* Posts by J. Cook

857 posts • joined 16 Jul 2007

Page:

All good, leave it with you...? Chap is roped into tech support role for clueless customer

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Went for a coffee - stayed two weeks

Ah, Netware. ABENDS were that product's BSOD. (black screen of death, in this case)

Unlike Microsoft, the server was usually kind enough to tell you the NLM it occurred in and an error code for you to raise hell with the vendor if needs warranted.

Apple bestows first hardware upgrades in years upon neglected iPad Mini and Air lines

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Issues

that 3rd party player would be VLC, and once the iFruit is connected to a computer, one can drag n drop the files in through iTunes using the "files" functionality.

'least, that's how I put my (legally ripped and compressed) movies on mine...

Bloke thrown in the cooler for eight years after 3D-printing gun to dodge weapon ban

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Because

There's a handful of data centers in Arizona, strangely enough. But then, there's also a significant amount of manufacturing for the military, and the military itself has training areas.

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: @Redpawn ... Gun show

People collect them for the novelty, because some of them are antiques, rare, or have an interesting history behind them. Same as just about everything else, really. The laws are still enforced at these shows, I assure you. (at least the reputable shows strictly enforce the rules, at least...)

The last private sale I was involved with, the seller wanted to see my driver's license and (because I had one at the time) concealed carry permit. The firearms I've bought from a store all had federal background checks done via the usual forms and 15 minutes of waiting for the fed's systems to spit out an answer.

Unless you are a crook and/or 'know a guy', getting a firearm legally without a paper trail is slightly harder than people think.

Techie in need of a doorstop picks up 'chunk of metal' – only to find out it's rather pricey

J. Cook Silver badge

There was the one time back in 2001 when I took a line card from work with me home so I could take it with on a late-night flight to somewhere to swap it into a switch where one had failed. The line card was worth more than the house.

Crash, bang, wallop: What a power-down. But what hit the kill switch?

J. Cook Silver badge

Two words: Molly Guard

It's been around for... a while.

Use an 8-char Windows NTLM password? Don't. Every single one can be cracked in under 2.5hrs

J. Cook Silver badge
WTF?

Re: Maximum Password length

Worse yet, some of those sites limit the password to under 8 characters. It's almost like they are using an old miniframe* with a web front-end slapped on it or something... at least it allows for complexity, which at gives some modicum of difficulty in this day and age.

I can understand why- processor time used to be expensive, and crypto is processor intensive. That was before Moore's law and parallel processing kicked in proper-like and made CPU cycles cheap. (remembers running L0phtcrack on a machine's NTLM database overnight back in the early 2000's to extract the admin password on a win2K server when the original admin password was lost/misplaced. it got everything except the contact person's password, which required it to brute-force attack.)

* iSeries, I'm glaring at YOU.

J. Cook Silver badge
Go

Re: The Usual Response...

That backup strategy is 'multiple copies on multiple media'.

Especially if you insist on keeping the master copy on a thumb drive. Ask me how I know....

Ever used VFEmail? No? Well, chances are you never will now: Hackers wipe servers, backups in 'catastrophic' attack

J. Cook Silver badge
Go

Re: Backups?

Good points about tape but you missed the important one: Test your backups. Having a tape is no good if you can't restore it after your system has been hacked/burnt/stolen/confiscated/mislaid. Also no good if the tapes are worn out because you cycle around the same five daily backup tapes for 5 years.

THIS TIMES INFINITY AND BEYOND!!!!

We have both a near-time replication of critical apps to DR, daily/weekly disk to disk backups, and monthly copy to tape, and limit the number of write cycles on the tape. Commvault is smart enough to flag a tape as bad if it gets too many errors on it, and it will also deprecate a tape and refuse to write to it after a certain number of cycles. (your backup application may or may not operate in a similar manner.)

J. Cook Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Backups?

Commvault will cheerfully do a live VM image and backup, both full backup and incremental. If the underlying storage supports it, they have a feature called "Intellisnap" that leverages the storage's snapshot feature to take the image, although it's slightly more convoluted.

(I don't work for commvault, but I do use their product at my company.)

As for size: yeah, disk to disk, then secondary copy (aux. copy in commvault's parlance) to tape.

Opportunity's mission is over, but InSight almost ready for a driller thriller below Martian surface

J. Cook Silver badge
Coat

... That sounds like a book title by two time Hugo-Nominated author Chuck Tingle.

Mines the one with an impact driver in the pocket.

Granddaddy of the DIY repair generation John Haynes has loosened his last nut

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: RIP

I have a Haynes manual for the last two vehicles I've owned, and a couple for ones I don't. (I ended up having to wrench on them for one reason or other.)

The other US contemporary is the Chilton book, which is a gargantuan tome of information that is only needed if you are trying to completely re-build the car from the frame up, using parts found on eBay, the local auto parts store, junkyards, and the occasional visit to the stealership dealer.

For the large part, they are a useful reference; my truck's skid plate, for example, isn't held into the frame by two different sets of bolts, which the haynes book says otherwise. *shrugs* they at least make life a little easier.

Wells Fargo? Well fscked at the moment: Data center up in smoke, bank website, app down

J. Cook Silver badge
Pirate

Re: The BOFH Strikes Again

You also don't want to use a ten pound extinguisher to put out a very minor fire in a tiny closet. Ask me how I know... *coughs*

Hold horror stories: Chief, we've got a f*cking idiot on line 1. Oh, you heard all that

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Help desk

One of our system admins has dealt with the vendor of one of the apps he administers so often that when he calls for support, the L1 techs all know his voice and pretty much pipe him directly to whomever is taking level 3 escalations that day, because they already know he's tried everything they would run him through. A rare case of an intelligent support desk on the vendor side. (to be fair, most of those issues are a case of "we've sent that over to the developers to figure out just WTF happened and HTF to fix it.")

Defaulting to legacy Internet Explorer just to keep that one, weird app working? Knock it off

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Why not

There's a Chrome extension (ietab) which does essentially that, but inside a chrome tab.

Reliable system was so reliable, no one noticed its licence had expired... until it was too late

J. Cook Silver badge
Boffin

Not really a license story, but...

... that time when I saved the company's bacon virtualizing a very old, 'we need to keep it running until we can get the last two apps off it' database server that used to a two node cluster with a shared 'smart' storage array between them. It was running SQL 2003 on server 2K3. The hardware was out of warranty and support, and in examining the storage array I found some very alarming risks- the fool who built the cluster used a single disk for both the quorum and DTC drives instead of mirrored pairs, which meant that the entire cluster was a single drive failure away from total failure. Once I pointed this out to management (and after one of the two nodes failed), I got the green light to virtualize the remaining node in the cluster. It took three tries to P2V the machine. The first attempt failed courtesy of a disk failure on one of the raid arrays, the second attempt worked but produced a non-viable machine that we ran out of time on the change window trying to correct. Third time was the charm, thankfully.

I left the physical hardware running but disconnected in the event we needed to pull something from it post- change, which lasted exactly a week until the failure I had warned them about occurred (quorum drive failed, taking out the cluster).

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Soon never seems soon enough

I'm waiting for someone to figure out how to virtualize an AS/400 (aka iSeries) on VMware/Xen/Hyper-V, although that'll never happen, because IBM is goofy that way.

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: I generate the licenses..

I ran into that recently with one of our 'small' apps- We are looking to migrate the app to a new VM running a newer OS AND upgrade the software in one go. The publisher recently changed how they issue license keys (which are tied to the support contract)- When I asked for a new key, both the sales rep and the support rep said 'oh, we don't do that anymore, as long as your contract is paid up you'll be fine.'

Then I told them what version of their software we are on, and what my plans were, and they magically decided to issue us a current, valid key, along with some useful instructions on performing the migration.

Some people.

Techies tinker with toilet-topper to turn it into ticker-tracker

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Sounds like....

Steven "I'm so sorry" R

Suuuuuuure you are... :)

Furious Apple revokes Facebook's enty app cert after Zuck's crew abused it to slurp private data

J. Cook Silver badge
Flame

Re: I'll help Facebook do better!

... but then you can't reuse the hardware.

Personally, I'd isolate just their data centers that are exclusively used by facebook, and call in the coordinates to the OADS platform for a 'hot' delivery...

Trying to log into Office 365 right now? It's a coin flip, says Microsoft: Service goes TITSUP as Azure portal wobbles

J. Cook Silver badge
Joke

Re: I must be in a time warp

He might have taken a jump to the left... then a step to the right.

I helped catch Silk Road boss Ross Ulbricht: Undercover agent tells all

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Great Read

Shell companies within shell companies. large business have used that tactic for ages to shuffle money around to evade taxes and the like.

My chemical romance drowns tomorrow's money, warns TSMC: Chip maker's yields rocked by bad batch

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Duff batch spotted

Oh, the thermal issue with a rather *lot* of drives using a cirrus logic controller? bitten by that one, managed to resurrect one drive long enough to get the data off it; the other wasn't as lucky.

Fight, fight, fight. Gloves are off again between Nutanix and VMware

J. Cook Silver badge
Pint

I'll be over here on the sidelines, eatin popcorn and making sarcastic comments about the silliness of this entire spat.

You're an admin! You're an admin! You're all admins, thanks to this Microsoft Exchange zero-day and exploit

J. Cook Silver badge
Coat

Re: Possible quick fix

Or.... (dare I say it? DARE! DARE!)

Groupwise.

*sprints to the armored bunker*

Oh snap: AWS has only gone and brought out its own Backup

J. Cook Silver badge

Snapshots...

I'm assuming (that horrible, horrible word) that they are similar to 'block level' snapshots, similar to what other virtualization, backup, and storage vendors use. (VMware uses change block tracking and delta disks, Nimble and (IIRC) Veeam use change block tracking as well. If I recall how SQL server snapshots work correctly , it writes the old data that got changed to a seperate database file when a row is updated or added to a table.

I've not actually looked at AWS for anything, it's something of an anathema here at [RedactedCo]. Azure, if anything would probably leverage whatever methodology Hyper-V uses for snapshotting it's VMs, although I could be waaaaay off.

I find it ironic that they are charging for restores.

Microsoft sends a raft of Windows 10 patches out into the Windows Update ocean

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Jet

DHCP uses the ESE, just like AD, Exchange, and other 'small' services where the admin is not supposed to fiddle with the database directly, but through the tools MS provides.

J. Cook Silver badge

Access is ok for... simple things that aren't expected to get a lot of use ever. It's a terrible way to learn RDBS design, though- start directly with a SQL of some form (MySQL, Orkable, SQL Swerver Express, PostGreSQL, etc.). You'll be happier in the long run.

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: MDBs? Really?

nope- There was a small business I went to once in 2002; the 'server' they were using was a windows 3.11 for workgroup machine acting as a file server and I think a database server for some in-house app they had build on dBase or FoxPro for windows.

(After I did what I could there, which was also advising that customer to upgrade to something that's at least year 2000 compliant, I let the bosses know that I didn't want to go back there.)

That is hell.

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Jet

Been there, done that. (The dreaded "USN Rollback" message in the event log, along with the afflicted domain controller absolutely *refusing* to authenticate anyone not logging locally.)

ESE isn't all that bad, considering it's roots. the heaviest use I've seen is down in the very core of Exchange; there's an ESE instance for each mailbox database a mailbox server has, and anyone who's dealt with a busy exchange server knows it gets pounded on hard by it's users.

What a cheep shot: Bird sorry after legal eagles fire DMCA takedown at scooter unlock blog

J. Cook Silver badge
Boffin

Boing Boing's forum has a thread for this latest missive; as one might expect, it's full of the more flighty people, punning around.

https://bbs.boingboing.net/t/bird-scooter-tried-to-censor-my-boing-boing-post-with-a-legal-threat-thats-so-stupid-its-a-whole-new-kind-of-wrong/

Happy new year, readers. Yes, we have threaded comments, an image-lite mode, and more...

J. Cook Silver badge

The other thing that got broken some time ago appears to be a browsing cache glitch of some sort- replies (at least for me on multiple machines and multiple browsers) don't appear after submitting unless I reload the page; then they pop in.

J. Cook Silver badge
Coat

Re: How do the vultures find time to make these changes

Kinky!

Upvoting / downvoting bug

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Looks like it might be licked?

Testing the 'replies don't appear unless I reload the entire page' quirk; Since [RedactedCo]'s internet access uses a MitM security appliance, I thought that might be the reason for the quirk....

Edit: still broken- tested with the three major browsers on win7 x64 bit (Firefox64.0, Chrome 71.0.3578.98, IE 11.0.101 )

(the two replies below were from my testing, not trolls. :D)

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Looks like it might be licked?

I should probably report this, but it might be my organization's nanny filter messing around as well, which is why I'm only now mentioning it. Comments (and replies) don't appear for me after posting unless I reload the entire page.

I'll give it a whirl when I get home and on a non-filtered connection and see if that might be it. :)

J. Cook Silver badge
Go

Looks like it might be licked?

I was able to upvote both posts here, downvote one and then re-up vote it.

Looks like someone's been hard at work on how replies / threading looks as well- I rather like it.

Microsoft's 2018, part 2: Azure data centres heat up and Windows 10? It burns! It burns!

J. Cook Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: All that elderly code is one reason for the current woes of the OS (?)

A rare upvote from me as well- Having been slow roasted over lack of QA on tiny things, releasing an OS update with little QA is about as close to an unforgivable sin as possible, especially one that trashes user data...

GDPR: Four letters that put fear into firms' hearts in 2018

J. Cook Silver badge
Go

Enjoy your upvote from me for making me giggle at the $20 words. :D

It's a Christmas miracle: Logitech backs down from Harmony home hub API armageddon

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: woot!

That's not likely to happen, sadly.

Techie basks in praise for restoring workforce email (by stopping his scripting sh!tshow)

J. Cook Silver badge
Coat

This is the loop that never ends;

it goes on and on, my friends...

Some coder started running it, having forgetting to fuzz,

and now it will continue, simply because...

This is the loop that never ends;

it goes on and on, my friends...

Some coder started running it, having forgetting to fuzz,

and now it will continue, simply because...

[loops ad nauseum]

Silicon Valley CEO thrown in the cooler for three years, ordered to pay back $1.5m for bullsh*tting investors

J. Cook Silver badge

Just gonna quote Mr. Rogers here...

Know when to hold em,

Know when to fold em.

Know when to walk away,

Know when to run.

This one forgot when to walk away, obviously.

Error pop-up? Don't worry, let's just get this migration done... BTW it's my day off tomorrow

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Along the same vein ...

Yep. I've pulled that line at least once in my career. it's a dick move for sure, but being let go is kind of one to begin with.

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Trial version of Windows

The way I understand it, you are not supposed to be running a production environment on an evaluation license. However, real life frequently doesn't work like that. :)

SQL server licensing, however, lets one swap from express to standard to enterprise by re-running setup and performing an edition upgrade, which basically flips some bits around and kicks the database engine to activate the new features.

Ding dong merrily on high. In Berkeley, the bots are singeing: Self-driving college cooler droid goes up in flames

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: R2-D2 it is not!

We found the one with the bad motivator, at least....

Time for a cracker joke: What's got one ball and buttons in the wrong place?

J. Cook Silver badge
Coat

Re: Not IT related, but still funny.

"... and that is how I met your mother" /rimshot

J. Cook Silver badge
Boffin

Re: You can also get...

I have an ancient dell lattitude E6320 sitting in my 'scratch monkey' bin with one of these; the eSATA port was for an external drive bay; the USB connector was for normal USB things. (I want to say that the drive bay could let you swap the normally installed optical drive for a floppy drive, but I don't have the floppy drive that fits that specific dock.)

US bitcoin bomb threat ransom scam looks like a hoax say FBI, cops

J. Cook Silver badge

Re: Terrorists Also Need Funding...

Will the feds want to declare it terrorism? Oh, hell yes. That way they get to use special terrorism laws to get special snooping rules and tools and nail them to the wall stiffer punishments.

And they can engage other resources to get the exact location of the terrorist, and make a personal visit to insure they don't do it again...

Godmother of word processing Evelyn Berezin dies at 93

J. Cook Silver badge
Boffin

"Berezin didn't invent the concept of word processing; or the term 'word processing'; or the first actual word processing machine. IBM did all those things. She did, however, invent the first standalone word-processing machine driven by electronic components. It was an important evolution that lowered the cost of word processing and made it more reliable," Drum wrote.

Ok, then, the first practical and accessible to the masses word processor.

Still, innovation is innovation, and I'll lift a glass up to her tonight. Hail!

Page:

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2019