* Posts by Dwarf

651 posts • joined 11 Dec 2014

Page:

Dell BIOS update borks PCs

Dwarf
Silver badge

Dual BIOS is the way to go - as you say, some systems do this already. Its not difficult to test in the BIOS if the image is valid before booting it, to check if it booted successfully last time or to have a keypress that forces to the alternative bios image for this / next reboot.

As to Jumpers and replacing chips - do you really expect a user to be able to disassemble their laptop and do this ?

Dual BIOS removes all this pain at the cost of a larger device that can support both images.

0
0

Backup crack-up: Fasthosts locks people out of data storage for days amid WCry panic

Dwarf
Silver badge

The joy of cloudy stuff

Someone else's panic becomes your outage and you can do nothing but sit back and wait until they decide to provide service again.

Perhaps a little planned maintenance wouldn't go amiss - rather than the unplanned / forced maintenance.

17
0

Microsoft Azure almost doubles infrastructure cloud market presence

Dwarf
Silver badge

Market share

The article states that Microsoft 1.5Bn vs AWS's 3.5Bn over the same period.

So, with a quick bit of maths 1.5 / 3.5 = 42.8%, or AWS is more than twice the size of Microsoft.

That shows how little people trust Microsoft's offering - even with their forced push to make them look like the "obvious" option.

When will they learn that customers aren't gullible ?

1
1

Why Microsoft's Windows game plan makes us WannaCry

Dwarf
Silver badge

You run a large estate of 600+ machines. If you have all of them on one O/S, you hire one engineer on 50k and 3 technicians on 20k. If you have them on a 12 bespoke OSes, you hire 12 specialist engineers on 50k each, and each of them spends 90% of his time doing nothing.

That's why.

Whereas when the vulnerability hit you had 100% of everyone doing nothing *

* Except the IT team who were working through the weekend.

8
0

Sophos waters down 'NHS is totally protected' by us boast

Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: Panda

The register hijacked by sales drones ???

Perhaps you would substantiate your claim - which version, when was the patch out, how come you knew about if before everyone else etc.

3
0

Beeb hands £560m IT deal to Atos. Again

Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: "declare harddrives with bad sectors fit for work"

Being a bit 'vertically challenged' there's not many other places to hit.

1
0
Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: "declare harddrives with bad sectors fit for work"

Re: "declare harddrives with bad sectors fit for work"

Actually, all hard drives come with bad sectors that are mapped our during manufacturing, its been like this since the start as nobody can manufacture defect free discs, its called the factory defect list and the bad blocks are mapped out during the manufacturing process. Grown defects that occur during life are generally not a problem, that's what the defect map is for. The drive will spare out dead blocks with one of the pre-allocated spare areas. Go read on SMART and its metrics for reading these counters. This is only a problem if the drive runs out of spare blocks due to a significant issue, or more commonly it suffers a major problem with a sensor, head or motor that renders the whole unit inaccessible.

SSD's are the same, as are device that use NAND flash There are standard methods of dealing with these challenges (which are detailed in the manufacturers data sheets) and ultimately its what makes your IT products cheaper to produce.

There is plenty of info out there on how this works and on the technologies that make reliable storage from raw media that inevitably contains defects. Unsorted Block Images (UBI) is a good example of this.

Not that any of this has anything to do with the BBC/ Atos deal though.

3
0

UK hospital meltdown after ransomware worm uses NSA vuln to raid IT

Dwarf
Silver badge

They don't need their own Linux distro, there are plenty that will already do what they need.

1
1
Dwarf
Silver badge

Budgets

I guess that if the NHS was better funded then they would have the budget to spend on keeping the IT that keeps their business working up-to-date.

Its a bit rich that Amber Rudd is quoted on the BBC as saying that "the NHS must learn from Friday's cyber-attack and upgrade its IT systems". Surely the fault lays at the door of the of government funding (or the lack of it). Critical public services must be correctly funded - irrespective of which government that happens to be on any given day as they are all as bad as each other in this regard.

I also believe that key supplier such as Microsoft should be forced to support applications for a longer period of time that reflects the complexity of making significant changes in large enterprises. This is a cost of doing business with such customers.

1
1
Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: It doesn't have to be connected to t'internet

I take if that you've either been on a different planet or asleep under a rock whilst the variety of USB VID/PID control products hit the market then ?

Its trivially simple to control USB device insertion to only approved device types / types & Serial numbers and/or to specific users

3
1

IBM wheels out bleedin' big 15TB tape drive

Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: Why does nobody build disk libraries?

There was also the Plasmon UDO, archive platform, which looked really good from a reliability perspective.

Last I heard they had gone, but it seems that the domain still exists, but the driver compatibility seems to be about 10 years old, so looks like its gone to the great big bit barn in the sky.

2
0
Dwarf
Silver badge

@kain

How is that any different from any other type of tape drive in existence ?

7
0

Crooks can nick Brits' identities just by picking up the phone and lying

Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: They shouldn't encourage you to give out your 'security' data so easily

Mutual authentication would be a big plus here.

If there was some way for me to authenticate that they really are genuine, then I might be more inclined to talk to them. My usual response when they call is "if its important, then write me a letter and provide some account specific information so I can validate your request is genuine and I'll contact you on your customer service number that I hold on file."

The problem is that they always ask for something that is by definition useful to the bad guys.

If I give some info on trust, then all they have to do is say "yes, that matches", how do I know that they didn't just write it down and say "OK". Of course, if their next response is oh, "my system has just gone down" and they want to call back later - then you know you were suckered, but by then its too late. How many non-IT types would fall for this ??

Don't get me started on phrases containing "for data protection reasons" - its my data, you can't protect it from me or intimidate me with the scary sounding phrase !!

1
0

OpenWRT and LEDE agree on Linux-for-routers peace plan

Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: Forks and Choice

DD-WRT forked from OpenWRT too.

I've used OpenWRT and LEDE on a number of devices (a bunch of BT HomeHub5's) and it seemed a bit fragmented as to which site / code base one was best for any one topic. LEDE seems to be better in terms of functionality and the overlay file system is great for config and upgrades (run sysupgrade and you are done), but the documentation on how to tweak a particular router seemed more up-to-date on the OpenWRT site. I just hope that they merge the "good" from both projects - like dropping the pointless drinks recipe from the login process

I kind of expected the target project to be called something like LibreWRT, but I guess that OpenWRT has a certain heritage.

0
0

Microsoft distie Entatech goes TITSUP

Dwarf
Silver badge

So we can conclude from this that Microsoft licences are not flying off the shelves then - contrary to all the marketing hype.

2
1

It's been two and a half years of decline – tablets aren't coming back

Dwarf
Silver badge

Sales and Marketing reality distortion field

When will sales and marketing people wake up to the fact that there is not a limitless market of people who either have the disposable income or are prepared to pay more and more and more for their tat.

We buy things because we want them and haven't already got one. I purchased a hammer 20 years ago and will probably pass it on when I'm gone. Socks, OK they may well wear out, but only get replaced when they have to. Tablet PC's, mobile phones, etc - only replaced when there is nothing better to get such as a holiday, new car, new socks.

What are tablets really used for web browsing and e-mail on the move, definitely not Fakebook or some random calorie counting spy-on-me with their "lack of privacy policy" application that thinks that I really really need it..

Hint to sales and marketing people

My hammer doesn't need to report back on what sort of nails I'm banging in or what my nail to thumb hitting ratio is, so drop the spyware type bolt-ins and "analytics" on everything I do with my stuff in my life and I realise that I spend my money on things I actually need and only when there is nothing better to spend that money on. You flooded the market with devices, now you need to realise that the market is full, except for breakages and the like.

Its not exactly rocket science is it *

* Rocket science - take tube, bang one end closed, fill with propellant, light, stand well back.

42
1

What augmented reality was created for: An ugly drink with a balloon

Dwarf
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Oh God

Regrettably I am also alcohol intolerant. I tolerate it so little that it never stays in the glass for very long.

Look on the bright side, it could be worse. You could get one of those male only medical complaints such as Beer Bulimia, which only ever seems to come after 20 pints !

The only other one is obviously Man Flu - which has the awful medical details here

Coat icon - because its got the wallet in it for the next round, or the pack of industrial strength man flu tablets in the pocket.

6
0

'I feel violated': Engineer who pointed out traffic signals flaw fined for 'unlicensed engineering'

Dwarf
Silver badge

Fined for pointing out someone else's mistakes.

Quick - find something to fine him for in the vain hope that he will stop and go away.

Rather than the way it should be - OK, so you think something is wrong, lets investigate and make things better.

Except, in this case, presumably they make a big pile of money from the traffic fines that are made from the dodgy logic, so using some more dodgy logic to fine him fits in just perfectly with their thinking.

Add my vote to the mandatory opening up of all algorithms so that people can spot the logic errors.

9
0

FTP becoming Forgotten Transfer Protocol as Debian turns it off

Dwarf
Silver badge

The one good thing about FTP

You can go rummaging around the shared file system without getting any silly Apache error messages about folder listing being denied, or suddenly get to a web page that you are not interested in.

Simplicity does have its place.

I remember rummaging around in various vendors public ftp sites to find the specific tool I needed that doesn't appear on their web site.

Does anyone else remember when Microsoft used to think that it was a good idea to make their downloads available via an Internet visible SMB share, so you could just mount it from your office to get service packs and patches..

0
0

Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft

Dwarf
Silver badge
Linux

Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft

Yep, no worries about that, the Penguin says no

19
2

Another ZX Spectrum modern reboot crowdfunder pops up

Dwarf
Silver badge
Coat

Its not a 100% accurate emulation

There is no wobbly RAM pack capability.

5
0

Drunk user blow-dried laptop after dog lifted its leg over the keyboard

Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: Doggy piddle

I powered it down, got out the big rubber gloves and cleaned it out and it worked fine ever after. The carpet was another matter...

Did it have a dog shaped lump in it ?

5
0

Script kiddies pwn 1000s of Windows boxes using leaked NSA hack tools

Dwarf
Silver badge

Back doors

And yet some people don't understand why government back dooors in encryption is a really bad idea

Trust us they say, we will keep it really secure.

24
1

Microsoft promises twice-yearly Windows 10, O365 updates – with just 18 months' support

Dwarf
Silver badge

Support for Windows 10 soup of the day edition

I can see how this will pan out

You bung Windows 10 on a machine, install a 3rd party product, hit a problem and call up for support.

Support: Which OS/version version are you using ?

Customer: clackity clack. um, it's Windows 10, 21st April 2017 09:05:03 AM edition with .Net 25.19.3421.231554

Oh, hang on, no it's just updated to 10:05:15 edition and it's rebooting,

Windows is updating your computer

Support: Sorry, we only support Windows 10, 1st April 2016 15:45:23 edition. With .Net 22.123.4322.94763

21
1

Microsoft touts SQL Server 2017 as 'first RDBMS with built-in AI'

Dwarf
Silver badge

I'd wait for the per-core pricing first.

...on the GPU's I presume

0
0

AWS v Oracle: Mark Hurd schooled on how to run a public cloud that people actually use

Dwarf
Silver badge

Put another way

Oracle spent less on cloud as it has less cloud customers than the competition

2
0

Zuckerberg's absolutely mental: Brain sensors that read YOUR MIND at 100 words a minute

Dwarf
Silver badge

Tinfoil hats

In other news, sales of tinfoil has sky rocketed. Anyone want a personal Faraday cage ?

I'll start making prefabricated tinfoil hats and market them in different colours and styles, perhaps a cyberman version or a Magneto style hat, I might even dabble on some choice wording on the outside, after all that works on T shirts and other random clothing, alternatively I'll sell it to FCUK to market for me.

There - you can see my thoughts, but only the ones that I want you to see. After all, I don't want it snitching on my inner thoughts when that hottie from accounts walks past again.

0
0

Guess who's back at Microsoft? Excel, Word creator Charles Simonyi

Dwarf
Silver badge

Dear Mr Simonyi

As you clearly understand office products, please can you get rid of that damn ribbon thing and put a proper menu back - one that doesn't take a good chunk of my screen real estate and hide things behind hieroglyphics that I'm supposed to remember. I'm no good at ancient Egyptian or Mayan hieroglyphics, but I can read words and process their meaning quickly.

You might also want to explain why menu's are good to the millennials - and try and sort out the Windows 10 debacle too.

12
3

Microsoft raises pistol, pulls the trigger on Windows 7, 8 updates for new Intel, AMD chips

Dwarf
Silver badge

Trust

Trust is earned over years, but destroyed in seconds..

Nice move Microsoft. Why not try the other approach - listen to you customers and what they really want

(BTW, its not Windows 10)

5
0

Finally a reason not to bother with IPv6: Uh, security concerns...?

Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: If IP6v hadn't been made so goddamn complicated...

See, more and more of the same dismissive BS that tries to cover your lack of understanding of anything technical.

As for the facts and straight questions on how you would do it better - you have absolutely no answers. That's either because you know you are wrong or can't provide a sensible answer. Go on then, pick any part of the technical bit and prove me wrong ..

Cut-n-paste - nope, you are wrong on that as well (see the trend here). Go try and match any part of it on your favourite search engine and see for yourself. You might even learn something about IPv6 with the pages you end up landing on.

I had hoped that as you claim to be an experienced C programmer then you might get the low level mapping of bit fields as it allows efficient efficient code to be written, but you have shown from your lack of responses and attempts to be patronising that you can't do this either.

You are a waste of time and I shall not engage any further with you on this topic as you are not worth the effort.

0
0
Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: If IP6v hadn't been made so goddamn complicated...

Wow your lack of skill seems to know now bounds, glad I never employed you as a programmer.

Seems that when you can't get people to agree with your misguided view, you get all insulting and hope to force your view that way - well guess what chum, that won't work with me. As to trying to use an age insult - well guess what, I've not seen that before on the Internet, you should try and patent it before someone copies it. BTW you are wrong on that too. I've probably got more grey hair than you too, not that that's significant on this forum.

Lets have a little think about your latest poor assertion that "There is no reason for an address that long"

In case you forgot, old computers in the 70's when the Internet was created were typically 8 or 16 bit, so it was easy to do maths on 4 x 8 bit (i.e. a long), hence the 32 bit addresses used in IPv4. This also mapped well against the relatively small amount of memory in systems of the day and allowed people to use dotted quad notation when working with the resulting addresses, so it was good design on the day.

Now, roll the clock forwards a couple of decades and machines are typically 32 or more commonly 64 bit, so doing maths on 4 x 32 bit or 2 x 64 bit is trivially easy too since it maps to two 64 bit registers that are common in the hardware, hence the 128 bit addresses,

Doing it on a smaller bit length just doesn't make sense, whereas the longer bit length allows for far greater structure on the allocation of addresses which helps significantly with global routing on the core Internet routers.

If you looked closely, you would see that most of the routing on the outside of a company (i.e. on the core or at the ISP level) is done only on the most significant 64 bits, which improves performance and aligns nicely to the bit length in 64 bit hardware. You might also notice that the least significant 64 bits are handled within the end customers network generally as a single subnet, again for simplicity on implementation. Those that want a /56 or similar (hey look, nicely 8 bit aligned) or a /48 (hey look nicely 16 bit aligned) have minimal routing to do in the lower bits of the upper register, so yet again well structured and easy to code or put into hardware.

You might also notice that the addresses continue with the simple dotted formation, but to differentiate them from their predecessors and take advantage of the longer bit length they just uses colon for separation and 32 bit hex for the segments of the address, This is yet another benefit of IPv6, you can subnet down to any nibble and get meaningful and readable addresses which is far better than the "only works on 8 bit boundaries" that IPv4 enforces due to the use of decimal formatting. Network engineers care about little details like this.

So, with that background and as a supposedly expert programmer, I'be be interested in your view on how you think that could be improved from you assertion that its not optimal - as once again, clearly you are wrong.

Its clear that the designers put a lot of thought into the addressing and what happens at the network layer and how that would be handled within hardware from a network optimised implementation on custom network hardware with something like an FPGA in it, which can then deliver high performance. Alternately, it can scale right down to a low power system with fairly easy software implementation in a similar manner.

Now, if your routing isn't working right - then that probably flows back to a lack of knowledge on how IPv6 or more specifically routing works as it seems to work OK for everyone else, unless of course its running your code and there is a bug in it that you need to look at.

Oh - and BTW - you can stop acting like a prat too. Do try and cheer up, its Easter.

0
2
Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: If IP6v hadn't been made so goddamn complicated...

You expect me to take you seriously with the responses you've made so far ?

You claim that IPv6 brings no benefits, but then you claim you programmed support for the very same protocol for it in a previous decade - which implies that you must have at least a slight understanding of its benefits when you were defining the structs and noticed that they take a few more bytes than before.

Then you claim it makes security a headache - nope, its the exact same concept that IPv4 uses - the firewall allows or denies access, so I doubt your claim of "I understand IP6 perfectly well" - you can't even stuff the v in the middle of the protocol name ffs.

So, I refer to my previous statement. Your lack of understanding doesn't make it difficult.

As to PokeUrMum - sorry - I don't remember her.

You my note that your patronising attempts were unsuccessful, just like your attempts to explain that there are problems in something when there isn't.

0
3
Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: If IP6v hadn't been made so goddamn complicated...

bob: say it with me: "NAT is NOT a security device!"

+1000 upvotes @s2bu

I'd only add that any ordinary home router defaults to UPnP enabled, so extending the thinking into how that affects security - the firewall helpfully provides inbound connections direct to any device on the LAN that asks - straight through to the firewall and any NAT layer and directly onto your supposedly secure home network.

This is why all the IoT devices keep getting hacked - the actual level of security is far lower than most people believe it to be.

1
1
Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: If IP6v hadn't been made so goddamn complicated...

No IPv6 usage ... please re-check your homework

C:\>nslookup

> www.microsoft.com

Non-authoritative answer:

Name: e1863.dspb.akamaiedge.net

Addresses: 2a02:26f0:c8:287::747

2a02:26f0:c8:281::747

2.20.160.103

Aliases: www.microsoft.com

www.microsoft.com-c-2.edgekey.net

www.microsoft.com-c-2.edgekey.net.globalredir.akadns.net

So, nice IPv6 addresses clear to see

OK they are using Akami's CDN, but that is to be expected as they have a lot to distribute with their new OS every week and that's what CDN's are for.

0
0
Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: If IP6v hadn't been made so goddamn complicated...

You underestimate the clout of large corporations.

Large corporations are deploying IPv6 - they are the network providers, since they need to stay in business as they have run out of IPv4 addresses. Go and look at the real penetration of IPv6, its carrying a large percentage of Internet traffic right now.

In regard to non-network focused large corporations - consider what happens when they want to provide their new services to customers - they will not stop just because of a low level technical thing (IPv what ??). They will fire the blockers and bring in people who understand it, deploy the required technology and move on. If you aren't skilled in this, you will simply be sidestepped by someone else who can.

Go ahead and live under your rock if you want, or go and read up on how it actually works and find out its no different to any of the other technologies that looked complex when you first started, but without fail turned out to be a lot easier when you started understanding it.

Your lack of understanding doesn't make it difficult.

As the old adage goes, the person who says its impossible is generally overtaken by the people who are already doing it

2
1

Apple wets its pants over Swatch ad tagline

Dwarf
Silver badge

I thought Apple got "Think Different" from the IBM slogan "Think"

Well, I guess it is different. Oh heck, there's those two standard English words used in the same sentence - send in the lawyers.

I wonder if I can claim trade marks on a phrase I used 20 years ago that has no meaning beyond what I meant when I wrote it.

Complete Muppets (tm), they should go and get a proper job rather than worrying about things that normal people don't care about

9
0

Windows 10 Creators Update general rollout begins with a privacy dialogue

Dwarf
Silver badge

I get it

Retrospectively asking the customer for their preferred settings, when the setting they actually want isn't presented - leave my data alone and don't you dare try and spy on me and whilst you are at it - GET OFF MY LAWN

Presumably it still only allows you to change these settings when you log in with the Microsoft account that you don'y have or don't want, rather than writing to a local setting on the machine. They used to be able to do this with an INI file, then the registry, now they need a full cloud to do the same thing. Poorly engineered / over engineered anyone ??

This is very much like the de-installers for some applications that give you a list of reasons why you de-installed, but the one you want isn't there, which then results in meaningless marketing stats that go chasing after the wrong thing again. Its a shit product is never an option you get on the list.

6
2

Radio hackers set off Dallas emergency sirens at midnight as a prank

Dwarf
Silver badge

Lawnmower man

Obligatory reference to the end of Lawnmower man

1
0

April proves to be the cruellest month again as Fujitsu staff down tools

Dwarf
Silver badge
Trollface

Re: Wankers

Which ones - Fujitsu or Unite ??

5
0

Adblock Plus owners commandeer Pirate Bay man's tip jar Flattr

Dwarf
Silver badge

No, just no.

0
1

Alabama man gets electrocuted after sleeping with iPhone

Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: so much wrong here...

The reason the earth pin goes at the top is because if it's not plugged in fully and something falls on it, you get nice, safe earth. Even if a live conductor falls on it you get a pop and the breaker saves the day, so, yes it is safer when fitted as designed. Swap the socket upside down to make it look cute and you have a 50% chance of live mains instead when something falls on it, so, the falling thing ends up live. Many non metallic things conduct, such as wet string.

As to the UK plugs, they have rectangular pins and insulated bands on the conductors to stop people wrapping their hands around to and getting shocked, the earth pin is longer so it connects first and sisconnects last, plus it's gotgrips on the side to make removal safer and a fuse in the plug to further reduce the risk when an appliance fails. Properly installed and working sockets are not loose.

The IEEE regulations define the safe installation and testing of electrical circuits, there are many good safety features in the standards.

23
0

Ford slurps 400 BlackBerry devs in smart car software push

Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: How Many?

@Dave 126

OK, I'll give you that one. A well tested and stable OS wins over things like Windows 10 that don't get properly tested.

Whats your view on how stable the application produced by 400 new developers will be :-)

0
3
Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: How Many?

What could possibly go wrong.

How about these for starters

  • Blackberry - with their market leading thinking
  • A mini qwerty keyboard and a car
  • A dated operating system
  • Ford

2
3

Android beats Windows as most popular OS for interwebz – by 0.02%

Dwarf
Silver badge
Linux

Everyone's been saying that Microsoft has lost the plot with many of their recent decisions and now they should be able to see for themselves the outcome of their poor product range and inability to listen to what real customers want..

They have a choice - give people what they want, no not what THEY WANT, what they, the customer wants. Its either that, or you are heading to the next chapter of the history books.

Given that Android is Linux based under the hood, then is now proven that is the year of the Linux client, its just not in desktop form, its the smaller cousin.

4
9

Microsoft taking CodePlex behind the shed and shooting it by Christmas

Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: Another repository goes...

Yea, its called technology evolution.

2
1

I need an ISP that offers IPv6. Virgin Media: Whatevs, nerd

Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: Am I the only one...

Assume I know how to obfuscate the tracking details you reference, Dwarf.

No, I look at it a bit differently and take other precautions - like not visiting dodgy sites in the first place.

Apart from that I'm not delusional about what each technology layer does and which bits are good, bad or past their sell by date..

0
0

Yee-hacked! Fired Texan sysadmin goes rogue, trashes boot business

Dwarf
Silver badge

When I was laid off in a particular snotty fashion, I got a phone call a week later asking if I wouldn't mind coming in to brief the new IT guy. I declined.

The correct answer is that now I'm no longer employed by you, the consultancy rate is (5-10 x previous rate) and you would be happy to help, but given the circumstances, the terms are payment in advance.

Obviously if you are still in the exit process and arguing about the package, then the same can be done on severance, again paid in advance.

If they want it bad enough, they will pay. If not, then you tried to help, but it becomes someone else's problem. I think its called cause and effect.

66
0
Dwarf
Silver badge

An interesting point to add to the risk register for those partaking in cloudy stuff.

The usual approach of "deny physical access and remote access" is no longer enough to buy time whilst accounts are disabled.

Sure the AWS training courses includes information on Identity and Access Management (IAM), and what to do when the admin leaves, but how many would remember to do that on the day and how many of those would need a change request signed in triplicate to get privileged accounts changed "just in case something goes wrong", even though something worse can go wrong without the approved change.

As for the Muppet who did it, good luck in your new career, since nobody will touch you for IT roles now.

18
1

UK gov draws driverless car test zone around M40 corridor

Dwarf
Silver badge

Meaningless statistics

Clark, in common with other speakers at the conference yesterday., emphasised the safety and societal benefits of driverless technology. Road fatalities in the UK are now 3,600 per year, compared to 6,400 in 1975. Given that 95 per cent of crashes involve human error, taking the human out of the equation will result in a massive drop in road deaths, the reasoning goes.

There are quite a few more drivers on the more congested roads now than there were in 1975 and road building has not kept up with demand, but even against all those odds, the figure is 50% less than back then. The vastly improved safety of modern cars also has a lot to do with things as we've got better at making them.

The bit that the stats glosses over is that "95% of crashes involve human error" - please remind me again who wrote the software for the automated death machines ?

I'm also prepared to be that the new "funky bubble" cars that keep popping up are a lot less safe in a crash than a modern hatchback or SUV.

I've been in charge of my body since a couple of years after I was born and if something is going to happen to me, then I want to be as much in control as possible. I don't want to become a statistic against bug number 3412-432, so don't expect to ever sell me one of these pieces of junk.

3
1

IT contractors behind IR35 calculator to leave HMRC... because of IR35

Dwarf
Silver badge

Re: Less Experience?

I assume that if they are based our of foreign shores, then they will be paid locally in their local currency, so presumably UK.Gov will not make a lot from taxes from them either.

Fantastic end-to-end thinking from them.

4
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017