* Posts by gnarlymarley

120 posts • joined 2 Jul 2014

Page:

YouTube supremo says vid-streaming-slash-piracy giant can't afford EU's copyright overhaul

gnarlymarley

Re: Too hard

Naw. It's more like a community that decides to ticket/tow illegally parked delivery vehicles being warned by a delivery company that if they start doing so, no one will make deliveries in their community.

Ummm, deliveries will still happen. The catch is that they will be by someone like the mafia who will enjoy the higher pay. There are a lot of thrill seekers out there that will attempt to deliver and try to get away with it.

Of course, in this case, google may just block all IPs in Europe and withdraw its presence, just like it is heading for the android EU stupidness. The VPNs will need to stay out of Europe and even if they are breaking the law there, they will never be caught. This lack of presence means the jobs move to other parts of the world, so less employment in Europe.

So what would be the point of a law that does not stop copyright criminal activity?

2
2
gnarlymarley

"The police should catch bad drivers, instead of giving me speeding tickets"

Ummm, isn't speeding considered aa act of a "bad driver"? The speeding ticket is only an issue if you were not actually speeding.

Now I was going the flow of traffic one day, and a cop pulled me over and claimed I was speeding. Now I drive under the speed limit instead of going the speed limit. (And yes, I will admit that going slightly slower that traffic could be considered impeding the flow, but better to be "safe than sorry". If you don't like it, then stop calling the cops on me.) By adding more laws, we make it easier to catch the innocent in some sort of trap and we miss catching the guilty. It would be nice if we could actually catch the guilty without involving the innocent. (Also by guilty, I mean someone that broke the law, not someone that annoyed you.)

3
0
gnarlymarley

Re: "A badly thought out copyright rule may remove"

Any video that isn't pirated will stay there, and you will be able to keep on watching it. Instructional videos that don't infringe copyright - and remember there are a lot of fair use exceptions - they will stay there, just like any promotional video uploaded there with full rights, so what are your you talking about?

Under the current laws and current system setup, there are instructional videos that fall under fair use that is getting removed. I will name EEVblog as one of them due to some of his video which catch "bad actors" on the fundraiser sites. So are you saying that by adding more laws, we will start having actual fair use treated properly? I think what you would actually see is that more people would abuse your new law to their personal advantage.

1
1
gnarlymarley

Re: @ pascal monett

The problem for YouTube is that cleaning it up, will destroy their business model.

They get more adverts from a bootleg of the latest music hits, than they do from a video of me repairing a walkman. If they clean it up... then the income goes down the pan. That's the problem.

The reason for this is that some people seek it out. Back in the day (a few decades ago) the music industry tried to block MP3s, and when they started to release their content on MP3 instead of CD, mysteriously folks started getting their content from the music industries instead of the pirates. For me, I have no need of anything from the music industry (as I have already purchased any CD that is of interest to me). I imagine that folks will keep doing this as it appears to be the reason why folks upload pirated content up to youtube. One thing that folks have not accounted for is the "free advertising" from those of us would would run across pirated stuff and then seek out the original source.

3
1
gnarlymarley

Re: So what?

I watch a lot of YouTube videos - and as far as I am aware none of them are pirated. A badly thought out copyright rule may remove one of my best forms of entertainment (certainly better than the rubbish on TV). There are also a lot of instructional videos on YouTube - if they are removed because of the EU copyright rubbish then that will harm a number of people who use them.

Sorry Duncan, I have to agree with you.

There have been a number of original youtube artists that I watch that have been labeled as copyright violations. In the firewall world, there are two kinds of packets, false-positives and false-negatives. One means you get a copyrighted video through and the other means you block something that is not copyrighted. If as msknight says we will have a fine line that will never have any false catches (and I mean either direction), then the blocking would be okay. The problem is that there are always false catches and some of us that completely avoid the copyright music, pictures, or videos, keep getting caught in its cross hairs.

Also, I have to partially disagree with msknight. Mainly because the above where I note that catch all rules everything, youtube would need to hire 24,000 people (400 hours of video uploaded each minute) just to track all the videos. Also, due to human error, might need to double that so we can have atleast two people check every video. Now you can argue that they need blocked until otherwise specified, but that would mean the end of live streaming, even from Alex Jones as one would not be able to trust that he himself is not uploading "copyrighted content".

2
1
gnarlymarley

Re: So what?

Shed loads of content on YouTube is pirated.

There maybe lots of pirated junk on youtube, but there are some of us folks that do not have the time to seek it out, so we do not see it. All of the youtube videos that I see, all make some sort of comment about copyright and attempt to silence videos or blur background pictures. This means that I do not see the content.

Now back in the day when I would see something of interest, I would attempt first to see out a legitimate channel before finally giving up and going to the reupload. Any more these days youtube has raised the cap on how many viewers needed before you can "monetize" your videos, so it should no longer be worth it unless you can nab enough stuff to get youtube to pay you money for it.

1
0

Strewth! Aussie ISP gets eye-watering IPv4 bill, shifts to IPv6 addresses

gnarlymarley
WTF?

Re: Not el Reg

Hang on! Is el reg starting to go IPv6? I just noticed that nir.regmedia.co.uk has been IPv6 for a while. I finally decided to look up what they had that was connecting to IPv6 when pages would load and I found atleast one domain that was connecting over IPv6.

>nslookup nir.regmedia.co.uk

Non-authoritative answer:

Name: nir.regmedia.co.uk

Addresses: 2606:4700::6812:fb87

2606:4700::6812:fc87

2606:4700::6812:fd87

2606:4700::6812:fe87

2606:4700::6812:ff87

104.18.251.135

104.18.252.135

104.18.253.135

104.18.254.135

104.18.255.135

0
0

It's been a week since engineers approved a new DNS encryption standard and everyone is still yelling

gnarlymarley
WTF?

third parties?

DoH or DNS-over-HTTPS is a way of encrypted DNS traffic to make it hard for third parties to see where people are coming from and where they are going to online.

Just who are we kidding? The DNS provider will be able to log it on their side after it is unencrypted. This means that a "third party" will see what and where you go. Anyone that hacks in will see where you go.

I will call this DNS encrypted farse what it is, security through obscurity.

4
2

Sorry friends, I'm afraid I just can't quite afford the Bitcoin to stop that vid from leaking everywhere

gnarlymarley

Re: I've seen a definite uptick in these

These emails say all the same thing, even though both my phone and computer have no camera on them.

That malware make your front-facing camera capturing video

The other thing I find interesting is that they are sending it to an alias account for automation that has never had a password. Oh well, I guess they will keep sending it directly to my spamcop forwarding script.

0
0

Mozilla grants distrusted Symantec certs a stay of execution, claims many sites yet to make switch

gnarlymarley

Re: Who, and how much?

I guess they're trying to hang on to users. Firefox Quantium seems to have made some monthly active users move somewhere else. There was a summer slump that never went back up. Odd that...

And this is the reason why to try and keep your users happy. In the past, firefox has attempted stuff like this only to have the users complain to the website administrators. Now that the users are more wise, they are switching browsers instead. This means administrators may not be getting notified that there is a problem and folks are switching instead. I am one of those people that switched.

It also means that firefox lost their power (their ability to say what I do on the internet by forcing changes) over me and my browser.

1
0

New Zealand border cops warn travelers that without handing over electronic passwords 'You shall not pass!'

gnarlymarley

Security by Obscurity

Reminds me of the US where they have successfully sold this stuff as keeping people safe (I.E. preventing crime), but strangely enough I have not heard of one single case where the searching of electronic device prevented a crime. I have heard of numerous where it "caught the criminal" after the fact. Me thinks that too much information can get in the way of actual crime prevention, especially if the parser does not know what to look for....

3
0

'This is insane!' FCC commissioner tears into colleagues over failure to stop robocalls

gnarlymarley

Re: Poor FCC Commisioner Rosenworcel. She will now be inundated and the carriers will laugh.

I get 1-2 per day. Try blocking before the repeat calls come in.

Blocking calls is not an option. The scammers are laughing now as they are using every legitimate (callerID information ties to real people, mostly my neighbors) phone information in your local area. So are you stating to block legitimate people? When I told one of them that I was going to report them on the do not call list, they laughed at me and said go ahead. So instead I started asking for more information from them, such as a call back phone number or email address that I could add to the report. It seems that the callerID information is automated, so the actual person on the phone is does not know what it always is.

Just yesterday, we had a call where the callerID was my own. Kinda weird talking to yourself on the phone, where there is someone else on the other end of the line that is not you, but appears to be using your phone.

1
0

Microsoft 'kills' passwords, throws up threat manager, APIs Graph Security

gnarlymarley

Re: Phones ? really ?

I applaud the move away from passwords. Or I would, if I didn't think something relying on phones wasn't outright stupid.

This is not really a move away from passwords since you still have to remember a pin along side having the phone. So, what happens if you phone dies? You might as well keep a password as a backup for when the hardware dies.

0
0

In a race to 5G, Trump has stuck a ball-and-chain on America's leg

gnarlymarley

standard stabilization?

Maybe this will stabilize the standard. I realize that most of us prefer to purchase new phones every two months, but I would like something that lasts. If the Tariffs work, maybe we can get something that might last longer and the rest of us can actually purchase a cell phone that will last twenty years.

0
0

Microsoft pulls plug on IPv6-only Wi-Fi network over borked VPN fears

gnarlymarley

Re: Two questions if I may

They are actually behind Cloudflare, which means v6 is just a toggle away. It also means that, with appropriate hosts file entries, you can talk to El Reg over native v6 even without them explicitly enabling it. The last time I tried this, it worked fine except that attempting to post a comment didn't work. The post just disappeared into the aether, and never showed up.

Yes and any properly designed back end will just use any protocol in front of their web server without issues. Why log the IP inside the database post, when there are a few IPv4 providers change addresses using dhcp more than once a day. A system that is properly designed, I.E. uses the username to track anonymous posts and such, should work successfully with the flick of that switch.

As it stands, SSL and such work the same over both IPv6 and IPv4. Shouldn't be that hard for dual stacking the server.

1
1
gnarlymarley

Re: Two questions if I may

2. I don't know what their hold up is. Many sites get IPv6 by simply asking their CDN provider to switch it on. But at least where I sit, El Reg doesn't seem to use a CDN. So maybe it's their server load balancer that can't handle IPv6. Most of them can.

Me neither. If most people's CDN do not support IPv6, they do support the ability to get a tunnel. Took me about ten minutes to set it up and then another two weeks to realize that the concepts behind IPv6 and IPv4 were very similar. IPv6 is really not that hard. And like other folks have mentioned, on cloudflare, it is just the click of a button to enable.

2
4

Euro bureaucrats tie up .eu in red tape to stop Brexit Brits snatching back their web domains

gnarlymarley

why not a forwarder?

The eu could charge for them to keep it, but use a forwarder instead. That way all their old links could be URL swapped to the new domain and presto, they could still charge and maintain their control over the .eu domains. Even just a rinetd or iptables would allow them to spy on all traffic through the ip forwarder.

1
0

A boss pinching pennies may have cost his firm many, many pounds

gnarlymarley

time is money

When you think about the math or saving rails, each person would have a cost of about $100 (about twice the salary of $50 because of office space, lights, computer, and such.) per hour. Lets say it only took about five minutes (even though it would probably be more like fifteen to an hour).

Now that would be about $8/person for that five minute period. The weight of the servers would probably require four people. So this means that *each* server lift would be at least $32 worth of time. Do that once per server ($35 is what I see they approximately cost for new rails) and the rails could have paid for themselves.

Now, if I just do the math alone, I would be saving money by *having* rails just in man power alone!

1
0

Europe's GDPR, Whois shakeup was supposed to trigger spam tsunami – so, er, where is it?

gnarlymarley

Re: lots of people pay for privacy service for whois info

And so nothing really changed except that, with GDPR, it's theoretically possible to get the same level of service FOR FREE.

Except that the registrar becomes the middle-person. With private domain registration, the registrar had a hidden email forwarder setup, so email sent to the whois contact previous went directly to the domain admin email via a secret forwarding address. Now if that information may not present, then the registrar can hire additional people who can interface between the said domain owner and the complaintee.

As long as the issue is taken care of, I don't not care who fixes it. My guess is that this may not be as big of a deal as we all originally thought it would be.

0
0

We've found another problem with IPv6: It's sparked a punch-up between top networks

gnarlymarley

Re: IPv4 Address Pool Has Been Expanded Significantly

The main reason that IPv6 has not been rolling out smoothly is because it ignored the first rule of engineering in upgrading a working product / system, i.e., the backward compatibility to IPv4. Had it done so, the transition would have been completed a long time ago without even being noticed.

Both NAT64 and NAT46 provide backward compatibility. Maybe you mean the IPv6 mainstream idea that NAT *cannot ever* work with IPv6? It is the ideas of the NAT haters have have *tried* to force IPv6 without NAT, which has taken out the idea of any possibility of backward compatibility. Funny, the NAT haters can unite, but will always lose their poor battle, all because the rest of us have been using this backward compatibility for many years now.

6
0

Hackers clock personal deets on 'two million' T-Mobile US subscribers

gnarlymarley
WTF?

Now is the time for the loads of fake IDs to head into the stores and have them get new sims. Yeah, maybe no financial data or social security numbers were nicked, but names and other data that would be used in the fake ID scams would have been.

0
0

Bitcoin backer sues AT&T for $240m over stolen cryptocurrency

gnarlymarley

Re: A Fool And His Money..

well what does AT&T have to dispute they violated there own rules on there own security practices (if any thing that store employee should be fired fined and jailed for bypassing a high risk security measures )

If this is true, then AT&T, while maybe not liable for the bitcoins directly, will be liable for the false sense of security.

Also, (again if true) this may encourage AT&T to start block 2FA, to prevent further liability. Even if the guy was to walk away with only a few dollars, I would still think about the damage a case like this could make for 2FA.

0
0
gnarlymarley

Re: So much for the "what you have" 2nd factor...

I agree though that SMS is not a secure form of 2FA. Too easy to compromise, whether through social-engineering, theft or SS7 attacks.

And this is why SMS will *never* be a secure method of authenication in my mind.

0
0
gnarlymarley

If I do not have a working phone with that number, the text is still sent and I have to wait 24 hours before corporate will make the SIM and send it to my registered home address.

Anyone desperate enough to hack this will still make it through. They just might be watching your home address for incoming mail. The IRS scams have seen fake police cars waiting outside a person's home, so by saying for corporate to send the SIM to your home address can be pointless if the hacker knows to watch your mailbox.

0
0

When's a backdoor not a backdoor? When the Oz government says it isn't

gnarlymarley

NSA going to leak your "not-a-backdoor"

I am surprised that more folks are not against this based solely on the grounds that the NSA will leak the backdoor to the bad guys. Note that the USA NSA is able to get backdoor stuff in the past from other governments, so no matter which country you belong too, it will be leaked. The question is a matter of time, not "if" but "when".

If all governments get their way, there goes your bank account's security.

1
0

IPv6: It's only NAT-ural that network nerds are dragging their feet...

gnarlymarley

Re: "the world is clinging stubbornly to IPv4"

When a business feels it is pressured enough to have an IPv6 website, that business will ensure that it can still get money from the IPv4 holdouts.

It very well could be that the holdouts are avoiding IPv6 due to its IPv6 built in rotation of addresses, which can make it harder to track who is who than just normal NAT.

2
1

Sitting pretty in IPv4 land? Look, you're gonna have to talk to IPv6 at some stage

gnarlymarley

Re: "won't be long before websites *demand* that you access them over IPv6"

Ummm, I think we gave up with the IPv6 demands about five years ago. Instead we just went with NAT64 gateways back then. If folks really want to know the real IP of who is connecting instead of the gateway, they would be using IPv6 going already.

0
0

Google Chrome: HTTPS or bust. Insecure HTTP D-Day is tomorrow, folks

gnarlymarley

Re: stuck on HTTP

HTTP will still work. You'll just get a little bit of grey text saying "Not secure" on your browser bar.

And I will welcome that text for pages such as news sites that have no logins and do not collect my information. Anyone thinking that HTTPS cannot do MITM is just ignorant.

1
1

UK Home Office sheds 70 staff on delayed 4G upgrade to Emergency Services Network

gnarlymarley
WTF?

Re: The wrong solution from the beginning.

Many technical staff remain unconvinced that ESN will ever deliver what the emergency services need.

Hmmm, interesting comment. From what I have seen backup communication is good to have. 4G does go down in a power outage, but the emergency communications folks have special batteries and generators at their towers. Does this change really mean that in a real mass emergency the folks that really need it are shutdown just like the rest of us?

1
0

Time to dump dual-stack networks and get on the IPv6 train – with LW4o6

gnarlymarley

Re: Big advantage

. . . convert your NAT gateway to IPv6, bang, job done . . .

I guess you could do this. I have been using NAT6 since for more than seven years now and it does work, but the mail goal of IPv6 is to get away from NAT. Also, interesting that there are DSL/cable modems that have NAT6 build into them. For me, it was easy. Find the RFC1918 equivalent IPv6 addresses (RFC4193 addresses), enable a firewall/NAT6 software, and then browse the internet. I mean if you really really want to put NAT into the IPv6 world, you can do it, but it is just easier to get a block now that some ISPs are handing them out.

(side note: My ISP acquired a class B IPv4 block and stated at the time there was no need to go to IPv6. So, I got a tunnel instead. Now that the tunnel servers are going away, it maybe time to change ISPs or else just use IPv4 as the monopoly ISP hates IPv6.)

1
0

Crime epidemic or never had it so good? Drilling into statistics is murder

gnarlymarley
WTF?

Re: We need gunlaws like in the US to fight crime

And to an extent you're also right that the solution to crime is preventing it, not retrospective punishment for the minority of offenders who are caught. But arming yourself doesn't prevent crime - at best it might cause the criminals to choose a different victim

Interesting that laws themselves never prevent a crime. The laws only attach a punishment to the crime. Folks who know about the punish can decide for themselves if they want to avoid the crime so they can also avoid the punishment.

But as gun laws were tightened over the decades in the UK the gun crime rate trended up.

This also proves an interesting point. When the law abiding citizens turn in their guns, the criminals then can use their gun (which criminals are going to keep and not turn in because, hey, they are criminals) more freely.

What I would prefer is that someone also to add to their gun ban stuff that kills much more people than guns, such as scalpel and automobiles.

0
1

US Supreme Court blocks internet's escape from state sales taxes

gnarlymarley
FAIL

I guess this is the end of my filling out the sales tax on my tax form once a year. Little do these politicians know that a few people would fill that out. If they think they can get tax money out of it, hopefuflly it is not like their 1/4 rate of around 2% like they did with amazon. Otherwise the greedy pig politicians will be losing money.

0
0

Stern Vint Cerf blasts techies for lackluster worldwide IPv6 adoption

gnarlymarley

Re: They are just being frugal

Hell, it would make a whole series of interesting articles: How The Reg went IPv6, the problems we hit, and why haven't you done it yet?

Excellent idea. Seeing a series of articles documenting it would be nice. It would be very good to see the transition as well as the excuses.

This can be as easy as setting up a box that has a IPv6 to IPv4 gateway along with both IPs and then a AAAA record and you will have it. Getting that working, though can be challenging if your admins are not familiar with it. Most operating systems have access to IPv6 built in already.

It took me about 30 minutes to enable IPv6 using a tunnel years back (using straight addresses on each server), but learning it took much longer. Where I had the most learning was seeing how it worked with different MTUs as well as routing and multiple tunnels. The ISP side could probably be the hardest part.

BTW, If you are using an updated OS (something within the last six years), you probably already have the IPv4 addresses which are mapped in the IPv6 address format in the logs. (This format could look like ::104.20.250.41)

1
0

Who had ICANN suing a German registrar over GDPR and Whois? Congrats, it's happening

gnarlymarley
WTF?

Interesting that the government is going to want that contact information when they find lawbreakers now using GDPR to hide, and yet the common folks are not allowed to have that contact information. I guess they would want it so they could spill it, and since they are the government, will not get caught. What a two-faced law GDPR is.

0
0

One year late, US senators act on fake net neutrality comments that drowned the FCC

gnarlymarley
FAIL

Ultimately, about 22 million messages were submitted, and while three in five were in favor of net neutrality, once duplicates and those with garbage email addresses were tossed out, the overall sentiment was against net neutrality.

I am curious how they determined which addresses were faked. I never did see any emails to my address or the comment I submitted, nor were they any attempts to contact me to determine is my address was real. My suspicion is that someone picked the comments they liked for real addresses and the comments they didn't like for fake ones.

0
0

IPv6 growth is slowing and no one knows why. Let's see if El Reg can address what's going on

gnarlymarley

It is easy to find out why this is slow, just ask El Reg why they are not adding IPv6 to their site and we will find the reason for the slow uptake.

2
0

ServiceNow goes for more Now, a bit less Service

gnarlymarley

Re: ...interesting

I am wondering why all the comments are so negative here...

There are quite a few reasons I can think of, but I shall not bore you with all my reasons.

1. SNow is build to work in better in non-IE browsers, so sorry for those of us who are "stuck" on IE. (By stuck, I mean I will lose my job and have been told so by HR and upper management, if I use another browser.)

2. Some of us use SNow with multiple browsers. SNow is built to function best in a single browser. (I.E. rather than store your next webpage on the browser, it does it on the server. So if you have two search windows and update the tickets in on, but has refreshed in the other window, both windows now get the same search.)

3. A lot of extra fields and forms cost "extra" money, which means most companies, such as the one I currently work for, prefer the "out of box" crap.

4. SNow is a lot of javascript based, so if you click something, there is no way to hit the "stop button" to cancel that action. (This falls under a bad user interface)

5. Because of that javascript if you hit the back or forward button in the browser while it is loading a page, SNow clears all history and starts you from the beginning. (This falls under a bad user interface.)

0
0

Lakes on the moon? Boffins think they've found the evidence

gnarlymarley

Re: No traces of dairy, then?

So my blue cheese doesn't have a lunar origin?

Just give is some time. They will probably find a trace. . . .

0
0

Drone 'swarm' buzzed off FBI surveillance bods, says tech bloke

gnarlymarley

Re: An Interesting Indent.

. . . disable all wifi in a block's radius . . .

Ummmm, most wireless home phones operate in the 2.4GHz and 900MHz bands. If any us still has one of these, probably a good idea to have a hardwired phone handy just in case they do jam those frequencies.

0
0

BT pushes ahead with plans to switch off telephone network

gnarlymarley

internet outage preventing you from calling your ISP?

Funny how when the internet goes does, the ISP no longer gets calls about their internet outages. And yes, my VOIP phone has been affected a few times about this. Good think I have a POTS landline so I can continue to call them when it did go down.

0
0

You're a govt official. You accidentally slap personal info on the web. Quick, blame a kid!

gnarlymarley

Re: Seems like deja vu

All you need is a functional brain and an extremely basic notion of logic.

They are politicians. I think the basic meaning of the word politician in the USA is someone that does not have/use a brain. Being that Nova Scotia is so close to the USA, maybe the political stupidity is bleeding over.

1
0
gnarlymarley

Re: Unisys screwed up

Firstly,this sounds like they just listened to Unisys trying to hide their sheer ineptitude......

Almost sounds like Unisys was told by the government of what to say, as the government found this before Unisys did. Seems to be that someone in the government is trying to cover their.......

1
0

US government weighs in on GDPR-Whois debacle, orders ICANN to go probe GoDaddy

gnarlymarley
WTF?

whois has always been public

Okay, OKay. Apparently I am confused. Whois has been known to be public information and is nothing more than a phonebook of where the people who run their part of the internet "want" to be contacted. Technically, if you want to hide that information, then the "normal people" of the internet will think you are an evil hacker (I guess fracker in coding terms, or black hat in security terms). Why would anyone want to hide their "public business contact" information?

Maybe we should be banning the phonebook for publishing our telephones?????

1
4

Data watchdog fines Brit council £120k for identifying 943 owners of vacant property

gnarlymarley

Re: Recycling money?

....If the council has to fork this out of their annual budgets, doesn't this just punish those that pay local council tax since this gets passed onto them....

When you stop and think about it business just do this same exact thing. They are basically tax collectors and pass any taxes onto their customers. I mean, where do they get the money to pay the added costs? Just like the money will come from the citizens that pay local tax, business do the same.

2
0

Furious gunwoman opens fire at YouTube HQ, three people shot

gnarlymarley

Re: Of all places

What has to happen for people to stop wanting to kill one another? :(

And I was thinking this was a disgruntled person that had an issue with the demonetization idea that google has pushed lately. Sounds like there are some folks that might have issue with it when they got the notice a few months ago.

With this possibly being a family feud, not sure the whys or wheres that could be behind it.

1
0

Are you able to read this headline? Then you're not Julian Assange. His broadband is unplugged

gnarlymarley

Re: Simple solution.

....look for an SSID of "cupboard boy" and a password of "hahahaha"

gone with an SSID of "pasty-faced asshole" and a password of "yes,you."

Hmmm, free wifi. I will have to look for these next time....

0
1

Slap visibility beacons on bikes so they can chat to auto autos, says trade body

gnarlymarley

survival of the fittest? I guess this would somewhat work until the dark clothing folks forget to change the battery in their "beacon"

0
0

Capita screw-ups are the pits! Brit ex-miner pensioners billed for thousands in extra tax

gnarlymarley

Re: Outsourcing .....

Oh - competition will drive prices down will it?

Actually, the so called "competition" (atleast in the US of A) is their buddies. Much of these companies are nothing more than "friends" of the crooked politicians. And to think we think we can vote them out, except the new ones we vote in become corrupt quicker than we are voting them out.

0
0

Stock trader gets two years in prison for pumping up with Fitbit

gnarlymarley

Careful! US Congress does not like competition. Seems to be only the politicians and SEC heads that can get way with this kind of stuff.

1
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018