* Posts by anonymous boring coward

1434 posts • joined 21 Jan 2015

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Cognitive Services, Clippy? AI's silent infiltration of Microsoft's Office stack

anonymous boring coward
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Shouldn't AI be called Real Stupidity?

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Microsoft president exits US govt's digital advisory board as tech leaders quit over Trump

anonymous boring coward
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"Trump has been working to improve the condition of ordinary Americans who voted for him."

Riiiiiiiight...

Some are more gullible than others, it seems.

Sure as hell keeps up the tweeting though! One of the leading tweeter twats of the world, for sure!

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anonymous boring coward
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Are you trying to defend the walking scab that finally fell off that festering pus-pit POTUS?

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British snoops at GCHQ knew FBI was going to arrest Marcus Hutchins

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Rules

"See, no black helicopters, they don't have the bottle, useless bunch of nosy parkers."

That's because GCHQ is British, so can distinguish a joke from a real threat. The US guys? Not so much...

They can't even distinguish research form terrorism. Bit of an IQ deficit over there.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Or maybe they still couldn't make a case against him even with Blairs extradition law

Given that anyone with a brain would be working for the NSA, not the FBI, I'm not surprised if they are desperate.

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anonymous boring coward
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" If there is evidence he did this then he'll do time, if not then he'll come home."

Did what, exactly?

You do know that Americans invent crimes right, left and centre nowadays, don't you?

Hell, you might not even be safe!

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Mediocre Britain: UK broadband ranked 31st in world for speed

anonymous boring coward
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"Only countries that started digitalisation much later than us. When the UK did it, faxes were cool."

Ehh.. I had to use modems, the type that called someone on the other end of a landline who also has a modem, way into the 1990s. I used Pipex which had many of those modems somewhere, when I didn't dial straight into our office to use telnet and X11 to work from home.

Faxes may have been cool in the UK at the time though?

I have absolutely no memory of UK rolling out "broadband" particularly early compared to other 1st world countries. And it's not particularly good either. Or very cheap. It's a money spinner though for some inbred very large companies, that's for sure. When is the goddam line rental gonna be over or at least lowered to a reasonable figure? Has the 1970s copper been payed yet? (Do the sums.)

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Yep pretty much says it all

Planning? What's that?

Please explain to someone living in the UK..

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anonymous boring coward
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Don't forget, though, that UK is a vast country where the long distances makes data infrastructure very expensive, compared to the other small European countries! Hang on..

Oh, I meant, don't forget though, that UK CEOs are payed extremely well, because they are so very, very good (or went to Uxbridge, perhaps), so the funds available for improvements are quite slim. Bit like BBC. Besides, plebs don't really need fast broadband.

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anonymous boring coward
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" The correct context for this discussion is 30 years ago when data was the new kid on the block and no-one was really sure how popular it was going to be."

Other countries had absolutely no problem being sure how popular data would be.

You know, one doesn't actually have to defend everything that's bad just because it's in your own country...

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anonymous boring coward
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Brexit will fix this in no time, as we will be wallowing in money.

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The Next Big Thing in Wi-Fi? Multiple access points in every home

anonymous boring coward
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I'm currently up to 8 APs in my home, counting 5GHz ones as separate ones.

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The revolution will not be televised: How Lucas modernised audio in film

anonymous boring coward
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Re: THX

I've heard plenty of THX Certified setups that sound awful.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Modernised audio? Hmm...

"Audio is often painfully bad in the big modern multiplexes near me (the area's moderately affluent, urban, well connected, and densely populated with a fair bit of cinema competition) and I can't understand why. There's usually far too much bass, the gain's generally cranked up so high the repro system distorts horribly, and I try to forget the rest of the flaws."

The speakers aren't specified correctly, leading to dynamic compression and distortion. Powerful PWM amps are no substitute for efficient large speakers with the ability to play soft as well as give proper slam. To give good slam you need dynamic headroom -i.e. the maximum deliverable sound pressure need to be a lot higher than what you actually take out of them during use.

It's just overall shoddy audio engineering today.

I think the decline in sound started when multiplexes became the norm.

My home setup sounds far superior to cinema audio.

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anonymous boring coward
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You were unlucky!

I saw it in 1977, and had pretty good sound and picture.

Actually, the film image was superior to digital projection in some ways (colours and motion).

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Core-blimey! Intel's Core i9 18-core monster – the numbers

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Cost of AMD CPU In General

AMD has better value CPUs if you don't need the absolutely fastest available. It has had this for a long time now. With Ryzen they may actually now compete, or beat, Intel in the top performance level too.

Cheap motherboards for AMD are easier to find, and AMD traditionally has had good upgrade paths for faster CPUs on older motherboards (i.e sockets). Meaning often RAM and Mobo investments can be kept for longer.

Sadly Ryzen isn't available for AM3+ sockets, so there is a definite break with the previous generation AMD CPUs. (AM3+ has had a good run though).

I have run AMD in all my PCs for the last 18 years, so someone may want to add Intel info and correct me on the value aspect..

P.S: There was a debacle about Intel's compilers fixing the binaries to run much faster on Intel CPUs, in effect making benchmark software (as well as actual applications) favour Intel. IRL AMDs are quite fast.

P.P.S: "Is there something about AMD i am missing - and why don't vendors use AMD more ?"

There is a lot of business decision making going on, with lock-ins, Intel leveraging it's size, sales trickery, and so on. Comparable to MS vs the rest.

P.P.P.S: The value of having at least one other player competing with Intel is immense. That's one reason II never abandoned AMD.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Intel's Core i9 revealed to reach 36 cores. Not.

FX outperformed Phenom II.

Although the improvement wasn't as high as the gaming community would have wanted.

Tantrum ensued.

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anonymous boring coward
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If they insist on the top-of-the-line i9-7980 their desire will come at a cost of about $276"

Sounds pretty reasonable to me!

Still sticking with AMD though.

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London Mayor slams YouTube over failure to remove 'shocking' violent gang vids

anonymous boring coward
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"I'm told that as an Aspie, I don't do "real" empathy and truth be told, I don't even know what real empathy is."

Well, that certainly ends that discussion!

Perhaps you are in over your head in a discussion about moral and ethical issues, then...

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anonymous boring coward
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"Anything where he doesn't have to rock the boat. He's not a politician, he's an idiot trying to be like Tony Blair."

Anyone saying something political is a "politician". It's not a real job, only reserved for certain self-important people such as BoJo the Clown. Perhaps you are thinking of elected representative? Well, he certainly is one of those. Just not for the Parliament.

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anonymous boring coward
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"Not my job. Not Google's job, either."

Shwooosh..

Point in clear text then: YouTube can implement their own rules within, say, 10 minutes.

Your solution would take at least one generation, probably longer. In the UK I suspect it would take about 70 years to implement.

Get it?

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anonymous boring coward
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"No. The video is not the problem. It's "kicking the absolute shit out of another guy" that is the problem."

BOTH are a problem! Unless you want to live in some voyeuristic shit society where people do anything to get views on YouTube? Perhaps if it was a relative of yours being almost killed and shown on YouTube you would be able to conjure up the empathy needed to understand this?

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anonymous boring coward
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I believe most countries have laws against inciting violence.

If a video doing so is also the means of of doing so, then obviously the video must be taken down.

YouTube are only behaving, as always, as immature profit-first irresponsible ^&%. Their mechanism for filtering contents for children is a joke as well. They just don't care as long as the money rolls in.

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anonymous boring coward
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"How about parents do their part, instead of demanding corporations raise their children?"

Yes, that will be easy to implement. Please go ahead and fix this.

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anonymous boring coward
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YouTube is a profit first entity (owned by Google).

The made shedloads of money from allowing stolen material to be viewed on their platform. I wouldn't expect them to take any responsibility.

"I want to see these scum bags for the scum bags that they are"

Fine. These scumbags actually like this sh*t. They feed on the scumbaggery. YouTube helps them doing this. This is not a good thing.

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Linux kernel hardeners Grsecurity sue open source's Bruce Perens

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Missing the point

"GRSecurity has just tried to work out some method to get paid. "

They did it wrong.

And if they, in addition, can't tolerate someone pointing this our, they might as well go away forever from this business, as far as I'm concerned. Total d*cks.

BTW: Lot's of people contribute for free and will continue to do so. That your personal circumstances and motivations have changed doesn't mean that this is true for all programmers.

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anonymous boring coward
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https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.html

GPLv2 section 6:

6. Each time you redistribute the Program (or any work based on the Program), the recipient automatically receives a license from the original licensor to copy, distribute or modify the Program subject to these terms and conditions. You may not impose any further restrictions on the recipients' exercise of the rights granted herein. You are not responsible for enforcing compliance by third parties to this License.

Adding additional conditions would violate this GPL, and thus anyone tacking on threats of consequences if actions compliant with the GPL are taken (such as redistributing the source code), is clearly not adhering to the GPL. In other words: The restrictions cannot be altered by anyone using the GPL.

If you are actually claming to redistribute works falling under the GPLv2 but not following the terms of the GPL you should probably stop doing so.

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anonymous boring coward
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"IANAL, but here I disagree. OSS Inc. has the right to stop doing business with anyone, for any reason. "

If the reason is the redistribution of GPLed source code that OSS Inc themselves have used, then they have violated the GPL and do not have the right to use that GPLed source themselves.

Besides, don't these companies using GPLed source code have a duty, according to the GPL, to distribute the GPLed source code to ANYONE asking for it -not just their customers?

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WannaCry-killer Marcus Hutchins denies Feds' malware claims

anonymous boring coward
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So pointless. There is no security in obscurity. Why is FBI trying to help Microsoft not having to fix Windows XP (or whatever version)? The means of breaking these OSs are well known, and trying to put the genie back into the bottle by arresting someone trying to help improve security is just madness.

To put it another way: If XP is obsolete old crap (according to MS), why would the state go after people seeking to improve future operating systems? It's like arresting someone who shows how old obsolete safes work and how they can be opened using a stethoscope. Everyone knows they are not very secure, and everyone in the industry knows how to crack one, and if you have one, well, that's your problem.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Oh dear... maybe

"I am in no way defending the US policing or judicial systems but if the above is true then I would submit that Hutchins has been rather silly."

You don't seem to know anything about the programming community? Let alone the more specialised branches, such as security.

Even I, not involved in security, actually read (I now realise) some of Hutchins' tutorial-oriented material in order to better understand some of the ways viruses can attack systems. These things aren't secrets -they are discussed openly, partly in order to encourage the OS vendors to improve their products (MS, looking at you there..)

FBI should go after MS instead for leaving vulnerabilities open.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Proportionality? We've heard of it.

"we could use some criminals to run the country"

Not sure what you mean? You have some of the biggest ones running it right now...

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Proportionality? We've heard of it.

"America is beyond insane. It's criminally deranged."

Yes. Certain institutions (FBI, CIA, NSA) feel they have a monopoly on security research, and everyone else should never touch the stuff. America, World Police, here we come!

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Google drops poker face, allows gambling apps on Play Store

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Is there always an element of chance in poker?

By that definition everything is a gamble.

I can tell you that skill is the single most important factor in playing Poker, and that no-one without it ever has won a major tournament by being lucky.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Is there always an element of chance in poker?

Certainly, as I don't play golf!

Ice hockey, perhaps instead?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Is there always an element of chance in poker?

From that reply I know I would beat you easily..

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anonymous boring coward
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I wouldn't call Poker gambling.

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Q. What's today's top language? A. Python... no, wait, Java... no, C

anonymous boring coward
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Re: "One can use sed as well for quite a lot. Even hairier than using Awk."

That's the kind of programming that gives hair on the chest! (Or is it a neckbeard?)

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Apple pulls massive HomeKit chip U-turn to keep up with Amazon Echo and Google Home

anonymous boring coward
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I'm confused. Your wife's iPhone works fine, and your's doesn't?

Also, isn't "insane" just a bit strong about some usability issue?

You don't state what your TV is hooked up to.

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AI quickly cooks malware that AV software can't spot

anonymous boring coward
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Re: So it's just like "The Matrix" then...

But will the battle look like Kung Fu?

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WannaCry kill-switch hero Marcus Hutchins collared by FBI on way home from DEF CON

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Burn, baby burn..

"He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom."

So those alarm clock with springs that would never, ever go back in, and that camera.. All unwise? Darn.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: You never know

"I also think the paranoia about American madness is unnecessary"

What state of mind should one have then regarding the American madness, in your opinion?

I agree that paranoia isn't correct, as it implies that the madness isn't real.

I, personally, feel more of a growing concern that the "free" aren't so free, and the "world leader" is only leading in greed and stupidity.

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Four techies flummoxed for hours by flickering 'E' on monitor

anonymous boring coward
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"someone else on the BBS would have typed it in and we could download it using our 1200-baud modems"

BBSs and modems? Spoiled rotten, you lot!

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Trump-backed RAISE Act decoded: Points-based immigration, green cards slashed

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Mother of expats

"This is the new strategy, is it ?- take away white-collar jobs from Americans and give them to cheaper immigrants, so the Americans now can move down to the unskilled jobs."

Perhaps just as well?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Not sure it changes much for DJT's base

"The US does not need large numbers of middling-talent immigrants."

Are you sure about that?

Wouldn't those raise the overall talent level of the US, given the native talent pool?

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anonymous boring coward
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"This legislation will not only restore our competitive edge in the 21st century,..."

In the same way that Brexit will make UK more competitive?

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Programmer's < fumble jeopardizes thousands of medical reports

anonymous boring coward
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I'm < impressed.

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'Real' people want govts to spy on them, argues UK Home Secretary

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Ask her this

"there service"

It's "their service". And the rest was mostly wrong too,

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Welcome to the Rise of the Machine-to-Machine. Isn't it time to 'block off' some data ducts?

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Web 1, 2, 3

"You getting something in return for being tracked, all those 'free' services, you are not having to part with money just your information."

There was lot's of free (actual free) information before Google elbowed in.

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anonymous boring coward
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"Web 3.0 was the world looking at Web 2.0 and seeing that it was a disorganized mess."

Was it? I think it was about monetising the web.

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Another day, another British Airways systems screwup causes chaos

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Be careful what you wish for.

Tell me about it...

Just got back from 3.5 days of shock solid rain out of 7...

One whole day it only rained a little..

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