* Posts by Naselus

1394 posts • joined 26 Aug 2014

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Real talk: Why are you hanging on to that non-performant disk?

Naselus
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Re: ...and with protocols such as FCoE

I think he'd more or less lost credibility when he started a conversation about tiered storage without ever identifying the performance vs capacity dichotomy that sits right at the heart of storage architecture.

So really, he failed to understand why storage bods exist, and in doing so underlined why they have to.

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Naselus
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Re: Really?

All this, of course, makes it doubly ironic that the author's bio includes the following:

"His main pastime is shouting at people who try to install technology without considering whether it actually fits the business or the requirement".

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Naselus
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Re: "If you can afford a new car then you’re not going to buy a beaten up second hand vehicle..."

Exactly. The author's point is basically rubbish, since he believes that performance is the only metric which matters for storage. It isn't.

If I have 4 terabytes of WORN data, then the only metric I care about for it is price per gigabyte. I couldn't care less about it's performance. If I recommended buying a 4TB of flash disks to store it on, then I'd be wasting thousands of pounds of budget that would be better spent elsewhere.

This isn't even a new discussion. It's long been settled, in fact; only a neophyte stampedes for the fastest possible storage without reference to the workloads.

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Venezuela floats its own oily cryptocurrency to save the world economy

Naselus
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"asserts it will fix long-standing problems caused by the USA's 1933 abandonment of the gold standard and restore order to the world economy."

Pretty sure you're referring to Nixon's 1971 suspension of dollar-gold convertability rather than 1933, tbh.

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Worldwide smartphone shipments slip for first time ever: Apple and Samsung hit

Naselus
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Flagship sales have been falling for years, even as the market as a whole has been growing.

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Windows slithers on to Arm, legless?

Naselus
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Satnad remains the problem

This'll be abandoned, just like everything else that doesn't fit into his 3 main products. Literally everything aside from Azure, Office365 and Win10 x86/x64 is constantly on notice and can be cancelled at any moment, which means buying into any of them is impossible.

SatNad has done well on the core 3 - Azure is in a strong position, even if AWS still overshadows it, Win10 is growing fairly well and is on course to become the world's default desktop OS over the next 2-3 years as businesses undergo hardware refreshes, and Office 365 is doing surprisingly well considering that there are free products which perform all the same functions. But his ruthless disregard for everything else (seems to be a 2-strikes-and-you're-axed policy for all and everything) is causing MS to drop even competitive offerings after one or two bad years.

It's a policy of permanent retrenchment, and it's hampering Microsoft's ability to grow or innovate, leaving them mostly just iterating yesterdays cash cows rather than pushing forward with new ideas.

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iPhone X 'slump' is real, whisper supply chain moles

Naselus
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Re: Samsung needs to find Android buyers?

"I suppose they could sell them to Chinese companies that want to create iPhone knockoffs, unless they are shipped without the notch..."

Samsung aren't sitting on 20 million notched OLEDs. They're sitting on unused production capacity for 20 million OLEDs. That's a key difference, which means it's relatively easy for them to convert the capacity to produce a non-notched version to shop around to 'Droid makers.

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Naselus
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Re: Doesn't make sense

"Imagine launching three new flagship iPhones at the highest prices ever asked, while also introducing the widest array of new, cheaper options, and then "envisaging" that the vast majority of customers would all buy just one of those models: the most expensive iPhone X."

No, this does sound pretty much like Apple's whole business model.

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Naselus
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Re: Maybe Apple

"If you're unaware of how much teenage girls and young women use their phones on an hourly basis compared to the rest of us, I would not employ you to sell phones."

Fairly sure the teenage-to-twenty-something-girl market has not been crying out for the opportunity to easily make their face look like a shit.

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Apple Macs, iThings, smart watches choke on tiny Indian delicacy

Naselus
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Re: Perfect example of why the re-focus on stability/performance for iOS 12 was necessary

"Hopefully they will get back that attitude, that's one of the reasons I've owned iPhones since 2009."

I don't see why they would, tbh. Jobs was obsessive about his vision - he wasn't much of an engineer, and didn't really understand the tech, but he knew what it ought to be like from a user point of view. And he would scream blue murder at engineers for failing to deliver what he had in mind.

Cook simply isn't like that. I'm not entirely convinced he has anything much in mind when it comes to a new product, aside from possibly just a string of dollar signs; he seems to have very little in the way of taste when it comes to tech products, and very little ability to judge what's a good idea and what's a non-starter. His hit rate on new product lines is basically zero, limited to the most raving fanbois only, while the company coasts along on iterating the iPhone ad infinitum.

Seems to me, as long as Cook's in charge, there's no incentive for Apple engineers to look for perfectionism, since the top isn't interested either.

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Apple to devs: Code for the iPhone X or nothing from April onwards

Naselus
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Re: We develop for Apple and Android

Suspect this doesn't really tell us much about the X itself, tbh, but rather than all iPhones will be adopting the notch in future.

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Ubuntu wants to slurp PCs' vital statistics – even location – with new desktop installs

Naselus
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"Canonical is meant to be UK. They should now about EU privacy rules and GDPR."

I've yet to encounter a single UK company where anyone outside the IT department (who it was inevitably dumped upon) knows a damn thing about GDPR.

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Six things I learned from using the iPad Pro for Real Work™

Naselus
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Nonetheless, there's actually relatively few jobs that an iPad Pro would be useful for.

It's essentially limited to more or less (MS, Libre or Google) Office-centric workloads. Anyone needing custom-built software (say, a fat-client CRM system)? No. Anyone needing CAD (Architects, most engineering roles?) No. IT? Not much use for anyone until the File Manager is better.

Ultimately, Andrew saying that he was able to do a full days work on an iPad Pro and not be overly inconvenienced means that Andrew's relatively lightweight software requirements (basically just email and a word processor) are still not as useful on the iPad as they are on MacOS or Windows.

And the real problem is, most of those tasks can already be performed to an equally inferior standard on the normal iPad, at half the price.

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Naselus
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Re: blast away

"But the entry level you have chosen isn't the entry level. The entry level is the MacBook Air or the new MacBook."

He's literally using the processor named in the linked article. The one that actually says the exact opposite of what Orlowski says it does.

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Apple's HomePod beams you up into new audio dimensions

Naselus
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Re: @SuccessCase:Love the Picture (with the Hacksaw)

"Actually that's incorrect, the interface is Airplay (a lossless format), so anything that can be played over Airplay, which includes to give some examples, Spotify on iOS, any music from Android devices with some extra software, anything on a Mac, anything on a PC (again with extra software or with iTunes)."

I stand corrected, then, but really only just. It's still a very good speaker that doesn't natively connect to most people's kit, but, through jumping through a bunch of complex hoops that most home users won't understand, or buying a new Mac or phone, you can finally manage to get it to perform the very, very basic function it is allegedly designed to do.

So I'd say my original diagnosis and wider point still stand; this is a great speaker that insists on not letting you use it as a speaker, and a behind-market home assistant priced absurdly high because it has an over-engineered speaker built into it. It's as big a goof as taking away the headphone jack - in fact, it's the exact same goof.

Ultimately, I'm left wondering which market this thing was supposed to be for. Music lovers aren't going to be able to connect their cherished 40-year old vinyl turntable, thousand-pound amplifier and half-dozen additional carefully-placed speakers to it to benefit from the speaker's excellent sound quality. Anyone who isn't that bothered about sound quality won't see a $350 speaker as a serious purchase option. And people who want a home assistant will get one of the ones that actually integrates with stuff they do around the home (smart switches, smart lights, voice-ordering from Amazon etc), rather than the seriously pitiful option Apple has put together.

It's two different products mashed into one, and the good product has been artificially gimped to a point that makes it even harder to compensate for the needless presence (and added cost) of bad one.

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Naselus
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Re: @SuccessCase:Love the Picture (with the Hacksaw)

The speaker quality itself is basically irrelevant, though, since it can only ever play stuff from your iTunes library. So literally anything which can plug into Spotify AND iTunes, or a CD player, or any other kit, is more useful.

Basically, Apple tried to make a home assistant and then realised that what they had was fourth or fifth rate - Siri is by now embarrassingly bad compared to every other voice app, the smart home space has become too diverse to lock into Apple's ecosystem and so the 'boat' for lock-in has sailed (making the attempt to try it anyway bizarre), and everyone else has large, mature voice app markets for their product where Apple has a Windows-Store-esque wasteland. Moreover, Apple doesn't reap the subsidies that Google or Amazon do, and so needs to over-price hilariously by comparison. That's when they suddenly started trying to re-brand Homepod as a 'voice-activated speaker', despite the fact it was originally billed as a smart home assistant/hub.

A more sensible approach would have been to strip out Siri along with the half-baked Smart Home gubbins, and just sell the speaker itself at $200 with bluetooth and a line-in port. That would have been hard to turn down - competitive with Sonos in price and better in quality, and able to be hooked into an Echo or Google Home device to replace their internal bag-of-dicks speakers. Instead, what you end up with is a very good speaker, inexplicably attached to a badly gimped Amazon Echo which refuses to let it connect to 90% of your other kit or play any music owned on any other platform.

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Naselus
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I'm guessing Amazon delivery driver

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Data scientist wanted: Must have Python, spontaneity not required

Naselus
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" the quality of the job postings is just really, really low."

Guessing this tbh. Probably a number of tiny companies who do not need data scientists and do not hold enough data to analyse trying to get on the bandwagon after the CTO saw a presentation about how marvellous it is, but unable to afford the actual £60k+ that a real Data Scientist would expect.

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Oracle: We've stuffed automation in 'pretty much' all our services

Naselus
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Knowing most companies

"However, the biz has repeatedly emphasised that increased automation will not mean the end of people's jobs – instead saying it will simply cut out the monotonous yet time consuming day-to-day tasks."

Including such monotonous and time-consuming tasks as coming into the office, communicating with other staff, carrying a staff ID badge, or collecting paycheques at the end of the month.

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Samsung needs to eat itself, not copy Apple's X-rated margins

Naselus
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Re: Galaxy S9 Lite

Came to say the exact same thing - Samsung already have 2 'lite' model lines in the J and the A, along, of course, with the other 'lite' flagship in the Note. Basically, they already have complete market coverage. That's why they sell the most phones in the world, after all.

The S series will continue to track Apple flagships, because at that end of the market the price is actually part of the appeal. Both the iPhone X and the Samsung S series will continue to hike in price until that part of the market ceases to exist altogether, while the real battlegrounds will be in the low-to-mid ranges.

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Meltdown's Linux patches alone add big load to CPUs, and that's just one of four fixes

Naselus
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Re: For procurement...

"Ok, look at this:

https://www.servethehome.com/intel-offers-enterprise-meltdown-spectre-benchmarks-gift-amd/"

Your quoted page largely supports my argument.

"Still, if the Intel Xeon Platinum was 27% faster pre-patch, we would expect it to be no faster than 22% faster now."

"The one we really want to see the results of is the “Storage bound workload” for the NoSQL database. Intel claimed a 27% lead over AMD EPYC but it is showing that some storage bound workloads using fio can see a 22% decrease. If Intel had a 22% decrease there, it would actually push Intel below AMD EPYC on that benchmark."

So... Intel generally likely to remain significantly better on generic workloads at high-end, but some risk of AMD taking a lead in intensive DB ops. As in, exactly what I proposed in my initial post.

So yeah, I generally wouldn't be looking at AMD in the server room - yet. Epyc is OK when there's a major budget constraints - for SMBs looking to run a lot of stuff on one box, say - but as you move up into serious enterprise kit and you can spend serious money, AMD still aren't competitive. But it's really not far off, and the performance loss Intel have suffered from Meltdown really does mean AMD could feasibly overtake again for a generation or two in the near future.

Then Intel will just do what they did in the late 1980s and the early 2000s and hurl so much money at the problem that they leave AMD in the dust again. Same thing happens every 15 years or so.

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Naselus
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Re: For procurement...

"What performance premium do Intel chips provide, when they have to be patched for Meltdown, and AMD chips do not?"

At the very high end (which is where we're looking here, in cloud DCs), Intel chips have a roughly 25% higher benchmark than AMD. So even with a 6-10% slowdown from the Meltdown patches, you're better on Intel chips. The only workloads where this may not apply is heavy database usage (SQL clusters etc); the very high (upto 40%) impact of meltdown mitigation on these specific use-cases means the top AMD chip performance may squeak ahead on these server types.

Mid-to-low end, the difference in baseline performance is less - but the use-case for servers using these chips will tend to be less impacted by meltdown mitigation too, so Intel likely remains ahead.

AMD will generally give better performance-per-dollar at most levels, but the metrics show absolute performance on both single and multi-core remains an Intel strength. Epyc and Ryzen are very good processor lines, far better than the dross AMD have been releasing for the last decade or so, but they're not really a match for Xeon and the i-7 at the high end of the market yet.

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Talk down to Siri like she's a mere servant – your safety demands it

Naselus
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Re: Reg does clickbait

Wind in your Apple Defense Lasers. 'Siri' is being used as shorthand for voice assistants, nothing more.

And the story is almost certainly apocryphal. A quick google finds hundreds of versions - the woman (it's always a woman) is always in her 80s, though sometimes 83, sometimes 87. Her grandson (it's ALWAYS her grandson) is always seeking bail, but the amount - while always thousands of dollars - varies, as does the reason he's been locked up.

The scam itself is reported on the 'net as far back as 2005 at least, long before there was any clever voice tech to perform it (when apparently the scammers were simply expert impressionists). Whether it's ever actually been performed in real life is more questionable.

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Uber and its 245 million reasons to settle with Google's Waymo

Naselus
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Re: Shares?

" Even if they are going to crash and burn, they will still do their IPO."

Doubt it, tbh. If they IPO, then they need to let someone else see the books and put a realistic price on the stock. A realistic price for Uber is probably close to zero, since it's not profitable, the business model has no realistic path to profit, the core app business has no means of preventing competitors from copying it, and the company seems to have little money left.

I suspect we may be hearing about Uber going belly-up in the next two years, tbh. Possibly as the unicorn bubble pops.

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Hyperscale oligarchs to rule the cloud as the big get bigger, and the small ... you won't care

Naselus
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Just go do a couple of courses in Cloud sysadmining and you'll be fine - hell, you can probably call yourself a 'cloud architect' and start pulling in twice your current salary for easier work.

In my experience, cloud doesn't actually reduce the amount of system administration that is needed in-house. It just means you spend more time swearing at AWS and Azure portals rather than swearing at poor Server 2012, VSphere and ONTAP integration.

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Apple's top-secret iBoot firmware source code spills onto GitHub for some insane reason

Naselus
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Don't engage with it. Opinion remains divided whether it's some kind of joke Bombastic Bob sock-puppet account, a poor amanfrommars1 tribute act, or a Russian trollbot AI training system.

Opinion also remains divided over whether those three things are really separate and distinct categories, or just three descriptions of the same thing.

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Naselus
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"it turned out to be a gay porn film featuring hunky German bikers, and not a zip of the Win2k source after all."

No waiiiii, I got that one from a mis-named stream too. Not Win2k, though. Lets just say that all my friends were very surprised when I told them what I thought of V for Vendetta.

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Naselus
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Re: Is it Legit?

Yeah, I wouldn't consider it a global IT security issue. But it may be indicative of some insiders at Apple resisting the fruity firm's notorious internal police-state-style setup. Apple's team structure and corporate culture is more secretive, compartmentalized and restrictive than most intelligence agencies, and many of the engineers have only really put up with it as long as the tech remained exciting to work with.

Endlessly iterating the same 4-5 basic product lines gets dull quickly, and I wouldn't be surprised if some of the rank-and-file techies are getting fed up with the relatively poor pay and relatively bad working conditions compared to the other tech giants (while still being markedly better than 99% of the world's population have to put up with). And Tim Cook ain't Steve Jobs; people will put up with more shit to work with one of the really big names in technology from the late 20th century (even if he was an asshole) than they will working for an identikit corporate type.

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Naselus
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Meanwhile, inside Apple HQ

"Damn it, James, I thought you said the source code file was highly secured!"

"It was, I set up the file to only open if the user entered the Mac OS root passwo- oh. Shit."

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It's 2018 and your Macs, iPhones can be pwned by playing evil music

Naselus
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Re: Dream On Apple

"While I agree that's what everyone says I have an Alexa speaker in my kitchen and she seems worse than Siri at following commands."

The statistics don't lie. Voice assistants are measured on two metrics - question recognition (the ability to recognize that a question is, in fact, a question), and ability to answer (the capacity to provide a correct answer to a question).

Google dominates - it has a score of roughly 80/80. Cortana follows on about 60/70, with Alex coming in third at 20/60. Siri languishes at 20/20, barely better than Samsung's dire Bixby (about 20/15). Apple really haven't made much progress in the area, while all the major competitors have done much better - probably directly because Apple is much less interested in compiling large amounts of useful training data, while Google, Amazon and Microsoft all already had large databases available for the purpose and an incentive to increase those databases for other business interests (Search businesses, online shopping, advertizing revenue etc).

"In general I'd say Apple waits to get a product right and enters markets where they feel the existing products can be outdone. "

Apple does best in immature markets. The iPhone wasn't the first smartphone, but the smartphone market barely existed prior to 2007. The iPod wasn't the first MP3 player, but the MP3 market was tiny and reliant on stolen media prior to 2004. Apple is undeniably very, very good at moving into an immature market and dominating it for a few years, before losing market share to a competitor who is willing to play the commodity game (Wintel in PCs, Android in phones/tablets, generic competitors in MP3 players prior to streaming destroying the whole market). They're also very, very good at building ancillary markets onto an existing one - think iTunes for the iPod, the App store for phones. First mover advantage on those creates the lock-in effect that Apple relies on to extract maximum value from a marketplace before abandoning it and moving on to the next Big Thing.

Unfortunately, they've missed the boat with home assistants. The underlying economics don't add up - even with a decent speaker attached, home assistants will only ever be sensibly priced for consumers when subsidized by datamining - and their rivals have mature app/skill stores and, quite frankly, just plain better tech, which is improving faster, at a lower price.

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Naselus
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Re: @insane_hound

"(other than their own, and I guess a handful of third party stuff they sell in the stores)"

Uh, has someone forgotten what the App store is...?

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Naselus
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Re: Dream On Apple

"Homepod can be successful even if it never gets more than the 5-15% market share the Mac and iPhone have."

Can it, though?

The very minimal number of decent use-cases for home assistants means that a $350 price tag is hard to justify. Everything else in the same space costs half as much.

Then we have the other factors. Siri is pretty widely recognized to be the weakest of the voice assistants - and by a very wide margin, being less capable of recognizing questions than any of the other main contenders and even less able to answer them. And Apple are entering the market from way behind here, into a space where the opposition have much larger, well-developed app ecosystems - which is not one of their strengths. Apple are good at entering a market early and leveraging their marketing muscle and design chops to dominate early. They're pretty bad at competing in an established marketplace, particularly one where they have a clear quality disadvantage over competitors.

This strikes me as the equivalent of Microsoft's efforts to break into the mobile phone market - coming in late and badly overpriced, with little third party support in place and no real quality advantage to make it stand out against cheaper and more mature rivals.

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Naselus
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Re: Dream On Apple

"but the only logical long-term economic model would require you to pay a monthly subscription for the benefit"

Have you heard of Facebook? Noticed they don't charge a monthly subscription since they can make their money by selling your marketable information instead?

That's the business model for all the home assistants. Amazon isn't going to charge you a subscription for Alexa, because the data it's mining is worth far, far more than that. Honestly, they just can't believe that they don't have to pay YOU.

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Insurance companies now telling you what tech to buy with um-missable price signals

Naselus
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Re: I disagree

Agreed; especially since one of the companies which their mandating as 'secure' has had repeated, embarrassing password-related fails in the past few months.

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Naselus
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Re: Selling insurance against breakins seems insane

Um, most of the things you mention are good reasons why having an outside insurance agent to force you to comply with best practices is a good thing, tbh.

Keeping current on patches? Something we're always complaining ought to be in place, and roundly mock any company which is hacked for failing to do so.

One employee getting phished? Forces you to keep your anti-phishing training and automated email filters up to date and to enforce least privilege properly. If Susie in the call centre can't access anything, her being phished doesn't matter.

IDS having all it's alerts switched off? Not something that ought to be happening either.

Many of these things are areas IT and IS have spent years trying to push companies toward, but companies themselves have failed to see any reason to do so. Having an insurance company demand compliance to provide coverage may actually make C-suite or board members take it a bit more seriously.

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Look at stupid, sexy Kubernetes with all the cloud firms hanging off its musclebound arms

Naselus
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Re: Supporting Kubernetes is good, but how long for?

In fairness, enterprises aren't even going to learn Containers exist til about 2021 anyway.

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Uber: Ah yeah, we pay women drivers less than men. We can explain!

Naselus
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Re: Let's see the same for driver ethnicity and immigration status

Also, knowing Uber, it'd be worth finding out what other statistics they're keeping. Finding out that they've been tracking the correlation of female driver earnings to breast size, would not surprise me.

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No, Windows 10 hasn’t beaten Windows 7’s market share. Not for sure, anyway

Naselus
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The fact it can't run 90% of other commonly-used programs in most industries?

For most people, work =/= MS Office. Otherwise, we'd have all gone open source years ago.

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Naselus
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Re: One should add to the graph...

"Fixed that for you."

No, I think my way was better. Try it. Inform one of them that they don't have to look at the web through a mess of ads, and tell them about Adblocker.

But don't install it for them. Let them install it themselves. They won't; if it actually involves looking for and installing something themselves then they decide that they 'don't mind the ads'.

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Naselus
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Re: I wish they would give figures rather than percentages

It's mostly going to be new machines rolled out in business hardware refreshes, tbh.

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Naselus
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Re: One should add to the graph...

Also known as "heavily biased toward about 98% of the actual market". Adblock is very popular, and still probably only has about 5-10% potential market penetration. Most users are not tech savvy and don't really mind looking at the internet through a blur of massed advertizing.

I was on an adblock-free PC the other day and actually didn't recognize one of the websites I regularly visit.

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Naselus
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"And 2.4 kids."

It's quite hard to add up how many you have without removing them from the freezer and trying to put them back together, tbh.

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Why is Bitcoin fscked? Here are three reasons: South Korea, India... and now China clamps down on cryptocurrencies

Naselus
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Re: Basic economics killed Bitcoin as a currency

It's not a classic Ponzi scheme. A Ponzi scheme has a very specific meaning which Bitcoin doesn't fit at all.

In a Ponzi scheme, the initial investors receive dividends which are paid for out of the capital of newer investors. The capital is never put to productive use - the scheme's runner keeps as much of it as he can and pays above-market dividends out to continue attracting new investment. As such, more or less by definition, an asset cannot be a Ponzi scheme.

There have been several Ponzi schemes launched using crypto-currencies as a cover for how they alledge to turn market-beating profits. But the currencies are not Ponzi schemes in themselves, so stop saying that they are as it just makes it clear you don't know what the term actually means.

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Naselus
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Re: In a heating dominated climate

"Maybe some clever company needs to create a new line of electric heaters that use their power for bitcoin mining (or cloud computing or whatever) instead of resistance coils. They can advertise "heat that pays for itself"..."

I seem to recall that someone did try and kickstart a similar idea, but it wasn't practical - basically, your initial install costs are so high compared to using traditional radiators or space heaters (and electric heating is so expensive anyway, compared to gas) that it's not a remotely attractive addition to an existing building.

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DevOps: Bloody hell, we've got to think about security too! Sigh. Who wants coffee?

Naselus
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Re: you're peddling cheap, low quality, high street tat

Either way, too many developers and programmers (including many with good engineering degrees from good universities) view security as something that's in their way, rather than something that should be integral, and so look to remove or circumvent security features rather than correctly writing to incorporate them.

Meanwhile, the 'Ops' part of DevOps has tended to be marginalized (because Ops staff are 'unproductive' while still being about as expensive as code monkeys), so despite the relatively strong security culture that ops teams have built up in the last twenty years or so, it's just not translated into the developer-dominated DevOps scene. The result is a lot of decidedly shabbily-run devops infrastructures, even when the code is decent.

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Nunes FBI memo: Yep, it's every bit as terrible as you imagined

Naselus
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Re: How to get rid of fleas on your dog

"Collusion -- so far -- has not even been demonstrated."

Well, except that bit where the Russians asked Don Junior if he fancied trying to collude with them, and he said 'I love it'.

I do wonder where the Republican definition of collusion is going to end up. Pretty soon, we'll reach the point where anything short of directly recruiting Putin as your campaign manager is 'No collusion!'.

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Naselus
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Re: Opinion poll proxy vote!

"So no, we don't want to see it in our president -- but why should we expect him to be any different than every other politician in Washington?"

Possibly because his entire platform as to why people should have voted for him was 'I'm an outsider and not like those politicians in Washington'?

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Naselus
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Re: Really?

"As for the Steele dossier parts of it have been corroborated by the intelligence services. and Carter Page was an item of interest as long ago as 2013."

Indeed. And this was the third FISA re-application. Each re-application must show that the previous FISA surveillance of the target has yielded results - so Page had already been under surveillance, which had shown results, for about a year at the time of the application where the Steele dossier was included.

So yeah, this memo is so full of shit it should be called Sean Hannity.

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EU bods up GDPR ante: Threatens legislative laggards with ‘infringement procedure’

Naselus
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In the words of Sir Humphrey

The Germans will love it, the French will ignore it, the Italians and Irish will be too chaotic to enforce it, and the British will resent it.

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29 MEEELLION iPhone Xs flogged... only to be end-of-life'd by summer?

Naselus
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Re: I always thought the X would be one and done

"because they won't need to price it high to limit demand to match supply"

Sure, that's definitely why Apple priced it at a grand a phone. Because they're always so anxious to ensure that they don't create demand that they can't satisfy.

And as for the next one being $100 cheaper... not a chance in hell, Apple will continue to see if they can just keep increasing the price by $100 a year until it starts seriously hurting the bottom line, and then hold it there.

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