* Posts by Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese

967 posts • joined 22 Jul 2014

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Blighty's super-duper F-35B fighter jets are due to arrive in a few weeks

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: Glad you researched, but be careful of the source,....

I did the guided tour* of Battle of Britain Memorial Flight at Conningsby a few years ago. I'm sure the guide there related a story about a "dummy" bomb that had been lying around an RAF base for years (it might even have been Conningsby) which was eventually identified as real when someone tried to move it. That wasn't a dams bomb though - it was either a Tall Boy or Grand Slam - both also Barnes Wallis creations and very powerful, but also not likely to demolish a building miles away.

* Very good, and highly recommended.

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Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: "Starved of hydro-electric power

There was a very good programme on the BBC World Service about this last night.

The raid was intended to impact industry geared towards manufacture of war materiel, but it was also intended to damage numerous power stations. As noted by other commentards, the knock-on effect of diverting German military manpower was highly significant.

The good bits:

- It generally achieved these goals

- A big propaganda win for the British

The bad bits

- The impact on power supply wasn't particularly major. In some cases power supply was restored in around 48 hours, in other cases a couple of weeks or so.

- Loss of life for crews involved in the rate was staggeringly high in the context of the number of planes involved in the raid.

- German industry used a lot of slave labour, and many hundreds of Ukrainians were killed as well.

- Significant number (small number of thousands) German civilians were killed as well...although in a few weeks' time the allies would be firebombing German cities, leading to civilian death toll an order of magnitude greater than that off the dams raid.

The programme also talked a bit about the incredible flying skill of the RAF pilots involved in the raid...taking huge Lancasters (no terrain-following radar or any of the other mod cons) at pretty much zero altitude across Europe and back.

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Bowel down: Laxative brownies brought to colleague's leaving bash

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Whatever the reason, after this I think it's safe to say that the feeling's mutual.

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Julian Assange said to have racked up $5m security bill for Ecuador

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: Suing would backfire, badly

Courts use video links for witnesses who cannot make it to the courtroom for whatever reason.

True, but that for the case of people who *cannot* make it to the courtroom, e.g. because of hospitalisation - they would if they could but they can't.

For Assange, it'd be a case of *will not*. He'd be perfectly capable of doing so but would be refusing to attend.

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Android devs prepare to hit pause on ads amid Google GDPR chaos

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: RHLSTP

Generally an entertaining and occasionally thought provoking hour with a (generally) comedic celebrity, unencumbered with worries about taste and decency.

Indeed. I was listening to the Jess Phillips (MP) episode yesterday - entertaining, and very refreshing to hear an MP speaking as frankly as she did (even with the odd very unparliamentary F-bomb thrown in for good measure)

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Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Second, people might dislike adverts, but most people would rather put up with them than pay hard cash for apps.

Curiously, unlike apps, in the case of subscription TV services like Sky people seem quite happy to both pay a subscription AND watch adverts. Funny old world....

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Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: Consent

So - no consent, no personalised ads?

Surely it should just fall back to unpersonalised ads then? Assuming consent is a big no-no in the brave new world of GDPR.

That's what I thought as well. However, it might be possible that advertisers (who pay per ad impression displayed) might not be wanting to have ads displayed in an untargeted fashion. Knowing that they have been charged $<x> for an advert to be shown to someone who fits their target demographic is one thing, but running the risk of spending their advertising budget on ads that are shown to random individuals with no interest in the product or service? They might not want to pay for advertising in the latter case

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Britain to slash F-35 orders? Erm, no, scoffs Lockheed UK boss

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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theoretically got about the same combat range as the WW2 Fairy Swordfish if actually armed.

Small point of pedantry - that should be Fairey with an 'e'.

When spelled without the 'e' the word has a different meaning, as in "the idea of the F35 ever working as intended is a complete fairy story"

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It's Galileo Groundhog Day! You can keep asking the same question, but it won't change the answer

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: ???

It's quite well known that the US government requires domestic GPS receivers to cease working above 60,000 feet altitude and/or faster than 1,000 knots. Receivers capable of more than that are classed as munitions

IIRC this limitation was discussed a lot during LOHAN days. Is it not the case that it's actually an "and" rather than "and/or" condition? A combination of that sort of altitude and that sort of speed means some sort of missile, but just the altitude alone is benign (hence being able to use GPS to monitor altitude on weather balloon-based experiments.

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Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Surely a homemade system will be far cheaper as most of the development work has already been done.

I bet the contracts that the work was done under will have clauses that mean that EU have control over the IPR. Even if UK were remaining in EU and the Brexit question was moot, EU (who paid for the initial development) wouldn;t be happy about private sector companies building the same system for, say, a group of African countries without EU getting some sort of kickback and/or saying whether or not they approve of the countries in question getting access to that sort of tech.

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Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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The problem will be getting access to the Public Regulated Service - that data stream is encrypted, and as a non-EU country the UK won't be allowed to decrypt it.

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Sort your spending habits out, UK Ministry of Defence told over £20bn black hole

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Strangelove

The Department is reluctant to present openly an assessment of the affordability gap

Mr President we must not allow a mine shaft affordability gap!

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Hacking train Wi-Fi may expose passenger data and control systems

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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"It might be possible, and this is speculation, to lock the braking system."

It might be possible, and this is speculation, that the claim about being able to make the leap from wifi network to controlling the train's brakes is a bit of headline grabbing

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Southend Airport tests drone detection system

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: A relatively quiet hub ..

Doesn't Luton have aspirations of considering itself to be a "London" airport as well?

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Data centre down: Budget plane-ride mart Ryanair goes all in with AWS

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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I would find it most amusing if Ryanair's attempts to migrate their systems to the cloud environment were thwarted because the cloud servers don't have any processors in them.

AWS: "Oh, you want servers *with* processors do you , Mr o'Leary? Well, there'll be an extra charge for that. Oh, and by the way, are you interested in upgrading your storage array to one that actually has disks in it?"

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There will be blood: BT to axe 13,000 employees

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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BT's London HQ

Interesting bit of trivia about BT's current-but-about-to-be-former office near St Paul's - it's the location from where wireless signals were first publicly transmitted by Marconi. I remember spotting the blue plaque when passing a while back.

(One day you''ll be in a pub quiz and thank me for stuff like this)

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Scrap London cops' 'racially biased' gang database – campaigners

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: And a jail bird sir

But, to be fair, he was wearing a loud shirt in a built-up area

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Uber and NASA pen flying taxi probe pact

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: Sounds more like investor bait

Agreed. Consider how much time and effort the likes of Moller (sp?) put into flying car development without really getting anywhere, and that was (so far as I am aware) just about developing a product, never mind solving the sort of safety problems mentioned in this article.

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Commodore 64 owners rejoice: The 1541 is BACK

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Reliability

Back in the day I was a VIC-20 user (bought before the C64, and when it eventually came time to go for something bigger, I went down the Speccy route).

I remember buying the 1540 drive which stopped working properly after a couple of months. The shop eventually replaced it with a 1541 which got used very heavily for long time, and rarely skipped a beat. I guess I must have been one of the luckier ones.

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UK's Royal Navy buys £13m mine-blasting robot boat

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: "The Strait of Hormuz"..

They might clear some of the mines, but given the narrow channel it wouldn't be a challenge to block the strait using well armed small boats, mini and full size subs and air, sea or land launched missiles.

Indeed. Given the volatility of their cargo, I imagine the crews of any ships trying to head east would be *very* wary of anything with the potential to make flamey/explosiony things happen.

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My PC is on fire! Can you back it up really, really fast?

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: I recall even my mum (a bit like Dilmom) telling me a fire story

Stuff we did in the labs when I was at school which I bet kids aren't allowed to do nowadays...

- Burning strips of magnesium in a bunsen burner

- Dropping lumps of sodium into dishes of water

- Filling a cocoa tin with gas and letting it burned down until the gas:air ratio was explosive, causing the lid to shoot across the room

- Various experiments involving mercury

- Making gun cotton

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Blame everything on 'computer error' – no one will contradict you

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: I'm not sure I believe you

It beggars belief that someone can suffer so many few separate technical problems in a single day.

TFTFY

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No top-ups, please, I'm a millennial: Lightweight yoof shunning booze like never before

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: They'll grow up

Where does your magical 10% deposit come from? Not everyone has parents who can get them started

In my personal experience....when I first started working, I was living at home. I paid bed and board to parents but it was considerably less than my outgoings would have been if I'd been living in my own place, so I was able to put money into savings. That built up over a year or two into enough of a deposit to get me onto the housing ladder

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Grab your lamp, you've pulled: Brits punt life-saving gravity-powered light

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Inspired! I'm incredibly impressed.

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Firefox to feature sponsored content as of next week

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: Kiss FF goodbye.

You want to force ads down our throat? I'll counter by not downloading your products, not visiting your site, & not doing anything that rewards you financially for your actions.

@Shadow Systems...I'm curious to know something - if you're currently getting benefit from Firefox by using it as a web browser, what are you doing now to reward Mozilla for providing you with that?

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‘I broke The Pentagon’s secure messaging system – and won an award for it!’

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: Chairman of the Bored

mandatory sexual harassment training... ... an "all hands" to discuss our piss poor morale

I think I can see what the problem is at your organisation - if sexual harassment is mandatory, then it's no wonder that morale is low.

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US citizen sues France over France-dot-com brouhaha

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: Shirley

...French courts have no jurisdiction regarding US domains? (Which is what .com domains basically are)

Not strictly true - .com denotes commercial rather than USA-ian. No specific geography implied, although many people seem to associate this TLD with the left-hand side of the pond as we're used to seeing .co.uk for commercial domains over here.

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Can't log into your TSB account? Well, it's your own fault for trying

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: French Cinema

There's something about having visuals and dialog out of sync with each other that I find very annoying. I'd much rather have subtitles.

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Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: We are currently experiencing large volumes of customers

What really boils my p*** is when I hear the phrase "unusually high call volumes" being used as an excuse - *every time* that I try to get through to the call centre. Look, I've tried calling every day for nearly a fortnight at different times of the day and night, and always get the same message. The call volumes aren't unusually high, it's just that the call centre is under-staffed and/or under-skilled to be able to deal with them.

When I finally get through and am greeted by an enquiry as to what my call is about..."well I started trying to get in touch with you with a query about my account, but now my call is actually about closing that account so I can take my business elsewhere".

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Avengers: Infinity War: More Marvel-ous moolah for comic film-erverse, probably

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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@ Alister Re: Must be my age

What about Cathy Gale (Honor Blackman)?

Didn't she appear between Emma Peel and Purdy? That would make her a Nearly-New Avenger.

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Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: Must be my age

Likewise.

(I'm old, but just young enough that Purdy is my immediate frame of reference rather than Mrs Peel.)

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TSB boss: We know everything's working, you just can't see that

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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RE: Ktsecful

unfit to run any company larger than a cornershop

I believe the standard unit of measurement is fitness to run a whelk stall

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Russians poised to fire intercontinental ballistic missile... into space with Sentinel-3 sat on board

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: Launch partner?

Interesting to read about an ex Soviet missile being used successfully. This morning I was listening to an old edition of the QI "No such thing as a fish" podcast and they had a fact about in the event of WW3, lot of Soviet missiles would have been inoperable - apparently the crews in the missile silos were in the habits of drinking all of the fuel.

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'Your computer has a virus' cold call con artists on the rise – Microsoft

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: Re "putting the phone down is almost always the right thing to do."

1hr11mins on the line?

Lightweight...I managed to keep one strung along for just over 3 hours. Cordless phone with speaker on it so could carry it around the house with my while I got on with my chores. Just had to remember to put in on mute from time to time (the sound of flushing would be a bit of a giveaway that I wasn't taking it seriously)

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CEO insisted his email was on server that had been offline for years

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: Deleting emails

Some folks seem to want to keep every email they've ever received, for ever, just in case. Others (mia culpe) hate having cluttered computers and delete them asap

There is a third category. My dear old Mum had the habit of using the Deleted Items folder as an online archive. Once an email had been read, she would delete it. When she needed to refer back to it, she would go into the deleted items folder and dig it out.

That sort of worked, until the mail client (I can't remember which one she was using - she insisted on having something slightly obscure, the same as she'd used on her office PC when she was working) decided to do some admin itself, and purged some older emails from her deleted items folder.

In the end, I solved the problem by hiding the deleted items folder from view, and creating a new regular folder called "Deleted".

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Facebook's login-to-other-sites service lets scum slurp your stuff

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: Failbook slurping from Tesco Direct

I guess that it allows Tesco to target their advertising. Say you only go to Tesco's (or any other store's) website when you want to do some shopping - you're visiting it on their terms. A retailer will want to tell you about stuff which they think will prompt you to start that transaction and maybe buy something extra, say by telling you about some attractive offer. They can promote that offer through any advertising channel, but directing adverts to known customers, e.g. through Facebook, simply means better rate of return on their advertising spend.

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Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Facebook are not alone in doing this. When I do a search on Google for the name of my company, I get a plethora of websites with an info page based on data scraped from Companies House.

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We 'could' send troubled Watchkeeper drones to war, insists UK minister

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: Rename the damn thing.......

Kami- KarZee

Isn't that the name of the army's stealth portaloo? Oh no, hang on, I@m thinking of the Camo Khazi

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Scissors cut paper. Paper wraps rock. Lab-made enzyme eats plastic

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: RE: old fashioned paper bags

Paper produced from hemp would be a better alternative. If it weren't illegal.

Why would paper made from hemp be illegal? Hemp is currently grown for use in the building construction industry (although there's some which doesn't make it that far, as people steal some of the crop in the mistaken belief that it still contains the chemical components which would make it a narcotic).

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Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: PET

I did not know this. Every day's a school day - have an upvote

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Windows 10 Spring Creators Update team explains the hold-up: You little BSOD!

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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RE: AC

my advice would be to buy a machine that has a good track record of reliability... for example, more or less anything but acer. I find Lenovo and HP to produce laptops that work and suffer few ill affects from MS updates...

Funny you should say that, but I did steer them towards HP. They'd already found out the hard way that Acer is not the wisest choice. And after suffering that f***ing annoying Yoga advert on the tellybox, I don't feel inclined to say any kind words about Lenovo.

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Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Only yesterday a friend was asking me for advice on selecting a new Windows laptop and keeping it in good running order. Top of my list of advice was to disable Windows updates. For me auto-update is a ticking timebomb....one day a machine is running fine, the next it's BSODed into oblivion because Microsoft have forced it to take an update that the user has managed quite happily without up to now.

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The first rule of maths class: Don't start a fight club

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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There was a teacher at my high school who took some delight in arranging fights *with* the kids (I say "kids" - they were 15 or so) who fancied themselves as hard cases. He wasn't that big a bloke, but he was an ex Royal Marine, so would just take them around the back of the school and knock 7 shades of s**t out of them.

At the time, we thought he was a bit of a good egg, for putting the school bullies and hardnuts in their place.

In hindsight, he was probably just a bit of a psychopath

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Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: Trigonometry

I hope not, Cos that would be a Sin

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Best thing about a smart toilet? You can take your mobile in without polluting it

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: The cuckoo clock

The cuckoo clock

Ironically a German invention.

I forget who it was that said it, but somebody said that Germany's two greatest achievements were convincing the world that Beethoven was German and Hitler was Austrian

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What most people think it looks like when you change router's admin password, apparently

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Re: In parts of Latam, ISP gives Zero / NO access to Router!

Can't comment on this. I always toss the ISP-supplied router and replace with something I've bought myself and which is better than the sort of junk that ISPs pass off as being fit for purpose

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Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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Although I've updated the network name, passcode and admin password, I've never updated the firmware on any router. My reasoning is a case of balancing risk of two different events.

Possible event the first - some miscreant finds my router and manages to hack their way into it by exploiting an unpatched vulnerability in the firmware

Possible event the second - I update the firmware in good faith, only to have the router suffer because of some bug in the firmware. When I eventually get back online I read an El Reg article about how the latest firmware from <x> is bricking routers up and down the country.

On balance, I fear well-intentioned vendors more than I fear ill-intentioned hackers.

But that's just me - YMMV

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UK defines Cyber DEFCON 1, 2 and 3, though of course doesn't call it that

Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese
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I never got past the first row in the table. I read as far as the bit that says "co-ordinated cross-government response" and then started laughing so hard that I now can't read through the tears.

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