* Posts by BubbaGump

9 posts • joined 22 May 2014

Microsoft's Euro cloud darkens: US FEDS can dig into foreign servers

BubbaGump

Re: Doom for US tech companies

Unfortunately, you are most likely correct. The US doesnt' care.

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BubbaGump

Re: Doom for US tech companies

You really think "content" is not extracted? That US laws and oversight protect such an intrusion? Wow, I have a bridge in Brooklyn that I'd like to sell you. Interested? Yes spying has a long history, however, with current and upcoming technology, the extent of spying is unprecedented and the fact that everyone is fair game is Orwellian.

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BubbaGump

Trevor's Rebuttle

Wow, nice job/post. However, living in the US, I do "hate the cloud". None of the cloud services are talking at all about Privacy, Security, Accessibility nor Reliability, at least publicly. Amazon remained absolutely quiet after a Botnet was easily set up in their cloud. And Office 365? Why would I want to use that? I have always run Office locally and will continue to do such. Oh, MS said that way you will always access the latest and greatest. Really? I don't remember managing the infrequent Office updates to be a daunting task. Office upgrades have become less and less useful so I don't see the value there. In the US, we clearly have the most expensive internet and far from the fastest or most reliable. The ISP's are consolidating for control of the internet and they charge a premium for faster speeds and content providers will be charged to not be throttled. Remember, the ISP's are also the TV providers. Now many companies are providing cheesy data plans that are easy to exceed, so one gets pushed into more expensive monthly data plans. In other words, the "cloud" is slowly being forced on us in the United States. American companies seem to feel if they want it, build it and sell investors on it, you will use it one way or another.

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BubbaGump

Doom for US tech companies

Didn't Germany cancel Verizon's contract and kick them out due to US spying? I hope this is only the beginning. I'm a US citizen and hope that Europe and other nations start pushing back, hard, on America's Orwellian surveillance. After all, what is the US going to do about it? Nothing. Washington is so gridlocked they can't even agree on toilet paper. I store nothing in the "cloud". I download my emails via Outlook, then the emails are deleted from the server thereafter. One thing other countries need to realize is the parasites on Wall Street have instituted a perpetual growth model. In order to maintain that momentum, globalization is absolutely necessary or the system will collapse. If American companies are not welcomed abroad due to these unprecedented over-reaching laws we might actually see the business and investment machinery unite to stop this intrusion for survival purposes.

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BubbaGump

Is that a cloud coffin nail I see before me?

Amen my friend. I've been arguing for quite a while that the "cloud" would be a privacy nightmare. A convenient one stop shop for the NSA, the DHS, the CIA and the FBI. Also, with the proof of concept recently on Amazon (botnet), the "cloud" is a hacker's wet dream. Here in the US where internet speeds vary dramatically depending on where you are and upload speeds are mostly dismal, accessibility is a real issue. Couple that with the loss of Net Neutrality and the user/business will pay a premium for faster speeds and so will the content provider. ISP's following, Wall Street's dictum, are making a play for absolute control of the internet while monetizing everything they can. Then of course, there is reliability. True mobility is not having to be connected to the internet 24/7 to get the job done or even entertain yourself, a higher end laptop will do just fine.

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The Register Comments Guidelines

BubbaGump

I resent being censored when I object to specifics of the Gay agenda or Gay marriage. Gays are allowed to marginalize and even be derogatory to heteros, but any perceived opposition to gay rights is quickly rejected by the moderators.

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FCC boss says he'll SHAME broadband firms for fibbing on speeds

BubbaGump

Very seldom do we get the advertised speeds from the US cable companies. They have more excuses than I care to list. The US has the poorest performance and yet the highest prices for internet access, and now with net neutrality all but gone, the matter is going to get worse. The providers are careful to state "up to xMps" to cover their behinds. The incremental costs of higher speed access jumps up in price considerably. Now these parasites want to charge providers for fast lanes too. The providers will have to pass on the cost to the consumers who are already paying higher prices for faster speeds. It's a double whammy.

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Windows XP fixes flaws for free if you turn PCs into CASH REGISTERS

BubbaGump

Re: And so the countdown begins

I agree. Smart Phones are virtually ubiquitous. I encounter very few, and far in between, people using tablets. Most of those have a tablet as an accessory, not a replacement. There is NO tablet currently or in the foreseeable future that can come close to competing with my high-end laptop. At work, the PC and Workstation will continue to dominate. There are different markets out there and one size fits all will not be attainable. For people, like myself, who are not screen zombies, have no need to be connected 24/7 nor have a higher end computing device with them everywhere they go. The hype needs to stop and the individual markets addressed.

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eBay slammed for daft post-hack password swap advice

BubbaGump

Typical American Business. Incur a major problem, hide it as long as possible, start thinking about plausible deniability and damage control, get caught or are forced to come out of hiding, down play the issue, indicate that you have been reborn from the experience and are now there to help. Crying is a nice touch. If all else fails, someone then needs to resign. Why did eBay wait so long to inform its users? Look at what Target did at Xmas. That was certainly a dodge for business purposes. Look at the massive recalls from GM and Toyota for issues they had long known to exist. Sometimes I wonder what would happen if companies simply stepped up to the plate and did the right thing, in a timely manner, if it would not greatly reduce the collateral damage and in the long run improve their business.

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