* Posts by anothercynic

768 posts • joined 4 Dec 2014

Page:

Oracle spaffed $30bn on buybacks over the past 9 months, but analysts warn it can't last forever

anothercynic Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Those tax cuts in action

Good heavens no! Workers and wage increases? Are you MAD?

Let's spin Facebook's Wheel of Misfortune! Clack-clack-clack... clack... You've won '100s of millions of passwords stored in plaintext'

anothercynic Silver badge

*SLOW CLAP*

Another reason to shorten the time of the info I have on said network to two years...

Don't get the pitchforks yet, Apple devs: macOS third-party application clampdown probably not as bad as rumored

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: and the re$t...

Actually no. $99 doesn't mean you *have to* use the Mac App Store or the iOS Store to deploy apps. With an Apple Developer ID, you can create your own DMGs and distribute things outside the Mac App Store. It's just that when you install the app, you install an app that is *signed* and guarantee that it's ok (because it's been checked).

We deploy scientific software that requires some components that are unsigned because signing will not allow the actual app to communicate with some non-macOS components. But we were aware of this problem already and are looking at implementing XPC 'stuff' to replace Dbus-based inter-process comms.

It just becomes more painful and annoying, and possibly us going 'this is not worth it'...

Boeing... Boeing... Gone: Canada, America finally ground 737 Max jets as they await anti-death-crash software patches

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: More than 300 dead is largely worth an abundance of caution

AF447 however is an Airbus A330 that *did* crash with fatal consequences.

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: More than 300 dead is largely worth an abundance of caution

Airbus doesn't necessarily mean safer, correct. Airbus didn't make the mistake of using just *two* sensors for critical control systems. They *did* however make the mistake of not using heated sensors (which was rectified post-AF447 when it became clear that that was one contributing factor).

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Is this to say that the 737 max is too difficult to fly manually?

HALLELUJAH! Someone quoting The Air Current!

Anyone who wants to have excellent, impartial, factual coverage, go read Jon Ostrower (the WSJ coverage has gone to pot since he was made redundant there). TAC is brilliant.

anothercynic Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: More than 300 dead is largely worth an abundance of caution

Well, Boeing persuaded the FAA that because it was a derivative, it was ok to be certificated as such, nevermind the fact the wing is new, the engines are new, the CoG is different and now requires software to maintain the AoA. But hey... it's all *fiiiiiiiiiine*.

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: If proof were needed

It has to be certificated by the FAA.

UK joins growing list of territories to ban Boeing 737 Max flights as firm says patch incoming

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: An already safe...

@werdsmith, there is no 737-800 MAX. It's either a 737-800, or it's a 737 MAX 8. They are different models. The -800 is fine. It continues to fly. The MAX 8 is grounded.

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: The reason that the Max series need MCAS

Other airlines recommend full automation all the time. This can have problems e.g. Asiana Flight 214 which came in too low at Los Angeles and struck the perimeter wall.

San Francisco. It struck a sea wall which is rather more solid than a mere perimeter wall. That was also the first fatal hull loss of... a BOEING 777. Not an Airbus. A Boeing. And it was not particularly the automation at fault (given this was a visual approach), but also Boeing's unnecessarily convoluted documentation for its flight automation system... THAT is what was criticised. It led to the lack of systems understanding by the pilots (which was a contributing factor).

Anyone pointing fingers at Airbus over automation and gleefully saying that Boeing doesn't have that problem should look at exactly this incident and Lion Air JT610. :-(

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: The reason that the Max series need MCAS

@PhilipN,

Sully flew an Airbus (US1549). Which is, if you were to believe some in this thread, "fully automatic and the pilot can't do *anything*". The fact that Captain Sullenberger was able to put the A320 down on the Hudson well enough to not only keep the hull intact, but have everyone onboard survive the incident (albeit with injuries), should be enough proof that the whole "Airbus is crap because automation" narrative is crap.

Incidentally, the Atlas (Prime Air) 767 freighter that went down in Texas recently did so after turbulence and 'stick input'... it appears it pitched up (in turbulence) and the pilot then pushed the control column forward to bring the nose down. It then stayed down until it impacted. The stick shaker that *should* activate in that instance apparently didn't. So... Boeing with its "the pilot is always in control" policy clearly is not infallible either (and the 767 has a shedload less automation than the 787 or the new MAX has).

Go figure.

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: The reason that the Max series need MCAS

Airbus are pretty much completely reliant on technology, and it is openly acknowledged in their design philosophies etc. The pilot cannot bypass the technology, that capability no longer exists, and that has to be explicitly part of the design->deployment process.

That is categorically not true. Airbus uses standard flight law, alternate flight law and then only in extreme situations will allow the pilot to make *all* decisions.

QF32's return to Singapore after the engine explosion was literally the latter... One thing that came out of the QF32 debriefs was that the flight computer was not helping with the number of error messages it was showing, and that was apparently changed.

The difference between the 737 MAX certification and Airbus' approach is that Boeing convinced the FAA that the fact they needed MCAS to help deal with the change in the CoG and aircraft stability was not something pilots needed to know. Brazil disagreed and insisted that any airlines using the MAX in Brazil would have to specifically train their pilots to be aware of MCAS and how to control/disable it if it failed/misbehaved. EASA was leaning towards Brazil's view but that also changed (no doubt helped by plenty of chivvying from Boeing).

Airbus is at least very clear about what it does, how it does it, and why it does it. Boeing changed how they did things and showed a lot of arrogance by saying "oh the pilots don't need to know and it won't make much difference in the grand scheme of things". Tell the relatives of JT610 that.

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: I forgot to add

@Waseem, I totally get what you're saying (being from Africa, seeing Ethiopian having this happen hurts, especially given they have a stellar reputation compared to many of their continental aviation compatriots).

The UN is special though and having multiple employees killed in a flight (similar to MH 17), can probably invoke additional protocols beyond just a standard accident investigation (usually handled by the country of the airline, the country of the manufacturer and certification authority, and possibly nations of passengers involved in the tragedy). I would not be surprised if they involved the French authorities as well. The global media tends to also sit up when an incident involves Europeans, Americans, or Asians.

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: An already safe...

Ouch!

It was more the squared windows than the punch rivets... But your point is nonetheless very valid.

Swiss electronic voting system like... wait for it, wait for it... Swiss cheese: Hole found amid public source code audit

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Meanwhile in Venezuela...

The US of A is happily riding the electronic vote wagon... Diebold? Yeah, we believe them. No problem. They say it's not hackable. Ok then. Please go ahead and vote.

The Swiss at least expose their dirty laundry (*gasp* so un-Swiss) by making their code publicly available and asking people to see if there are problems with it. Problems are found, fixed, and checked again... better than Diebold's "Nothing to see here, everything's fine" hand-wave.

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Say what you will

I'd rather trust an e-voting system designed by the Swiss than anyone else. The Confoederatio Helvetica would *never* allow anything to affect what makes Switzerland Switzerland negatively.

Well... Mostly. They have their moments in some instances (like their referendum on restriction of movement... which backfired spectacularly).

TalkTalk kept my email account active for 8 years after I left – now it's spamming my mates

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: You brought up an interesting point

Yep, I'd recommend that.

Data breach rumours abound as UK Labour Party locks down access to member databases

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Why have it?

*ONLY* their communications details (email and phone number) would fall under legitimate interest, the rest as legitimate interest "for communicating and campaigning purposes" is dubious at best.

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Ethics

Given that this kind of data breach is the same as perpetrated by a 'disgruntled employee', any *smart* person would download such information before their termination. Of course, under GDPR the act of their termination (whether self-performed or not) would cease their permission to use that information...

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Why have it?

Still does not make it legitimate interest...

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Nothing new

Somehow that data would probably be considered grandfathered under some obscure loophole of some sort... Of course, supplementing/updating such data with data gleaned post Data Protection Act legislation would probably make it subject to the Act and hence subject to data retention rules. Another reason to BREXIT! EMPAAAAAHHHHHRRRR! Taking back controoooooool!

*eyeroll* *slaps own hand for typing that*

Google: All your leaked passwords are belong to us – here's a Chrome extension to find them

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Which password manager to plump for?

You can use 1Password... you do *not* need a subscription. You can use it in standalone mode where you create your vault and possibly sync it via Dropbox or iCloud (if you are so inclined).

Original WWII German message decrypts to go on display at National Museum of Computing

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: After the war . . .

If you like that book, also read "Inferior" by Angela Saini. It makes science over the centuries look terrible when it comes to sexism and inequality.

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Support TNMOC

Indeed. Love TNMOC.

anothercynic Silver badge

@Antron Argaiv

They might be linked, but they are distinct organisations, with acrimonious history between them after Bletchley Park Trust gained control over the whole site. Don't ask...

IBM HR made me lie to US govt, says axed VP in age-discrim legal row: I was ordered to cover up layoffs of older workers

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Corporate Parasitism

Wow. Just wow. Would've been good to keep a copy, no? ;-)

Are you sure your disc drive has stopped rotating, or are you just ignoring the messages?

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Error messages

Actually, a photo of the screen is usually good enough on iPhone/Samsung... At least it also gives you a clue of what else was on the screen too that might possibly have something to do with it (or not).

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Error messages

Welcome to my life in science. Science is teeming with people with one or more PhDs, M.Scs etc... yet basic comprehension of error messages (or, if you don't understand it, leave it on the screen or take a screenshot of it), is beyond them! And then, when you ask them about it, they launch into a long diatribe how it inconvenienced them.

That said, the UX (user experience) of some software packages I've dealt with in my time in IT is horrific!

DNAaaahahaha: Twins' 23andMe, Ancestry, etc genetic tests vary wildly, surprising no one

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Furthermore...

If a professional DNA lab does an analysis and finds them to have identical DNA (as one should as an identical twin) but 23andme et al show wildly varying results, I would trust the professionals, thank you very much.

For any avoidance of doubt, an organisation like Sanger I would trust (given that they worked hard over many years to sequence the entire human genome with exceptional accuracy)... anyone who claims to give you accurate results in days from a (dodgy at best) spit sample is lying through their teeth.

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: GIGO

David, I would trust the Sanger Institute with their PCR process and DNA sequencing (producing 1 error per 100K). I would *not* however trust someone like 23andme to be as accurate...

Man drives 6,000 miles to prove Uncle Sam's cellphone coverage maps are wrong – and, boy, did he manage it

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Reality check

Actually, I did this once... for 3 months.

When Rootmetrics first showed their face on this glorious isle of ours, I was annoyed by the mobile coverage maps that our mobile operators here spaff out. Some of their maps are just sheer fantasy (like Vodafone claiming that we had 3G coverage when we just about got GPRS). Their (Rootmetrics) Vodafone coverage in their map around our neck of the woods wasn't that good. So, as it happened, Vodafone had given me a new contract with unlimited* data for 3 months. So I took ruthless advantage with the new fancy phone (an iPhone 4), and ran RM's app constantly in loop mode on my journeys to and from work, into Oxford, around the back country, wherever my fancy took me, the phone and the network were being hammered. After 3 months, Vodafone said that my data usage was above average, would I like to upgrade the data portion of my plan? No, given that in those 3 months, the RM map around our neck of the woods started looking a damn sight better and my purpose was done.

And yes, when EE crowed how RM said their network was best, they were *not* lying. Vodafone was *crap*, no wonder they cried foul. But given that my own data collection showed that Vodafone *was* in fact crap, I applauded EE. I'm still with Vodafone though... mostly because tech support (should I need it) is actually around after 8pm (unlike EE), and because some of my plan bennies are worth it.

Excuses, excuses: Furious MPs probe banking TITSUPs*

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Motes and beams

My commiserations, dear Anon. I feel your pain. I stayed in government IT for a very short time because I would have lost my rag (and job) a long time ago if I hadn't... It is somewhat worrying. :-/

European Union divided over tax on digital tech giants as some member states refuse free money

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Enough said...

@Spartacus, the digital services tax is not on profit. It's on revenue. See this?

The EU's proposed tax is a 3 per cent levy on firms with a global annual turnover of €750m and annual EU revenue of at least €50m. This would hit around 200 companies and boost member states' coffers by about €5bn.

The bold is mine. So yes, Soundcloud and Spotify would most certainly fall into this. If the US goes for a tit-for-tat response (which, given the current administration, they are likely to do), both Swedish digital giants would see a fat slice of their profits go to Washington, D.C.

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: VAT

the problem here is that a small number of largely American companies are exploiting technicalities to transfer profits. Punish those fuckers, not those who already pay their fair share.

Please. Who are you kidding? *Every* company employs a number of accountants who, whenever something in the tax law changes, look at how it can improve the company profit margin and minimise tax exposure. It's *not* just 'largely American' companies who do this. Every company does it.

And if the law permits it, it is not 'exploiting a technicality'. It is called 'doing what the law says you must do'. That HMRC (or whichever tax authority) eventually cottons on and goes 'hang on, that's not what we meant', that's not the companies that are at fault, but shoddy law-making.

The Double Irish Dutch Sandwich mechanism only exists because the Dutch tax authorities let it. Why do they let it? Because a little bit (the Dutch 'foundations' that usually make up part of the DIDS are still taxed in the Netherlands but at a virtually nil rate because their 'revenue' is all royalty) of a large pie (the said DIDSes) is still better than *no* slice, or worse, *no* pie at all. The Dutch government knows full well that this mechanism is being subverted to funnel profits away, but that arrangement suits them, until it doesn't, that is.

Ireland has already done its bit and has eliminated the quirk in their law books that allowed the Double Irish (portion of the DIDS) to exist. By 2020, all companies using the Double Irish have to have eliminated them because then it is no longer a legal mechanism that has any tax advantages.

anothercynic Silver badge
Facepalm

Enough said...

... If at least one US legislator has already cottoned on, expect others to too. And yes, this is *exactly* what I referred to 2 months ago (go and cruise through my previous responses, it's in response to member 'Arthur the Cat'). What goes for the goose goes for the gander. Ireland knows which side its bread is buttered on, and Sweden (especially them) and Denmark and others are also getting a glimmer of what this may mean to their own digital giants. Spotify and Soundcloud are both Swedish and are exceptionally popular; so you can see where this could go if/when the US retaliates against the EU's digital services tax.

Manchester man fined £1,440 after neighbours couldn't open windows for stench of dog toffee

anothercynic Silver badge

Standard excuse: I've got diabetes, I can't do it. I've got a manky eye, I can't do it... the list goes on. This general malaise of people not being bothered and expecting others to do stuff they can do (short of having someone wipe their arse too while they're at it) is exasperating.

London flatmate (Julian Assange) sues landlord (government of Ecuador) in human rights spat

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Lets Get Real

This is not about rape allegations anymore. It is about breaching bail conditions.

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Lets Get Real

Skipping bail and a warrant out for the arrest of the perpetrator does not fall under a statute of limitations...

UK.gov to press ahead with online smut checks (but expects £10m in legals in year 1)

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: "those PVC sheets every single sex shop sells "

Come on then. What's the real German version... Ein Deutschsprecher wants to know ;-)

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: They just block them.

@Version 1.0, that may be true, but remember that those same traditional Tory voters won't ever be *seen* to be main consumers of porn. They deny it. But they are perfectly fine to disadvantage everyone else purely based on 'I'm alright, Jack'.

Raspberry Pi fans up in arms as Mathematica disappears from Raspbian downloads

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Just another pre-installed program

Seconded. I'm glad Mathematica remains available, but like Mike, I don't use Mathematica on Pi, so pre-installing it does not help matters. But I guess some form of comms before this change would have been much more appreciated than the post-oops scramble.

Bloodhound Super-Sonic-Car lacks Super-Sonic-Cashflow

anothercynic Silver badge

Well that's a shame...

... It was a big fat money sink, yes. But like a few others here, the effects on STEM subject participation is not to be underestimated. This has been seen time and again; Apollo and Saturn V, Thrust SSC and others have had a distinct (but delayed, obviously) effect on STEM. I really hope this administration does not stop that wave from happening. :-/

It's over 9,000! Boffin-baffling microquasar has power that makes the LHC look like a kid's toy

anothercynic Silver badge

@Rich 11

And they said accelerator engineers and beamline scientists don't have a sense of humour... ;-)

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: 25 TeV vs 14 TeV

@El kabong, please. If scientists the world over are impressed, they tend to be impressed for a reason. The LHC is the most powerful particle accelerator on the planet (although it accelerates protons, not electrons), and it works by *smashing* things together. The 14 TeV are actually 2 x 7 TeV in opposite/oblique directions.

The most powerful electron accelerator on the planet currently *only* does 17.5 GeV (in one direction), and it only emits a monochromatic X-ray class beam of radiation of 25 keV. To emit a beam that has energies of 25 TeV or more... add energies inside the quasar by another order or three (or four... you get the drift) of magnitude.

Find me a man-made toy that emits a radiation beam of 25 TeV before speaking again about 14 mosquitos vs 25 mosquitos.

Watch Series 4: What price 'freedom'? About as much as you'd expect from an Apple product

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: Not for me...

The only thing that matters to me is 2).

If you can't make a watch that runs for more than 24 hours, then we're not friends. Garmin beats this with my trusty old vivoActive (7 days with 6 days of at least 2 hours/day active training with chest strap)... just over a week's worth of juice (8 days at a stretch).

The Apple Watch 2 I was given never made it out of its box... it still sits there, 2 years later. *SHRUG*

Oracle? On my server? I must have been hacked! *Penny drops* Oh sh-

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: 128K of ISDN

Ahhh, ISDN. I still have my old Digi DataFire ISDN card that I used to use to dial into the US with for 64K uncontended connectivity directly into our HQ's services, instead of the crawling 33.6K (you try running Lotus Notes over PPTP on 33.6K and 16K international data throttling and tell me it's not anything but crawling) I had for standard Internet before that. The 56.6K Sportster went back into its box until I moved countries.

The phone bill dropped by almost 2/3 when that DataFire arrived and I kicked it into action...

Uncle Sam gives itself the right to shoot down any drone, anywhere, any time, any how

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: "Credible Threat"

Even easier... streamers! Enough to foul up the props for long enough to disrupt airflow and cause it to lose air space. ;-)

How an over-zealous yank took down the trading floor of a US bank

anothercynic Silver badge
Angel

Re: stdin?

Yes... @Chris King is right... I know this is true because a class colleague of mine ended up at a fancy uni studying for a B.A. Informatics degree, whereas I was at the equivalent of a polytechnic and got a diploma for the exact same thing. Where they studied on all the theory of everything that is business administration, we got dumped in the deep end with our first COBOL classes within two weeks of arriving there and not even knowing where to switch the workstation (an ancient, even for that time, Olivetti one) on.

To add more fun, some machines had the old 5.25" 360K drives, whereas others had the more modern 5.25" 1.2MB ones, and... even more fun, the third-year lab had... *GASP* 386es with both 5.25" *AND* 3.5" 1.44MB drives! That lab was always busy... with DOOM players.

It was bizarre to have my class colleague begging me to teach her COBOL at the end of her second year, where I was already having loads of fun with things like ADABAS/NATURAL, Pascal and C (COBOL? Who dat?). Her course was 4 times the price of mine, yet here I was teaching *her* stuff that her lecturers didn't bother to teach them!

Yeah. Now she's a house wife (nowt wrong with that, but a bit of a waste of 3 years at uni). I'm messing about in science, aviation and IT. Funny how that works.

YEAH POLY! POLY FOREVER. :-D

P.S. And yeah, I am of the vintage where dodgy hardware things are all too familiar... and this story is not unplausible at all.

US and UK Amazon workers get a wage hike – maybe they'll go to the movies, by themselves

anothercynic Silver badge

Re: What's the net benefit to workers?

No, Sanders is not for "just doling out other people's money". What Sanders is for is a fair wage without necessarily having to rely on the government to keep your head above water because your shyster of a boss is paying you just about enough to get away from any legislation that could cost him more in fines & reputation. Where he *will* "dole out other people's money" is when people do end up needing assistance from the government (like losing your job, needing healthcare) or for something that universally leaves society better off (like free education). It doesn't mean irresponsibility.

Paying employees a decent wage so they don't need to rely on government handouts makes perfect sense. They will pay their taxes, they will be net contributors to society and the economy, and the government can spend what they save on their handouts on better things (education, not the slush fund that's called the DoD). ;-)

Page:

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2019