* Posts by LucreLout

1427 posts • joined 30 Jun 2014

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Ecuador tried to make Julian Assange a diplomat

LucreLout

Re: What if....

@msknight

...he legally changed his name as an Equidorian citizen, got a new passport, etc. and then applied for being a diplomat in his new name? That might sneak under the radar... and stand a chance of working.

I suspect that literally anyone Ecquador proposes diplmatic protection for will be invited to attend an interview at the FCO or similar prior to approval, or required to submit fingerprints and photographs. At least up until the point that the case concludes.

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LucreLout

Re: It's a weird world...

@nethack47

since it's hard to see how unprotected sex and after the fact regrets amounts to rape.

Well, lets just look at that objectively shall we? Forget about who the suspect is for a moment.

A girl consents to sex with protection and instead you have sex without protection, for which there was no consent. Sex without consent is rape. There's no excuse. Yes, some small percentage of rape allegations will be mailicious or made up, but that is why we have these things called trials; to work out who is telling the truth and who isn't.

Now, back to Assange. In all the time he was in Sweden after the leaks, he made zero noise about being extradited. He simply didn't consider it a threat. Then, after his lawyer illegally warned him he was going to be arrested for rape, he fled the country to the UK. The only country in the whole world it makes less sense to flee to in order to escape prosecution in America, is America.

I'm not sure there are any after the fact regrets in this case - I've not heard form him any denial that he was told to bag up and didn't. That the woman didn't flee on the evening and report immediately does not an after the fact regret make. He strayed from the parameters of consent and acted in a manner he had allegedly specifically been told he did not have consent for.

In the time between entering the UK and fleeing to the embassy, he was seemingly totally unconcerned about extradition to America from the UK. He belatedly raised that as a 'fact' after the Swedes got their paperwork straight, and fled to the embassy.

The situation he's created for himself is undoubtedly uncomfortable, but I have no sympathy for that because he's hiding in order to deny a couple of women their day in court. What if those women are telling the truth? He's simply aggravating their suffering by denying them their day in court, and subjecting them to his media presence every few weeks. The impact on his wife and children must be devastating. "Mammy, why does Billy at school call daddy a rapist? And why won't he come out of that little room." If the statute of limitations in Sweden has expired, then he will be referred to as an alleged rapist for the rest of his life...... if he actually is innocent, that must hurt beyond belief.

If he had any sense at all, he'd have left the in time to serve his time in Sweden, get sent to jail under Obama, then pardoned right along with Manning. Waiting until Trump is in charge seems like a strategic error, especially after the fury Mannings release caused among Trump supporters.

Unless there is a statute of limitations in regard to the offences he's wanted for in America, and I suspect there isn't, then he will forever be at risk of detention under any future Presidency. His only play is to come out, serve time for the bail jumping, and see what happens next. That aside he's on the couch until he dies.

We're clearly never going to waive the bail jumping, and as much as Ecquador may want to get him out of their embassy, it'd difficult to see a means by which that could ever happen, short of some James Bond style escape sequence.

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WikiLeave? Assange tipped for Ecuadorian eviction

LucreLout

Re: can somebody please

The small fire thing is pretty much how I've always expected this to end.

AFAIK, and I'm certainly not a lawyer, the bail jumping offence is complete - he didn't report to the court and so is liable to immediate arrest and detention- the odds of getting bail for any hearing ever again are basically nil.

I do wonder what international convention is for people hiding in an embassy if natural or other disasters force an evacuation. It's not like they can drive a diplomatic vehicle in there - there's no garage. Presumably he'd simply be collected and detained?

The stupidity of fleeing Sweden for the UK because you claim to be worried about extradition to the USA is beyond my comprehension. If I was worried about extradition to the UK, Sweden is the EU country I'd be most likely to flee too. Russia would be my preferred destination ala Snowden. Spend all day drinking Vodka in the Kermlin then all night banging Anna Chapman like a big bass drum. It's got to be better than a couch.....

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Women reboot gender discrimination lawsuit against Google

LucreLout

Re: I'm not sure why I'm doing this in the 21st century but....

> That's pretty sexist to assume a woman made into a man to be equal. Can't a woman just be herself and still be equal?

In the jobs market... I wish.

If you're a dev (C#/JS/Java/Python) and you're looking for work in London somewhere in the current century, let me know. I'm quite proud of the way we hire where I work now, and I'm fairly confident that any of the ladies on the team will agree they get a fair shake - to the best of my knowledge, salary and chromosomes are unrelated.

Don't let the bastards get you down. Whatever their gender.

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LucreLout
Stop

The third option is to hire best person to do the job.

Which means there won't be any women in IT at all.

Wow. That is just so wrong I hardly know where to start.

I'm about the least progressive person you'd want to work for or with, because I don't buy any of the diversity BS. Diversity isn't a strength any more than it is a weakness. Just hire the best person for the job and don't sweat their gender, age, race, sexual preferences, whatever....

But if you're seriously going to claim that none of the women I work with or have worked with are there on merit, then I'm going to call BS on that. Programming, or indeed any other aspect of IT, neither requires standing up to pee or the lifting of heavy objects, thus must be a gender neutral role.

The female luminaries in our industry are many, as are the men. Yes, people outside of our industry complaining that there should be more women in IT do have a massive blindspot when it comes to work such as emptying the bins, oil rigs, mines, road construction etc, but that is their issue and their blindspot - let's not project that onto women within IT, because from my lengthy experience, they are all there on merit.

I simply cant grasp the correlation between good code and genitalia.....

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Brexit judgment could be hit for six by those crazy Supreme Court judges, says barrister

LucreLout

Re: Parliament must vote

May is currently viewed as an unelected PM

No more so than Gordon Brown and he hung on for ages.

MPs who supported remaining (the vast majority - 479 remainers vs 158 leavers) while they represent electorates that voted strongly in favour of Brexit are likely to want an election as late as possible so that Brexit slows or stops.

MPs won't stop Brexit. They can't. Best case scenario for remainers is that the current lot vote no. All that will see is a UKIP landslide which will then vote yes. In doing so labour will have destroyed itself as a party, because its Northern heartlands would never forgive the betrayal. Corbyn knows this and has publicly committed to triggering A50 when asked to vote upon it.

Based on the current polls and state of Labour/UKIP/LibDem opposition, an early election would benefit the Tories

Doubtless the same thought has occurred to Jez - he'd be wiped out in the election and would, if he refused to step aside, split the party down the middle, quite aside from the lurch to UKIP.

an early election may help MPs determine if the referendum was a one off or if they were being given a clear message....

They've never been given a clearer message. The French, Italian, and German counterparts are likely to be given the same message over the next year or two.

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Nearly a million retail jobs will be destroyed by the march of tech, warns trade body

LucreLout

Re: Hmmmm

@AC

this is all the fault of Central Government, over the years they have relentlessly cut local government funding forcing Councils to look every which way to keep themselves running, which of course leads to excessive parking regulation and high business rates

That is because councils missed the point entirely. The goal is not to keep themselves running. The goal is to slash the overstaffed inefficient back offices through the use of automation, increased effort, and some semblance of competency.

Preservation of the status quo was never the goal, nor should it have been. Thus, it is really the fault of the petty empire builders within the council.

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Gosh, what a huge shock: Ofcom shies away from BT Openreach split, calls for reform

LucreLout

Re: Screw you, Ofcom.

@msknight

Screw you, Ofcom.

I thought that too.... then I started wondering what defines a competitor? Specifically I'm wondering what stops me from setting up "14 Acacia avenue cable company" with just the one client, me. Then run the fiber from my house direct to the xmas tree.

OpenReach can and will remain utterly hopeless and devoid of competency, but even allowing for that, dumping the copper should make my... clients... speeds significantly faster.

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LucreLout

Re: BT welcomed the conclusion

BT shares up 11p already today also tells it's own story.

That's a little over 2.2%, with a market movement on the day of 2.4%.

I'm not suggesting the regulators decision isn't a cop out, because it is, only that the share price movement of BT didn't happen for the reasons you expressed.

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Trade union threatens work-to-rule action over HPE Lancashire job cuts

LucreLout

Re: Jobs under threat.

So Sherlock, your deduction was correct. What's your brief?

It was a tad obvious, no?

As regards for myself, what can I tell you, I work for a bank. Its not been any fun for a long time now, and it certainly isn't what you're thinking it is. Lots of hours, lots of real pressure, and lots of years now since anyone had a decent pay rise, or indeed, any rise at all. Oh, and we all get tarred with the same brush, making us about as popular as Jimmy Saviles party planner.

Unions always destroy the industries and employers in which they reside. It's why they virtually don't exist in the real world anymore; mostly they're just confined to the state sector and various spin offs. Sadly, nobody at any union has ever paused to reflect upon why that might be. And none of them ever will.

12 months after the closure of your site, contact your members and work out what percentage of their old package (including pension) they're earning now. It will be less than half, because it is always that way, and that will reveal the market rate for their skills, not whatever your union last extracted under threats of strikes.

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LucreLout
Holmes

Re: Jobs under threat.

@Tonyd225

In the interests of full disclosure, you've registered in the last couple of days and made exactly two posts, both on this issue. Union rep perchance?

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LucreLout

Re: When will unions learn?

@wolfetone

Unions work. Period.

Yes, there's not a single instance I can think of where they've not worked in their members interests at all.....

Aside from coal, ship building, car manufacturing, dock working, etc etc The list is, let's be honest, as long as it is depressing.

Was there a time when we needed unions? Yes, absolutely, before health and safety laws for example. But then, there was a time when nature needed dinosaurs, and that time too has passed.

The saddest thing is that most union members simply don't understand the dynamics of how unions work and why they operate in the cackhanded manner that they do. Unions are commercial organisations competing with each other for your subscriptions, and they no more have your interests at heart than does your telco; in both cases you're their revenue.

If you're a capable, credible employee you should be able to stand on your own and interact with management individually. The deadwood can't, which is why they prefer unions, because unions will protect them just the same for as long as they can make revenue off them.

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IT boss gets 30 months of porridge for trashing ex-employer's servers

LucreLout

Re: Dumb git cubed

@Medixstiff

I have never worked or met a fellow IT person that would do this utterly stupid stuff, maybe because we all know we would not do well in prison.

Yes, I'd be very popular in prison, which is why I really don't want to go there!

No matter what kind of bad joke company I may be working for, there's nothing they can do to me that I'm going to feel is worth being made to shower with a bunch of men that haven't seen a woman in years or decades, and who've been busy hitting the gym while I've been hitting the burger bar.

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Wi-Fi operators must notify device users of potential data processing

LucreLout

Who cares what the ICO think?

Any fines they ever actually levy are utterly trivial to the businesses concerned. Its like the little old yappy mutt in the corner - no teeth and very little bite left.... all it does is bark and pee on your shoes.

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Ukraine has a Eurovision pop at Russia

LucreLout
IT Angle

Re: Rules is rules

@Richard

If Eurovision has rules forbidding songs with an overt political agenda then is should enforce them equally on all contesting nations irrespective of how popular or otherwise the political agenda in question is.

On one hand I agree with you.... on the other, well, all the actual voting appears to be politically driven to the point of absurd predictability.

I can't possibly imagine the populace of all these countries just happen to vote along geopolitical lines, and can only conclude the whole charade is fixed.

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Pilot posts detailed MS Flight Sim video of how to land Boeing 737

LucreLout
Mushroom

@Jack of Shadows

I don't know about you but I will not go gently into the night.

If the pilots are incapacitated in-flight and I become the planes last best hope, trust me on this, you'll not be going gently into the night. There'll be nowt gentle about it!

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Good thing this dev quit. I'd have fired him. Out of a cannon. Into the sun

LucreLout

Re: Coding by geniuses

@Just Enough

Because the code monkey writing the shitty code usually has a boss who knows nothing about writing code. So all the boss knows is that the code appears to work, was written really quickly, and only the code monkey understands it. Therefore the code monkey must be a freaking genius.

This ^^^

I've suffered that situation so often over the past 20 years that I now simply quit when encountering said monkeys. There's nothing you can do for them because both the monkey and the manager are equally convinced of the monkey magic, and neither can grasp why its wrong, expensive, frustrating, and dangerous (from a risk PoV).

I've seen nothing over the past 20 years that has in anyway persuaded me that our industry is better for not being regulated, similar to the GMC etc. It's the only way to keep the monkeys in the zoo rather than wandering through your business causing havoc.

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A third of Brits would cough up £300 to ransomware peddlers

LucreLout

Re: White hat hack

@Rol

Maybe we could enhance that into an automated and very public shaming with full disclosure of which weaknesses were closed and how long they've been well known.

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LucreLout
Mushroom

For the rest of the population though, the chances are high that some numpty is going to click on the wrong email attachment at some point.

Yes, yes they are. I think we should accept that premise.

The article states "More than four in 10 ransomware victims in the UK have paid to recover their documents, with 31 per cent of users willing to pay up to £400."

If we could cut off the scummers funding such that there was no money in deploying it, I think it reasonable to assume most, though not all, of it would simply go away. With that in mind, I wonder what would happen if we criminalized payment of the ransom?

Obviously in some cases there would be great hardship caused, possibly loss of life if medical records become involved. I expect they scummers would go bust within a few months, were payment barred globally, because they'd move on to some other (hopefully less damaging) scam. That sort of analysis was something Worstall was good at; I wonder who El Reg has to lift that mantle now, and if they'd be interested in commenting?

Or we could nuke them from orbit: It's the only way to be sure.

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Apple must help Feds unlock San Bernardino killer's iPhone – judge

LucreLout
Gimp

@AC

However the fact that the boot loader is unaware of the locking/unlocking mechanism sounds like a weakness to me. The only protection you have is that the boot loader will only flash signed firmware. But what if you took someone's phone, and loaded an old version of firmware with known vulnerabilities?

But what if instead of all that you just hit them with a $5 wrench until they give you the code?

https://xkcd.com/538/

I'm not sure requiring unfettered physical access to something you can then break into counts as much of a weakness. It works for all physical world applications of security, from locks to safes etc.

I'm no Apple fanboi, but I think if the only way to get in was with a court order and Apples help, I'd consider my phones security good enough.

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LucreLout

@Spleenmeister

You are so missing the point it's funny. Never mind the myriad of reports from the scene while this tragedy was unfolding that point the finger of suspicion diametrically away from these two losers.

*yawn* another tin foil hatter; just what the web needs.

Ok, I'll bite. One, just one, credible news agency reporting "from the scene while this tragedy was unfolding that point the finger of suspicion diametrically away" from the two dead losers. No? But then, there never is.

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LucreLout

@Eddy Ito

Why shouldn't law enforcement have to follow the rule of law and get a court order?

That's exactly what they have done. You may disagree with their being awarded access to the data, or not, but you can't argue they didn't follow the legal process via the courts.

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Public enemies: Azure, Amazon, Google, Oracle, OpenStack, SoftLayer will murder private IT

LucreLout

Re: Yeah, I've noticed that too

I'll be able to find a new line of work, but it certainly won't pay as well as what I'm doing now, because I won't have the experience levels I have now on the new stuff

Nobody will SirWired, nobody will. What will determine your pay rate will be how much experience you have relative to your peers more than in absolute terms. Seems to me you're making the right moves and what you need to do is keep doing what you're doing.

That being said, people like hedge funds will never use public clouds - they'll always have their own kit and networks guys. I imagine many smaller R&D focused companies will do the same, so I'd not be willing to call time on your main skill set just yet.

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LucreLout

Re: Not so fast

@Tom

Why is there a widely held belief that US data protection is worse than EU, when evidence indicates it is the same or better? Euro-jealously perhaps?

Please explain how American data protection provides equal of greater protection to EU citizens within the EU? It may or may not provide better protection for US citizens in the US, but surely you can see why those of us not in that boat are asking questions?

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LucreLout

Re: Centralisation/decentralisation Insourcing/outsourcing

I strongly suspect that what does move out of the cloud back into the DC will move into "private clouds"

My bank is moving wholly to virtualised PCs in the near future, which is what we'll be using our old datacentre to host in a private cloud. The stuff that was in the DC is already being gradually moved to the cloud, with a lot of the major software components being moved to a SaaS subscription.

I expect there will be some form of market for that, while PC manufacturers swallow both barrels, having been relegated to the retail only channel.

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Is this the last ever Lumia?

LucreLout

Re: Changing name into "Surface" won't make it any better.

@AC

No apps, not very reliable (can it even stream to a Bluetooth speaker without stuttering yet, or go a few days without randomly rebooting?)

Sorry, but that is pure ignorance on your part.

I'll freely admit to moving from WinPhone to Android at my next phone purchase, as I see that as the winning horse - there's no future for Windows Mobile, in my view.

No Apps is just wrong. There has yet to be an app devised that I need or want for either Android of iPhone that I cannot get on Windows Mobile. Not one. Randomly rebooting? I've been running WinMobile for about 10 years or so now, and yes they used to do that, literally years ago. I've never had my 8.2 WinPhone reboot randomly, not once.

Time to pull your head out of your ass and notice that the world has moved on perhaps?

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UK to stop children looking at online porn. How?

LucreLout

Re: Won't someone think of the children?

@Mr Dogshit

There have been far too many MPs and public servants thinking of children already.

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LucreLout

@crarcher

Good luck with that. Not entirely sure sites based abroad give 2 hoots about the legislation here or in over 200 other countries.

I'm not sure how they could. Allegedly there are a great many actresses with their own websites, and because of the numbers involved, competition is probably quite, erm, stiff. How are they supposed to fund on-going compliance checks and legal advice for 200+ nations?

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LucreLout

Re: This will be widely ignored ....

Plan B will be to get the ISPs to do the blocking for them, but the technical complexity of this (plus the simle fact that the porn sites can just change IP addresses, domain names, etc) will probably defeat that;

I'm assuming they'd just delete the entry from their DNS servers, which would likely be all the law required them to do. Re-point that away from your ISP to Google and the problem goes away.

I can't imagine the ISPs will want to spend serious money policing something they know they'll struggle with. The flip side, of course, is that you'd probably see TOR expand as more people use that to escape their ISP, and more institutions etc provide entry nodes.

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LucreLout

Re: Wanna stop kids looking at porn?

@moiety

Also make the point that some things you can't unsee...

This. In spades. It would apply to all sorts of material which can be found on the internet, ranging from gross to sick to the genuinely disturbing. It would work better than any censorship.

Many problems with legislation around technology stem from it's written by and to appease baby boomers, who are the last generation not to get technology. Now, before the boomers let rip with the down votes, there are a great many technological masters within their cohort - much of the foundations upon which the modern age exists were laid by them - but in terms of a whole generation, they're the last of the Ludd's.

Gen X spans the gap between "hedge finds" and downloads, Gen Y would have heard of the former but possibly not encountered it much if at all, and the Millennials would assume it was a fairy story, like most of the 60's.

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Shopping for PCs? This is what you'll be offered in 2016

LucreLout
Joke

Re: "Nobody needs to load software from disc any more"

@BongoJoe

Given that I am living, travelling and working on my motorhome ... No DevOps here though; I just want to get thing done.

Yes, and it's precisely that approach that has led to you living in your car ;-)

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Coding is more important than Shakespeare, says VC living in self-contained universe

LucreLout

Re: Shakespeare? who is he anyway?

@AdamWill

To a large extent, the point of study is not so much what you study as the techniques you learn by studying it

Certainly this is true, else all those studying "the classics" at Oxbridge would be wasting their time, and I rather think they're not.

That being said, the study of anything other than computing conveys no knowledge of or ability with computers. Separate study must begin, and it is this that is often lacking. Most of the worst code I encounter is produced by people who studied something else at university; those studying nothing fare better, and those studying computing best of all.

I believe this to be because having completed a degree in something else, too many participants then begin working as programmers and learn on the job. That works fine, but the code they produce while so learning is universally garbage.

So back to the point of the article. Impressively, I think we're in near universal agreement that Kohsla is fundamentally wrong. I enjoy writing code for a living, but seldom enjoy reading it for entertainment. Quite apart from that, it is Khosla and his ilk that drive the offshoring boom, leaving coders in stiff competition for work from cheap, inexperienced, and largely unskilled offshorians.

I can see much to be gained in teaching my children coding, both as a means to structure thought, but also as a fall back skill in case their careers don't work out. But as a primary career? Coding seems to have little future for those of school age, and I certainly don't envy the junior programmers just starting out.

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LucreLout

Re: George Santayana

@MonkeyCee

Useful skills to have at a very low level, but no use for a job. If my coding skills where the same level, I'm not sure how I'd apply them in any useful sense.

Obviously, then you'd be a manager ;-)

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LucreLout
Joke

Re: My own creativity is expressed not through writing plays

@amanfromarse

Your Left/Right comments, thinly-veiled self-aggrandising bollocks.

Yup. I mean, since when have the left ever been aspirational?!

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Send tortuous stand-up ‘nine-thirty’ meetings back to the dark ages

LucreLout

Re: Morning Prayers

In a previous work place a few years ago we had Morning Prayers but also Evening Psalms.

Indeed. At my last gig, one of the projects decided to have 9am mtgs and 5:30-6pm mtgs. Which is fine, if its a multi-region project where you need to crossover time-zones, but this wasn't. Someone seemed to presume we'd all be working into late evenings at a time when I'd decided to leave that company.

My morning status updates got skipped after the first week, which roughly would have gone like this:

Monday AM - Had a nice sh*t and went to the pub as it was Friday night.

Tuesday AM - Went home, watched TV, had dinner & the wife, and went to bed.

Wednesday AM - Went home. Mrs was out with the girls so I ordered pizza & prawn on the internet.

Thursday AM - Home, dinner, wife, TV, bed.

Friday AM - Beers with the guys, skanky hot dog, more beer, various table dancing establishments, strange looking kebab, and a dodgy cab home. Are done now, only the kebab had a lot of chilli sauce on it and it's now seeking a place of residence?

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Computer Science grads still finding it hard to get a job

LucreLout

Nothing to do with offshoring all jobs...

.....no, nothing at all.

Offshorians are cheap because they're inexperienced, talentless, or both. Unfortunately the bean counters who decide on "location strategy" don't understand enough IT to realise that the offshorians have a similar competency.

If we stopped shipping the entry level jobs to India, we'd stop having unemployed IT graduates, and probably stop RBSing critical parts of our commercial infrastructure.

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LucreLout

IT(R?)35 stops tax avoidance, new hires would not be put off by this.

ROFL!!!!!

No, no it doesn't. It changes the tune to which you dance, but the band plays on regardless.

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Scariest climate change prediction yet: More time to eat plane food

LucreLout

Re: False premise leads to false results

"Boffins" can predict all they like, but no evidence will change the mind of those who are convinced AGW is a conspiracy.

It's not a conspiracy; It's a lifestyle.

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Met Police wants to keep billions of number plate scans after cutoff date

LucreLout
Pint

Re: Prediction

@AC

All ANPR proves is that a vehicle carrying that registration plate was in an area at a particular time. Relying on that for a legal defence would be very weak, as there's no evidence you were in it. The police would use that clue to narrow the search for better evidence rather than evidence itself - except where they use it for speed/parking/insurance and other vehicle based crime.

In your example the prosecutor would simply rebut the lack of evidence the defendant was in the vehicle at that time. Not a great defence.

I forsee similar issues with the massive DNA sweep. Eventually, the law of numbers will lead to a case where *2* matches are found (if not more) at which point the defendant gets a free pass.

At that point other evidence will be found. Take the case of twins, prior to the RNA breakthrough. Identical DNA, so if one is in the system, the other is too. Where DNA places one twin at a crime scene, it may be other evidence places the other somewhere else entirely. Where that isn't perfect, the criminal already gets a free pass - the reason I recall the RNA thing is because of a case where twins blamed each other for a rape, apparently with the intent that neither could then be charged. That worked for years before RNA proved which twin had committed the crime.

Not every criminal gets caught, certainly not every crime is solved, but it has always been that way. A large DNA database would identify more criminals than it will find multiple matches. Even dropping all of the latter, it would drive a huge increase in crime detection; a universal DNA database would all but prevent many crimes due tot he ease of identification of offenders.

However, that is only one variable in a complex equation; what about privacy, data accuracy, and all the other downsides that also need to be weighed in such a decision. There are many valid arguments against both ANPR retention/collection, and a DNA database, but I'm sorry to say that your arguments as presented are not among them.

Beer icon, because not agreeing with your line of argument is not the same as not agreeing with your sentiments.

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LucreLout

Re: Show us evidence..

@Adam

You know what, I'm not sure that excuse would've worked in a murder enquiry. Or sny inquiry that the police were taking seriously.

I'm sure they took it seriously. Let's say I hire a vehicle which then has an accident at which it fails to stop, and let's say I was driving. I ask my wife to sit in the car, then I adjust the seat all the way back and to an odd angle. When the police find the car, any forensics will at best tell them that both of us say in the seat at some point. If there are no images showing the drivers face, and there are no eyewitnesses, there's really not a lot the police can do. Provided my Mrs was in the car at the time, even her mobile will be pinging the right towers to have been driving.

Or they may have put the evidence before a jury to let them decide the liklihood that the hirer wasn't driving.

Unfortunately the costs involved in our legal system make speculative trials unaffordable. The CPS, rather than the police, would be the bottleneck here anyway as they decide whether to charge and proceed to trial or not. And the CPS are the least competent arm of the state I've ever had dealings with, and I say that having dealt with the DVLA, tax man, and passport office regularly.

All that being said, what happened to that cyclist is outrageous. The driver has no place on the roads now or at any time in the future. Unfortunately proving beyond reasonable doubt who was driving is likely to be impossible at this time.

In the end, there is no justice but that which we take for ourselves.

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LucreLout

Re: Show us evidence..

is there any evidence to support these all too glib statements that retention is needed to solve crimes?

I was wondering that too. Maybe they can cite a case, lets start with just the one, where this has been the decisive factor in bringing a criminal to justice.

From the article :- "the Met said it needs to keep some ANPR data for longer than two years in order to investigate unsolved cases, investigate linked offences, enable reinvestigation and the late reporting of crime."

Lets take that at face value for now, as I can see how someone apprehended years after a crime, for a separate crime, could feasibly be linked by tracking the movement of vehicles they previously owned or had access to.

This has to be balanced by the other side of the coin surely? How is the data going to be secured indefinitely; what other purposes or crimes, beyond the serious Levi Belfield level, will this be used for; how is this to be weighed against the obvious privacy concerns?

Giving the police the benefit of the doubt as to why they need the data != giving them the data. Seems to me that it would be more appropriate to have a public consultation (it IS our data after all), followed by some robust debate, before reaching a decision here.

1
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Techie the most recession-proof job

LucreLout

Re: Yeah... not "tech" so much..

I'm a code monkey, have been for decades, and the idea it is recession proof is concealing a lot of blips.

If your employer goes bust then it doesn't matter what you used to do for them.

If you get a new asshat boss and need to leave, the recession can make that very difficult, especially if you're a very highly paid non-contracting code monkey. And that can be utterly utterly miserable.

The next recession looks likely to arrive in H1 2017, and hopefully after that is out of the way we can get some feel good factor going in that recovery, because it's passed me by this time around for sure.

The other piss on the chips, of course, is off-shoring. Bean counters and empty suits have this hopelessly incorrect idea that because Indians & other offshorians are cheap that they can do the job. Unfortunately that just isn't born out by the experience of literally anyone I know who has had the privilege of working with them.

The code is below graduate level, the spec poorly understood and often some distance from what is built, and appalling lack of accountability borders on insanity (Lose your job? No worries, the body shop over the road is hiring and will give you a raise).

Until the government take action to address this madness, there's zero likelihood of me encouraging my kids into coding. I'd rather spend my time teaching them a trade or something else that can't be off-shored or easily robotised, and just enough computers to fall back on.

5
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Bank fail: Ready or not, here's our new software

LucreLout

Re: Oh yes

@AC

Yes, and at the end of it all, the b@stards will have the temerity to label you as resistant to change!

7
0
LucreLout

@Doctor Syntax

The distinction is getting less clear. The bank is, to a large extent, its software.

It is, but unfortunately that isn't how banks see themselves, as software companies. IT is still just a cost to be managed as low as possible. Quality costs, it always has and it always will, but the drive for the past 8 years has been to ever cheaper just barely good enough software and staff, with the inevitable public overshoots that engenders.

3
0
LucreLout

Re: Nobody wants...

These companies seem to think that unit testing and TDD can find every bug. They are wrong. They're great tools, but they're an adjunct to proper testing, not a replacement for it.

Unit testing / CI for me really just tests that the programmer hasn't mullered the system somewhere they weren't expecting. One of the primary benefits I see of TDD is that it forces forethought about class design, and usually leads to some level of adherence to SOLID, Design Patterns, and other industry standard concepts. In essence then, it ameliorates the cowboys, it does not certify the code.

UT, however, are not the only thing you can automate. A proper enterprise level public facing application should have a test suite that simulates users clicking every button; entering range tested, type variable inputs into every field; generally doing what proper fleshy testers do, just automated as part of the build.

Most of the RBS style banking problems aren't developer related though, they occur because some low cost chair warmer in India didn't have the skills, experience, or training to understand that dumping a queue, or skipping a batch step is not the answer they're looking for. Stopping the off-shoring is the answer here, rather than Dev Ops minutiae.

9
0

Amazon UK boss is 'most powerful' man in food and drink

LucreLout

Re: the geeks shall inherit the earth

When machines replace workers in site automation and self-learning AI automation robots, the geeks will be kings.

No, no we won't. That's hubris. We'll be redundant like all the other workers.

The main moderating brake on that happening is that we're being offshored to low skill low cost countries like India so fast that we've barely time to keep the plates spinning, never mind automating them.

6
0

TalkTalk confesses: Scammers have data about our engineers' visits to your home

LucreLout

Re: DIdo Harding

@Chivo234

Yeah, there's far too much of that around. Yesterday I noticed that awful Pryce woman on TV plugging her book about life in jail on the beeb. Who cares? You're a criminal, now have some sense of shame and disappear from public life FFS.

3
0

London seeks trials of Google's robo-cars

LucreLout

Re: The only problem with autonomous cars

Well, yes, but not in the way you think.

Effectively all lanes will become Zil Lanes, as we saw during the Olympics. The public sector just can't help itself - the view that they're all important (see Key Workers for reference) pervades and they'll insist on being able to leapfrog traffic queues.

0
0

Official UN panel findings on embassy-squatter released. Assange: I'm 'vindicated'

LucreLout

Re: discredit ...

@uffish

You can wiggle around in all the pseudo logic you want but America has not treated her as well as she deserves.

I can see what you're trying to say, but what you've actually said is "I, Uffish, am a hard of thinking pseudo-intellectual, who isn't half as smart as I'd like people to believe".

Attempting to counter an argument you have no counterpoint too by mislabeling it "pseudo logic" just gives away the game that you have no argument, no reasoning, just an emotive position you'd like the rest of us to adopt.

Manning was treated exactly how she was always going to be treated because she knows she's guilty. The balls to then press on and go for it are admirable, and your detracting from that because you want her to be innocent is disrespectful, and you should be ashamed.

I'm not sure why you're struggling with the concept that what is legally permissible and what is morally allowable are two separate things.

1
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UC Berkeley profs blast secret IT monitoring kit on campus

LucreLout

I'm personally highly amused by English profs and others who will very loudly insist that "paper is better" right up until they've actually used a Kindle for travel

I'm certainly no prof, and I do love my Kindle when travelling, however, for reading academic journals then yes, paper is better by far. I can scribble notes in the margins easily, underline things etc. Lay all the papers out around me when evaluating & analyzing them etc.

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