* Posts by anonymous boring coward

2049 posts • joined 21 Jan 2015

All that dust on Mars is coming from one weird giant alien structure

anonymous boring coward
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"when will man first step foot on mars (if it hasn't already, queue conspiracy theories)?"

That's right! We haven't been to the moon, because MSM claims we have. (And a few others too)

But since we claim not to have been to Mars, we have actually been there in secret.

It all makes sense now...

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British Airways' latest Total Inability To Support Upwardness of Planes* caused by Amadeus system outage

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Amadeus

BMI?

Why should a tall person get a discount?

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Fork it! Google fined €4.34bn over Android, has 90 days to behave

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Big fines are just a cost of doing big business

So you think EU should hurt anyone selling phones now, instead of just Google?

Doesn't sound like a good idea to me.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: ....we are approaching a time of living in "interesting times"

Just let the legal professionals do their jobs, and you use whatever phone you are a fanboy of.

The less you worry about it, the better for everyone.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: ....we are approaching a time of living in "interesting times"

"it is antitrust becasue apple wont let anyone else make an apple phone"

Huh? Is Mercedes "antitrust" because they won't let anyone else make Mercs?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: You can't fork Android

"looking forward to a native Android experience on a Pixel 3"

So time to reward Google for their practices?

I'm staying away from Google hardware after the Nexus 7 went bad so fast.

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Dudes. Blockchain. In a phone. It's gonna smash the 'commoditization of humanity' or something

anonymous boring coward
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I get that a blockchain can be reliable technology in the case of something like Bitcoin.

But if we have 1 million blockchains for various trivial purposes, wouldn't that make them just as unreliable as any other technology? Who is going to verify it all and pronounce authenticity?

I admit to little knowledge in the area, so don't hesitate to put me right.

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anonymous boring coward
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"Chen's LinkedIn profile reveals he has a Master of Divinity (MDiv) degree in postmodern philosophy from Fuller Theological Seminary."

Is it April 1st already?

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Pi-lovers? There are two fresh OSes for your tiny computers to gobble

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Very nice.

"We also know that geolocation data is relatively easily de-anonymized"

No kidding! A trace leading to your own door, every day. With no motion during the night...

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Feds charge Man after FCC boss Ajit Pai's kids get death threat over net neutrality axe vote

anonymous boring coward
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Re: He commited a Felony

Something can be consequential and still be morally or legally wrong. It often is.

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anonymous boring coward
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I think you'll find that it's the law that's right, and not Pai in particular.

Don't give him credit when none is due.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: He commited a Felony

"So if someone does murder Pai's children, it will have been provoked by Pai's evil policies?"

Only if that was the case.

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When Google's robots give your business the death sentence – who you gonna call?

anonymous boring coward
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"what's your backup plan, and your exit stratergy"

Sounds like using the cloud is a bit like a SEAL team extracting a hostage.

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anonymous boring coward
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Relying on The Cloud.

The Internet of Hackable Things.

Artificial Stupidity making critical decisions.

What could possibly go wrong?

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Drug cops stopped techie's upgrade to question him for hours. About everything

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Made it here first!

"Drug" is a very weird word in English.

In my native tongue a "drug" is something that influences your perception of reality somehow, or simply puts you to sleep (temporarily, or forever).

Insuline and such are medication (or medicine), not "drugs". A "drugstore" would be a quite shady place indeed!

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Google weeps as its home state of California passes its own GDPR

anonymous boring coward
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"We think there's a set of ramifications that's really difficult to understand," said a Google spokesperson, adding: "User privacy needs to be thoughtfully balanced against legitimate business needs."

Yeah, really hard for them, perhaps.

Whose business is that, then?

Come to think of it, there is no need for any balance at all, really. Privacy could be 100%, and it would be just be fine by me.

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Chrome sends old Macs on permanent Safari: Browser bricks itself

anonymous boring coward
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I love my oldish MBP, but dread the day that Apple decides that it's not worthy of the next OS upgrade. That's the one major issue I do have with Apple: Planned obsolescence.

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GDPR forgive us, it's been one month since you were enforced…

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Don't fret. It is all part of Trumps grand plan

Don't act the fool.

Water isn't a pollutant either, but you can still drown in it.

Too much CO2 will feck up our planet so much that you will wish you had more pollutants instead of CO2.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Don't fret. It is all part of Trumps grand plan

"It has dropped its CO2 output greatly - almost entirely due to fracking for natural gas."

Kindly explain how that works? Natural gas creates CO2 when burned, just like any other carbon based fuel.

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A volt out of the blue: Phone batteries reveal what you typed and read

anonymous boring coward
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I bet a clear power draw signature like that depends on stuff like spell checking and auto completion being on.

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On Kaspersky’s 'transparency tour' the truth was clear as mud

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Seriously?

"a government ran by a pseudo-dictatorship which invades a peaceful nation and runs hundreds of thousands of people out of their home at gunpoint."

Now you are slightly harsh about the UK government. But only slightly.

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anonymous boring coward
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The UK government has sent UK citizens to, for them, foreign countries on the basis of having, apparently, insufficient documentation (technicalities, in other words). They detain thousands of people on vague grounds. The government is in the process of destroying the economy in the interest of a few tax dodgers and their useful idiot xenophobe friends. The government has sent people to die abroad on missions with extremely vague objectives.

I can see them doing quite a lot to get their own way.

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Amazon, eBay and pals agree to Europe's other GDPR: Generally Dangerous Products Removed from websites

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Dangerous?

Many countries use a combination of a percentage of the speed limit, and a maximum overspeed (for example 20mph) before losing the license. Hefty fines long before those limits.

Assuming you ask about the signposted speed limits, I guess making them suitable to the road conditions, but also taking into account other road users, would make sense. Especially now when drivers expect not to have to think at all, and just keep to the posted speed limit (as a lower limit) regardless of visibility, other road users, and so on.

So, yes, more nannying because drivers don't do their own assessments any more.

Also: Drivers should be forced to take a "pedestrian experience course" walking along some heavily trafficked B-roads. That should scare the sh*t out of them, and give them a valuable lesson. Might help with the obesity epidemic as well.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Dangerous?

Obviously, if people habitually go 15mph above the speed limit, lowering the limit will have an effect.

If people completely ignore the speed limit, it won't. This is where policing comes in.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Dangerous?

Speeding on the roads is not "Liberté". It infringes on everyone else's road use, and their liberties.

Walking along a B road here in the UK, drivers going well above the speed limit look like they have seen a ghost when they see a pedestrian. I couldn't even imagine cycling along that road.

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anonymous boring coward
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"does that mean Amazon etc.. are liable because they were aware of the danger?"

No, but I'm sure some American will sue Amazon claiming exactly that.

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anonymous boring coward
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Luckily, UK will soon have none of this EU-nonsense clout, and will be free too strike out on its own, and forge its many, many own laws. (Not red tape, much better laws, for sure.)

The first such law will be to always keep a suitable lubricant handy, in case US shows up.

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Happy birthday, you lumbering MS-DOS-based mess: Windows 98 turns 20 today

anonymous boring coward
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All I have to say is "Ctrl-Alt-Del".

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Microsoft commits: We're buying GitHub for $7.5 beeeeeeellion

anonymous boring coward
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Re: How can it possibly be worth that much?

Yeah, Beats was "only" 3bn.

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anonymous boring coward
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My take on this is that a few get billions of dollars for the work done, for free, by thousands of people.

What do the the contributors get? Those that actually made Github worth anything at all?

Not only did those thousands do the work for free. They also gave it away to be re-used for free.

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SUSE Linux Enterprise turns 15: Look, Ma! A common code base

anonymous boring coward
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Re: not uncommon

"That's so wrong. If immigrants choose to live in your country, they should better change their lifestyle and adhere to local unwritten/written rules and really integrate with local people."

Sure. What is the opinion of the native Americans on the subject of floor labelling?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: numbering

And where is Windows 9? Come to think of it, where is Windows 4, 5 and 6?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Cultural cloning and diminishing returns

"More of a Pratchett style, to be fair"

The problem with imagining it in a Pratchett style is that you'd have to imagine it in a style you have to imagine -which is fine by me, but can cause some confusion.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: not uncommon

"Clearly, all vendors should avoid version numbers containing "six", because it sounds like "sex""

Oddly enough, in Swedish the word for six and sex is just "sex" -spelled the same and pronounced the same. Never caused a problem, or embarrassed anyone.

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anonymous boring coward
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"Based on an ad hoc survey of customers at the SUSE Expert Forum, SUSE reckons that around half of users will likely make the jump to the new version over the next 12 months."

So they aren't planning to have it install automatically if you close an obscure dialogue window by hitting the "X" then?

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No, Samsung, you really do owe Apple $120m for patent infringement

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Who invented what?

"The first GUI driven desktop operating system? Nope. Not in-house. Licensed from Xerox."

It wasn't licensed. It was loosely copied based on what they could see at a Xerox tour. They may have poached some Xerox people later. Xerox, stupidly, went after Apple when Apple sued MS for copying Apple (at a much later stage). Xerox wasn't in the OS arena, and didn't really know what to do with it's ground breaking GUI tech.

Xerox themselves created their system inspired by Douglas Engelbart's NLS (from 1968!).

"The much loved OSX. Nope. Re-written on top of the Open Source operating system, BSD."

OS X is a UNIX-type system based on Next STEP, which was indeed partly based on BSD but with a Mach OS kernel. There are many such BSD derived systems. It has had extensive changes, and the graphics subsystem is unrelated to other Unix systems.

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Do UK.gov wonks understand sci-tech skills gap? MPs dish out Parliamentary kicking

anonymous boring coward
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Re: All the government knows is that...

"This makes taxing them correctly easier for HMRC because making money is all they are really interested in."

Don't you mean "taking money"?

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Half of all Windows 10 users thought: BSOD it, let's get the latest build

anonymous boring coward
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Basically Windows is on that bandwagon that games are: Make the utranerdy users salivate with apprehension about every little minor "enhancement". Adrenaline from the anticipation. Sad.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Needs saying!

"So every day more Windows 10 machines have been successfully upgraded to the April 2018 Update than the total number of Linux desktops running in the world."

And every day Android and millions of servers run Linux, not clunky Windows.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Wasted energy

Indeed. And we also have to pay for it with actual money.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: The dark side of rolling releases

" The result would be a better version of the original."

Not entirely true.

Often hardware requirements increased for no apparent reason.

And the XP update system went from fast and slim to exceptionally slow and fat.

And even now in Win 10 it's just as slow and fat.

Windows update is major fail and embarrassment for MS. How can people (companies) keep coping with it?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Rolled out != working users

"Laptop - has the "desktop" issue and is currently a paperweight. I simply don't have time to do anything more to try and fix it"

Insert a USB drive with a linux distro?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: "reflects perhaps misplaced confidence"

Feck me know or later?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: A mess

My stable platform is now an older MacBook Pro. Runs very nicely indeed, and with many useful features that MS has failed to copy properly so far.

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anonymous boring coward
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P.S: I then had to roll it back, but at least that took less than one hour.

P.P.S: Why isn't saying anything at all, so any issues can be identified? Totally useless waiting for hours with absolutely no information. Not even knowing if it is progressing.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Sorry to report no problems on 11-year-old machines

"I will admit the xeon required some coaxing (online upgrade failed so had to use a thumbdrive)"

A new definition of "no problems".

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anonymous boring coward
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Of course it's fast. It's presented as just another update. Only it took 5 hours to install on my gaming PC.

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Internet engineers tear into United Nations' plan to move us all to IPv6

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Mapping plan

"The people who devised IPv6 were NOT engineers - any sensible engineer knows the KISS principle"

I have to agree. Anyone familiar with v4 looking at v6 initially goes, "wtf is this?"

That's not normal with properly engineered stuff building on previous things.

And why is UN involved of all entities?

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Activists hate them! One weird trick Facebook uses to fool people into accepting GDPR terms

anonymous boring coward
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Not a lot to be surprised about there really.

My LG phone gave me a rare update, which was all about privacy invasion.

I declined under threat of not getting any more updates.

But I haven't had a real update for over a year anyway.

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US judge won't budge over Facebook's last-minute bid to 'derail' facial biometrics trial

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Reputational injury

Most FB users are just like smokers: Hooked.

They don't care if it's damaging, or not.

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