is spilling out IPv4.

0
0

Undocumented alien caught stealing orbits in our Solar System

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Really confused here..

The simulations indicate that (surprise!) this object's retrograde Jovian orbit is stable. Okay. Don't understand it, but I can believe it. What I cannot believe is that this single fact is enough to infer that the object has been here for five billion years. Why not one million? Or 100,000? Moreover, I understand that the gas giants formed closer in and then migrates out. Is this still believed? If so, does the simulation indicate a stable orbit during such a transition?

Problem #2: How does item #1 imply that the object is extra-solar in origin? Could we not have an Oort cloud object get knocked by Neptune to Saturn to Jupiter with at least as great a probability?

2
2

Summoners of web tsunamis have moved to layer 7, says Cloudflare

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Another day, another marketing blurb as article

At least this time, it's for a serious company (Cloudflare) talking about a genuine emergent issue (L7 attacks). But the solution they are talking is strictly for script-kiddle level attacks. Login attempts? Seriously? What am I missing? And why would this be significantly different than other traffic to mitigate?

0
0

EU considers baking new norms of cyber-war into security policies

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Who cares about your internet

When one air burst can know out the electrical grid over most of the continent? (Here in the US, I hope that the EU has their act together on this one.)

Seriously, these people need to get over themselves. None of the protocols are hardened, and patriotic hacking is a real thing. (Some Al Quada sites were taken down around 2002, much to the CIA's chagrin, for instance.)

1) If you don't harden your electrical grid, you don't have internet survivability.

2) If you don't harden your internet protocols, you don't have internet survivability.

3) The "international community" "condemns" slavery, but check out Africa. Also, child soldiers. Also, the use of poisonous gas. Also, political imprisonment. (Check out China.)

These people need to go get real jobs.

6
0

Last night's net neutrality episode had some good one-liners but a repetitive plot

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

I've gotten to the point that I generally just skip this author's articles. The constant partisan sniping obscures whatever underlying facts there are to the point of making the article useless. THIS article, however, is a well-served almost even-handed mockery of a mockery of a process.

Well done!

2
0

I got 257 problems, and they're all open source: Report shines light on Wild West of software

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Slow news day?

This looks like a copy of some Black Duck marketing material.

7
0

Get over yourselves: Life in the multiverse could be commonplace

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

"Dark" does not mean "special"

"Dark matter" means nothing other than "we don't see it shining". Think Oort cloud objects. Or comets away from the sun. Or Neptune, asteroids or moons other than our own before telescopes. Also, burnt out, really dim, or failed stars, rouge planets, cold gas clouds and isolated black holes.

Fiction loves to have other ideas--it's a great way to pull magic into an otherwise tech-dominated world--but science is sometimes boring.

2
0

Boffins urge Google to drop military deal after Googlers storm out over AI-based super-drones

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Meanwhile, in China....

The willful ignorance of these pompous preeners is preposterous. China is conducting a full-on arms races in every area of technology and a cold war from the South China Sea to buying control of the Panama Canal Zone to pushing pure propaganda through "cultural centers" in college campuses.

Military applications of AI is not a "mineshaft gap", it is an area of research that we know they are investing in heavily. Until China is being called out by these useful idiots to at least as great an extent as the US, I'm assuming that the entire thing is just another Chinese intelligence operation.

0
0

US judge to Facebook: Nope, facial recognition lawsuit has to go to jury

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Playing for keeps

At least twice in the article, the judge has rebuked FBs lawyers for attempting to remake legal arguments already rejected. This stinks strongly of attempting to bankrupt the opposition. Judges need to start issuing contempt citations for this sort of abuse of process.

The whole, "it was the algo that did it, not us" thing is going to be fun. As these things evolve, the utility of having corporations as legal persons is going to take on an entirely new level--even if no person in the company knows how the company violated a law in some case, the company clearly violated a law.

7
0

Pentagon on military data-nomming JEDI cloud mind trick: There can be only one (vendor)

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

It blows my mind that they are looking to use AWS instead of having (some) Amazon employees build them a DoD cloud. Apple is the only big tech company that I've heard of that even begins to handle security of information within the company to levels that military folks find routine.

1
0

US border cops told not to search seized devices just for the hell of it

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: Works for me

Yes, the UK has a constitution. And the efforts by some to make it a written constitution have been fiercely argued (for and against) by some of their finest legal minds. I don't pretend to know anything more about it than that. But I do know that much.

And, as for the way that constitutional law works in the US, the constitution itself is practically a dead letter. Everything is based on precedent, and the court has, for instance, simply decided that it would not abide by part of the 21st amendment. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granholm_v._Heald)

So, where is the constitution that actually governs the US written? I certainly cannot find it.

0
0
Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Given that "the border" has extended 70 miles north of the Rio Grand for several decades, I really don't see what taking a phone down to the local forensics shop could be at issue.

IANAL, though.

5
0

Kremlin's war on Telegram sees 50 VPNs stopped at the border

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: I translated bits from the Russian press last time

...

There are now even more vicious eviscerations coming out (some of them not translatable without access to a Russian edition of the profanisaurus) like this one: https://www.novayagazeta.ru/articles/2018/04/30/76338-o-perehode-na-uzelkovoe-pismo

...

Russian practically has a sub-language for cursing. Asking the right set of questions about more "interesting" curses was a sure way to get our Russian instructor to blush. College kids & their games.

4
0

Fresh fright of data-spilling Spectre CPU design flaws haunt Intel

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: Bifrication of compute resourses

In 2006, the IBM Power processor routinely would have 300+ instructions in flight. I assume that number has only climbed. That's smoking.

1
0
Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: Bifrication of compute resourses

I'm basing my observations on the 10 years of microprocessor validation (at AMD & IBM) that I did ten years ago.

All of the spec-x side channels that I am aware of have to do with cache flushing, for a suitably broad definition of "cache". One may therefore eliminate these attacks by ensuring that speculative fetches don't result in flushed caches. The naive approach would be to use orphan buffers. These orphan buffers would have to have the same response times as the caches that they are replacing. Not a designer, but "good luck with that". Just as high-waycount caches don't use true LRU logic, I think that it is much more likely to use cheaper solutions, like prefetch buffers which are basically a copy of the main cache. Since caches have dominated processor area for generations, I'm saying "doubling". It would be nice to be wrong.

Sorry about not being clear wrt TCE. I'm specifically ruling out consumer processing, or any environment wherein bad applications might be run, such as anything AAS. For instance, if the environment only ran a single application which only made use of the data of a single entity, the environment is trusted because there is simply no one and no thing to distrust. Industrial controls, special-purpose supercomputers, those sorts of things are places where systems might be designed this way. Definitely not a silver bullet, but rather an affirmation of the claims made by some vendors that using a SPECTRE-vulnerable processor does not mean that the appliance in question is thereby insecure.

2
0
Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Bifrication of compute resourses

I'm going to keep banging on this drum. The performance gains of speculative execution at the processor level are two+ orders of magnitude. This cannot be covered up at the system level. Retpoline and similar efforts will either not be completely effective or will have substantial performance impacts. New processor designs to avoid the cache timing effects basically require that you double the amount of silicone for the same size cache, plus add some quite complicated control logic. Even then, you will get some slowdown because of the time required for the logic to operate and the longer lines to the caches.

OTOH, in trusted computing environments, all of that can be skipped. I'm pretty sure that the trusted computing environment is large enough to sustain the current model. It will grow when the performance/cost advantages become clear.

1
0

Twitter signs for Google cloud at list price of about $10m a month

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

GCP is still young

I think its more than a little bit early to write the G off on this one just yet. I don't know the scales, but I'm actually surprised that Twitter isn't running their own data centers. 500Pb is hardly a rounding error just yet. This customer is going to justify a lot more investment into GCP.

I don't want a one- or two- player environment. Encourage the little guys--even if they are rich.

2
0

GoDaddy exiles altright.com after civil rights group complaint

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Matter of scale, matter of society

It is true that the First Amendment only applies to government. That is because it is part of the constitution, not because that is the limit of the intent of the ratifiers. The ratifiers were committed to the principle of Free Speech _in society_, not just relative to government. They knew that the government is a natural vector of oppression, so when they formed this one, they did so on the condition that a Bill of Rights be added. It is not an accident that the amendment first adopted was this one.

But government is not, by far, the only instrument that people can use of oppression. In fact, we regularly use the government to shut down oppressive behaviors by other entities. Even the government/non-government distinction is not that clear. We allow states to vary their laws, not just to test them before national application, but because people can (and do) move between states in part because the agree or disagree with the policy of government in those states. National media attention is often brought to bear on HOA restrictions for things like flags. In fact, the HOAs win these fights in the courts. They sometimes loose them in the court of public opinion.

If I have a comic strip, blog, or newsite, even one with a global following, whatever constraints that I want to demand of commenters is my business. Why? Because there are literally tens of thousands of other equivalent places people can go to express their views, and I will lose ad revenue, or at least my own voice, if they do.

But...what happens when there is a pervasive exclusion based on weak criteria? The Jim Crow laws were overturned, so that governments could not discriminate based on race, but how much difference did that make? In fact, discrimination by businesses and associations became more intense as people holding these views resented the repeals. Privatization also became a popular dodge.

Marxists theory explicitly calls for this sort of exclusionary behavior. Why should the political views of a professor of mathematics affect their job prospects? Of someone in IT? And yet expression a libertarian or conservative view will get you targeted in much of our industry.

Ever see a comedy bit where the commander asks for a volunteer to step forward & everyone except one mug takes a step backwards? That is what we are seeing as it regards free speech on the internet. The internet allows "anyone" to have a platform to express their views to an extent undrempt of by any but a few just fifty years ago. As long as you don't offend (current) liberal sensitivities. Then, you will hounded out of every forum which they control--whether you expressed said opinions in a particular forum or not.

THIS is the complaint against Monroe's comic. The "more equal" brigade is on the march, driving unhygienic views out of the public sphere. The marketplace of ideas is becoming decidedly unfree. And he defends this.

---

As for the particulars of this case, if they were calling for violence, then they were crossing the line. They need to be shut down along with Antifa & BLM. Oh, wait. Antifa & BLM are NOT being shut down, you say? Why exactly is that?

Was Der Stormer calling for violence? I've never heard that they were. And yet, they had to go to China to find a registrar. If you are completely confident that your views will remain acceptable to the constantly evolving leftist intersectionality, then good for you, I guess. I, for one, don't welcome my new overlords.

6
1

US techies: We want to see Pentagon's defence of winner-takes-all cloud contract

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: Oh ffs

Compartmentalization is demanded by the healthcare & financial services, so the cloud providers are building it. But don't hold your breath--it's not in the architectures.

0
0
Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Military procurement has been classic government SNAFU for most of the life of the republic. Look into the contract to build three or four ships of the line from the first Congress. (Quite a line, there.) Apparently, things were somewhat better for during the cold war, but the scandals have just been rolling out since the early nineties.

As for the particulars here, most government data is NOT classified. I presume that the contract is not about TS-SCI stuff.

0
0

FTC Commissioner refuses to budge until Trump fulfills promises

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Trying to see the tech angle here

Bueller? Bueller?

2
12

Ahem! Uber, Lyft etc: California Supremes just shook your gig economy with contractor ruling

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: Looked at the other way

Yep. That will work great. Force the two dominate players in the market to coordinate actions.

The thing is that during major events, Lyft & Uber are actively competing with each other for drivers. And the drivers have no requirement to take any particular ride. Furthermore, it has been reported here that Uber drivers have been gaming the system to drive down supply in order to trigger premium pricing.

This does not look like company control to me.

A bit of personal history. I failed out of college. (Long story.) As I was getting my act together, I ended up doing day labor mowing lawns. I accepted a rate below minimum wage. I was happy to do so, because I was literally competing with ten-year olds. I resent the Feds for saying that it was illegal for me to do so. I especially resent them for attempting to take 14% of my income "for my retirement" during a period that I was "food insecure".

People are not forced to work for these companies.

0
1

Vlad that's over: Remote code flaws in Schneider Electric apps whacked

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: Another wake-up-call

Because autoupdates over the web NEVER resulted in security holes.

2
0

AWS sends noise to Signal: You can't use our servers to beat censors

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Iran, no. China, yes. It was really annoying to me to watch Google engineers whine that Google is not in China & at the same time while that they are working with the US DoD. China ran an intelligence operation that exported all of Google's code a few years back. But that doesn't affect quarterly profits today or tomorrow.

$ > human rights. It's the way of corporations all over the world.

0
0

GitLab crawling back online after breaking its brain in two

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

In house repos

At a previous employer, we ran an inhouse Github server. Worked pretty well. Things that we open sourced went on github.com, but the master was kept in house. Which also meant that if github ever went down, we were fine.

We weren't fine when rubygems.org went down, though. Oops.

0
0

You say Halo and I say goodbye: Microsoft has a word with unauthorised mod devs

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: Release the game on Russian servers

Actually, the US Army has been running a modded version of one of these games for more than a decade for actual training. The games are rerun with the instructors providing commentary.

Fiction <-> Truth ; Life <-> Art

0
0

ISO blocks NSA's latest IoT encryption systems amid murky tales of backdoors and bullying

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

This

What angered me most about the Snoden-revealed chicanery is the trillions lost due to the need for independent development of encryption techniques. (Not just direct costs, but the delays in dependent technologies as well as the lost due to cracking.)

I probably ought to reach out to my political contacts and see about having the US just completely pull out of these kinds of things. The only customer that can trust the NSA today is the US government.

0
0
Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: NSA helped Microsoft "secure" Windows Vista

This is actually a solved problem, from the standpoint of business risk. In the US, there are major companies (like, really, really, big) whose sole business is to provide accounting & auditing services to other businesses. Likewise, law firms. These firms must keep customer data secured and isolated.

AWS securing and isolating customer data is not a differentiator in the market, it is baseline to entering the market. As Google quickly found out.

Of course, securing and isolating a NAS is different than securing and isolating a file cabinet. But the principle is the same.

0
0
Claptrap314
Bronze badge
Black Helicopters

Re: Very helpful NSA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=urglg3WimHA

0
0

America's states try to restart net neutrality – with very mixed results

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

We got the national speed limit in the 70's to "save gas" (thanks, Carter). AIR, this was repealed in 1995 by a bill originating in the Senate. (And the first thing to come out of the "Gingrich Revolution" in the house which affected Americans outside of Congress.)

0
0

That's no moon... er, that's an asteroid. And it'll be your next and final home, spacefarer

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: Asteroid Ships

The fuel needed to maintain a 1g acceleration for, say, one week would be prohibitive. See: The Rocket Problem. Sorry.

1
0

Power spike leads Chinese police to 600-machine mining rig

Claptrap314
Bronze badge
Paris Hilton

Didn't China already ban coin?

Didn't I read about it here?

1
0

Facebook can't admit the truth, says data-slurp boffin Kogan

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Everything's been show business for quite some time. It's just that it's become more apparent.

0
0

Petty PETA rapped by judges over monkey selfie copyright stunt

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: And on another news item...

This reminds me of a story I read about this guy who got tired of churning out low-grade prono books. He created a program to do it. After a while, he got tired of _that_, and offered to sell it to the publisher. The publisher freaked out, because without the human authorship, First Amendment protections would not apply... Oops.

0
0
Claptrap314
Bronze badge

According to a 2010 study by the American bar, the 9th had the highest reversal rate of any circuit court (80%) except for the Federal Circuit, which is a specialist court, over the previous ten terms.

So, yeah. I'll continue the slightly-exaggerated snide comments so as to fit in around here.

3
18
Claptrap314
Bronze badge

My understanding is that in the early days, Slater was claiming that the photo WAS the work of the monkey, as a means to drum up interest in the work (and himself). His tune suddenly changed when various folks took him up on his rhetoric.

That said, it's nice to get a mostly sane ruling out of the ninth.

5
16

Scratch Earth-killer asteroid off your list of existential threats

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: A close shave a week and a bit ago, it could have started WW3.

20 hours is a very long time when you are talking about DEFCON-changing events. Furthermore, I would be shocked if there was not some sort of hotline from the detection center to a colonel somewhere to inform them of the situation. Finally, I don't believe that US nukes can be launched until DEFCON 2.

So, not really.

1
0

Astroboffins build AI to chase galactic blue nuggets in space

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Seems a bit odd...

Doesn't a lot of science advance because someone notices something "off" about a sample or piece of data? From the reporting, it would seem that the various AI systems are quite happy to force data into some small set of buckets. This application feels backwards...

0
0

British Crackas With Attitude chief gets two years in the cooler for CIA spymaster hack

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

There most certainly IS a difference between going after "regular" people verses going after "important" people _in their capacity as important_. Murder of someone because you don't like what they are doing is a crime against the person. Murder of a judge or a prosecutor, or even a witness or a juror is a crime against peaceable society.

So I do expect his actions to be taken more seriously.

OTOH, a fifteen year old hacks the head of the CIA? "I'm not even mad. That's amazing." Seriously, the intoxication of the feat drew him into boasting (and thence, getting caught). The creeping was just more of it. I'm certainly on the side of light punishment.

But what about the fact that the head of the CIA committed a national security felony by putting those documents in a place that they could be obtained? If I were the defense attorney, I would argue that since the man who put these documents in an unsecured location did not even lose his job, that surely the documents could not actually have been important.

Oh, wait. Brennan's boss was Hilary Clinton. Never mind, then. It's all good.

0
0

Europe wants cloud giants to cough up data from anywhere in 6hrs

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

I keep beating this drum: If you do business with EU entities, expect to be required to comply with EU laws. Oh, wait. It's usually US/US. But yeah. I would rather weaken the internationals via Balkanization than have them be able to run over the locals.

0
0

Congressional group asks FBI boss Wray to explain Apple lawsuit

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

The $1M

I bring this up every time, but the simplest explanation is that the foreign (Israeli) firm that was given the $1M to crack the phone had done previous uncompensated work for the bureau, and that this was its delayed payment.

1
0

Cisco backs test to help classical crypto outlive quantum computers

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

One Time Pads are not Magical

To be useful, an encryption scheme requires not just that adversaries be unable to read a message, but that the intended recipient are able. One time pad systems are all about key management.

In a public key system, a potential recipient publicizes a public key, and keeps the private key--private. It is never transmitted. With one time pad, there has to be a communication of the pad between sender and recipient. And how do you secure this channel of communication?

I'm not saying that one time pads are useless. Just limited.

3
0

A developer always pays their technical debts – oh, every penny... but never a groat more

Claptrap314
Bronze badge

Re: the ruby community, documentation is considered a code smell

Taken out of context, you can reverse meanings! Most excellent job, sir.

Now, let me say it again:

The work of simplifying code is _hard_. It requires effort and discipline. It much easier to write an explanation somewhere (and call it documentation). But... the low road is not the road to long-term success.

If your code needs an explanation, then what it really needs is to be simplified.

The above line precisely matches the pattern of "code smell".

If you disagree with the claim "simplifying code to the point that it does not require an explanation is better for code health than explaining complicated code", I would very much like to see why.

0
1

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018