* Posts by J. Cook

471 posts • joined 16 Jul 2007

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Equifax mega-breach: Security bod flags header config conflict

J. Cook
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Devil

Oh, it gets better! Apparently a site equifax set up for argentina was coded by either an 8 year old, or someone who has no business coding web pages:

https://krebsonsecurity.com/2017/09/ayuda-help-equifax-has-my-data/

"It took almost no time for them to discover that an online portal designed to let Equifax employees in Argentina manage credit report disputes from consumers in that country was wide open, protected by perhaps the most easy-to-guess password combination ever... "

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HP users moaning over 10-minute login lag during 'Win 10 update'

J. Cook
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Re: Yay HP software

last place I worked for had that mentality. "Oh, we need a computer for [x]. I'll run over to the local office supply store / best buy / warehouse club and pick up something 'appropriate'."

which is why we had a mix of HP pavilions, Dell optiplexes (those were the new ones!), eMachines, and the odd Gateway 2000 here and there. Made for fun times getting parts for them when they broke, and dealing with complaints about performance- windows 2000 ran fine on them. Windows xp... not so much, unless you turned all the shiny off and killed some of the more egregious services after doing a format and fresh OS load from official MS media.

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Apple's adoption of Qi signals the end of the wireless charging wars

J. Cook
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Boffin

Re: for once...

"Your example - mass adoption of Lightning - was never going to happen because it is proprietary to Apple. However, many aspects of it were adopted in USB Type C."

Same with the MagSafe power connectors- I would have *loved* to see non-apple laptops use those, but they are/were an Apple proprietary design that they refused to license out. (Certainly a friend of mine would have loved to see them, as he did a roaring trade replacing broken power jacks on laptops- he is something like one of three guys in the state I'm in that's willing to do it.)

With lightning cables, you have to pay apple a license fee to make them, follow their design spec, and quite possibly buy the funny little chip from them or their authorized supplier.

Apple is similar to Microsoft and Cisco in the aspect of they will take an otherwise vanilla industry standard, and 'enhance' it with their own proprietary extensions.

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Your boss asks you to run the 'cloud project': Ever-changing wish lists, packs of 'ideas'... and 1 deadline

J. Cook
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Re: Management advice

This plus eleventy BAZILLION.

Loyalty, very much like respect, is an earned thing, and cannot be bought or easily bribed.

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So you're already in the cloud but need to come back down to Earth

J. Cook
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Coat

As Yogi Berra once said, it's like deja vu all over again.

I rather like "deja poo" as an alternate term- it's the feeling we've done this crap all over again. /rimshot

Mines the brown one.

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It's official: Users navigate flat UI designs 22 per cent slower

J. Cook
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Re: A serious question.

<cite>Oh, right! You mean that "Strictly equivalent" ≣ icon. Yeah. Hate those. And "Cogs".</cite>

The gear icon I can at least grok as meaning 'settings' or some such. As a menu? no. My main hatred for the hamburger menu is that it's not a universal thing- on some UIs, it opens a context menu, on others it opens what used to be a sidebar menu (or left hand column of items), and yet on others it's something completely different.

Chrome, for example, doesn't even have a 'normal' hamburger button, but three dots stacked in a vertical line- that's the menu for you.

And don't get me started with Office 2013 and 2016, or I'll be here all night.

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J. Cook
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Joke

Re: Personally

And in Arizona, USA, it's Cold until the hot water gets there and HOLY MONKEY BALLS HOT HOT HOT HOT AHHH MY HANDS until it finally cools down to cold after ten minutes. (at least in most of the houses I've been in- apparently they never heard of putting insulation on the pipes to keep things hot or cold.)

At least in the summer. In the winter, it's actually normal.

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SanDisk's little microSD card sucks up 400GB

J. Cook
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Re: I was thinking of madder things

I'm not sure how good that would be, cost wise:

10x $249 for 4000 GB raw storage = $2490

+ $~45 for the adapter board, plus shipping = $2535

Or you could buy a pair of 2 TB Crucial MX300 SSDs for half that and raid 0 them either using an appropriate sata controller or software raid0, and still have money left over for a proper data backup device.

Performance wise, you'd probably hit the 3 Gbps ceiling that the sata spec that board uses before you'd run out of bandwidth on the cards for read speed.

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FTC ready to give back tech support scamming money to the bilked

J. Cook
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Most likely because it's because the con artists running it have spent most of the money, and the 'fine' is all that the FTC can squeeze out of them. Blood from a stone and all that.

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Bombastic boss gave insane instructions to sensible sysadmin, with client on speakerphone

J. Cook
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Boffin

Re: PST

*falls out of chair laughing*

Outlook (and exchange, and most other mail programs) treat mail as data, because storing *thousands upon thousands* of what is ultimately tiny documents (1 per email message!) would have brought most file systems to their knees in short order, regardless of how janky (FAT12!!) or robust (ZFS!) they are.

Ordinarily, I'm in total and complete agreement. I keep reminding my users that Exchange/Outlook Is Not A File Storage System. And yet, I have users with OST files over 5 GB, and PST files approaching the *30 GB* mark, because they can't be arsed to delete ANYTHING EVER.

That having also been said, the ESE database engine that Exchange uses is pretty damned robust and puts up with most of the abuse I (and my users) put it through.

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Western Digital continues buying spree by snapping up Tegile

J. Cook
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Re: Mainstream players

Well, HPE bought 3Par quite some time ago and much more recently Nimble. They had their own branded stuff that was partly provided by Hitachi (the XP product line) and apparently either re-sold or bought Left-hand at some point in the past as well.

I'd call them a mainstream player, at least.

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Smart robots prove stupidly easy to hack for spying and murder

J. Cook
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Devil

Another point of view?

Perhaps the stuff was originally designed and written pre-internet, and nearly pre-network.

And the reason why the holes were never patched? backwards compatability.

Just saying...

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Disbanding your security team may not be an entirely dumb idea

J. Cook
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Pirate

Re: Sounds like another management idea - "They are all just IT guys, right?"

More or less spot on.

System Admins (Storage, server, mail, etc.) have "Data Integrity, Availability, Confidentiality" as their three. At least the good ones do. (At least I *hope* I'm a good one!)

Then again, I wear a lot of hats in my current position. Not surprisingly, someone snuck 'infosec' onto my hat rack while I wasn't looking.

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Linux-loving lecturer 'lost' email, was actually confused by Outlook

J. Cook
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Re: been there - seen that - never been shouted at to that extent (yet)

My last boss blew through his 2 GB quota in *THREE MONTHS*. (everyone in the company had something like a single gig for mail storage, which worked out pretty well as long as you got used to the concept of deleting the chaff and useless crap.)

Then he threw a compleat and utter tantrum when I told him that he needed to maybe clear stuff out.

glad he's gone.

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GoDaddy gives white supremacist site its marching orders after Charlottesville slur

J. Cook
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Re: Google has also given them the boot!

The 'defacto' standard for DNS propgation is 48 hours. At least that's what I tell management around %employer%.

Secondly, all the people baying about free speech: go look at popehat's article regarding it, and the obigatory XKCD post (in one reply for your reading pleasure, even.)

https://xkcd.com/1357/

https://www.popehat.com/2016/06/11/hello-youve-been-referred-here-because-youre-wrong-about-the-first-amendment/

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Chap behind Godwin's law suspends his own rule for Charlottesville fascists: 'By all means, compare them to Nazis'

J. Cook
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Mushroom

Re: Everything I don't like is a Nazi

To add to it: (and pardon my swearing on this here forum post)

THEY ARE MARCHING LIKE FUCKING NAZIS. THEY ARE TALKING LIKE FUCKING NAZIS. THEY ARE FUCKING **BEHAVING** LIKE FUCKING NAZIS.

Looks like a duck, talks like a duck, acts like a duck, etc.

Apparently, large portions of the country I live in have forgotten their history. The trick is 'is the world willing to teach it to us again', or is this how humanity ends?

*drops mic*

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If Anonymous 'pwnd' the Daily Stormer, they did a spectacularly awful job

J. Cook
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Flame

Re: Genetics

At least one of the anti-semitic idiots found out that he was jewish, if my skim of the weekend's news was right.

(yes, it's not speled rite. no, i'm not correcting it.)

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New Amiga to go on sale in late 2017

J. Cook
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Not necessarily a plague...

There was the debacle about ten years ago where one of the big manufacturers of electrolytic caps in the far east made and shipped a couple millions bad caps. I remember Dell having to eat rather a lot of boards on the Optiplex GX280 lines because of it.

Plus, in the environment where I live (Hell, AZ, USA) we have what is best described as 'piss poor' power. Pretty much anything more then 6 years old out here that's been in daily use is going to need new caps, unless you've put a sacrificial power conditioner or UPS on it.

I should dig up the crate that has my two A500's and see if they still even power up; Although I'll have to go digging for the workbench disks...

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Big question of the day: Is it time to lock down .localhost?

J. Cook
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Re: Is localhost even needed?

I have a similar problem with the company AD being named [company].local

means a host of spiffy email related stuff just doesn't work. Oh, and our madman of a consultant about threw a fit when I told him 'no, I'm not making people sign on with their UPNs and adding [company].com to AD as alternatives.' One world changing thing at a time, folks.

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Microsoft dumps mobility from its Vision

J. Cook
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Joke

Well, that's not nice...

Nutella is a respected spread and is damned tasty to boot.

*shows self the door*

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Four techies flummoxed for hours by flickering 'E' on monitor

J. Cook
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Pint

Re: @ Chris 125

... Holy cow the armory is still around?!?!?!?!? I wonder who's running it now, seeing as the owner passed on some time ago. *raises a glass in remembrance*

... aaaaand apparently, my account is still there. I'll be hanged if I know the password for it, though.

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Symantec offloads its certs and web security biz to DigiCert

J. Cook
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The real question here is...

... will customers of DigiCert have a problem with this? Some of us don't exactly have a good relationship with Symantec...

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It took DEF CON hackers minutes to pwn these US voting machines

J. Cook
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Joke

Re: The security of voting machines

I'm still looking for that ancient tome by Mac O'Velly... :)

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Pre-order your early-bird pre-sale product today! (Oh did we mention the shipping date has slipped AGAIN?)

J. Cook
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Pint

... that papersoil kickstarter has to be a joke, right?

(This is where I'd normally say "no one can be that stupid?" but sadly, I've run into people that *are*.

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Sysadmin jeered in staff cafeteria as he climbed ladder to fix PC

J. Cook
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Re: Windows for Worgroups

For while anyway, until IBM figured out how to make it work over UTP/STP. Then while you still had the One Ring logically, the physical layer was your standard ethernet star topology going back to the hub.

Also, in the US at least, THinnet was 50 Ohm, whereas our TV cables were 75ohm. it'd work, but not very well.

(I am thankfully not old enough to have played with Thicknet or Type 1.)

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J. Cook
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I'm lazy; that's what building blueprints are for. (which is why you like being somewhat friendly with the facilities people (not facilities management, but the ones who actually do the work, although both helps))

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BOFH: Oh go on. Strap me to your Hell Desk, PFY

J. Cook
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Re: That's funny

@Steve Kerr, Ikea adjustable desk...

I was wondering how well those worked; those were cheaper than anything else I've see as far as free-standing adjustable desks go.

I managed to get work to spring for a Varidesk for my cubicle. Dr.'s orders.

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User filed fake trouble tickets to take helpful sysadmin to lunches

J. Cook
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A number of jobs ago, I used to do on-site service for small companies. One place I went to was a furniture store, and we did their POS systems. I was called out to fix one of them, and they hit me with the old standby of 'while you are here, can you fix this other one?" I figured, what the hell, I'm getting paid anyway, and it was on covered equipment, so I poke at it, and got it working in a couple minutes.

Now, we were not allowed to accept tips, but this time, I was forced to accept it as a good will thing. $20 for plugging a cable into the correct port and fixing a POS that was down for some time prior to that? I'm good!

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J. Cook
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Re: Why so much anger?

Some times, it is.

My very first job was on a call center for a large shipping company supporting their in-house written apps that they provided their customers for creating shipping labels and whatnot.

One of the calls I got was from a very upset and annoyed shipping manager, who proceed to rant and rave at me for about 20 minutes or so. The poor guy wasn't made at us, or the software, but at one of the other employees of said shipping company, and I guess he just needed someone to yell at. I was polite, professional, and let him de-spool, taking notes the entire time. I'm not sure if I actually did anything, but I wrote it all up and sent it up my chain of command, which was about the only thing I could do. (I made the caller aware of this, obviously.) I did get an apology from him for his ranting, and I went on my merry way; Apparently, I have a sympathetic ear or something.

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Ten new tech terms I learnt this summer: Do you know them all?

J. Cook
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Pint

Re: HDTV

Indeed. I had a 21" Trinitron CRT that maxed out at 1600x1200, and that was back in 2000. BLoody thing weighed a ton and a half, too.

Granted, the 24" screen I'm seeing this on is an actual native 1920x1080 panel, but still... I don't miss the 100+ pound desk-bending firebottle, but I do miss the massive amounts of screen real estate on a single monitor. (which is why I have two monitors hooked to the system I'm using.)

Beer, because I'll be drinking on in a couple hours.

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Why can't you install Windows 10 Creators Update on your old Atom netbook? Because Intel stopped loving you

J. Cook
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Coat

Re: I have a system with one of these CPU's

"is there an icon for BAD joke alert, CORNY joke alert, etc. ?"

If you can tell there's corn in it, then you need to chew some more.

*shows self out*

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The curious case of a Tesla smash, Autopilot blamed, and the driver's next-day U-turn

J. Cook
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Re: "The occupants wear seatbelts and airbags fly out from all around, "

@werdsmith: not quite. SRS airbags (the SRS stands for "Supplemental Restraint System") are intended to work in conjunction with seatbelts. There are multiple types of airbags: my 2011 Tundra, for example, has the 'standard' ones that deploy from the steering wheel and dashboard, but also two different side-impact airbags (a 'curtain' style and one that deploys for mid-torso protection), and a knee airbag.

I'm not certain what the standards are in the UK and the EU, but the US has a federal standard (FMVSS208) that dictate what the minimum requirements are for new vehicles.

The tracked automatic seatbelts that were popular in the 90's are no longer generally used- they tend to be too difficult to maintain as they age.

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Want to kill your IT security team? Put the top hacker in charge

J. Cook
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Thumb Up

Re: Speaking as a manager...

Jesus Horatio Christ on a bicycle, THIS.

I have deep mental scars from the last manager we had here- I don't have proper words to articulate how bad he was in this character set. (or language, for that matter. The words I *do* have would awaken the Old Ones, and that's just bad news for everyone.)

I consider myself a manager of machines, not people. (while my official job title is 'network administrator', in reality it's more like 'Systems engineer/Exchange engineer/AD engineer/Storage engineer'. Yeah, lotta hats there.) I've worked under a person who has a personality very similar to mine, and he wasn't that good of a manager, TBH.

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User left unable to type passwords after 'tropical island stress therapy'

J. Cook
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Re: @Alistair -- Da job Bag

I dunno- one with metal bits jammed into the head and with ketchup stains* on it will give people a notion to not be stupid, especially when waving it around in slightly heated conversations...

* that's how one gets that effect, anyway...

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J. Cook
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Re: Grooming habits... or lack thereof...

I used to work for a company that did business to business PC service, which also meant that we did third-party warranty calls- Those 'extended service plan' things you buy at the large retailers which are usually useless. We got one machine in that was so heavily coated in nicotine that it was a total loss- Apparently, the home user had their ashtray parked in front of the intake to the machine, and they had a two-carton per day habit. (or it was in a house full of carton/day smokers)

The warranty people refused to honor it, claiming abuse, and the customer wasn't happy with them. The poor bench tech had to scrub his bench down with bleach and the shop stank smelled like an ashtray for a week after the thing left.

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J. Cook
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Re: At Wolfetone, your MILTB...

My dear mother does something very similar. (including written notes on how to power on the mac.)

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Hey, remember that monkey selfie copyright drama a few years ago? Get this – It's just hit the US appeals courts

J. Cook
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Re: Devil's Advocate

Best expansion of the acronym EVAR.

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Ker-ching! NotPetya hackers cash out, demand 100 BTC for master decrypt key

J. Cook
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Re: This was just a test , , ,

Uh, not quite that bad. Maybe. Great Depression level? Most certainly.

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What does an enterprise cloud look like?

J. Cook
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Go

+ MANY on the 'automated backup' solution.

*goes back to the rock face to continue fighting with current backup 'solution' which is stupidly complicated for the simple act of getting backups of a friggen file server. *

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How HCI simplifies the data center

J. Cook
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Coat

Re: At first I thought it was "HCl", not "HCI"

That reminds me of a little ditty:

Charle was a chemist,

But he is no more.

He drank what he thought was H2O

but was H2SO4.

Mine's the lab coat with the 'bad chemistry puns' book in the pocket.

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Microsoft recommends you ignore Microsoft-recommended update

J. Cook
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That is almost as funny as the time Installing IE 9 utter broke the management console for Exchange 2007 and 2010. And by broke meaning 'you can open it, but you get an error message trying to close it' which meant that you had to whip open task manager and kill the underlying MMC process that it was running. Bunches of enjoyment from that technet community thread.

Oh wait, that's not funny at all.

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Disney mulls Mickey Mouse magic material to thwart pirates' 3D scans

J. Cook
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Re: @ Not also known as SC Solid DRM

"Repo! The Genetic Opera"

I saw bits of that one night- it was.... bizarre, especially not seeing the opening parts of it and having no clue what was going on until I google'd it.

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Sorry to burst your bubble, but Microsoft's 'Ms Pac-Man beating AI' is more Automatic Idiot

J. Cook
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Boffin

Re: So much wrong with this.

Correct! It was, in fact, the atari VCS (aka 2600) system and not the arcade version.

If it was the arcade version, there'd be at least one boffin wanting to know how the difficulty switches were set on the unit.

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Crouching cyber, Hidden Cobra: Crack North Korean hack team ready to strike, says US-CERT

J. Cook
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Pint

Re: Maybe this is silly, but here goes...

I've blocked countries from my web servers for less. It's a valid, if draconian, tactic.

It's possible, it's not _easy_.

It'd require a lot of concerted effort from *every* ISP that has network links that cross country borders.

You'd have an easier time herding cats whilst nailing jelly to a tree and juggling a pair of running chainsaws all at once. :)

Beer, because I'm heading out the door to get one.

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HPE hatches HPE Next – a radical overhaul plan so it won't be HPE Last

J. Cook
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Flame

I hit the trifecta on the Buzzword bingo from just El Reg's distillation of her speech alone.

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Apple gives world ... umm ... not much new actually

J. Cook
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FAIL

For the peeps whining about the iMac Pro to Z2 comparison, Go price out a similarly spec'd Dell Precision 5810, which is roughly the same class, spec wise, and you can get something *close* to an apples to Apple comparison. (ponder that the Vega is pre-release, AMD announced it at the same time as Apple said they'd be using it.)

Also, 1 TB SSDs are freaking expensive still, that's a good chunk of the cost.

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The biggest British Airways IT meltdown WTF: 200 systems in the critical path?

J. Cook
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Re: > It was as though no one knew servers could multi-task !!

Pretty much this.

"You need to be the only on the box? OK!" *builds VM for app* "Here you go!"

89.9% of the time, none's the wiser, and the other 10% of the time, the vendor is basically "Oh, it's a VM. We support that too!" (It's not *quite* 100%, because there's always that ONE VENDOR who INSISTS they be the only tenant on that host/set of hosts because their code sucks that badly and they tend to be of the 'throw more hardware resources at the problem' types.)

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Trident nuke subs are hackable, thunders Wikipedia-based report

J. Cook
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XP on floppies...

Thankfully, no. It was CD-ROM only, no DVD, no USB.

XP Embedded is also different from 'normal' XP in that it's a monolithic pre-compiled image- you have to bake the drivers for your machine into the image on a developer or build system first, then you could deploy it to the device you were preparing. Windows Embedded Standard 2009 (which is the updated release of the XPe SP3) runs out in April of 2019, interestingly enough.

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Sons of IoT: Bikers hack Jeeps in auto theft spree

J. Cook
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Re: Alarms

Nope: you *have* to use the keyless entry to shut the thing up. and that was on a 2001 GM product, which we can all blame for having to pay $70+ for chip embedded keys in order to start our luxobarges.

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Ransomware realities: In your normal life, strangers don't extort you. But here you are

J. Cook
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Windows

We've been using a semi-custom GPO that blocks application execution from the usual malware sources (TEMP, appdata, etc.) that Thirdtier.net put out when cryptolocker hit mainstream (but before they started charging for it).

I've not actually tested if a ransomware can encrypt previous versions remotely; I know that at that point in time, we were using a Netapp filer for CIFS/SMB, which doesn't offer writable snapshots through the stock previous versions tab. With windows file servers? I don't know, and I'm slightly terrified to try it in anything but a completely air-gapped sandbox. Presumably, it may be a safe assumption that as long as the file server is not compromised, it should be safe? We've been focusing on preventing the stuff from executing to begin with.

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