* Posts by divhide

13 posts • joined 19 Sep 2014

Microsoft whips out PowerApps – now your Pointy Haired Boss can write software, too!

divhide
Facepalm

Too old for this stupidity ... I'm out.

Can be fairly safely said that configurable stuff probably has its merits. But allowing vast legions of dim eejits to "play programmer/analyst" is just f*****g stupid. PHB-eejits ... worse yet!

While the stupidity is nothing new (brilliant reference to The Last One, amongst others), the Emperor's New Clothes* manage to take the pointy-clicky-shiny-stupidity to a new level.

/rant over.

It's beer o'clock on a Friday somewhere, Somewhere it is so ...

*PowerApps

Is the world ready for a Raspberry Pi-powered Lego Babbage Engine?

divhide

Re: Sorry but..

Possibly down to being 7735808 when buying calculators? Economic apartheid again ;-) !

divhide

Re: Sorry but..

We had to settle for 55378008 ... you're lucky getting down to 5318008 ;-) ...

Then again, we were all at a Boys-only school. Sigh.

Don't want to upgrade to Windows 10? You'll download it WHETHER YOU LIKE IT OR NOT

divhide

Re: FSF recommended distros

Just tried it ... seems to work ok. Mebbe a short outage on your end?

divhide
Pint

Re: "Personal" computer no more

... rant is a spot-on reflection of my feelings.

Your last sentence resonates especially well with me - "It's just my primal scream of rage and frustration against an IT world that I no longer fit or understand".

Well said, that man! Have a beer, heck, have the brewery!

Layabout, sun-blushed techies have pick of IT job market, says survey

divhide
Pint

Re: More salary needed

Hello AceRimmer - yes, indeed, most of my replies almost certainly hit file #13 very quickly indeed. That occurred to me before I ever sent my first boilerplate response.

I have visions of you facepalming and asking "in that case, WHY waste your time?". Well, pointless as it is, it reduces the frustration a little for me. I don't think any of us is naive enough to think that anyone loses sleep over my boilerplates!

As said, I've some experience on the recruiting side of things (not decades, it is true, but some), so do have some idea of how things work, both past and present. There are a notable few recruitment agencies who do seem to do a more thorough job of things before they send out their emails. Unfortunately, they do seem to be in the minority.

The quality of a recruiter's up-front efforts tend to shine all the way through any interactions with said recruiter and agency.

There. I feel much better after a coffee and a moderate rant.

Beer, 'cos there's no coffee icon.

divhide
Pint

Re: More salary needed

Spot-on. Valerion.

In probably puerile response to the speculative emails which I also receive, I have started replying with a polite (though slightly cutting) boilerplate text indicating that while I have deepest sympathy for the plight of the (ostensibly) hiring client, the search for a competent, experienced, qualified and dirt-cheap resource is likely to end in woeful disappointment for all concerned. Last senrtence is usually "Please do not forward requirements for junior positions - with 25+ years of real experience, I believe that I am possibly no longer a junior. Wasting your time and mine is perhaps counterproductive.!.

I know plenty of candidates take the metaphorical, but FFS, why have many (not all, mind you, not all!) recruiters fallen back on the laziest of lazy approaches to selecting potential candidates. And don't offer me the "too many candidates, not enough time" routine - I do have enough hiring/hunting experience to know that this is a weak excuse for laziness.

We could probably all list several sadly funny recruiter pick-up lines ...

KPMG, PWC et al ... not much has changed since I walked (happily!) away from a PW (pre-C) offer. Horses for courses, I guess ... not my kind of course either,

This post has been deleted by a moderator

Ericsson boss sticks a pin in Google’s loony Loon bubble

divhide

Re: Not a panacea

Damn ... old age ... forgot one last bit: Slapping down some Interweb access in front of some illiterate Third World kids is no substitute for education in the very old-fashioned sense. You still need teachers on the ground, doing the grunt-work of getting the basics in place. Along with the PVC piping for water (ok, simplified a little too much!), and some primary healthcare.

THEN, and only then, can we start getting all excited about teh Interweb ...

Seriously, if you can't read at an adequate level ... in a language which is frequently NOT your mother tongue ... *wanders off to beat head on wall*

divhide

Re: Not a panacea

Sigh ... briefly adding to my comment (in partial response to a few responses suggesting that internet access somehow allows education to 'happen' ). Access to teh Interweb does NOT address the most essential/fundamental education which those in First World countries take for granted - how to read at a basic level, how to do basic arithmetic.

divhide

Re: Not a panacea

@Lost all faith ... I suspect you mean well with your comment/reply as posted. But I'd also submit that you have little idea of just how wide a gulf exists between the rural communities referred to, and the optimistic "Hey, let's look up propshaft repair!" scenario which you paint. Live in the environment, and you will gain a far deeper understanding of the issues and genuine needs.

Charles is absolutely correct. Without building the fundamentals, all the digital connectivity in the world is worth jack-squat. I have direct experience of the very communities to which Charles refers - being able to access Wikipedia is breathtakingly less important to them than having clean water. Or primary healthcare. The list goes on. Without the fundamentals in place, Interweb access is just fluff.

Just my inflation-adjusted few cents' worth (or pence or whatever applies best!)

Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed

divhide

"can't be pirated" ... uhuh.

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