* Posts by Claptrap314

569 posts • joined 23 Jan 2015

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Facebook names former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg head of global affairs

Claptrap314
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"Trapped in its own tech bubble"?

Or maybe "trapped in its own liberal bubble". Doubt it will help much with that.

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Apple to dump Intel CPUs from Macs for Arm – yup, the rumor that just won't die is back

Claptrap314
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Techincal & Marketting difficulties

You can probably spin a custom ARM chip suitable in a year. You cannot build a component validation team in a year. I don't know Apple's internal structure, but unless they already have competent verification and validation teams in place, this will fail badly.

As for a translation layer, remember that x86 chips already are translating into a risc-type internal instruction set. There might be less of a performance loss than we expect.

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Trollface

Re: Stop Press!

Apple: Don't Do Different.

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Yale Security Fail: 'Unexpected load' caused systems to crash, whacked our Smart Living Home app

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FAIL

Unexpected load? Really?

This is EXACTLY the sort of business that should be on GCP or AWS. Properly configured, the worst a customer will see is a long response time. Even if they screw up & do a thundering herd, autoscaling will prevent actual outages. (And if they do a rolling deploy, they will realize the thundering herd LONG before it takes their systems down.) Straight up failure to apply basic SRE principles.

If it is DDOS, the route to mitigation is already quite well known. Again, straight up fail.

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Re: Let this be a lesson

I think ICOs still have that one...

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F5: Don't panic but folks can slip past vulnerable firewall servers, thanks to libssh's credentials-optional 'security'

Claptrap314
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State machines are hard?

LOL. Maybe this is why everywhere I go, I'm considered a regexp expert.

State machines are NOT that hard. Certainly, we want to abstract them out most of the time, because we really don't want to think of a 32-bit register as >4 billion states. What's hard is when people fail to decouple the state machine from the rest of the code.

And, yes, goto is still considered harmful, so if some junior programmer, especially without the appropriate training, attempts one, he's likely to mess it up as badly as anything else that he's not prepared to handle.

For serious parsers, you might just want to look into these newfangled tools out there--they go by "lexx" and "yacc".

I've never gone so far that I needed these tools, but then I'm a mathematician. I DO view processors as state machines, I just know when & how to abstract that detail away.

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You like HTTPS. We like HTTPS. Except when a quirk of TLS can smash someone's web privacy

Claptrap314
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Creating Firefox preferences in about:config

lmgtfm: http://mozilla.gunnars.net/mozilla_howto_aboutconfig.html

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Stroppy Google runs rings round Brussels with Android remedy

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Re: Do the work for us..

WAT? Amazon was around long before Android. They were quick to expand to smart phones when they came out, but this was from an already existing near-monopoly in what was then a much smaller market.

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Claptrap314
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Big IT has forced me to temper my libertarian ways

The network effects described above explain why there is one highly dominant search engine. One highly dominant short-form messaging platform. One highly dominant general social interaction platform. One highly dominate consumer goods platform. And one dominate operating system in most domains. (Android for phones, Windows for the desktop, Linux for the datacenter). It is also why IBM was basically Apple with 90+% market share back in the day.

These network effects themselves form an almost unassailable barrier to entry. Windows phone? G+? This is a real pattern, not a coincidence, and not due to corporate incompetence. (Other than the failure to realize what a meat grinder such an operation would be in the first place.)

But beyond this, what we have in EVERY case (except maybe, JUST maybe, Twitter) is that these dominate players extend vertically in a way which is not merely anti-competitive but actively damages the consumer's experience.

Google's actions regarding play services follow Microsoft's regarding IE so closely that you might think that surely they hired on some bored retired Microsoft director as a senior consultant or something. They talk about protecting the consumer, but what they are doing is driving the margins of their "partners" to zero by taking complete control over what the consumer is allowed to experience.

Only in this case, Google's real money comes from how much it gets into the head of every third person on the planet (soon to be every other thanks to their getting in bed with the Chinese).

I was in the USAF for a few years. I've seen government incompetence up close & personal. I don't like it, and I want government to have as little power as possible. But what is possible? I want a government to keep evil people from stealing my stuff. Also from getting into my head (personally--me, not some generic member of some group of thousands) to figure out just how to lure me into spending money I don't have on things I don't need, or to vote for policies that I would otherwise support. And yes, it is only getting worse. AI-driven, global tracking cookie-informed ads are coming, and they are coming fast. The only tool that I can even imagine to hold it back is regulation.

I don't even know who the good guys are anymore.

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Sure, Europe. Here's our Android suite without Search, Chrome apps. Now pay the Google tax

Claptrap314
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Re: TANSTAAFL

My complaint was about the sense of entitlement. Sure, I'm running Linux--and I have intense gratitude toward the many developer's whose work I am using at no cost.

I did miss your "or lost cost" phrase. But even then, when you look at the number of hosting services out there, I have a hard time believing that the market would not have driving costs lower unless costs were near these levels. If you don't consider $100/year for a domain that includes imap low cost, then perhaps you've not seen as much of the world as I have.

As for the employer's time, again, you are quite correct that I do not know your situation. Apparently, you get few personal emails a day than I do sometimes when I sneeze. (I've found the MK I eyeball to be the best spam filter.) Certainly, if someone on hourly is only scanning during breaks, that is fine. Likewise, for salaried employees that treat the eight hour end-of-day as being dependent upon urgent business needs, there is plenty of room for dealing with limited personal stuff while at work. I've had employers specifically state that they would rather I take calls during the day than not. I was basing my complaint on a general phenomenon where people aren't committed to delivering excellence to their employer.

Which is why I explicitly stated that I was not intending to attack you personally. Upvote for your closer. :)

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Claptrap314
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TANSTAAFL

Please don't take this as a personal attack. I'm drawing attention to a broad phenomenon. http://dilbert.com/strip/1997-10-01

I find it weird that no one attacked your premises that 1) an email client with your desired features should be available for free and 2) you should be notified about personal emails instantly while at work.

I was pleased to pay for Eudora before moving over to Linux for my home system. Likewise, I'm currently paying for a domain which includes a pop service. Yes, pop. Because I don't do personal email at work.

I find these two societal trends quite disturbing. We should expect to pay for things that we receive that are of value, and when we are at work, we should expect to be working.

I'm not ready to cede either of these points.

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Deeper dive with GitHub Actions: One config file to rule them all and in the darkness bind them

Claptrap314
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Again?

You know, you could just go with Chef. Or Terraform. Or probably Puppet. (I've not seen the last one.)

The syntax is HORRIBLE. And these are NOT config files. They don't even dare to call them that. These are DSLs for arbitrary code execution wrapped & hidden so as to make it hard (or impossible) to test. Chef's saving grace is that the testing ethic is so strong the in the ruby community that Chef kitchen was out within months.

JUST DON'T.

If your computational needs are Turing complete, you need a Turning complete facility to manage them. Sticking some arcane DSL wrapper over the problem is ALWAYS going to fail as system grows.

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LuminosityLink spyware mastermind gets 30 months in the clink, forfeits $725k in Bitcoin

Claptrap314
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I recall

an early (possibly pre-internet) cypherpunk article which rambled, but included the most memorable line: "An operating system is the ultimate virus." He even said that before Andriod and Windows 10. Huh.

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Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella is worth 154 median minions

Claptrap314
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Socialist rhetoric

is socialist rhetoric. Median income is a ridiculous metric. How many grounds keepers in that figure? (Hint: American tax law makes it practically illegal to employ grounds keepers in the same company as software engineers.) Guards? Cafeteria workers? Janitors? CEOs?

Yep, in the US, my understanding is that executives at the major companies in fact work for their own private S-Corps, which then contracts them out to the company they are an officer of.

In fact, a large business is a sprawling enterprise requiring a span of job requirements that is truly mind boggling. For various regulatory and tax reasons, the set of people who are actual employees of a given company is not at all representative of the people whose employment is actually tied to the enterprise.

Moreover, there is no theory beside the free market that can consistently provide a "just" salary across even modestly different jobs.

Unfortunately, a pure free market is almost as hard to find as a pure socialist one--and for the same reason. People are assholes. So executives' primary source of remuneration is the skill with which they weasel around what few barriers to them just writing checks to themselves that exist.

The options are to do nothing (except perhaps gripe on some semi-anonymous websites), lobby for more regulation (which has consistently been singularly ineffective), or to engage in direct actions (strikes and/or revolution). The problem is that history has shown that while the former are ineffective, the latter are positively destructive.

Piss people off enough, and they will cut off their nose to spite your face. Short of that, however, it's a pretty bleak picture.

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Thought Patch Tuesday was a load? You gotta check out this Oracle mega-advisory, then

Claptrap314
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Re: Just woke up

You mean the one where you are using Oracle products?

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Fed up with cloud giants ripping off its database, MongoDB forks new 'open-source license'

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Re: Do you think the Chinese will really care?

True, but I think this article is talking about multinationals operating in China. Of course, the same legal cutouts used for tax purposes will tend to shield the operators.

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Now this might be going out on a limb, but here's how a branch.io bug left '685 million' netizens open to website hacks

Claptrap314
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Re: Welp, here we go again.

Online shopping? Me? Hahahahahahahaha....

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Claptrap314
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Welp, here we go again.

Conveniently, I don't use Tinder, Yelp, Shopify, or Western Union. Imgur? $#@*. Oh, wait. I exclusively access Imgur through and account that I use just for viewing comics & Imgur.

Quite a few folks here are really down on cloud computing as "somebody else's computers". Shall we talk about cloud-style programming and "somebody else's code"?

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Huge ice blades on Jupiter’s Europa will make it a right pain in the ASCII to land on

Claptrap314
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Lunar lander?

I don't know why anyone thinks that landing in such an environment would be hard. We've had an entire generation preparing for just this scenario.

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World's largest CCTV maker leaves at least 9 million cameras open to public viewing

Claptrap314
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In the IoT, the "s" is for security.

I guess it was my turn to say it.

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Re: Tedium

It is practically by definition that if there is a reason for a CCTV, there is a reason to hack it. I don't think you're sufficiently devious for this line of inquiry.

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It's October 2018, and Microsoft Exchange can be pwned by a plucky eight-year-old... bug

Claptrap314
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Re: As a developer...

Dude, really. If you aren't even going to attempt excellence then go do something else.

There are lots & lots of things that can be done to avoid bugs. Usually, I would say that avoiding magical thinking is the first. In your case, clearly you need to start by giving up on defeatism.

Seriously, at my favorite job, we were bought out & shut down. My last project was a month long. I never got to see it go live. I met up with our sysadmin at our next job & asked him how it went. "Everything was fine."

At my least favorite job, I skunkworked over the course of four years a switch to a 20k assembly language test tool to make the pointer size selectable. When the time came to make use of it, I asked the implementer how much of that code he needed to fix. "None. Everything was fine."

Certainly, these are "small" projects. But the discipline of software excellence really can achieve code that you can leave alone.

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US may have by far the world's biggest military budget but it's not showing in security

Claptrap314
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"Good Enough for Government Work"

Bane of my existence while in the Air Force. I don't think I could have made it as a lifer.

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Re: Large systems are difficult

Found the (other) Google SRE. (Or former, as is my case.) :D

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Don't make us pay compensation for employee data breach, Morrisons begs UK court

Claptrap314
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"Industry Standard"

The sad fact is, there are precious few companies that are not extremely vulnerable to this sort of thing. "Senior Auditor" is not a title you hand a green grad. Implementing controls to detect issues at this level is probably doable. Of course, whomever implements THOSE has the keys as well...

I'm all for improving security at pretty much all levels, but at some point, you need to limit these claims to situations where the company in question is clearly lagging what most similar companies are doing.

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Sun billionaire Khosla discovers life's a beach after US Supreme Court refuses to hear him out

Claptrap314
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Re: As Woody Guthrie wrote....

That's certainly the attitude of a lot of Californians, anyway.

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Claptrap314
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Re: I do hope he'll put his toys back in the pram.

I'm pretty sure that is a critical part of the argument. There is NO easement. What there is is a desireable beach which was converted to public use about forty years ago, and previous owners that did not mind compromising their property rights.

Good (ie: entertaining) right of way disputes are like that. It takes decades for the rights to erode through common use.

My grandfather had a neighbor that wanted to farm the road between her field and his. Kinda the reverse of this case. Got a great story out of it.

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Super Micro China super spy chip super scandal: US Homeland Security, UK spies back Amazon, Apple denials

Claptrap314
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Size matters

I spent a decade doing microprocessor validation at AMD & IBM a little more than a decade ago. Part of that work involved being around a lot of motherboards, many of them custom-built for testing of the cpu.

The size of this chip just does not ring true. A "chip" the "size of a grain of rice" would be VERY hard-pressed to have five wires attached. Even three would be tough. There is simply no way for such a device to sit across a standard data bus.

Moreover, the evolution of buses was definitely in the direction of point-to-point. Adding anything to a bus is going to blow it's specifications. Therefore, the addition of ANY snoop-chip to a motherboard is going to require significant changes to the design. And motherboards do NOT have room to just go adding buses.

So yeah, this story does not make sense, at a physical level, to any of the tens of thousands of us who have worked in this area if we address the matter skeptically. Moreover, there are probably hundreds of thousands of techs who, when they see the above paragraph, are going to agree. Finally, anyone planting such a story knows this.

So what are the options for the truth?

As mentioned, a larger chip does NOT make this story more credible.

Some earnest low-level type overheard something, freaked out, and reached out to Reuters. The more senior people that Reuters contacted, some of whom likely already had some sort of relationship with them, were so amused that they went along with it. I'm going to rule this out because, as other commentards have mentioned, Reuters is too valuable of an institution for that many people to toy with it.

Some reporter & editor at Reuters went on a bender. Again, this seems very, very unlikely. In fact, given the nature of the story, one would expect that a senior editor would have been brought in as well.

The "natural" explanations fail, and pretty badly. So let's talk about nation-state actors / TLAs. The size of the operation pretty well rules out amateur or small-time operations. Who is hurt by the operation? To the first order, Reuters and a major Chinese manufacturer. Second order, this stokes the brewing trade war with China & the US. It also generally strikes against international trade.

I would argue that these last two points point AWAY from the five eyes. Institutionally, they are heavily vested in globalism. The recent change in the US administration has not had time to penetrate the agencies to the depth needed to justify, let alone initiate and complete, an operation of this sort. While it is true the the US President can fire all of the US district attorneys at will (as was demonstrated by President Clinton when he assumed office), the intelligence agencies are simply more independent than people here seem to want to believe.

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Garbage collection – in SPAAACE: Net snaffles junk in first step to clean up Earth's orbiting litter

Claptrap314
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Re: It's a solution, but to which problem?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagrangian_point

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Claptrap314
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Holmes

Orbital velocities

Really annoying to see this sort of thing here. Again.

Orbital velocity is almost meaningless in this context. What matters is the RELATIVE velocity of the objects in question. And guess what? For objects in the same orbit, this approaches 0 (like delta-d squared). So we're really talking about objects that are in overlapping orbits. Again, their relative velocities will usually be relatively low, because their eccentricities will be close.

This is important because, despite the pictures, LEO space is vast. The gaps between most objects most of this time is huge. Any project of this sort is going to have to spend a LOT of fuel chasing down targets.

This technology's military applications make much, much more sense.

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Boffin: Dump hardware number generators for encryption and instead look within

Claptrap314
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Re: Interesting effect, wrong explanation

I'm with you on this. Again, I spent a decade doing microprocessor validation at AMD & IBM. I wish a designer would jump in on.

From the standpoint of timing, cpus are NOT a bunch of transistors. They are clusters of transistors gated by clocks. The term "clock cycle" refers to the fact that the electrical changes coursing through some bit of a chip are "gated" until the appropriate moment in time. That inner loop, which will be optimized to the hilt by the hardware, will execute in a fixed number of cycles barring interrupts.

The only source of entropy in this code is the interrupts. And in a quiet system (and early boot systems can be very quiet), that's not going to generate very much noise at all.

It might be worthwhile to take a very careful look at experimental confirmation of these numbers. They seem rather optimistic, especially during boot.

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DEF CON hackers' dossier on US voting machine security is just as grim as feared

Claptrap314
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Re: Centralized incompetence

That would seem to me to be a stretch. The only clause that I can think of that would permit is that "congress shall guarantee to each State a republican form of government". I'm pretty certain that this clause, if ever tested, is a reactive clause.

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Why did Visual Studio Marketplace go down in the Great Azure TITSUP? Ask Azure DevOps

Claptrap314
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It's Magick...

I don't care what sort of "guarantees" someone gives, there is no 100% solution to availability. Google was switching over to some model along these lines while I was there. Yeah, if your application was small enough. And, if they did not have to do anything drastic with power. And nothing too unusual blew up while they were in the middle of their work. Then yes, you would not go down short of a datacenter-wide event.

But for the first year, (the time I was there), these "rare" events happened more than once a month.

So I don't fault the SREs at M$ if they were nervous about switching over. I also don't fault M$ for trying this new technology (which has a strong scent of salesware) less critical datacenters before going to more critical ones.

I DO fault them for having one datacenter that is critical in the first place.

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Linux kernel's 'seat warmer' drops 4.19-rc5 with – wow – little drama

Claptrap314
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Unhappy

Re: Groklaw wrote about this a decade ago

"but it cannot be assumed that it was the intention of the lawmakers when they wrote it.".

Sadly, it appears that I need to introduce you to the Mickey Mouse bill...

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Secret IBM script could have prevented 11-hour US tax day outage

Claptrap314
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99.999 can be real

LOTS of services at Google were there when I was an SRE.

But there is a difference between marketing and engineering. You need competent engineers to examine the provided system before signing off.

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Renegade 3D-printing gunsmith Cody Wilson on the run in Taipei from child sex allegations

Claptrap314
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Black Helicopters

Upped the charge...

This feels queasy. If she presented herself as 17, what exactly is his responsibility? Was he supposed to check her ID? Be able to tell a fake from a real one?

Having said that, I expect that anyone charged with engaging a prostitute who happens to be under 17 is going to get slapped with this.

But still. Funny how he gets hit with a prostitution charge so quickly after winning the other case...

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'Men only' job ad posts land Facebook in boiling hot water with ACLU

Claptrap314
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Cost-effectiveness verses abstract ideals.

Suppose you had a company that was in the construction business. You decide to run a sign campaign advertising for workers. The sign company has various sign locations all over town, and the prices of these signs depends mostly on the total amount of traffic.

You going to buy signs next to the football stadium or next to Pottery Barn?

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I interview with Amazon. They have a fascinating process regarding customer engagement. They send one, and only one, email out every night. The various groups within Amazon bid to have their material in that email. They are penalized if a purchase does not happen. I have an account, but I have never bought anything with it. Guess what? I don't get those emails any more.

--

What is happening here with Facebook is very, very similar. So long as there is a cost for running ads on F, ad sellers are going to be very, very sensitive to ROI on their ads. For whatever reason, there are far, far, fewer women looking for work in tech than men. That means that smaller businesses are not going to pay to put ads for workers in front of women. It costs them too much.

I don't like this. At all. However, I am aware of the basics of economics. So let's thing about what happens next.

This is a business opportunity for someone who can identify tech-prepared women and target them for job ads. In particular, if someone is so foolish as to use F for job hunting, the nature of the links that they are following should be a very strong indicator of what sorts of jobs to offer them. Also what kind of websites they spend their time at. (Excluding women for ads on this site would just be stupid.) If F is not presenting this to employers, they are blowing it, big time.

I have a lot of complaints against big social, but the problems of microtargetting actually do sort themselves out. Every case of business discrimination becomes an opportunity for another business to snatch a valuable worker.

I just received my first job ad targeting conservatives in tech last week. Especially if the bigs continue in their drive to create workplaces that I view as hostile and toxic, I am certain that I will receive more.

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Claptrap314
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ACLU policies

Have changed. After Antifa crashed the Charlottesville protests, the ACLU has stated that they will no longer represent neonazis. Compare their statement about representing them in Chicago. Given that Antifa is WAY more violent than the neonazis over the last few years, one could be forgiven for being surprised.

The ACLU has long leaned left. Until last year, this was not official policy, however.

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C'mon, biz: Give white hats a chance to tell you how screwed you are

Claptrap314
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Re: Finance

This is only surprising if you've never worked with a bank.

Fixed it for you.

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HTTPS crypto-shame: TV Licensing website pulled offline

Claptrap314
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Re: My Computer Science and Engineering Degree taught zero practical skills

You speak like you expected/intended your education to be something that someone else gave you (at school), or perhaps a one-and-done sort of thing? How sad.

I learned more science by reading the 500 & 600 section and subscribing to Scientific American & National Geographic (back when they were useful) than there was ever hope for me to have learned in the thin slice of time listening to someone try to explain things they themselves barely understood in K-12.

As the previous poster mentioned, the critical skills that are needed are not "practical" (and don't go on a resume').

1) The ability to learn new skills. The world is changing, you must keep up. I have literally had my job description completely rewritten between when I accepted the offer and when I showed up the first day.

2) The ability to recognize your own blind spots. The "unknown unknowns" are what kill us. Overcome Dunning-Kruger or be stuck being the one others clean up after.

3) Diligence. No matter how many layers we put between you and the bare metal, there will be tasks that are fundamentally repetitive and non-scriptable. (Think about writing good tests.) Disciplining yourself to doing it right every time.

Yeah, I was a hardass to my calculus students.

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Claptrap314
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https everywhere?

Why on earth would you use http for the admin interface on anything? For crying out loud, I'm no sysadmin for anything, but that's just ridiculous.

Oh, wait. Which article am I responding to? Umm... Well, yeah. Same, song, next verse. Otta get better, but it's gonna get worse.

We need a mass facepalm icon.

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Oracle trying hard to make sure Pentagon knows Amazon ain't the only cloud around

Claptrap314
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Re: Oracle Cloud

Found the Oracle shill. Try checking what just happened to the stock price when the numbers were released.

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So what's Microsoft's counter-AWS cloud strategy? Don't be evil

Claptrap314
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Re: no more outages ever?

I worked at G as an SRE. There are a LOT of things that are just head-shaking about these outages.

Like Microsoft going down due to electrical storms that seem to have affected approximately 0% of operations in the region of other companies.

Like Amazon configuring S3 with S3 without having the golden files elsewhere & with tested failover.

The big problem with configuration as code is that way, way too much code in the world sucks hard. In general, though, it's not the programmers per se. It is the ugly business processes that can make decent code impossible. These bad business processes are being exposed as outages. To err is human. To really screw things up, you need a computer. Thus it has always been, and we are now moving a lot of infrastructure maintenance to computers.

We have a lot of growing up to do as an industry.

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Could you hack your bosses without hesitation, repetition or deviation? AI says: No

Claptrap314
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Hard problem...blah, blah, blah, AI, blah, blah, blah

And this is the worst form--assume that "usual" is the definition of good, and initiate "corrective" action accordingly. I've worked in microprocessor validation. I've paid more than average attention to security since I was a child. Usual is good for monitoring drones. Real predators, not so much.

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How to nab a HTTPS cert for a stranger's website: Step one, shatter those DNS queries...

Claptrap314
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Fundamental design

Again, again, and again. If packets can be split, then the sewing back together has to be cryptographically secure. Anything else, and this will<bs><bs><bs><bs>almost certainly is being actively exploited by your local TLA.

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Take a pinch of autofill, mix in HTTP, and bake on a Wi-Fi admin page: Quirky way to swipe a victim's router password

Claptrap314
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Facepalm

https everywhere?

Why on earth would you use http for the admin interface on anything? For crying out loud, I'm no sysadmin for anything, but that's just ridiculous.

Oh, wait. Which article am I responding to? Umm... Well, yeah. Same, song, next verse. Otta get better, but it's gonna get worse.

We need a mass facepalm icon.

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Voyager 1 left the planet 41 years ago – and SpaceX hopes to land on Earth this Saturday

Claptrap314
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Stellar realestate

It's not the velocity that matters, it's location, location, location. The big achievement is climbing out of the Sun's gravity well. Add that potential energy back in to an Earth-orbit, and you will see just how blazing fast 38000 mph _at that location_ really is...

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Not so much changing their tune as enabling autotune: Facebook, Twitter bigwigs nod and smile to US senators

Claptrap314
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Guns & guys

I didn't read the quote that way, and I really doubt that many do. What an armed citizenry can do is be everywhere without creating a police state.

My reference to cops & soldiers is about people who are used to using the tools in question, not some sort of weird implication that amateurs are equivalent to professionals.

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Re: Self-restraint or self-regulation is going nowhere

Better Business Bureau. Good Sam. Underwriter's Laboratory. Realtors.

There are actually a number of places where it works. But not when you are looking at companies that can manage a cartel or monopoly.

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Cybercrooks home in on infosec's weakest link – you poor gullible people

Claptrap314
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Re: About one quarter right...

I pay attention. I am aware of the things you mentioned. But I reject your claim that these things are entirely indefensible. For instance, if a client can mis-represent the origin of a message, it should never be considered for use. (Outlook, IE...)

Likewise, there are only a handful of accounts that have any business need to access a bank. "Everyone" has smart phones. If they need to conduct personal business, do it on personal systems.

And so forth. No system is perfect. Security is not free. Businesses need to be rational about their costs, pay for the security that they want. That includes regular paranoia training.

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