* Posts by anonymous boring coward

1355 posts • joined 21 Jan 2015

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Blighty's first aircraft carrier in six years is set to take to the seas

anonymous boring coward
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Let's just hope the carrier isn't due to be scrapped before the fighter jets are delivered...

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From landslide to buried alive: Why 2017 election forecasts weren't wrong

anonymous boring coward
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Re: @ anonymous boring coward

"You mean the countries which have until recently been homogeneous and is now starting to deal with open racism?"

What?

Aren't you thinking of the various small villages around England now?

"Hard brexit is a great thing in my view."

As is suicide in some peoples' views. Not much point in discussing if you come from that angle. If you get it, do enjoy. Perhaps you get to enjoy Bumbling BoJo as well.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: @ anonymous boring coward

Do you have any idea how far to the right the Tories are vs, for example, Scandinavian countries? A few years of course correction won't hurt. A hard Brexit with May the OCD (strong and stable) PM will hurt many times more.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: @ anonymous boring coward

You are comparing some dictator in a undeveloped country with extremely uneducated people (even worse than the UK), with one of the worlds oldest democracies. Chavez wasn't above stealing ("nationalising") resources. I don't see that happening in the UK. You are afraid of the Bogeyman as depicted by the Tories.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Getting the wrong demographics adjustments

Making Theresa May realise that she is not, in fact, a dictator, is a big win.

We'll see how long it takes before she reverts back to playing Thatcher in a B-movie again.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Most of the Polls were Tory owned

If you can persuade one wing (say young left leaning voters) that they might as well stay at home playing PS4 games, because their vote won't make any difference, then the poll may well have been effective.

There are many ways small biases (biae?) can creep into polls to make them suit their customers.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: First Past the Post

"EU Commissioners are not elected. They're appointed"

Like Theresa May then?

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anonymous boring coward
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My main surprise in this election was the large turnout, which shows that young people have realised, after the Brexit disaster, that they must engage politically right now, rather than later or never. Some constituencies had 80% participation.

How lovely if some of the old stuffy backwards MPs can be further cleaned out in a soon to come re-run!

Sure, Corbyn sometimes sounds like some Chavez Light, but given the systems in place in the UK there is no risk of an actual Venezuela situation. A mild course correction towards the Scandinavian model is about as extreme as it will ever get here.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: The phrase "lies, damned lies, and statistics" ...

The exit poll showed what someone who had voted (as opposed to deciding not to bother), had actually voted, after they did it (no possibility of changing their minds).

No wonder they got it right..

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Labour says it will vote against DUP's proposed TV Licence reforms

anonymous boring coward
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Re: News to me

"Left wingers think government knows best and will ensure the money goes into the right places, if you just give you money to us.

Right wingers think that once you have enough you will donate time and money to the right places to fix the issues."

That's the Fisher Price version of how it works.

I have never noticed the Tories having much of a tendency to think people know what's best for them. In reality all governments always think they know best what's right for the lowly people.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: I Think We Need The BBC

"Many European countries implement a licence fee, and many others (European, Non-European) have government funding in addition to advertisement."

How stupid of me then!

Because others are screwed over by their systems, it's obviously correct that we are too!

We should never reform, even when technology completely changes our behaviour.

Makes so much sense.

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anonymous boring coward
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"but turning it into a commercial enterprise where profit and cost savings are the most important things is not the way to go"

You don't think BBC makes money outside sucking in the licence fees?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Amazon and Netflix?

Every dum-dum "documentary" (that's the sound of kettle drums) has to be one hour long, regardless how trivial the subject. And it has to have stupid CSI-lighting and photogenic made-up scientists, and shaky cameras with zoom lens issues.

Produced for the AD crowd.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Most of its good stuff isn't made in-house anyway.

If BBC only made stuff that differentiated them from the commercial channels, I bet the license fee could be slashed to less than half. That would be better value.

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anonymous boring coward
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The BBC has gone so much downhill that it might as well get the coup de grace.

Most of its good stuff isn't made in-house anyway.

For light entertainment any of the alternatives will do just fine.

If I were to pay only for what I'm interested in, the BBC's production would look totally different. And younger people wouldn't want to pay at all. So I understand why BBC and the established powers are desperate to hang on to the mild and controllable (and "entertaining") BBC under the current anachronistic mandatory licensing model.

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Ever wonder why those Apple iPhone updates take so damn long?

anonymous boring coward
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Re: no no no no no no no, Apple

"So Apple doesn't keep old hardware on hand for testing? They don't have an automated test process that would allow multiple test scenarios to play out? They don't have any sort of virtualized test environment?"

Only an idiot (MS?) would rely on that and then do a full roll-out.

Even MS, with OS as a service, have hopefully now learned that they must roll out gradually. Would you rather have 1% or your user base needing tailored help, or 100%?

There is a reason I always delay any updates as long as it takes to get feedback from those who can't wait.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Most incredible feat of software development - ever

"This must be the most incredible feat of software development (call it engineering if you want) in the history of the computer industry. It is almost so breathtaking that it is shocking."

No it's not. You are exaggerating. It's neat though.

Going to the moon with the equivalent of cheap calculator as the on-board computer, that's an achievement.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: I say "Well done Apple."

"And your limited understanding of file system formatting"

Formatting?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: It wasn't as risky as the author makes it out to be

This wasn't about releasing an untested update on peoples devices, it was about Apple purposely using peoples phones as a test bed, i.e. they implemented a change, ran some tests, then rolled the change back whether it worked or not, all as part of a single 'update' as far as the users were concerned.

I actually quite like this approach, if it means they can test some aspects of introducing the file system changes in a safe way, before rolling it out wholesale.

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anonymous boring coward
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Can't live without your iPhone for 30 minutes, even if doing it at a time of your choice?

Pathetic.

I can inform you that Android upgrades aren't exactly speedy either.

At least the i-stuff gets updates. My i-stuff that's a lot older than my LG G3, for example, still gets updates (LG won't update the G3 for no other reason than wanting to sell the latest and shiniest -don't get me wrong, I knew about this general Android problem). Having Google's own hardware doesn't seem to help that much. They just think it's natural to leave perfectly working stuff behind for the landfills.

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When we said don't link to the article, Google, we meant DON'T LINK TO THE ARTICLE!

anonymous boring coward
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Surely the correct headline would be:

Right to be forgotten forgotten

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Break crypto to monitor jihadis in real time? Don't be ridiculous, say experts

anonymous boring coward
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My point was that for the intelligence services to get good intel they should compromise the devices of the people under investigation. Not ruin encryption for everyone, thus making it obvious to even the most daft murderous lunatic sociopath nutter that those devices cannot be used at all to communicate securely.

The extra threshold of having to do so also makes it less likely that we will all be monitored causally like in some 1984 scenario. (For which our technical capability is now way beyond what was envisioned in "1984".)

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: What about privately agreed crypto between private parties?

You're on May's radar now mate!

Better sleep under the bed from now on.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Said it before.

"That's why I have no problem voting Tory"

Like voting for Trump then?

Don't mind having deluded morons in charge?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: There will always be a safe place to communicate

"The idea that there is a way to stop secret communications is a nonsense. Playing whack-a-mole with whatever is used now only has one end game"

The concept of not being able to say "enough is enough" and have it work just fine is an impossible concept to grasp for the vicar's daughter.

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anonymous boring coward
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If encryption was known to be useless, the potential "terrorists" (in reality: deluded, low IQ, narcissistic, mentally ill scumbags) wouldn't use it, would they?

So: Own goal. Worse than useless effort.

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Cuffed: Govt contractor 'used work PC to leak' evidence of Russia's US election hacking

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Dear "The Intercept"

"Retyping a multi-page document can be impractical."

More practical than serving 10 years.

Besides: OCR.

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anonymous boring coward
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Aren't you going to talk about Sep 11, and the fake moon landings too?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: "...undermines public faith in government."

If it's going to kill us or harm us, it's probably a pollutant.

If, for example, we spread table salt over the land to the extent that we couldn't grow crops any more, I'm pretty sure that table salt would be classified as a pollutant.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: IQ below 0

She is but one individual. Perhaps she wanted to be martyred by the system?

More alarming is that entire organisations let's single low-level individuals have access to entire massive databases of classified information -transferable onto USB drives, for example.. That truly is low IQ.

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anonymous boring coward
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The emails came with a Word document attached containing a Visual Basic script that would run a PowerShell script to slurp information from the victim's Windows PC.

Yeah, about that issue of allowing running of things that show up in the email..

I think I said it was a bad idea around 1987?

I'm sure I wasn't the first to notice the problem though.

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Apple appears to relax ban on apps fetching, running extra code – remains aloof as always

anonymous boring coward
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Security is one issue.

Another is modifying previously reviewed Apps to do something different than expected. (Which may be related to security, or just massively annoying, such as draining the battery.)

At least my i-thing stuff doesn't suddenly drain the battery for no apparent reason, whereas with my Android things there is no such guarantee. Apps misbehave on a regular basis -some I can't even kill with blunt force (and just the constant need to monitor their behaviour is a major pain).

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Silicon Graphics' IRIX and Magic Desktop return as Linux desktop

anonymous boring coward
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"When I first used Linux, I set it up with olvwm, and just used the commandline in the little console window to launch GUI applications. "

Yeah. I played around with fvwm a lot.

MS has brought back the need to type things to launch them though, with a start "menu" that is anything but.

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Amazon granted patent to put parachutes inside shipping labels

anonymous boring coward
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You can patent effing anything.

So now the pouch for the parachute has a label on it, and it's patentable?

FFS!

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BA's 'global IT system failure' was due to 'power surge'

anonymous boring coward
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Could someone please explain why power should "spike" when, as the story goes, all things were started at once? In my mind there could be a rush of current leading to a brown-out condition.

Perhaps it's a "power demand spike" that is being referenced?

But the idea with these statements seem more aimed at conjuring up images of dangerous voltages spikes entering the system and blowing up things, like some episode of Star Trek, or Space 1999 where CRTs tended to explode.

After a complete power failure, presumably equipment would need powering up in a controlled manner?

That must all be part of the specifications for the system, and should happen more or less automatically. It seems unlikely that all systems would power up simultaneously and overwhelm the supplies?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Power spikes & surges

Although on a smaller scale, an organ mishap can be very humiliating.

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anonymous boring coward
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OK, so something failed. And they didn't have a working automatic failover. I get that. Embarrassing, and the CEO should go just for that reason.

What I don't get is how it could take so long to fix it? It must have been absolute top priority to fix within the hour, with extra bonuses and pats on backs to the engineers who quickly brought it back up again. How could it take so long?

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BA IT systems failure: Uninterruptible Power Supply was interrupted

anonymous boring coward
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it could have resulted in both the battery supply and the generator supply being briefly connected in series to the power bus feeding the racks. That would result in the data centre’s servers being fed 480v instead of 240v, causing a literal meltdown

Sounds weird wired.

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Intel gives the world a Core i9 desktop CPU to play with

anonymous boring coward
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Only $1000 if you buy 1000 units?

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Lexmark patent racket busted by Supremes

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Epson extortion

I had an all-in-one (HP, possibly) that wouldn't scan a document if it was out of ink!

That POS went to the dump.

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How the Facebook money funnel is shaping British elections

anonymous boring coward
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"We are continually developing our understanding in this area"

Not very quickly, it seems.

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Pentagon trumpets successful mock-ICBM interception test

anonymous boring coward
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Was it a test missile from a UK submarine that went west instead of east again?

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BA CEO blames messaging and networks for grounding

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Culled from the Pilot's forum...

About that "power surge":

Looks like embellishment of the truth and dramatisation comes easy to this CEO.

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anonymous boring coward
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These people aren't suited to thinking by themselves and take any initiatives.

I once was at an airport where my luggage would never reach the pick-up area because the belt was full with unclaimed luggage from some earlier flight (and those passengers where nowhere to be seen).

I asked the staff there why they didn't remove the luggage so the new luggage could reach us. They "weren't working for the luggage handling company".

Of course, the orange-vest people on the other side of the rubber curtains couldn't come out into the hall to remove luggage, so they just stood around waiting for the band to move...

So I and another passenger removed all the luggage so the band could again move, and our luggage could get to us.

And this was in Western Europe. Not bloody USSR.

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anonymous boring coward
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Cruz has also promised that passengers will never again have such an experience with BA, in part because the carrier will review the incident and figure out how to avoid a repeat.

Is that because the only way such an experience can happen is if this incident occurs in the exact same way again?

Very intelligent thinking by that fantastic CEO. Obviously this has nothing at all to do with having enough of the right kind of people available to quickly identify issues and resolve them urgently. Nothing at all.

Looks like BA has a f*cking politician at the helm -and we all know how well that usually goes.

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New 'Beaver' web server has exactly ONE user outside China

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Nice Beaver!

"Just had it stuffed!"

From memory.

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What is dead may never die: a new version of OS/2 just arrived

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Win32 applications, only Win32s

"Graphics *drivers* have always been in the kernel (otherwise how could they talk to the hardware?)"

User mode drivers are given access to their hardware. No need to be in the kernel.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Nice for abandonware

"But this came at great costs in terms of stability, functionality and elegance. Which people without an understanding of the underlying reasons behind it - and more importantly, having never tried NT in any meaningful way - quickly assumed was because of "M$" incompetence when writing their "Windoze""

Just because NT was a proper OS, it doesn't follow that Win 95 was OK. There is a reason Ctrl-Alt-Delete is a famous key combination. MS can sometimes do things properly, then the right small group of people work on a project -but as a rule, business decisions trump technical decisions. Just witness the things that never get fixed, because management has decided that it won't be cost effective. Despite billion dollar profits.

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Euro Patent Office staff warns board of internal rule changes

anonymous boring coward
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Re: "seize private property" ?

Yes. Luckily the UK doesn't have leaching "upper class" scum like that. Oh, wait..

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