* Posts by Doctor Syntax

16426 posts • joined 16 Jun 2014

My PC makes ‘negative energy waves’, said user, then demanded fix

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: missed opportunity

"So, there wouldn't be much signal below them anyway."

Now try explaining that to those objecting to near-by mobile phone masts. And also explain that when they connect the mobile transmitter next to their head to a more distant mast it has to transmit at higher power and there's this thing called the inverse square law.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: "And bluetooth with Win10 is an iffy affair"

"Do any of them have K&R in the pocket?"

I passed "Unix: The Book" on to my grandson who has a PiTop. It's not all current but a good deal still is.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: "And bluetooth with Win10 is an iffy affair"

"My phone quite happily connects with my car every day, makes and receives calls using the car audio system"

Connecting isn't the problem. It's not realising it's disconnected when I take it out of the car that's the problem. It ends up in an offline mode but only infrequently so that I never get to learn the incantation needed to get it working again without a lot of trial and error. Or maybe the trial and error is the incantation.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: bluetooth with Win10 is an iffy affair

"Ah yes, proper 5-pin DIN"

5-pin DIN? Somewhere I probably still have the first mouse I bought. It has a 9-pin D connector serial cable.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: "And bluetooth with Win10 is an iffy affair"

No, I think what you both mean is: "And bluetooth is an iffy affair."

Let's get this sorted out properly:

Bluetooth and Win(x) are both iffy affairs, either separately or in combination.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

"just carrying about 2Kg worth of extraneous hair dryer wherever she goes."

And, of course, you never know when you're going to need a hair-dryer.

£12k fine slapped on Postman Pat and his 300,000 spam emails

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

"it goes unread straight into the recycling bin anyway"

If everyone posted letter box litter back marked "return to sender" I wonder how long it would take for the message to get through that we don't like it.

1.5 BEEELLION sensitive files found exposed online dwarf Panama Papers leak

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

"gotta wonder what their customers would have thought if they found out all the business and personal information they were sending these people was going to a hosed , not secure in any way, computer."

As a customer I'd first want to know what exposure the computer had to the internet. XP off net vs W10 on net: which would you prefer?

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Just because you have found a file on the internet doesn't mean it's a security issue.

"A 'business' with a few thousand pounds of turn over is clearly not in line to spend huge amounts on a consultant to verify their system, paying their increasing business rates is probably further up their action list."

A business with a few thousand pounds of turnover probably isn't paying huge amounts for data storage in the first place - possibly an old exercise book. It still doesn't excuse them if they write more in it than they're entitled to.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Just goes to prove

"I'd maintain my position that the new rights and fines will not substantially improve the situation in the real world."

I think the knowledge of this extends well down the scale of business size. The problem is more likely getting a firm grip on sales and marketing pestering departments who have the mentality of 4 year old children including the same response to being told "No".

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Just goes to prove

"Note that this is based on turnover not profit."

And not just turnover but global turnover which will make a big difference for some corporations.

Mind the gap: Men paid 18.6% more than women in Blighty tech sector

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Sooo...

"If you're, say, a software developer doing the same work/same hours as your colleague in the next cubicle (who happens to have ovaries or any of the other recognised grounds for discrimination) you should both earn the same pay."

You seem to have missed several posts pointing out that as that's the law it is actually the case. Maybe you missed it because it wasn't stated in sufficiently colourful language for you to complain about.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge
Headmaster

"A who works 60 hours a week gets paid 50% more than person B working 40 hours a week ... if they are only doing half the hours."

Last time I worked it out 40 was two thirds, not half, of 60.

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's a terrible leak of drone buyers' data

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Given that list of purchasers is there a chance of starting extradition procedures with charges under the Official Secrets Act?

My Tibetan digital detox lasted one morning, how about yours?

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: "surviving pile of stones with potential Scandinavian characteristics"

"Yes, yes, I know they were Angles and not Saxons."

Jutes.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Fifty shades of tea

"And drink it without cow-juice"

Applies to al types of tea. If you have tea that can actually be improved by milk you should get rid of it and buy something better.

Microsoft Office 365 and Azure Active Directory go TITSUP*

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

"Possibly because I'd told Microsoft to locate our stuff on UK servers due to impending GDPR requirements."

Not that that's going to do you much good. As far as the US govt and the CLOUD act are concerned there's no such thing as UK servers, just servers.

NUC, NUC! Who's there? Intel, warning you to kill a buggy keyboard app

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: VNC on Linux

"Just is it the right tool for the job question ?"

Reading the stories about that some weeks ago ISTR that binary size was significant. Maybe Minix could be got down to size & the others couldn't.

An easy-breezy attitude to sharing personal data is the only thing keeping the app economy alive

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: kill the money chain

the subsidy the net gets from the advertising industry will have to come from somewhere else

The net existed without it and many feel that those were better times.

Too many people expect everything on the net to be "free" for alternative payment to work

I'm quite happy for them to be disappointed.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Better alternative

"Third, today if a Democrat proposes the fix than the Republicans will blindly oppose it no matter what and vice-versa."

Other countries with other parties are available.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Better alternative

" if you use Facebook to keep in contact with family, friends, clients and customers, just switching it off is not an option that stacks up"

I'm sure there were people who said much the same about MySpace.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Better alternative

Even if faced with a stark "Agree to let us slurp your data or you don't get access" warning, most Facebook users will happily tick the box and go on their merry way.

I think Facebook is too smart (i.e. employ enough lawyers) to realise that that just lines them up for maximum fines rather than being told not to be naughty. The authors of GDPR saw the possibilities of that one and dealt with it

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: And that's exactly why...

"But you have just told world + dog that you do eat breakfast, and that you go out to eat it."

You believed all that did you? That's the trouble with the data fetishists who pay for that stuff., they can't distinguish between data and fact, let alone information. Intelligence and wisdom are entirely beyond their reach.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: And that's exactly why...

"all of which ... is monetisable."

The most valuable thing for advertisers to know about me is that advertising at me is counter-productive. It's not a thing they want to hear, of course, wants and needs being two different things. Would they pay good money to discover that?

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: And that's exactly why...

"So they probabbly HAVE data about me, but that data is likely to be of very poor quality."

Never mind the quality, feel the width. As nobody has any alternative data about you to judge the quality of what's collected the customers will believe what they've got and pay for it so the phone companies or whoever collects the data in the first place get paid. At some point, however, the customers might finally realise that what they're getting is worth less than they're paying for it. It's a bubble that's due to burst some time.

'Every little helps'... unless you want email: Tesco to kill free service

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Damn

"A vanity domain you pay for, then you can redirect as you want and noone will be any the wiser."

Nothing vain about it. It's just a more practical solution. If you have your own domain you can move ISP without disrupting your email contacts.

Some years ago my formerly very good ISP fell into the clutches of TalkTalk. At that time I'd used the ISP email. I moved to a new ISP but to prevent a recurrence of the inconvenience of that happening again I registered a domain with a registrar who provided an email service. After my new ISP fell into the clutches of Sky I switched to another ISP.

I also found that eventually my original choice of registrar started getting outages which they never troubled to explain - and seldom troubled to acknowledge to I transferred the domain and email service to another registrar/email provider, again without disrupting my email address.

The other side of having your own domain is that you can set up and tear down addresses as necessary. Anyone I expect to deal with on a regular basis is given an alias I've set up specifically for them. If they start spamming I simply drop that alias; in fact I've the option of setting it to bounce email with a message telling the sender why they're being bounced. I also set up aliases which will only last a few weeks and anyone who doesn't, in my view, need a long term alias gets given the current one of those which will be pulled immediately if it gets spammed.

For a few quid a year you can have a flexible email service that's not, on the one hand, tied to a service provider you can't dump, nor, on the other to a big corporation who treats you as their product.

I have a Hotmail address for situations which demand an email address but where I don't expect any interaction whatsoever and that's treated as /dev/null and a gmail address if I need a Google login which carries no traffic at all.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

"Presumably you will have to buy your own domain"

That's the best solution. It makes your domain hosting independent of ISP. You're free to change either as it suits you.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Damn

"Buy yourself a domain name and have the domain name registrar host it. Set it to redirect mail to whoever provides your mail service and tell your friends to send e-mail via your domain name."

Select a UK/EU registrar who includes a paid for email hosting package. Don't rely on a free as in you are the product service.

UK.gov: We're not regulating driverless vehicles until others do

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Greatly missed opportunity.

"Or BMW demand a right to overtake and cut in when they feel like it."

I thought you were dealing with future problems.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Hmm...

"What collateral damage?"

Those innocent bystanders who are the victims of testing a new technology on the public.

"So we should abandon the rule of law to make an industry stumping regulation for shits and giggles? Why?"

So we should allow technology to be tested on the public and if it goes wrong it's up to the public to hope they can pay a lawyer more than a big corporation? Why? In your own words, for shits and giggles? Or is it simply that in your view the little people don't matter?

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Hmm...

"Monetary compensation is only relevant for things that can be compensated for - which doesn't include death."

So it would be OK by you if, as a result of some big corporation's conducting experiments on the travelling public, someone gets killed and their family is put out of house and home because they can no longer pay their mortgage or rent.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

"On that basis, we wouldn't allow anyone to store thousands of gallons of petrol in busy urban centres either."

I think you missed the point about containment.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Hmm...

"If others regulate it out of existence that is good news for us as the industry will find it cheaper to do it here"

Not so good for those who become collateral damage of the testing process. There's certainly one regulation that needs to be in place: anyone testing on public roads should put up money in escrow to cover injuries. It should not be necessary for anyone injured or has property damaged or the family of anyone killed to have to sue for compensation. And once the funds in escrow run out testing stops until they're either replaced.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

"new laws forcing petrol station operators to install hydrogen fuel pumps."

Nasty stuff to keep where it should be, hydrogen. Wait for the backlash the first time one of these goes up.

As Zuck apologizes again... Facebook admits 'most' of its 2bn+ users may have had public profiles slurped by bots

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Simple solution...

"just delete your FB profile."

How? I don't have an account but that won't have stopped them building a profile on me.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Did I get this right...

Or maybe I should say "product" instead of "user"

It's worse than that. For some businesses the two are indeed the same. For FB the set of users is only a subset of product.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: But, but, but.....

"There are certain services that I'm willing to part money for out there in the "cyber-economy" and this would be one I'd consider."

But would you trust FB to provide it?

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: But, but, but.....

"The only info that could have been gained from searches of phone numbers and email addresses is your public profile info that YOU posted."

I haven't posted anything there. But anyone with whom I've corresponded or given a phone number to may have that, and my name, on their mobile. If they also use that mobile for FB then that information will have been harvested despite my not having posted anything.

FB, between now and GDPR coming into force, need to purge every bit of data of EU residents and potential EU residents who are not account holders from their system because they don't know who might challenge them and their transgressions are surely egregious enough to attract the maximum fines.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

"No one is asking you to do that, Mark"

Not yet. But how many fines of 4% of turnover are needed to bleed the whole corporation to death?

Facebook can’t count, says Cambridge Analytica

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

CA's role is spreading disinformation. So exactly why should we believe a a word they say?

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Numbers

"If Cambridge Analytica had 30 million records it does not automatically mean that so many millions of people had their minds changed about who to vote for."

Votes are determined on margins. Changing the minds of a marginal number of people can have a significant effect.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: Eh?

"Sorry, I don't believe a word that Zuck or CA say these days."

These days?

What's silent but violent and costs $250m? Yes, it's Lockheed Martin's super-quiet, supersonic X-plane for NASA

Doctor Syntax Silver badge
Unhappy

"I can recommend the IBM Model M"

Doesn't fit on a laptop.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Re: What Do You Think Airbus

"I think Airbus should ask the Chinese for the plans once it becomes a reality."

Maybe the Chinese will be fed fake plans as the Russians were for Concorde - allegedly.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

"The initial test flights ran up & down the Irish sea... It was very distinctive, but didn't seem loud enough to be a problem."

Agreed. I remember Shorts testing SkyVans at the more or less the same time. Ugly but if unladen I got the impression they'd be quite good at aerobatics.

"It was even better on the perimeter road at the end of the runway, when the reheat was still active. Made the world shake."

And if you were queued up behind one at take-off.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

Damn keyboard. First it was the space bar. Then it was the n which seems to have fixed itself. Now it's errm the key betweeny and i. And damn again, there goes the space bar.

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

I'm sure an AI headline writer would have come up with "Silent by deadly" or isn't that an expression that crosses the pond?

2001 set the standard for the next 50 years of hard (and some soft) sci-fi

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

"A film that ran at such a resolutely languid pace would last less than a week in a modern multiplex."

I saw it, well, bits of it, on TV once. My impression was that it was lasting more than a week. I suppose I'm just not a SciFi fan.

Here's the list of Chinese kit facing extra US import tariffs: Hard disk drives, optic fiber, PCB making equipment, etc

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

"low value items (semiconductor and electronics parts esp) that will still be cheap enough that the tariff will be paid and the US Govt gets extra cash."

Not necessarily unless the tariff also applies to the same parts in finished products. It makes home produced goods (even) less competitive with imports. Adding tariffs on production equipment pushes that cost up still further.

Hooo boy, Commvault, your activist investor is not a happy chappy

Doctor Syntax Silver badge

"Go in, change out the board, hollow out the company, get a short term profit, and get out before the company collapses."

Sooner or later the victims' customers will get the message and take their business elsewhere pre-emptively so the company collapses before they can get out.

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