* Posts by Naselus

1110 posts • joined 26 Aug 2014

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Sysadmin tells user CSI-style password guessing never w– wait WTF?! It's 'PASSWORD1'!

Naselus
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Re: "They looked for the password on the CD . . ."

"if you send a password-protected file and the password in the same package, it really totally defeats the purpose of the password."

Unlike using the word 'Password' as the password, because that's totally in keeping with Best Practice.

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UK Prime Minister calls on internet big beasts to 'auto-takedown' terror pages within 2 HOURS

Naselus
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Re: Even Better.....

"Perhaps we need to make all the terrs wear uniforms.... like Antifa....."

No, the solution is staring us in the face. If the pron filter already works, then we just need to convince the terrorists to make all their videos in the buff.

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Attention adults working in the real world: Do not upgrade to iOS 11 if you use Outlook, Exchange

Naselus
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Re: It is an Apple link that is the source of this article

"ElReg is surely *reporting* what has been published?"

Yup, that's largely how news works. Otherwise newspapers would basically just be long-form essays about what the journalists did over the weekend, tbh. Kind of like the Guardian is nowadays.

The fact it's on Apple's own website does kinda put the kybosh on the argument that this is just El Reg pouring negativity on the glorious Eighth Coming of the Jesus Phone, though.

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Naselus
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Re: Journalism is not about truth these days

"Can you imagine this site (or any other for that matter) headlining a story.

"Apple IOS Upgrade Success!""

Yes, I can imagine several thousand Mac-centric sites saying exactly that, even if the update in question accidentally summoned Cthulu into the front room and made him eat your cat ("The new unwanted cat elimination feature promises to be a game changer").

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Behold iOS 11, an entirely new computer platform from Apple

Naselus
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When your userbase was as UI-obsessed as Apple's were during the late 90s/ early 00s, yes. Given that anyone who wasn't entirely UI obsessed wouldn't have touched the crap they were churning out then with a barge pole.

Remember, when we're discussing early Mac OSX, we're not talking about the sleek, shiny, high-end post-2006 Intel-powered Apple, but instead the pre-2005 PowerPC Apple, who's hardware was a shoddy joke (though still with an eye-watering price tag). The interface was the only thing they had going for them, so interface screw-ups were a big deal in Appleland. People were literally shocked that the 2007 Macbook also turned out to be a good computer underneath the shiny interface, because we'd not seen a competitive bit of hardware from Apple since about 1983.

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Boffins discover tightest black hole binary system – and it's supermassive

Naselus
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Re: 24 light years apart

I believe they just have to be in a stable orbit around a mutual center of mass, so distance is only important in so far as it impacts their gravitational pull on each other. With objects as gravitationally massive as black holes, that means a binary system could form across a truly enormous distance - potentially including a system of smaller stars orbiting each.

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Naselus
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Re: Standard units of measure? (@Katyanna Quach)

Yes, she means '3.745318353333333*10^24 LINQ Hotel Recyclings'.

Hopefully that'll clear up some confusion among the commentards.

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Mobe reception grief turns LTE Apple Watch 3 into – er, a dull watch

Naselus
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Re: I don't know about you...

Sir Johnny believes that allowing the user to decide what the device is allowed to do is abdicating your responsibility as a designer.

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Itching to stuff iOS 11 on your iPhone? You may want to hold off for a bit

Naselus
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Re: wifi

Completely screwing up wifi connectivity with a software upgrade was practically a tradition until about 2014. Hell, this happening again is probably considered the return of a beloved feature.

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Naselus
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In fairness to Apple, which major software vendor doesn't work like that now? And, come to think of it, was there ever a time when they didn't?

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Compsci degrees aren't returning on investment for coders – research

Naselus
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Re: Don't bother

"Left his job as a Games Journalist and concentrated on Gunpoint full time. Release it and it became a big success."

Yes, but for every example like that there's 20,000 failed projects rusting in a bin, or which make it to completion and then sell <1000 copies. From which the publisher takes 70%+ for the profit margin.

Games development is a shitty job. You have all the downsides of a regular programming gig, get paid about a third less, and there's even less job security. It's one of the most exploitative industries out there.

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Apocalypse now: Ad biz cries foul over Apple's great AI cookie purge

Naselus
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Re: While I dislike Apple

"students have no sex"

You must've had the most boring university experience ever.

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The developers vs enterprise architects showdown: You shall know us by our trail of diagrams

Naselus
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"Many "Devops" teams lack the "ops" experience to justify the name"

Very much this. A good Devops team should have a bunch of developers who have enough knowledge to do very basic ops, and a bunch of ops guys who have enough knowledge to do very basic coding. That way, the drudge-work parts of the ops tasks can be assigned to the developer portion of the team, and the drudge work of the dev tasks can be given to the ops portion, while the experts can concentrate on doing the really complex bits of their own specialty when needed. Developers aren't sat twiddling their thumbs waiting for a 100k a year solutions expert to click 'next' six times in the RHEL installer before they can start testing their new program, and ops guys aren't sitting in maintenance mode for half their time.

Instead, a lot of Devops teams were set up by simply firing all the ops guys and giving the dev team root permissions. The result has been a cascade of cloud-based apps which have dreadful security and performance problems because their VM is running a default setup, because the developer has no idea how to properly configure an SQL instance and no problem with just opening a dozen extra ports on the firewall to make his shitty code work.

This is the kind of thing that we used to fire developers for ten years ago. Now it's being forced on them.

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Naselus
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Re: Awesome article

"I've long thought that a process/rule/whatever you want to call it should include a rationale as to why it exists"

The problem is, these often become so long and convoluted that no-one will bother to read them, or so technically-specific that most people won't understand them.

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Naselus
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Re: Awesome article

"Told him no. I get my state pension next month."

Should have said yes, but you'd be needing a full year's salary per month.

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Why the Apple Watch with LTE means a very Apple-y sort of freedom

Naselus
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Re: So much

In fairness, Apple kit always 'just worked' with other Apple kit and 'just failed miserably' with anyone else's prior to about 2006 anyway. The brief blip from 2006-2012 or so where they played nicely with other vendors was probably regarded as a bug rather than a feature.

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Naselus
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Just guessing wildly from a quick read-through of the presentation, but possibly because it's very heavily aimed at Machine to Machine service, and so the base station might need an intermediary (the iPhone) to act as a proxy.

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Naselus
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Re: Are you sure?

From the small print at the bottom of that exact same page of the Apple website:

"Apple Watch Series 3 (GPS + Cellular) requires an iPhone 6 or later with iOS 11 or later. Apple Watch and iPhone service provider must be the same. Not available with all service providers. Roaming is not available outside your carrier network coverage area. Wireless service plan required for cellular service. Contact your service provider for more details. Check www.apple.com/watch/cellular for participating wireless carriers and eligibility."

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Another month, another malware outbreak in Google's Play Store

Naselus
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Re: Useless Google

"...Microsoft finally had to take security seriously."

And even then it didn't make a big difference. No serious corporate relies only on MS security features, or even on just MS security products in addition to the in-built stuff.

The simple fact is, whichever operating system has dominant market share is always going to be a security hellhole. It's a huge target with the potential for a vast payoff, and so people will make correspondingly more effort to attack it. It's kind of the inverse of the security-through-obscurity which Apple and Linux benefited from throughout the 1990s-2000s, where there were just as many (if not more, certainly in the case of '90s Apple) vulnerabilities as Windows, but no serious incentive for anyone to try and exploit them. Linux's growing dominance in the server room and the IoT has been causing a corresponding rise in Linux vulnerabilities being revealed over the last decade or so, in spite of the fact that it's vastly more security-friendly than it's rivals. No software or system is ever 100% secure, and so people WILL find a way to break it, given a good enough reason to try.

And, for the bulk of users, security is never, ever a real selling point. Ever. Oh, they'll say they want good security... until there's a tiny slowdown, or the slightest increase in effort required to use it, and then they'll turn it off. Just look at the complaints about Apple's 20-times-as-secure-as-fingerprint face recognition in the iPhone X - 'this now means I need to look at the phone to unlock it! Ugh! I have to move my arm slightly to point it at my own face! I'm never buying an iPhone again!!!'. Or consider the number of people you know who have turned off their antivirus because 'it makes the internet run slow'. For about an hour, once a week. Until they are personally compromised in some way and lose out from it, they will not think safeguarding against attack is worth any effort on their own part, let alone spending more money, or actually bothering to research different phone OSes to figure out which one they need.

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Naselus
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Re: Useless Google

"4) Do nothing. Stamp on costs, continue as Wall Street's bitch, and just cruise on until the Play store gets hit by some absolutely disastrous malware outbreak that destroys the Android brand."

Thing is, I don't even see a truly apocalyptic malware outbreak destroying Android. There's not much competition. Apple have no interest in selling phones for under $500, which neatly cuts them off from 90% of the world market; Windows Phone is dead in the water; no other competitor can bring the resources to the table to challenge a mostly-free OS with Android's reach. And Android's security reputation is already awful, so it's not like malware outbreaks appear to have much negative impact anymore.

Basically, it'll end up taking the Windows route, where home users will live in a horrifying malware hellscape riven with endless digital plagues, while corporate types will hire specialists who lock the phone down to the point where it needs permission from an administrator to do anything more complex than take pictures, make phone calls and send emails. Which is more or less all that's required for the average executive anyway; we may as well have left them on Symbian.

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Unloved Microsoft Edge is much improved – but will anyone use it?

Naselus
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Re: And its only Windows 10?

Not to mention Edge's God-awful habit of stealing program defaults whenever it has the chance... which means everyone and their dog has already built-in a reg hack or login script that automatically re-maps all those defaults back to their preferred option. My network is actually a far more hostile environment to Edge than to any other browser now, simply because it was so invasive.

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Naselus
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Re: And its only Windows 10?

"Edge should either have been backported or at least IE should have got the improved support."

No, Edge should've been left in it's box 'til it was ready. Shipping it incomplete in Windows 10 gave everyone a chance to use it, find it was inferior to whatever they'd been using before, and promptly ignore it forever after. Which is a shame in some ways, since it's certainly leaps and bounds ahead of the decaying corpse of Internet Explorer; but really, if you're already on Chrome/Firefox/Opera/whatever, they're all so alike in functionality now that you only consider swapping if one of them introduces a particularly shit version (like Firefox were tending to do last year).

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123-Reg customers outraged at automatic .UK domain registration

Naselus
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Re: Little to do with automatic renewal

"Can you point out where it says that?"

No, because it won't say it in the agreement. However, if people are using www.wolfetone.uk to reach your children's toy company's website, and you stop paying for it, and the following day it's picked up by an eye-wateringly hardcore vore porn website, then you might find that your brand takes a bit of a hit in the ensuing PR disaster.

Basically, no-one wanted .uk to exist in the first place, since .co.uk already did and we'd all bought the domain we needed. Every new TLD is another set of websites I need to spend money on every two years to avoid some random bastard squatting on the domain and setting up a parody site or something.

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El Reg is hiring an intern. Here's the lowdown...

Naselus
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Re: you could just apply for a real job with them?

"1 year with the big 'C'."

Chlamydia?

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Naselus
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Re: Has El Reg seen what has happened to The Guardian of Late?

"Never to my political tastes, but it certainly used to be a quality newspaper."

The problem is, recently it seems to have given up being to anyone's political tastes. Their core readership turned pretty heavily pro-Corbyn back in 2015, but the paper itself has held out against joining them for as long as possible - not through the fault of the interns, but the 90s-era writers who's every article is a sonnet to the lost days of Tony Blair.

Regardless of your feelings toward Corbyn, it's frankly no surprise that the paper has hemorrhaged readers when it insists on endlessly castigating their hero, especially after the election result made the doomsayer's predictions seem ludicrous. They might do a lot better to put paid to the tedious musings of Polly Toynbee, Nick Cohen and Suzanne Moore and use the money saved on their monstrous salaries to give the interns full time jobs.

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Naselus
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Re: Is there Fondue?

"A Comp-Sci degree and you're paying £9.15 an hour?"

They did also say an English degree would do, so as long as they're offering more than McDonald's they're probably ahead of the competition.

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Apple's adoption of Qi signals the end of the wireless charging wars

Naselus
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Re: Race over? I doubt it

"I still struggle to picture widespread usage scenarios where wireless charging for a laptop is more practical than wired though."

Same as the scenario for phones - build it into couches, desks and coffee tables. Put your laptop on the table and it tops itself off. Especially useful when you have laptops plugged in under your desk and the exec using it doesn't want to get down on the floor to unplug it before he goes home; the number of requests we get for a 'spare' charger to take home forever is appalling.

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Naselus
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Pretty astonishing move, though. They will simply never sell a $120 Apple-branded charging pad if every $20 Samsung one also works with the phone (well, except for the frothing fanbois, but really, that's not the bulk of iPhone sales).

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Regulate, says Musk – OK, but who writes the New Robot Rules?

Naselus
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Re: Alien Supplies to Earthed Assets .... via Open Cast MetadataMining Operations

amanfromMars, proving that AI still isn't that smart.

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Sacre bleu! Apple's high price, marginal gain iPhone strategy leaves it stuck in the mud

Naselus
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Re: The market is big enough

", just like the 1k5 Hermes Apple Watch."

The Watch was a bit of a flop, though, no? Much like the entire wearable market turned out to be...

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Naselus
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Re: Even Samsung

The difference is, the Note 8 has been routinely hailed as 'the best smartphone in the world' - as was the Note 7 prior to the whole 'it catches fire in your hands' thing, and the Note 6 before it. Apple never really had to face serious competition for the title before the iPhone 6, and having that title opens the very deep wallets of the 'I want the best, money's no object' crowd - expense account executives, oligarchs, Chinese government officials etc. Basically, the only segment of the population Apple even bother trying to sell to outside the US/UK.

But the response to the X - even from traditional Apple stalwarts - has been much more mixed than previous models. For something that was pitched as a "major update", the changes have turned out to be decidedly run of the mill, with lots of playing catch-up and not a lot pushing the envelope. It's hard to get excited for 'here's a feature your secretary's 6-year old's phone has had for 2 or 3 years, only we're doing it slightly differently!'.

The simple fact is, near enough all the new phone's headline features would have been really competitive 18 months ago, but making a big fanfare about adding them now is just calling attention to the fact they were still missing even after 4th-rate brands had started adding them to their mid-range offerings.

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Naselus
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Re: Facial recognition - "live" sensing

The facial recog is 3D, and so should be able to tell if you're holding up a 2D image. Though it was also supposedly super-accurate and reliable even if you covered your face/grew a beard / underwent major reconstructive surgery, and then failed to unlock at all during the demo, so...

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Apple: Our stores are your 'town square' and a $1,000 iPhone is your 'future'

Naselus
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Re: Recipe for disaster?

What do you mean, 'new'?

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Naselus
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"With default settings Android is pretty secure"

Not really. The most up-to-date version usually is... not that anyone aside from Pixel owners ever has the most up-to-date version of Android at any given time. Even flagships often have anything up to half a year of lag time on the update, while with low-end models you may as well forget it.

I loathe Apple's overpriced, underspec tat, and I have serious concerns with the entire 'walled garden' security philosophy, but there's no denying that their security is much better than the dire malware hellscape that makes up 90% of Androidland.

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Naselus
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Re: Genius Groves?

"The problem with these discussion is that nobody is actually claiming any innovation."

Uh, I guess they must've misinterpreted the constant use of the word 'gamechanger' at every Apple event since 2002 as some kind of claim to have done something innovative.

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Naselus
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We'll see how 'fixed' it is once the real security bods have had a look tbh. Apple are claiming some ludicrously low failure rate, but then they always do.

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Naselus
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Re: These "new" iPhones

"To be fair, during the presentation they didn't claim to be first with any of those things"

Which is also pretty unusual for Apple, who have never been afraid of claiming credit for a stolen idea.

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Naselus
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Re: iPhone IX

The glass back is easier for Qi to pass through. It's actually a practical consideration. I can only imagine the scale of Sir Ive's tantrum over engineers dictating elements of his design.

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Naselus
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Re: Can't wait

No one said Apple were bad at business. It's making decent tech they suck at.

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Boffins fear we might be running out of ideas

Naselus
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Re: Eight men control as much wealth as the poorest 3.6 billion people

"From a financial point of view there is quite a difference between balance sheet wealth and P&L wealth."

There's no such thing as 'p&l wealth vs balance sheet wealth'. Wealth is what you own, minus what you owe, full stop. Profit v loss is income, and is a completely different thing. Conflating the two is not helpful.

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Naselus
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Re: Tim Worstal's article

"But what if this time the rich simply bring out the Terminators..."

he rich don't need the poor to work for them. They need the poor to define themselves against. If everyone has a million dollars, no-one is wealthy.

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Servers sales are up. Nope, you read that right

Naselus
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Correction

"“The growth for the quarter is attributable to two main factors,” said Jeffrey Hewitt, research veep at Gartner."

Should read "“The growth for the quarter is attributable to two main factors, neither of which we managed to foresee despite them being pretty damn predictable” said Jeffrey Hewitt, research veep at Gartner."

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Hi Amazon, Google, Apple we might tax you on revenue rather than profit – love, Europe

Naselus
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Re: Just change the current tax laws.

"So 10 countries = 100% of their global profit?"

He said tax on 10% of their global profit, not tax OF 10% of their global profit.

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Naselus
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Re: @Ledswinger "Its an excellent idea......"

"You're missing the point that no matter how it is collected, it is always the "people like us" who pay the tax in the end, because we're the ones with the money."

No, I think you're missing the point. The tax isn't the relevant bit, the avoiding tax is.

Amazon, for example, gets a huge advantage over competitors by dodging taxes. They competitors who pay their fair share can't compete and therefore go bankrupt, and Amazon thus collects a huge pile of barely-taxed cash to leave offshore waiting for a tax holiday in the US.

The taxes need to be paid. Yes, it might mean we have to pay higher prices for things. We probably SHOULD be paying higher prices, though. Hospitals need to be finded. Infrastructure needs to be repaired. These things need to be paid for, and the money has to come from somewhere; it's derailed by the fact that tax-avoiding corporations are out-competing compliant ones through offering prices that are effectively impossibly low. This in turn permits wage repression which otherwise wouldn't be tolerated, leading to a low-productivity, low-wage, low-price economy - i.e., a third world one.

That's the issue really, not 'who ends up paying the tax in the end'.

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The bigger the drone, the bigger the impact

Naselus
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Wrong direction

The future of goods transport will be underground, not in the sky. Automated vehicles in tunnel networks can be far, far, far, far more energy efficient that flying drones, and can be connected to a grid so they don'e need to carry batteries etc. Airborne drones could be used for final stage delivery (i.e., within an 10-minute or so radius of the depot), but no, there's just too many disadvantages to trying to use them for long-range or bulk delivery work.

As for Papua New Guinea, there's deep-rooted cultural reasons that capitalism hasn't really taken off there. Instigating a transport revolution isn't likely to override twenty thousand years of gift exchange economics, particularly since the profit margins on the agricultural produce in the mountains will take decades to pay back the capital investment required to set such a system up.

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Google to kill its Drive file locker in two confusing ways

Naselus
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" A few have disappeared but but the HDD isn't one of them."

15k rpm spinning rust begs to differ.

HDD was actually 3 tiers; Flash has firmly killed 2 of them. All 15k rpm use cases were replaced by SSD. All 10k use cases were replaced by hybrid SSHDs with slower rust and a flash cache. Only 7.2k remains, though it's quite likely to be with us for decades yet.

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42: The answer to life, the universe and how many Cisco products have Struts bugs

Naselus
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I don't think he meant 'liberal' in the American political sense, but rather in the 'a liberal helping of salt' sense.

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Massive iPhone X leak trashes Apple's 10th anniversary circus

Naselus
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Re: Wireless Charging

They weren't going to, as they were holding out for some magic long-range wireless tech to pop into existence. They didn't appear overly interested in actually spending any money making that happen themselves, mind. When it continued to not appear of it's own accord, they threw in the towel and signed up with the WPC.

I just thought that joining the WPC required one to hold to certain standards. What with it being a standards organization. Apparently it's not one of those standards organizations that set standards that members are expected to actually follow.

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Naselus
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Re: Wireless Charging

I thought that you HAD to be compatible if you joined the Qi consortium? Which was kinda the point, no?

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44m UK consumers on Equifax's books. How many pwned? Blighty eagerly awaits spex on the breach

Naselus
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I seem to recall an also-ran in the Grand National in about 1996?

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