* Posts by keithpeter

1383 posts • joined 14 Jul 2007

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US kids apparently talking like Peppa Pig... How about US lawmakers watching Doctor Who?

keithpeter
Boffin

Dr Who Theme

Quote from OA

"The theme tune is still like a sonic screwdriver to the eardrum"

Radiophonic Workshop

Delia Derbyshire

Daphne Oram

Delia was the glamorous one (with, sadly, alcohol problems) but Daphne wrote the book on electronic music.

I say all this having wielded a razor blade to 1/4 inch 15ips tape myself some half a century ago.

Cops looking for mum marauding uni campus asking students if they fancy dating her son

keithpeter
Joke

Re: Great news

"Charles Herring, chief of the university police department"

Would that be Charlie 'Red' Herring?

Defaulting to legacy Internet Explorer just to keep that one, weird app working? Knock it off

keithpeter

Re: Count me in.

Seamonkey?

Only plebs use Office 2019 over Office 365, says Microsoft's weird new ad campaign

keithpeter
Pint

Re: Price?????

"For instance, a user could create a form (say a new starter form) and easily add it to a workflow, add an approval step from a line manager and store the result in a database, with very little effort, very little technical expertise and very quickly."

Random un-audited shadow IT used to capture confidential and personally identifiable information as a feature?

Good luck everyone.

keithpeter
Coat

Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

Depends on your definition of trivial.

I find LO fine for my trivial word-processing, spread-sheeting and presentation needs. Typically course guides with 80 pages, formulas, diagrams &c associated presentations destined for import into interactive whiteboard softare. Nothing amazing.

For non-trivial stuff (in my definition) I'm using LaTeX / programmatically generated graphics anyway.

Senior slippery sex stimulator sales exec sacked for shafting .org-asmic cyber-space place, a tribunal hears

keithpeter

"Both Brooks, 58, and cofounder Susi Lennox, 73, decided to start the company when they grew tired of their jobs in the drug safety departments of various pharmaceutical companies."

I wonder how many people who work with detailed regulations and checklists all day dream of starting a small business selling something outrageous? These two actually did and seem to be fairly successful. They perhaps need to consult more widely about changes to their Internet presence however.

I helped catch Silk Road boss Ross Ulbricht: Undercover agent tells all

keithpeter
Coat

Re: Methinks

Of course, you can write in idiomatic English and use the old double conductive trick to hinder grammar.

Open sourcerers drop sick Fedora Remix to get Windows Subsystem for Linux pumping

keithpeter
Windows

Re: What's the benefit of this over native?

I think Microsoft are just going where the market is, like linux workloads on Azure.

A little part of me is just wondering if one day Windows 13++ might actually be some kind of customised kernel, a gnu userland with compatibility libraries for legacy applications. Just in terms of managing what must now be a colossal code base with a new generation of programmers turning over again into a third generation.

keithpeter
Pint

Re: Linux is moving on the desktop.

"So it's like Google Docs then?"

"Yes, let me introduce you to offline apps."

"What are those?"

@Jedipadawan

Thank you for an interesting view on the IT situation in a large and important country that we in the cold North don't always hear a lot about.

I work in education in the UK. I was wondering about how students in Indonesia keep track of their 'stuff' as they move through the educational system. Do they have a unique ID that their goog account is tied to so when they change school/college their things just follow them? Or do they have to basically start over? Or do they use a personal account? If personal account, famously the goog algos could just can it if some kind of activity triggers an action.

The UK govt is part way through rolling out a unique learner number [1] for every student above 13 years old (and eventually over 11 years old I think). At present, this is used just to allow colleges and universities access to qualification history but it strikes me that in the future, it could act as an ID for online storage.

Then no more stressed students and days spent with recovery software :-)

Icon: meant as token of gratitude, not necessarily endorsement of alcohol use.

[1] https://www.ucas.com/advisers/guides-and-resources/adviser-news/news/unique-learner-number-uln

Are you sure your disc drive has stopped rotating, or are you just ignoring the messages?

keithpeter
Windows

Re: Gah. Users.

"The help desk phone number has four digits, three of them the same digit to make it easy to remember and dial."

In my (brief, mercifully) career as a PHB, I spent a lot of time simply encouraging people to 'log a job'. That simple mantra was amazingly powerful when scaled across an organisation that employed 3 thousand people.

The Iceman cometh, his smartwatch told the cops: Hitman jailed after gizmo links him to Brit gangland slayings

keithpeter
Windows

Re: Proof once again

And perhaps wear plain, cheap, generic clothing in muted colours. And use a bike / vehicle with generic finish.

Excuse me, sir. You can't store your things there. Those 7 gigabytes are reserved for Windows 10

keithpeter
Coat

Re: Easy way to regain the 7 GB

"How much are you allocating for the swap partition?"

Thinkpad X61s with 1.5GB Ram and 60Gb ssd with 'full' drive encryption.

I allocate 1GB of swap and the rest one big linux partition and the unencrypted / partition for the kernel is something like half a gig. No issues, runs well for a laptop manufactured 11 years ago.

PS: Anyone got a linux going on one of those 32Gb ssd machines?

The Great British Curry: Put down the takeaway, you're cooking tonight

keithpeter
Pint

Re: Garam Masala Beans

@dave 93: a bit longer but feeds two hungry people

1 tbsp Vegetable masala powder (comes in a cardboard box - should have a haz-chem code - consists mostly of chilli, salt, ground cumin and ground corriander) and handful of fresh corriander from local shop washed (to get the lead off, we are on a main road) and chopped

Large onion peeled chopped

Can spinach drained, can chickpeas drained, can chopped tomatoes

Fry onion until scorched, add masala powder, add chick peas, spinach, fork it round a bit to break up the leaves, add tomatoes, bubble until reduces a bit

Serve with chopped corriander and kulchar naans from local naan shed or bought rotis. I usually have yoghurt with mint and some chutney on hand.

50 years ago: NASA blasts off the first humans to experience a lunar close encounter

keithpeter
Coat

Reading

http://andrewsmithauthor.com/AndrewSmith/MOONDUST.html

This book chimed with my own memories.

[Choppers, St Pepper &c]

keithpeter
Boffin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slosh_dynamics

There goes tomorrow morning...

Excellent. I was aware of the free surface effect on ships - which is still claiming vessels - but this takes it to a new level (groan)

keithpeter
Mushroom

Re: No LM = No "lifeboat"

"Being in the nuclear Navy, there are procedures for EVERYTHING. Usually it's for single-failure, though, so if you have a multiple failure, you basically have to use the knowledge and skills gained in drilling for the single failures and 'wing it'."

@Bombastic and all: That is very interesting. And a tiny bit unsettling.

Happy holidays all that are having them

Brexit: UK will be disconnected from EU databases after 2020

keithpeter
Coat

Re: Ah, the UK gov

"What the British want is a 'clean break'"

Thanks to David Cameron's two box vote we actually don't know that at all.

We do know that the vote was so close that it was within the sampling error of most opinion polls, and we do know that sentiment has shifted somewhat since, but not by a definitive amount.

I suspect that sentiment will continue to shift as the consequences of leaving the EU become clearer over the next few months.

Coat: off out now

Don't cross the Application Streams! Actually, maybe you can now in RHEL 8 beta

keithpeter
Coat

No registration required I think to download iso

http://ftp.redhat.com/redhat/rhel/rhel-8-beta/README

url shortening links for the binary DVD iso resolve to locations on the Red Hat CDN when using wget.

There is a public bugzilla for feedback.

Coat: mine's the one with an 8Gb USB stick in the pocket

Macs to Linux fans: Stop right there, Penguinista scum, that's not macOS. Go on, git outta here

keithpeter
Windows

Re: Oh the Irony

"Penguinista's blowing their wads (of cash) on shiny-shiny just so they can load (or not, as it seems) their 'free' hobby OS on it"

Wish my hobby was worth $3.4 x 10^10.

We (may) now know the real reason for that IBM takeover. A distraction for Red Hat to axe KDE

keithpeter
Coat

KDE on old laptop

"That being the case, you may want to give KDE a(nother) try.

The devs have been hard at work reducing the memory footprint recently, and it's surprisingly lightweight now."

@Bombastic and Updraft102

Recent KDE Plasma 5 from Alien Bob's packages for Slackware Current. On a Thinkpad X60 (core duo) with 1.5Gb ram, usable, firefox/libreoffice writer/music player. 1 Gb ram isn't happening - goes straight into swap.

Is this cuttlefish really all that cosmic? Ubuntu 18.10 arrives with extra spit, polish, 4.18 kernel

keithpeter
Mushroom

Re: fedora or die

@IanMoore33

Fedora 28 has its moments mind you, and those on fairly recent hardware. Don't chuck too many stones in that particular glasshouse...

keithpeter
Coat

Re: Modern Interface, and other stupid comments

@dajames: one of the reasons I cling to xfce. Alt-F keys (aka 'accelerator keys') are the business.

keithpeter
Pint

Re: Modern Interface, and other stupid comments

An upvote is not sufficient for the depth of this post and its rantiness quotient, so have a (virtual) pint.

I would just add that employer number 1 provides an rdp session that I can use to access their Windows Only business logic applications and employer number 2 has just adopted Office 365 (rightly or wrongly, we'll see how that pans out). So I can render unto my twin caesars what is due from the comfort of my Slackware running on a humble dual core processor.

keithpeter
Coat

Re: "the system has a more modern and 'flatter' look"

@jake: I have Slackware 14.0 full install on a Thinkpad T42 and it seems reasonably responsive to me. That is something like 2005 vintage. Might put Alien Bob's Plasma 5 on it and see what happens...

Apache OpenOffice, the Schrodinger's app: No one knows if it's dead or alive, no one really wants to look inside

keithpeter

@Dabbb: the binary oOo download from Apache Open Office seems to have its own copies of some libraries and seems to install on linuxes of various ages (Slackware 14.0 onwards to current in my case over the last few years).

keithpeter
Coat

Zen

"Time to market does not receive as much priority as quality, and we follow a sort of open source 'Zen.'"

Is Open Source Zen the kind of thing where I'll get walloped around the head with a stick by a geezer in orange robes who will then say "That's the Buddha!"?

I still use oOo under Slackware (converted from the RPMs on the Apache OpenOffice Web site). It is stable (both in the sense of not crashing and in then sense of not changing much) and runs reasonably fast and I know where the bugs are. I also have libreoffice installed and like to keep up with the new features.

Fujitsu says sayonara to UK exec heavyweights

keithpeter
Coat

Re: ICL?

"Fujitsu still make a heap of cash from VME which is being run by the last remnants of the old ICL"

@anon

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICL_VME

Interesting, thanks for reference.

Tesla's chief accounting officer drives off after just a month on the job

keithpeter
Childcatcher

Re: The end of the beginning

...I can't see Tesla remaining a large, financially viable and independent car maker by 2030.

Sell the company to a car maker then, and focus on Spacex?

Small number of technically sophisticated customers, history of extreme innovation and novel solutions in the business so more acceptance of ideas, plenty of problems to solve.

Might even get a holiday.

Could you hack your bosses without hesitation, repetition or deviation? AI says: No

keithpeter
Windows

Management by exception?

"For example, the range of contacts a user will interact with through an email system and the nature of that communication will almost always be within certain limits."

Clueless end user here

Yesterday, I had to contact two middle manager type people outside my normal silo on an urgent basis to resolve an issue for a prospective student with a very unusual profile of qualifications and support needs. Then I needed to document what was effectively a new clause in the usual process, and make sure all the people in the chain knew what I had done. Such is the responsiveness of a fairly small public sector organisation, I got that resolved fairly quickly, and my 'identity' in the organisation is a humble one.

So, yes, as mentioned towards the end of the article, it will come down to the response by IT support to an outlier event once flagged. One hopes that will be of the 'gather more information' kind rather than some kind of banhammer.

make all relocate... Linux kernel dev summit shifts to Scotland – to fit Torvald's holiday plans

keithpeter
Coat

Places

Portobello is a nice seaside town just outside Edinburgh.

Edinburgh hosts lots of museums both national and city focused. Plenty of strange things to try to explain that will engage all ages.

Mary King's Close strikes me as a good venue for any cabal meetings that may be needed (joke)

There is still a Scottish-Italian community left in Edinburgh (and Glasgow of course). Owen Logan photographed that community extensively for his Bloodlines book and exhibition. Some families run shops, including the famous Volvona and Crolla, and many family run restaurants. I was visiting Edinburgh fairly regularly in the 1980s and early 90s and can remember the old Valvona and Crolla shop at the top of the Leith Road in the city. Hams hanging from the ceiling, cheeses, wines, olive oil and opera on the record player.

The kernel wranglers could eat (and drink) very well.

Coat: mine's the one with the Iain Rankin novel in the pocket (several times we have stayed in a self-catering flat, I've bought a novel at Waverly, and I have found myself reading about the street we are staying in)

Mozilla changes Firefox policy from ‘do not track’ to ‘will not track’

keithpeter
Coat

Re: It's about time

"But... when will they FIX THE AUSTRALIS NONSENSE"

@bombastic: I just switch the menu bar on.

Also the Alt-F, Alt-B &c shortcuts just work even if the menu bar is switched off.

Now does anyone know how to get Firefox to work with the Alt-F11 shortcut in xfce?

Coat: just going now...

UK getting ready to go it alone on Galileo

keithpeter
Coat

Re: UK has the resources

"Unfortunately, the UK military doesn't plan to restrict its bombing to the UK alone"

Which raises the issue about NATO or UN approved operations and international cooperation. Bit hard with no access to the encrypted signals?

Coat: mine has a gyroscope in one pocket and an analogue integrator in the other for dead reckoning my way to Morrisons

'Oh sh..' – the moment an infosec bod realized he was tracking a cop car's movements by its leaky cellular gateway

keithpeter
Pint

Re: Why did they have to pull the terrorist card?

Brum

Well spotted

keithpeter
Windows

Re: Why did they have to pull the terrorist card?

"...if I want to publicise my cause by violent means I will just attack the police station, the address of which I can get from the 1995 phone book."

Er, actually, near me in the UK, you'd be blowing up an Aldi, a car park, some new houses, and a large hole in the ground. And more stations are closing soon apparently. We see a patrol car about once a week, and the helicopter flies over when the football is on. Haven't seen an actual police officer walking a beat for five or six years or so.

I live one mile from the centre of a city of 1 million by the way.

London's Gatwick Airport flies back to the future as screens fail

keithpeter
Facepalm

Re: Don't knock whiteboards!

A roll of 'magic whiteboard' can be handy at times when improvising. Care is needed when erasing near the edges of the pieces though...

CADs and boffins get some ThinkPad love

keithpeter
Coat

Re: The laptop of my future

@Michael Wojcik

"1250g? I'd consider that "barely noticeable""

Good for you. My lower vertebrae are becoming somewhat more sensitive to weight these days.

Coat: distributing the devices and other impedimenta around copious pockets does seem to help.

keithpeter
Coat

Re: The laptop of my future

@Greencat

Best start resistance training now! The X61s (Jan 2008) with ssd and 4 cell battery that I'm typing this on weighs 1250g according to my kitchen scales.

I'd pay quite a lot for an X60/X61 size-a-like with current technology.

ZX Spectrum reboot scandal biz gets £35k legal costs delayed

keithpeter
Coat

"If you have difficulties you can apply back to the court for an extension of time. That’s not going to be looked on with great sympathy."

Sounds like FOAD to me. I kept hearing Rumpole type accents when reading the OA.

Linux 4.18 arrives fashionably late while Zorin OS shines up its Windows

keithpeter
Coat

Re: Zorin OS

@AC: Nope, as they all have roughly equivalent functionality. Once stuff is free (as in beer and as in spirit) you can fork the base and get your own idea up and running very quickly.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Linux_Distribution_Timeline.svg

Above gives you the family tree so to speak. I'm on the Slackware trunk.

keithpeter
Coat

Re: What they are for

@Ian Joyner

So where would you locate the *BSDs and illumos based operating systems?

Coat: mine's the one with the Slackware DVD in the pocket.

Microsoft still longs to be a 'lifestyle' brand, but the cupboard looks bare

keithpeter
Coat

Re: Me neither

"If Microsoft wants to control my hardware, then it should give me a PC. If it's their hardware, then I accept their control over it."

@Pascal Monet: don't go giving them ideas. Given the reduction in cost of low end devices, I can imagine a relaunch of the 'free device pay monthly' model for internet/software for laptops/tablets. Works ok for phones after all.

Declassified files reveal how pre-WW2 Brits smashed Russian crypto

keithpeter
Coat

Re: It always strikes me as strange...

@msknight

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_talker

Use of minority languages was a thing when the need was for rapid communication of information that would be useless on a short time scale. Don't think people wanted to be fiddling with one time pads and doing mental arithmetic on battlefields.

keithpeter
Coat

Re: Paranoia and hot pockets

My cheapo Android tablet gave me the choice of encrypting its storage when I set it up. Took a couple of minutes. I'm assuming the result is a 16Gb ssd filled with random numbers. Could a otp not just be made to look like an ssd with encrypted storage until the authorities started to compare a number of devices and realise the amazing coincidence of identical random numbers?

Coat: Copy of MR-1418-RC in the (large) inside pocket

keithpeter
Coat

Re: The clue is in the name

OK, so if I write a couple of short messages as plain ascii (7 bit) and then use

xxd -b <message-files>

to dump the binary (1s and 0s), reformat to mimic a paper tape or something, and then XOR the result to get rid of the two-time key, it should be a reasonable simulation of the problem facing the chaps in the 1950s?

Oldest swinger in town, Slackware, notches up a quarter of a century

keithpeter
Pint

Slackware live

Eric Hameleers (aka Alien Bob) provides Slackware Live isos and a set of scripts for customising your own live iso. might be of interest to those who have not yet tried Slackware and who don't want to spend an hour or so installing it onto a spare computer.

I'm posting this from a slackware --current base installation running Alien Bob's Plasma 5 compile - very slick and stable.

Capita strikes again: Bug in UK-wide school info management system risks huge data breach

keithpeter
Coat

names...

"...some of the parents have double barreled names too, that dosent help"

Names can get tricky [1]. I always ask my adult students to write down what is on their passport/travel documents at enrollment so when they get their certificates at the end of the course there aren't any amusing issues when they go for jobs &c.

[1] https://www.kalzumeus.com/2010/06/17/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-names/

I hope whoever dropped the date-of-birth match does not work on further education college systems as well... ten to fifteen times as many enrollments often...

keithpeter
Coat

"...some of the parents have double barreled names too, that dosent help"

Names can get tricky [1]. I always ask my adult students to write down what is on their passport/travel documents at enrollment so when they get their certificates at the end of the course there aren't any amusing issues when they go for jobs &c.

[1] https://www.kalzumeus.com/2010/06/17/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-names/

I hope whoever dropped the date-of-birth match does not work on further education college systems as well... ten to fifteen times as many enrollments often...

Void Linux gave itself to the void, Korora needs a long siesta – life is hard for small distros

keithpeter
Coat

Re: Void can be forked

@Uncle_Slacky

Your username might remind others about Slackware. I thought that omitting Slackware from the OA was a bit of an oversight.

Slackware provides an example of a small distribution with what appears to be a sustainable business model (there is a small company that sells DVDs subscriptions and merchandise). I'm posting this from my desktop PC that runs Slackware 14.2 and it just chugs away in a totally reliable and dependable fashion. No major modifications of upstream, no complex configuration layers &c. Very consistent from version to version. At present Slackware does not use systemd, although Patrick Volkerding the Slackware BDFL has not ruled out the need to use it in the future.

Slackware went through its 'bus crash' moment some years ago when Mr Volkerding became quite ill so they have procedures in place &c.

Date engraved onto net neutrality tombstone: June 11, 2018

keithpeter
Coat

Giggleswick church

Not my monkeys and not my circus, but is that not Giggleswick Churchyard (St Alkeida's) in the photo? Taken with the church at the back and pointing up the hill?

Coat: mine's the one with the really expensive UK mobile internet dongle in the pocket. What is this neutrality the cousins speak of?

IBM bans all removable storage, for all staff, everywhere

keithpeter
Coat

Re: First, they came for the CD-R's

@TonyJ: I have learned. I never knew such a device existed.

Bought a cheaper make and will see if it is reliable.

One employer provides rdp access to desktop. Absolutely no reason for me (as end user) to have any portable storage at all. T'other employer not as well-provisioned in IT terms (Major UK city/Crapita) so need to carry some stuff. Security cross section is losing the damned thing.

Mines the one with the Trusted End Node Security USB in the pocket

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