* Posts by LucreLout

2031 posts • joined 30 Jun 2014

UK networks have 'no plans' to bring roaming fees back after Brexit

LucreLout
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Re: Who's opinion would you trust most out of this lot?

Carney is IMHO the most sensible, and arguably the most politically independent, apart from perhaps AC.

Here's Carney's latest:-

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45516678

The main problem with that view, is that on all available evidence to date, any Brexit related economic prediction I make after 0 to 10 lagers, has been considerably more accurate than the most accurate Brexit prediction from Carney or the BoE.

The only reason house prices would fall is if interest rates shot up. The only reason that would happen is to defend a run on the pound. The reason that won't happen is that Brexit is already priced in to the pound now.

What is more likely to happen should the pound fall further, is that London skyrockets as more foreign investors buy what is now to them a discounted central London property.

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LucreLout
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Fuck off.

Bit hard of thinking are we? Never mind petal, the grown ups have voted to leave, and as usual we'll do the heavy lifting. You just sit in the corner doing your angsty teenager thing.

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LucreLout
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If you change your mind about a constitutional vote affecting your countries relationship with others and which carries inevitable economic consequences, tough.

'Twas the same when we voted to join a common market.

That's why its conventional for referenda to require a supermajority.

Conventioanl where, exactly? In the UK it's not conventional at all.

And, of course, you decide before the event whether the decision is to be binding or advisory.

All referendums are binding. Were they not, people would not vote in them. Remainers wrote the text, so its too late to moan about the spelling.

That doesn't affect the fact that this has been an economically disastrous decision made in an outrageously stupid manner.

I agree, but now we're ont he verge of reversing that and leaving the EU to go back to our historically advantageous position of trading with the rest of the world, instead of pretending it doesn't exist.

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LucreLout
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In the meantime my children and grandchildren are going to have to live with that economic cost in the longer term

Mine are going to live with the economic opportunity. So are yours. Stop being afraid and start taking hold of the opportunities available.

My family have already (financially) done very well out of remainer panic. We remortgaged at all time low base rates, and fixed it for the life of the loan, moved out of the £ and then back in once the panic had set in, thus addind substantially and tax efficiently to our assets. If you were too busy panicing or incapable of thinking things through to do the same then I can hardly be blamed for that.

The end of the next labour government is going to make my family rich beyond anything I could have comprehended growing up. Those voting labour not so much, but again, I can hardly see how that will be my fault.

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LucreLout
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come Downing Street with a document at least as detailed and as heavy as the indyref document published by the SNP before their referendum.

The problem was that the SNP document was a total work of fiction. They assumed England would simply pay Scotlands national debts, set up a favourable trade agreement, vote for them to be allowed back into Europe, and gift them all of the oil (which according to international convention is in English waters, not Scottish ones).

Unicorns and trebbles all round.

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LucreLout
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Same as a trip to the US;

I go to the USA on business several times a year and use my phone freely while I'm there. Oddly, my carrier allows the use of my pre-paind minutes and data for no additional fee.

Whatever arguement remainers think they may have against Brexit, phone charges simply isn't one.... unless we recently annexed America?

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LucreLout
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A top brexshiteer

Yay, name calling. The rest of your post I've ignored on the basis that in doing so, you have stated you have no credible points to make.

Bye.

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LucreLout
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@LucreLout you seem to forget that it was such a marginal "win" for Brexit that it was clearly insane going through with it without a proper analysis and a rerun when we actually exactly know what Brexit was.

And it wasn't even a compulsory-for-parliament-to-enact vote.

The entire bill which formed the basis of the referendum, the question we were asked, and the government campaign to keep us in, were all formed by a remainer. The arch remainer at that. So remainers complaining about it need to look to themselves.

The referendum was spelled out very clearly before you voted - one and done, no re-runs; the same as the Scots IndyRef. There's no do-overs.

Point of fact, people voting leave did so ont he basis that the arch remainer guaranteed them he'd fire A50 in the morning and then we'd have a punishment budget. And still Leave won out.

Sorry, but you've had your say on this matter and you're on the wrong side of history. There's no democratic basis or need for another vote; quite the opposite - there is a democratic imperative that the result be honoured.

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LucreLout
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The problem is that competition doesn't really work for things like roaming charges or termination fees

And yet in the post to which you respond, you've been given a crystal clear example where it does "really work", and far far beyond Europe.

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LucreLout
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If Brexit were so simple, it would have happened already.

You wouldn't have watered down proposals of how to do it.

You wouldn't be reliant on the EU bending to your will.

Remainers really are going to have to take responsibility for all three of those.

Gina Miller managed to string the whole thing out by around a year with pointless and meaningless legal challenges for no better reason than she didn't like the result.

Chequers is what happens when you have remainers negotiating Brexit. It's logically absurd - you don't let the people who think we can't possibly succeed without kowtowing to the rEU negotiate how we leave it. Negotiating from a position of fear never produces your best outcome.

We're not reliant on the rEU bending to our will. Leavers don't want chequers, they want a clean break and WTO rules while we sort out a realistic trade deal: essentially rebooting the rEU back to what it was originally intended to be. I know remainers are firghtended by that idea, but that's just mostly because they don't understand economics, trade, or finance.

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LucreLout
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Interesting use of anonymity here. Apparently, Leavers still don't want to be publicly identified, even by pseudonym.

I'm not the AC above, but I am a leaver. We disagree politically, so that's about the same as every general election ever then.... Sorry, I must not have got the memo about being ashamed of it.

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Top Euro court: UK's former snooping regime breached human rights

LucreLout
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Re: Stopped??

Well, the authorities SAY the bulk-tapping is no longer happening, but we have no way of knowing that

I just assumed that GCHQ keep tabs on the Yanks, and that the NSA keep tabs on the Brits, and they swap relevant info.

Note that I'm not suggesting they should or shouldn't, only I'd be very suprised if there's not some sort of arrangement in place that sidesteps domestic lawmakers. After all, you never know who the plebs will vote for next.

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Sextortion scum armed with leaked credentials are persistent pests

LucreLout
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Re: These exploits only work...

Not quite, it is the degree to which the victim believes the social culture would punish him or her.

Some things are just private. I don't really care how the world would react to pictures of me nekkid being taken without my knowledge and circulated, I simply don't want it to happen because I don't wish to be so displayed.

Good luck to the scammers though - I have stickers I remove when I need the web cam, and they're replaced at the end of the call.

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Volkswagen faces fresh Dieselgate lawsuit in Germany – report

LucreLout
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Walked past a brand new one the other day and it was beautiful, and I wanted it sooooooo much. But not everyone's cup of tea, and Morgan on their own hardly constitute a car industry.

How any man can walk past a Plus 8 or Roadster and not want one is beyond comprehension. I may never buy one, but I'll always want one.

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LucreLout
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Re: Fraud or fraud and hypocrisy.

So investors are complaining that the company they invested in, that committed fraud in manipulation emissions tests, didn't give them information to allow them to commit insider trading offences?

Not only that but they seem ignorant of market regulations. ALL company announcements that might affect the price of the stocks MUST be issued on the exchange at which they are listed first. VW, loathe though I am to defend them, had no choice in the matter.

So what we have here is a bunch of people that would prefer to commit insider trading than face investment losses, and expect that any company they invest in will break the rules under which their investment was placed in order to facilitate the insider trading.

These people are not mentally fit to be investors. They should be ashamed of themselves.

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Tesla's chief accounting officer drives off after just a month on the job

LucreLout
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Elon Musk trying too hard to be John McAfee

I fucking love John McAfee. There, I said it. He's just the gift that keeps on giving - and endless parade of low-brow fun and shennaigans, from someone too smart to believe his own words.

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LucreLout
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Re: Shorting stock rewards the slime of the world.

Also, until the company actually goes bankrupt, NOBODY has lost money on their shares.

Sorry, but you're wrong. The mid-price for my shares is less than the value at which I acquired them, thus I have lost money on my Tesla shares. I may yet regain it, or I may lose further money still, but economically, for real, I have lost money. Why is everyone so afraid of admitting that?

They still own the same number it is just they have a lesser or perhaps in a few weeks, greater value.

Ok, so you seem to understand very basic market mechanics but apparently miss the significance of this in relation to your earlier point. Losing money on shares is multiplied by the quantity held, no mitigated by it.

I like the Warren Buffett quote. When people are greedy be fearful. When people are fearful be greedy.

You're seriously going to quote the Sage of Omaha, after just positing that nobody has lost money on a share that has lost market price? Really?

It is disgusting to bet against a company failing to make money where thousands can lose jobs, communities die

I'm not suggesting that Tesla is a zombie company (yet), but shorting is one of the things that helps zombie companies die out, which free's up the capital and staff for more productive use elsewhere. It's a core tennet of capitalism.

Why do I feel like I'm talking to a socialist who thinks they're a capitalist?

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LucreLout
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Re: Musk did get one thing right

The Guardian certainly has an insufferable side to it, particularly some of the columnists, but it is still one of the most trustworthy newspapers out there.

Ya think?

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/11/27/guardian_use_me_as_a_mouthpiece/

Not least because it isn't controlled by tax dodging newspaper proprietors

Ya think?

https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2016/04/will-the-guardian-now-investigate-its-own-tax-arrangements/

https://www.forbes.com/sites/timworstall/2013/06/28/the-insufferable-hypocrisy-of-the-guardian-on-corporation-tax/#39accd4a5969

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/guardian-media-firm-makes-186m-but-pays-only-200000-tax-8675818.html

LucreLouts law: Facts may be used to form opinions, however the inverse is not true.

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LucreLout
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Re: RE: What Car survey

Don't get me wrong, the design brief of the product is superb, but the build quality is shocking compared to similarly priced cars from companies with a lot more experience.

I've not read the surveys, but I expect you're right. When you rush tings, quality is the first casualty.

That being said, scalaing upa new product offering isn't the most difficult challenge in business (everyone from Apple to Cisco has done this before), so Tesla should be able to sort this out as things progress.

Assuming of course, they don't run out of money first.

(I have a small bet on Tesla but I'm pretty sure that it's not influencing my thinking here)

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LucreLout
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Re: The product is strong, and the vision is excellent

67% of $80 is around $54 and is the amount of current tax that needs to be replaced. Add that to your $12 recharge and you get $66, not $36...

My roof space can't safely produce petrol while I'm at work, but it can produce electrickery. Unless you tax domestic power at the same rate as road fuel, then its a non-starter.

Tax on vehicles is all but finished, absent tracking where & when they move and charging for that. Obviously, there might be one or two privacy concerns there, not to mention the idea of the government installing the ability to tell the vehicle not to move (something they can't currently do).

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LucreLout
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Re: I'll forgive Mr Musk every single one of his downsides.

How would you feel if he'd repeatedly called you a "pedo" on twitter?

I wish he would. Since it'd be completely untrue, I'd have zero concerns about suing him for millions or more. I'd have a lawyer working up the papers before he'd put down his phone.

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LucreLout
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Re: Howard Hughes, Tony Stark, Wizard of Oz..

So Tesla thought big. Solar panels, Electric cars, slight snag with night time but buy a Powerwall or 3.. And don't look at the acreage of solar roof tiles needed to fill up 1x100kWh battery. So a few risks, but Tesla's borrowed big and had US state and federal subsidies.. So not risked much of it's own money.

On the one hand, I agree. On the other, all that roof space all over the world is literally going to waste in energy terms. Using it for solar farming seems like a sensible idea - and when there's no adverse aesthetic considerations, it seems like a win-win.

I'm not suggesting that everyone run out and go electric (I need someone to eat the depreciation on a nice big V8 I have my eye on), merely that if you believe in AGW, or even if you just dislike inefficiency, then there seems to be a use case for Musk's work.

He has the money, the marketing skills, and the balls to try his seemingly crazy ideas, and with his level of intelligence, some of them are bound to end up benefiting humanity. The rest will merely keep us entertained.

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LucreLout
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Re: Musk the weed smoker

Do you really want the CEO of your company smoking weed, dropping acid and taking ambien.

In all honesty, I'm not sure I care. He's not a friend or family, and I can't even name most of the CEOs running businesses in whihc I have investments.

Most of my investments are in indexes, thus no CEO makes up more than about 1% of my investment capital at any time. If (s)he nukes the firm, then it pretty much just bleeds into general market volatility.

In terms of where I work - well, I make it my business, the defining strength of my career, to be able to attract another employer very quickly and on better terms, should my current employer blow up. It's the only real job security there is.

So, yeah, I'm genuinely not sure I care.....

On the flip side - I'm pretty sure he's amongst the most intelligent CEOs of the firms in which I hold investments, though looking at my Google stocks, intelligence isn't winning the race just now (AMZ are hammering GOOG, as are MSFT - I basically bet big on the cloud for my direct investments - it's not ideology, its cashing in, there's a difference).

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LucreLout
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Re: Daft Man

Must be like working for Trump to be honest.

I disagree. I'm pretty sure Elon Musk is an actual genius, rather than Trump, whom I suspect has too many flunkys that simply deadpan "genius" after every idea he's ever had, and he's started to believe it.

I'll admit to talking my book in equity terms: My gambling money is in Tesla stocks. I've been down 10% and up as much as 30%, and I only placed a bet earlier in the year :-0 I'll either lose the lot, or make enough off it to buy my next car. Probably the former rather than the latter, but that's why it's in the pot marked "gambling" rather than "investment".

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A real shot in the Arm: 3% of global workforce surplus to requirements

LucreLout
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Re: Only 3%?

A personal thought is that the public service is unfairly maligned for having too many "who do nothing but fiddle about with PowerPoint and attend meetings" the truth is that all large organizations become infested with these people - Particularly when they are natural privately owned monopolies

Yes, however, those private companies are allowed to go bust. The public sector just continues ad finitum, with an ever larger paper trail. Given the impossibility of reforming most of it, Parkinsons Law makes clear that we should cap the lifetime of public sector departments and organisations, beginning again with a clean sheet of paper every, say 50 years.

Looking at all the middle mamabegrs and administrators in the NHS, a reasonable back of the fag packet estimate would be that more than half the work done is meaningless paperwork rather than actual healthcare provision.

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Activists rattle tin to take UK's pr0n block to court

LucreLout
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Facepalm

Re: Is porn that damaging ?

However, 30 mins of Jeremy Kyle will show you how that's working out.

Wait.... what? Are you saying that is REAL??!

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Dear America: Want secure elections? Stick to pen and paper for ballots, experts urge

LucreLout
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Re: share of moonballs

First, the share of "moonbats" on the right is currently much higher, as is evident by the current President of the U.S. Second, the consequences of the right's agenda is much more severe

Sorry, but that simply isn't true.

The consequences of the lefty moonbats are always more severe. Pop over to Venezuela and report back. Trump hasn't achieved, and will not achieve, anything remotely as severe.

It's reached the point where Socialism has destroyed enough of the worlds successfull economys that the only rational response is to ensure anyone entering a voting booth is sufficiently educated as to its obvious and persistent evils that they never even think about voting for a leftist party again.

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Is someone chopping onions? Oracle cloud boss bids colleagues emotional farewell

LucreLout
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It's also possible that he's fighting a very private health battle with an uncertain prognosis.

That's how I read it, so all I can add is that I wish him the best of luck with it. Never worked at Oracle, never will, but it's unlikely he's taking time out for the flu.

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Cloudera and MongoDB execs: Time is running out for legacy vendors

LucreLout
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Re: The SQL Empire Strikes Back

Are you employed by Oracle by any chance ?

That or he's balls deep in out of the money options. I can't envisage any other rational reason for someone to be promoting Oracle. It's already dead.

Hadoop is killing it from the left, Sql Server from the right, MariaDB/others from underneath, and many other cloud-native flavours of NoSQL from above. There's no where for Oracle RDBMS to go; it's basically game over.

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Soft eng salaries soar by 25 per cent – and, oh yes, devops is best paid for non-boss techies

LucreLout
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Re: Enjoy it while it lasts!

Yes, the end is nigh for 75-90% of dev jobs in the western world.

The end will come one day, but nobody currently in Uni or working will be around to see it. Millennials will be retired and Ge X will be dead!

We need to totally rethink the Economy and how our lives are organised.

The economy works fine. Capitalism has lifted more people out of poverty than have been lifted out by all other ideas combined. Venezuela demonstrates only too well the oft forgot lessons that Socialism doesn't work - it only ever impoverishes the plebs and middle classes while the party leaders get ever fatter (literally as well as financially).

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European nations told to sort out 'digital tax' on tech giants by end of year

LucreLout
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Re: Double Irish With A Dutch Sandwich - it's dead(ish) Jim

Nope, the Irish government closed their part of the loophole in 2015 and pre-existing structures can only run until 2020.

Sure the particular instance of that strategy has issues, but don't for one second assume that any more tax will be payable. My business unit are already migrating whats left of our version of this to something else. Rather obviously, I can't tell you specifically what. I can tell you that nobody is expecting to leave Ireland as a result of the changes, and that Ireland isn't expecting to garner any extrat tax revenue from the change - its only being implemented to appease the EU.

Holland is still the best place for royalties (U2 still have their hedgefund there I believe), and Delaware is still Delaware. For as long as a company is taxed on profits, moving them via trade, loans, or IP will always ensure most of the profit ends up where its taxed less.

The Irish jig is missing several steps to be a properly aggressive strategy anyway - its just the one the papers know about. A proper strategy leaves you a tax loss in the expensive jurisdictions (double dipping the money-go-round enables simultaneous loss claims, its just harder than it used to be) as well as profit in a tax free location. Tax losses are more valuable in some respects than taxable profit, because you can offset it for 100% of the gain when you decide you need to make profit somewhere, or package it up and flog the vehicle to someone who needs to declare an onshore profit.

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LucreLout
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Re: Start with the basics and work from there

Smaller companies lose out because they can't afford expensive accountants to find all the same little loopholes, or more frequently because they are pinned down to a real physical location and no means to move profits off shore.

Two towns over from me the cafe there is based offshore for accounting purposes, despite having a decidedly onshore physical presence. Its a very small business - I know contractors with a higher turnover (they're very specialised, I admit).

The game is not nearly so diffcult to understand or expensive to play as you imagine. Oddly though, nobody seems worried about their use of the same planning as the tech giants....

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LucreLout
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Re: Start with the basics and work from there

That was done about a quarter millennia ago.

Correction, that was dictated about a quarter millenia ago, when international operations were exceedingly difficult to manage because of transportation speed/cost and the snail pace communications systems. The world has changed and governments, having lost the respect of the people, are not in a position to dictate.

So, given the world today, and the waste in existing governmental spending, define fair?

in turn the country could afford to build and maintain roads, hire police forces to prevent highway robbery, educate the populace and later to provide things like healthcare and pensions

Which neatly accounts for about 10% of the tax take. The rest they fritter away and waste.

You're confusing emotional irrelevancies, such as the public services you'd like someone else to fund for you, with what is fair or even realistic to expect companies to pay. A given company may have shareholders in 200+ countries around the world - how much do you think they value public spending in, for example Ireland, if they live in Uganda?

Companies decided that they could find and exploit loopholes and not pay their taxes, and all of a sudden are competing on how little tax they can pay. If you were defining "unfair" then this is probably it.

Unfair would better be defined as forcibly extracting from someone, using menaces, threats of impriosonment, and life altering sanctions, that which they would otherwise not give voluntarily. Which is the basis of all taxation.

What is fair about asking a company headquartered in say America, to pay taxes for services you wish to enjoy but otherwise cannot afford in the UK? What is fair about asking their global shareholders to pay for it? Sorry, but you haven't arrived at anything remotely resembling a working definition of fair, and so cannot use it for a predicate to raise taxes.

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LucreLout
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Re: taxation vs economic activity

I think you should have added to your comment that the state/country need tax money to provide affordable education and health care, for roads and bridges and more.

Unfortunately they waste it instead on wages for so very many jobs that simply don't need doing. Too much administration, too many middle managers, etc etc etc. The last thing they spend it on is the roads.....

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LucreLout
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Physical presence provides an extremely strong drag on being able to go jurisdiction shopping

It creates no drag at all. See Boots for an example.

If you are the UK you will quite quickly cut the tax take from all the physically-present companies mentioned.

Leaving them more money to invest in growth which then leads to a higher tax base.

Worse, in the slightly longer term you will end up pushing an even larger percentage of your workforce into fake self-employment.

The difference is nearly double already. Dropping it further won't inentivise anyone that isn't already playing that game.

It turns out that the hopelessly simplistic analysis you bought into wasn't just bad because it made us unpopular tax haven pariahs. It has actually cost us billions of pounds.

No, I'm afraid its just that you don't understand taxation or economics sufficiently well to reason through the proposition. This is what I do for a very well paid living. Sorry, but you really are so far wide of the mark as to leave me baffled as to how you've arrived at the position you have.

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LucreLout
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Re: Taxing revenue is inherently unfair

So your solutions is? You are very quiet about that - note that "taxing profits" has proved to be a complete failure ... the FANG companies don't make profits "on the books".

Sure they do - they just don't make them on the books of non-competetive tax regimes.

You have two realistically workable options for adjusting the tax amount paid, and really only two. They are:

1) An internationally accepted and levied flat tax

2) Be a competetive place to pay CT - and by competetive I really mean cheap (low CT, say 5% and you'd corner the market with ballooning tax take)

Anything else is just playig the same game we play now, but with marginally different rules. Two guesses who's better at playing the game within whatever rules have been devised? Hint: It's not now, never was, and never will be the tax man.

I can almost feel the hate from here, but I'm not condoning or condemning the players or game, I'm just explaining how it works in reality rather than intent. There's no moral or spiritual component to taxation, there's only a balance due created by applying a rule set. It is what it is.

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LucreLout
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Re: Beware of False Profits

The point of this digital revenue tax is that it'll be the revenue inside the EU that will be taxable at 3%, *not* profit, regardless of whether it slips into a Double Dutch Irish sandwich or not.

Ok, so lets say I have revenue of £100M. You now take £3M in envy tax.

The other £97M gets taxed at 20% on the profit part. Ok, but if your complaint stems from my not having made enough profit to pay you the Corp Tax you think you deserve, then I'll be making zero profit or less using the new system. Most of the tech giants have an operating profit margin in the UK & EU of close to or less than the proposed envy tax.

Thus, what you have achieved is at best, that I pay you 3% evny tax to operate here, when I'm already probably paying something similar anyway via Corporation Taxes. You've moved the money from one pot, to another, but not increased your £s taken.

However, this is where things take a turn for the worse for you. If your envy tax pushes me into making a loss for Corp Tax, I can roll that over for many years. A little legal entity restructuring and I can spin off the corp tax loss into its own vehicle and sell that vehicle from my offshore parent company to someone else who wants to operate here, thus regaining some of my envy taxes while you then lose out on somone elses CT.

Corporate taxation is an internationally competetive market place. It's not quite winne rtakes all, but its close enough to that to mean that if you want a share of the international CT, you are going to have to compete to get it. That'll not be popular, but then, the real world isn't about being popular.

Me/you being substitiutes for a FAANGM style operation and the tax man respectively.

This is my specialist area of IT, but I'm an IT specialist not a tax specialist, and even I can see mile wide roads down which to travel that don't lead to a cent/penny more in taxes becoming due.

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LucreLout
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If Britain lowered tax to attract Apple it would have to apply the same tax rates to Rolls-Royce, HSBC, ICI, Shell, etc etc

All of whom already engage in some level of tax planning. Don't assume that because the rate payable is reduced that the amount garnered would also fall. All economic evidence points to the contrary.

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LucreLout
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Re: Beware of False Profits

The problem isn't inherently the double-Dutch-Irish-malarkey, it's companies using that to shift profits to a lower-tax jurisdiction.

There's just so very many ways to achieve this, and so many companies doing it, that to focus only on the tech giants is to really misunderstand the scale of the industry.

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LucreLout
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More than that, the whole Irish double Dutch sandwich with extra ketchup bullshit won't apply any more.

Sure it will.

I realise lots of people really don't like the "Irish double Dutch sandwich with extra ketchup bullshit" strategy, but there's no reason at all why this won't work afterwards. Arguably, it'll work even better than it does now.

The only difference is that we could substitute ourselves for any part of that arrangement, knocking Ireland or Holland out of contention. Or both, if we chose. I'm not suggesting we should, simply explainin that we could.

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LucreLout
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I'm pretty sure that UK will act unilaterally about this pretty soon. Once they're out of the EU, there's no reason for them not to tax the UK profits of EU companies, is there?

Assuming we ever actually get "out of the EU", then the rEU become our competition for tax revenues. There's nothing to stop us attracting their companies here by ensuring our rate of Corporation Tax is lower than theirs, thus getting a slightly smaller slice of a much larger pie. In essence, lowering the rate in order to increase the revenue extracted.

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LucreLout
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Start with the basics and work from there

pay their fair share

Before everyone gets emotive and irrational, hows about the EU/Austria first define "fair".

Unless there's first an agreement on what fair is then dreaming up taxes and ways to spend them simply won't achieve anything.

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Fukushima worker death

LucreLout
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Boffin

Fukushima worker death

El Reg, any chance of a decent article on the apparent death of a fukushima worker due to radiation from the clean up please? Most of the commentards around these parts have a more scientific understanding of radiation that most main stream reporters, so I was hoping to find something today with more fact than hysteria.

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Software dev-turned-councillor launches rubbish* chatbot

LucreLout
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Re: FFS

Fly tipping is a problem caused by ignorant self serving idiots who don't give a toss where their rubbish ends up and who cannot be bothered to deal with it because its too much effort for them.

No, fly tipping is a problem implemented by self serving idiots, but it is a problem created by the council.

Councils don't drop litter, councils don't fly tip.

Councils decied unilaterally to cut back on garbage collection and access to the rubbish dump. They do so knowing that it increases instances of fly tipping. Its a choice they've made.

Councils however do pick up the cost of dealing with this selfish minority act which we all then share the burden of.

Which neatly brings us back to why councils should stop encouraging the fly tipping in the first place and simply reinstate the services we're all still paying for but no longer receive. Weekly rubbish collections and open access to the tip / recycling centre.

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LucreLout
Silver badge

FFS

The chatbot, which works via Facebook Messenger, will also address the scourge of local authorities across the UK – fly-tipping.

Fly-tipping is a problem created entirely by the local councils. Simply restore weekly bin collections, and allow unlimited trips to the council tip, and fly-tipping will go away again. Yes, I understand some people have concerns over environmentalism, but if its first dumped in the street / nearby field, then taken to the council tip anyway, what is really being achieved?

Scandinavia makes use of small scale local incineration of things that can't be recycled, leading to very cheap communal central heating and very low levels of landfill. Maybe, I dunno, try doing something constructive or 'new' about the problems rather than wasting time with a farcebook app most of your voters can't make use of?

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Go Pester someone else: TSB ditches CEO over bank's IT meltdown

LucreLout
Silver badge

Re: still expected to take away about £1.7m

Being told that 'if you so utterly screw up that you damage the reputation of this institution, you'll lose all of this' should be enough impetus not to screw up, but then again, any savvy senior exec would refuse to sign such a contract.

That'll be the paying for talent myth. Here's the thing. The vast majority of FTSE 100 CEOs NEVER lead a second one. So, if its talent we're paying for, why is it that they can't find an equivalent or better job?

Could it just possibly be, that it's simple troughing and nothing to do with talent? That they had the political ability to get to the top of a greasy pole, but that is actually the only skill they really have, and that every equivalent company already has several staffers in reserve who hase mastered that same skill?

Sure, you do find the odd one where a change in leadership produces remarkable financial results, but that's fewer then 5% of even top flight CEOs.

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LucreLout
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Mushroom

Re: still expected to take away about £1.7m

Just how bad do you have to screw up before you don't walk away with such a payout?

Unless you've brokent he law, it seems its impossible to screw up badly enough that the golden parachute is not wheeled out. Disgraceful.

And they wonder why my career ambition is to be the failing CEO of a FTSE 100 company. It is literally money for nohting. For less than nothing.

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Excuse me, but your website's source code appears to be showing

LucreLout
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Re: Hah

That said, webassmbly seems to have taken off like a rocket so the only javascript in future may be a thin glue layer.

I see, you must be young.

WebAssembly Vs JavaScript is essentially just BetaMax Vs VHS all over again. Yes, WebAssembly can be considered technically "better" than JavaScript in many regards, but JavaScript has the market share, and so will "win".

That, and can you seriously imagine your JavaScript based Millennial web developer learning C++?

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LucreLout
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...only recently Git understood you may need to have different branches of a repo at the same time on your local disk, and their solution is still a just workaround.

No surprise those who happily drink the kool-aid of the "greatest tool of all times" then incur in this kind of issues.

I use git in preference to all other version control systems. It's pretty damn far from perfect, but on reflection, I hate it less than all other version control systems.

Stupid or lazy developers will always be a problem for as long as the entry requirement to our industry is being able to write the word developer on your CV.

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If you weren't rich enough to buy a Surface before, you may as well let that dream die

LucreLout
Silver badge

Somehow....

.... after Wonga, 19.99% APR just doesn't have the same shock factor it used to.

Of course, there is always a catch. In this case, any unpaid balance would attract an eye-watering 19.99 per cent after the initial 24-month period.

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