* Posts by Naselus

1036 posts • joined 26 Aug 2014

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Firefox doesn't need to be No 1 – and that's OK, 'cos it's falling off a cliff

Naselus
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Re: IMO It is an engineering fault for their failure...

"Removing the opportunity to bypass the problem."

Very much this. If I wanted some company somewhere to decide which websites I'm allowed to visit, then I'd stick to IE or Safari. I liked Firefox because it treated the user as a grown up; when it started insisting that the user couldn't know what they were doing by definition, that's when I jumped ship.

We actually rolled out Firefox for use at work a few of years ago, and then within a couple of months they began to lock off protocols that we needed for web-based apps, shut down legacy plugins, and block us going to internal intranet sites with no SSL certs.

Given that, at the time, FF was also going out of it's way to become the slowest and most bloody awkward browser on the web, we ended up packing it in and shunting everyone other to Chrome. Literally all the service providers we needed to use the browser to access also stopped supporting it. It was like Mozilla were going out of their way to try and get FF taken off production environments.

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Naselus
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Re: A Night at the Opera, anyone?

Opera went downhill fast about five years ago and has never really recovered. These days, Vivaldi is the browser for the discerning power user.

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Naselus
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Re: blocked?

Nope, downloads absolutely fine in Chrome for me.

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Why you'll never make really big money as an AI dev

Naselus
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Re: What is "deterministic", who cares anyway

"Firstly "infinite orders of magnitude" is *exactly* the same as "inifite integers", "infinite prime numbers" or "infinite multiples of 42"."

Georg Cantor would disagree with you on that.

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Volterman 'super wallet': The worst crowdsource video pitch of all time?

Naselus
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Re: Makes you wonder..

"What kind of people would actually buy into this?"

The same kind of people who looked at the Apple Watch and thought "Yeah, this is definitely a must-have item. Finally, for just £300, I can avoid the inconvenience of reaching into my own pocket to look at my phone".

It is not hard to convince people to buy stupid shit they don't need to fix minor problems they don't have, which is why even salesmen are capable of doing it.

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Kill something, then hire cleaners to mop up the blood if you want to build a digital business

Naselus
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Re: Unicorn Fantasy Land!

Don't forget 'it's vital to kill something just to prove no app is safe'. Had a good laugh over that particular idiot maneuver. How are your users going to react when you quietly shift from Photoshop to MS Paint just to prove 'no app is safe'? Never mind the fact that your whole industry uses that one piece of software and all your clients are expecting stuff delivered in it's proprietary format; I need to prove that no app is safe even if it means killing the whole business in the process!

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Tapping the Bank of Mum and Dad: Why your Netflix subscription is poised to rise (again)

Naselus
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Re: Uber

"there used to be some articles by Tim Worstall right here at ElReg about it."

Almost completely certain that the other poster was basically referring to those exact same articles.

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UK.gov snaps on rubber gloves, prepares for mandatory porn checks

Naselus
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Re: Lucky parliament have got so much time on their hands

"This will later be used as a justification for outlawing / backdooring VPNs "

For all the noises that May has repeatedly made in this direction, I rather doubt it will ever happen. The Tories are run for the benefit of the business community. Business is not interested in having VPNs outlawed or made less secure.

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Control-C! umount! Ctrl-Alt-Delete! Tintri forcibly ejects from today's IPO

Naselus
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Re: silicon valley rumor...

I get the feeling this is more about the disconnect between valuations in the real world and those in VC-Land. The effective valuations being tossed around in the Valley are completely deranged (40+ billion for Uber, a company which could be replaced by an OSS app overnight?), often for companies that don't have sustainable business models or any real long-term strategy beyond 'let's get bought by HP, IBM, Dell, Google or Microsoft ASAP'.

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Naselus
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Re: Happened to my employer once

Blair Hull?

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Ubuntu 'weaponised' to cure NHS of its addiction to Microsoft Windows

Naselus
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Re: It will take 1-2 more WannaCries

"There's no particular reason why Linux is more secure than Windows. "

Indeed, this appear to be suggesting that the NHS going from Windows (which, if patched, was immune to the 2 big headline attacks of the last 2 months) to go to NHSbuntu (which, via systemd, was not immune to the latest Linux vulnerability, no matter how up to date it was).

Nothing to see here, just more Penguinista 'this will be the Year of Linux on the Desktop!' nonsense.

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NHS WannaCrypt postmortem: Outbreak blamed on lack of accountability

Naselus
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Re: Chartered Institute For IT?

The BCS is useful for advocating stuff like this, tbh. Attacking it for having the temerity to say that people should patch their systems and hire qualified professionals to avoid being hacked is a bit ludicrous, especially since we've all been saying exactly the same thing for the last two months.

Organizations will tend to listen to a chartered professional body in a way that they won't listen to unchartered ones. It doesn't mean much for the standards of the actual members, though; you can stick some extra letters after your name and wow clueless PHBs, but no-one's going to regard BCS membership as a replacement for actual experience and qualifications, or see it as a vital component of offering you a job. Can help in a tie-breaker, though, and there's access to discount training through it.

Plus, having a single professional body to belong to seems to have worked out pretty nicely for the lawyers, accountants, architects, doctors, engineers et al. You know, all the professions who aren't currently watching their jobs get shipped off to India while we're competing each other into a race to the bottom.

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Naselus
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"Just over half (53 per cent) of local authorities across the UK are prepared to deal with a cyber-attack, according to a separate survey of over 100 council leaders by management consultancy PwC."

Which actually means "Just over half of technically illiterate council politicians are too incompetent to understand how vulnerable they are to cyber attack". I honestly doubt there's a single local authority in the whole UK who could actually cope with a serious hacking effort.

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It's the iPhone's 10th b'day or, as El Reg calls it, 'BILL RAY DAY'

Naselus
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Well, he should fit right in at Gartner. Except for the bit where he predicted a bunch of stuff correctly.

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How to avoid getting hoodwinked by a DevOps hustler

Naselus
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Re: @Nolveys If they’re a 'DevOps Expert', they probably aren’t

It's pretty simple.

Ops still isn't cheap enough for companies, so now they need to help write, debug and repair shit code in addition to doing all the infrastructure and security roles. The fact that Ops has no idea how to do this or time to do it in is not relevant to the discussion, since your boss has literally no idea what 90% of the people in Ops do and doesn't care to find out.

Meanwhile, developers were spending far too much time doing post-release support for their own high-quality code. Devops instead allows them to try and debug untested, appallingly-written pseudo-code put together by an overworked firewall specialist with 15 minutes of training in C#, which was immediately thrown into production because AGILE.

No, no, we're definitely doing this for the team's benefit, and not because it allows us to fire half of each team.

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Naselus
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Honestly, this whole piece (like most of Cote's articles) reads like it was created by the Thomas Friedman Op/Ed generator.

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'Janus' resurfaces: I was behind the original Petya. I want to help with NotPetya

Naselus
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Reputation repair work

The thing about ransomware is, you need a bond of trust between the writer and the victim. That's why they often have first-rate helpdesks to talk people through their extortion experience.

NotPetya has tarred the Petya brand - the install key that the new malware offers is completely random, and so it would not be possible to recover the files even if the email account attached hadn't been shut down. So yeah, it's not surprising that the actual Petya crew want to help clean this up - otherise, no-one will trust them enough to pay the ransom during any future attacks.

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Don't panic, but Linux's Systemd can be pwned via an evil DNS query

Naselus
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Re: 2017 and inaccurately implemented protocols causing buffer overflows are still a thing.

"Leaving aside why this particular bit of SW is even doing this function. If fails what seems like it should be rule #1"

Actually, I'd probably say rule #1 should be "Never make your code do something that it has no business doing in the first place". I don't need the init system to respond to reverse DNS lookup requests. No-one has ever needed an init system to do so. So why in God's name is Systemd doing it?

It's not just this vulnerability that shouldn't exist; the entire function which the vulnerability is in shouldn't. That has to be more fundamental than even not trusting outside inputs here.

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Naselus
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Re: Only 14 responses (at time of writing)

Yes, but it's systemd, so there's a good chance it actually will overtake an equivalent Windows bug thread, and the level of bile will be higher. Linux fans may hate the heathen Windows users, but that's nothing compared to their loathing for the pro-systemd heretics.

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Naselus
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Re: If THIS isn't a reason to hate systemd...

Shhh, just be happy he didn't try and blame this one on Hillary Clinton.

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Murderous Uber driver 'attacked passenger and the app biz did nothing. Then he raped me'

Naselus
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It's almost like all the regulations on the Taxi industry which Uber tries to side-step were implemented for a reason, rather than just to screw with people, isn't it?

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Everything you need to know about the Petya, er, NotPetya nasty trashing PCs worldwide

Naselus
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Re: Cyber sex in action

Sage tech support regularly demand to have domain admin access in order to do support on our systems. I regularly tell them where they can stick it.

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Naselus
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Re: Suspicion...

"Considering how much money they have...."

Maersk is equivalent in size to Rosneft and actually more profitable. I suspect it's not so much how much money you have that matters, as much as how many friends your CEO happens to have in the FSB.

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Naselus
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"I feel these recent attacks are linked in some way, perhaps coincidence."

Fairly certain they aren't, tbh.

WannaCry was pretty amateurish. It looked quite advanced at first glance, but if you dug around under the hood you quickly found that actually it was two or three very advanced tools stolen from the NSA dump, strung together by some fairly low-end code that might be banged out by a script kiddie just learning how to build malware. It was, in a lot of ways, very primitive indeed, and was not a state-backed attack; they'd would have done a better job of it.

This one is completely the opposite. It at first appeared to be an amateurish knock-off of Wannacry, but digging under the hood finds a very sophisticated, advanced persistent threat that uses a dozen separate methods to try and target and compromise specific targets, before dumping a poorly-designed malware layer over the top to try and convince people it's not as clever as it actually is. This definitely smells state-backed; it may or may not be the Russians, but there's enough clever shit going on on the quiet before the half-baked encryption attack to show that the encryption thing is a sideshow, not the main event.

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Naselus
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Re: Decrypting?

"if the MBR has been overwritten, obviously the machine won't boot, but can the HDD be mounted as a secondary drive on something else and have the MBR re-written?"

Yes, that's perfectly doable - you can format it and it'll do more or less exactly that. It'll lose literally all the data on it, though, which is probably not what you're hoping to hear in this case. If you're hoping you can plug it in and re-create the data that was in in the MBR... no, not really. Best case would be recovering the data from the disk and then copying it back over after formatting it.

I've recovered data from a few disks where the MBR has been fragged to all hell and back, so it is doable, though not easily. You need specialist tools to do it with. The MBR doesn't just handle the boot loader, it also contains a bunch of meta information about stuff like the partitions on the disk (where they start and end, for example) or the block addresses for data, without which the OS can't tell where data is or what it belongs to.

Some programs are capable of re-constructing this data, though they're invariably either very, very expensive or very, very un-user friendly (requiring a good knowledge of how a disk drive physically works at a cylinder-and-sector level). I'm not aware of anything which would let you reconstruct the MBR itself if it was completely dead/encrypted, though.

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Naselus
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Re: Bring Back

"for most things now, we only need a browser"

This just isn't true, though. There's a great many industrial control devices which only run on Windows - in fact, which only run on obsolete versions of Windows that are out of support. Exactly the kind of devices, in fact, which a lot of these Ukrainian companies in the power sector will be relying on.

I used to support Schelling saws for a major plastics company in the UK. These saws are designed to slice big blocks of plastic into thin sheets, cost £250k each and are the size of an Olympic swimming pool. They only work with Windows XP. No Linux, no OSX, no silly browser-based bollocks. Just a fat client Win XP box.

When I worked at what used to be ICI's head office in Manchester, where most of the staff were engaged in trying to come up with a new shade of green paint, the machines that controlled the centrifuges and pigment analysis needed to be run on Windows XP. There was no browser involvement, and using more modern versions of Windows was impossible because the drivers were written so badly that anything after Win XP regarded them as unsafe.

And this is the case is a great many areas of business. We use Sage for our accounts, for example; several versions of Sage (possibly all, in fact) flatly must be installed locally on a fat-client Windows box. There's 800,000 businesses using Sage in the UK alone, and all of them are using it on a windows box because they don't have a choice. I now work with CAD users; the idea that they'll ever be performing their work remotely or in a browser is laughable. The local C++ clients they're using are getting bigger, heavier and more complex every year.

There's no denying that monocultures are bad, but honestly the illusion that there's a choice in the matter because a few applications can now be delivered via the browser is just that - an illusion. Lots of core software still cannot run on virtual machines, cannot be run through the browser, or cannot be run remotely at all, and is unlikely to ever be able to, which makes implementing a heterogeneous environment much, much harder in the sort term - it'll take decades of refreshes before there's anything like enough diversity to make a difference.

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Naselus
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Re: Suspicion...

"So it will be intriguing to witness how quickly these firms recover. Or maybe they just practice exemplary backup procedures?"

Rosneft apparently managed to recover so quickly that it had no downtime whatsoever, and there was no impact on any of the productive assets at all. Oh, wait, I'm sorry, that should read "Russian state-owned oil company Rosneft"... Not that that seems oddly suspicious or anything.

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Naselus
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Re: Backups

"Do you have a citation for the frequency of this?"

The obvious example is Stuxnet, which was released months in advance and did nothing until a precise date. But there's plenty of others; many infections rely on a change in their C&C server's output to tell them to activate (unlike the deactivate message used for Wannacry) or are post-dated. Or consider Botnets, many of which lie dormant for months until activated for use.

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Naselus
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Re: The real blame goes to..

"This is an argument for security through obscurity."

Exactly this. And security through obscurity is almost certainly not actually secure.

There's a basic rule in sigint which should always be followed:

Always assume the other guy is smarter than you.

This is the basic foundation of modern security infrastructure, and has been since World War 2. Basically, the Nazis assumed that they were smarter than their opponents, and so that the Enigma code was invulnerable. But it turned out the Allies were working on stuff that the Germans hadn't even begun to imagine, and so they were able to break the code in ways that the Axis assumed would be impossible. The Allies knew where the Axis were going to attack within hours of the order being issued, but the Germans remained convinced that Enigma was unbreakable.

This is why, since the end of the war, whenever we come up with a new encryption method we publish it and invite people to have a go at cracking it. Because the assumption is that someone out there is smarter than you and will figure it out even if you think it's unbreakable. It's effectively the same many-eyes principle which works in Open Source; if everyone is working on the problem and still can't crack it, then it's probably securer than if you're the only person working on it and hoping that some combination of obscurity and your own genius makes it uncrackable. This is one of the problems many infosec researchers have with Apple's walled garden; it's a bad philosophical approach to security even if you do a very good job of implementing it, and when someone smarter does decide to target it the result will be devastating.

The assumption should always be that the Bad Guy - whomever they happen to be at a given moment - knows your movements, has access to all your information, has slightly better resources than you do, and can do a bit more than you can at any given time. That makes hording exploits directly equivalent to arming your enemies.

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Naselus
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Re: Cyber sex in action

"Am I correct in understanding that this happens (in part) quicker in systems patched by Micro$oft?"

Exactly the inverse.

The main SMB1 vulnerabilities used for propagation were patched back in April (which kept a lot of us safe from Wannacry, too), so as long as you're actually running a decent patching schedule you were immune. The admin credential harvesting from local RAM would also be fairly ineffective if basic security hygiene was followed (in other words, MS's own best practice, as outlined in pretty much every level of MS training).

Oh, and Win 10 was effectively immune - it doesn't have the SMB flaw, and doesn't allow the creds to be harvested. Which must be very frustrating for everyone who was hoping to use this as another excuse to attack Win 10.

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Tanks for the memories: Building a post-Microsoft Office cloud suite

Naselus
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Re: Whilst I'm no fan of Microsoft..

Yeah, I honestly don't see much reason to migrate from Office to G-Suite. Office does pretty much all we want, everyone knows how to use it (or at least is equally familiar with not understanding how to), and is only marginally cheaper. It remains the gold standard for general office donkey-work programs. G-Suite seems to me more like a set of extremely limited, semi-functional imitators than a serious rival.

And the price difference is not sufficient to make up for the many shortfalls of the Google equivalent.

There's a good reason why the Accounts department in any firm big enough to have one want to keep Excel; Sheets lacks half the features that they use on a daily basis. It's not an accountant's idea of a spreadsheet; it's some kid at Google's idea of one, and he doesn't know half the stuff that the accountant wants.

Docs is likewise missing 50% of the features of Word. It can be used to write basic stuff, but if you want to do full-scale word processing, then it's just not there at all. I've never really needed the collaboration aspect (which is the only place where Google is generally competitive); but there's often been times that I want some feature from Word which is just plain missing.

Which leaves Slides, and sure, Slides is about as good as Powerpoint. Anyone who actually does external presentations, on the other hand, will not use either of these things, and instead makes slideshows in Acrobat or inDesign.

As for Libreoffice... it just never quite seems to get feature parity, does it? Don't get me wrong - I love Libre, I wrote both my degrees on it, I use it at home and have a backup copy of it at work for files where MS Office just screws up the format, but there's always just one or two random features which you'll need once in a blue moon that are missing from Libre (and definitely absent from Google Docs) but are certain to be present in MS Office.

So really, MS Office > Libre > Google suite.

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Microsoft PatchGuard flaw could let hackers plant rootkits on x64 Windows 10 boxen

Naselus
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Re: Um....

Yup, pre-exploit vectors. Things it would be really handy for security researchers to actually spend their time looking at, rather than things which require the computer to have already been broken into and completely overrun.

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Naselus
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Um....

This does indeed require you to have already gotten complete control over the device in question. Cyberark even say so in their own intro to the piece. So while it's an interesting post-exploit attack, it's not a big security problem in itself.

It's kinda like those guys who reported a Macbook 'vulnerability' which required you to remove the laptop's case to deploy them; while it's technically a vulnerability, the actual use-cases where it could occur requires the target to be so thoroughly compromised already that it's pointless to use it by that point. In other words, it's security researchers getting over-excited by purely theoretical problems.

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Cheeky IT rival parks 'we're hiring' van outside 'vote Tory' firm Storm Technologies

Naselus
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"the net effect of that is ALL prices increase as the costs of labour have increased"

Economics turns out not to be as simple as this, though it's a good soundbite for convincing simple minds.

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Naselus
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Joke

Re: "VOTE CONSERVATIVE if you believe in free enterprise and progression"

"BS. Linux serves without any reference to political preference."

And they say Linux fans have no sense of humour. Apparently rightly.

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Research suggests UK consumers find 'fibre' advertising misleading

Naselus
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Re: OMG!!! Colour me shocked

or 2008. Or 2010. Or 2013. Or...

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US voter info stored on wide-open cloud box, thanks to bungling Republican contractor

Naselus
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Re: 50 cases in the last 25 years

"Confirmed cases of electoral fraud in the UK are also several times more frequent than the claimed American level, with an electorate several times smaller. The UK Electoral Commission has some good statistics on it."

The statistics which show actual voter fraud by voters trying to vote multiple times is effectively zero? There's about 70 cases a year in the UK of people signing up to vote who are not permitted to do so; this is usually EU nationals living in the UK who are not aware that they aren't allowed to vote. That's about one person per million population.

Again, this is not a real problem and it has basically no impact on results, which is why Republicans are really, really hot on the issue until someone actually suggests an official investigation, which will come back reporting that it's not an issue and recommending that the voter suppression laws the GOP are constantly pushing for are dropped. This is not even a controversial point; Republican politicians have publicly admitted that this is what they're doing (in order to prove they're not attempting to disenfranchise people based on race, they said they were doing it to disenfranchise Democrats instead).

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Naselus
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Re: 50 cases in the last 25 years

"That number sounds incredibly low. If it's accurate, then it surely reflects poor detection rather than the actual level of fraud."

Not really. The fact is, if you wanted to swing an election, then in-person voter fraud is the least effective and efficient way you could possibly do it. You spend several hours driving to a different polling station, queuing up again, pretend to be someone else, and Bam! you've successfully added a single vote to the total for all that effort. Even if you spent all day doing it, you're personally going to manage what, 10 extra votes in an electorate of 120 million? For the risk, there's no reward.

It's a bit like the number of bank robberies where the culprit asks them to set up a new bank account using his own name and social security number and transfer all the money into it are very, very low - not because we have trouble detecting that kind of crime, but because it's not a crime people would actually perform.

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In the week Uber blew up, Netflix restates 'No brilliant jerks' policy

Naselus
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So does this mean

That Russell Crowe and Mel Gibson are never going to be getting their own Netflix Original series, then?

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Naselus
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Re: Jerks need not apply

" I don't know if you can have it both ways. But perhaps with a culture of maturity you could."

You can, yes. Being an absolute arse to people you work with isn't necessary, and making excuses for it due to talent is daft - especially when it turns out that the Brilliant Jerk usually isn't that brilliant, but just enough of a jerk to shamelessly steal credit wherever possible. Actually, that sounds like an exact description of Steve Jobs, thinking about it.

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Reg Radicals lecture encompasses far right, libertarians, and mushrooms...

Naselus
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Re: Stockholm syndrome

So, you're saying that Libertarianism only seems radically different to existing society, because it's radically different to existing society?

Your profundity clearly knows no beginnings.

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Conservative manifesto disappears offline – then mysteriously reappears

Naselus
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Does it matter?

They'd already basically disavowed the entire thing before the election, after all.

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Microsoft admits to disabling third-party antivirus code if Win 10 doesn't like it

Naselus
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Re: '34 years of development - Windows 10 is the result'

"Any large company is paying millions a year for Windows when they could use Linux or Chrome or both for free."

No, any large company is paying millions for Windows SUPPORT when they could be using Linux or Chrome with no support at all, or else paying just as many millions to Red Hat Software to support and train users in an OS that is incompatible with all of their main business software and which would require any bespoke programs they've created in the last 20 years to be re-written from scratch at great expense.

Which makes it a bit less of a mystery, doesn't it? Honestly, I like Linux as much as the next guy, but in the real world it is not going to replace Windows in the workplace. It's now dominant in the server room because it's well-suited to use there, and so it overtook Windows in a matter of just a few years. It's not well-suited in the desktop realm, which is why it's still a rounding error there despite a couple of decades of trying to push it.

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Naselus
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Re: Admission

"I'm a long time Win 7 user. If Apple sort out their hardware line up I'll be heading for Mac land when 7 drops off support."

I'm sorry, it's hard to take anyone seriously when they say 'Microsoft are being too controlling over which software I can install, I'm off to Apple land'.

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Stack Clash flaws blow local root holes in loads of top Linux programs

Naselus
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Re: Security 101: If they're sitting at the computer...

"TLDR; Yes, there's idiots in every OS, some who think they really know what they're doing but compromise the security of the machine very quickly. But out of the box Linux still is far more secure than Windows (not counting android)."

Tbh, I think we need to stop saying that, since it's not actually true. There's too many flavours of Linux out there to make blanket statements. Some distros are an absolute security abortion - even relatively big-name ones like Mint, which has left out certain kernel patches for no good reason for months or years at a time.

Really, we should just never refer to ANYTHING capable of connecting to a network as 'secure out-of-the-box' on general principles; there will be vulnerabilities we don't know about lurking in it, and without patching your secure-out-of-the-box solution will be insecure within 6 months. This seems staggeringly obvious to professionals, but to most consumers the notion that you actually need to make an effort maintain your device is completely alien. We're dumping them into a fast-moving arms race and encouraging them to think they don't need to hit the ground running.

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Naselus
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Re: Security 101: If they're sitting at the computer...

"It's perfectly possible to lock down a Windows desktop in the way you describe, and there's very little they can do to mess up anyone but themselves."

While this is entirely true, the important part of his statement here was 'by a moderately competent user'. Windows can be brought into a locked-down state if you know what you're doing, but it requires a pretty advanced level of knowledge to do so - and that knowledge isn't really that well advertized.

The same is arguably even truer of most Linux distros, of course. Properly configured, Linux is one of the most secure OSes in the world. Improperly configured, it's one of the least secure. Far too many of the more obsessive Linux fans don't recognize this and simply believe putting Linux on a device automatically makes it secure - despite the obvious evidence from the Linux-based Android security hellscape and the IoT security shitshow.

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Ego stroking, effusive praise and promise of billions: White House tech meeting in full

Naselus
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Somewhere in there is the germ of a good idea

Except it's the same 'germ of a good idea' that every president has had since about 1980. And none of them have managed to implement it. And now you honestly think Trump, a man who has shown that he can't pass legislation even with control of both houses of congress, can somehow pull it off?

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2 kool 4 komputing: Teens' interest in GCSE course totally bombs

Naselus
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Supply and Demand

The thing that jumped out at me from the article is this:

"as many as 70 per cent of secondary school computer science teachers could be lacking a relevant computer science background to teach at GCSE level"

Is this really surprising to anyone? A teacher starts on £27k a year, needs a specialist Master's degree, and like most of the public sector have been held under significant pay restraint in recent years. Meanwhile, a second-rate comp sci grad can expect to be on £40k a year six months after leaving uni. And most Comp Sci people were not exactly the popular kids at school, either.

So the deal on offer would appear to be 'why not spend another year at university so that you can earn 30% less money doing a job with fewer benefits in a building you've spent 5 years being conditioned to hate?". And then we wonder why the top-tier talents aren't falling all over themselves to go for it.

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Naselus
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Re: I told you so

Rubbish. I did an ICT GCSE back in the 1990s and it was literally just training in using MS Office - a month each in Excel, Word, Publisher (like anyone uses Publisher), Access and Powerpoint. We had whole hour-long lessons based around using Wordart ffs. What little 'programming' was involved was learning to make Excel macros. You'd get more problem solving skills from an English Lit class.

I'd been building PCs from components and learning to code by myself for 4-5 years by that point and so dropped the subject in disgust. From my school, literally no-one who completed the class got an IT-related job or degree; a lot of them were driven away from the whole area by their experience.

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Brit uni blabs students' confidential information to 298 undergrads

Naselus
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Re: Another reason to ban Outlook.

"The "recall" option only works for the recipients on the same Exchange tenant though."

Thing is, in this case they probably are. Most universities will just issue students an email account on their own infrastructure rather than sending email out to personal addresses.

Of course, it's a bit late by then anyway.

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