* Posts by keithpeter

1296 posts • joined 14 Jul 2007

Page:

Equifax's disastrous Struts patching blunder: THOUSANDS of other orgs did it too

keithpeter
Silver badge
Pint

What are the rest doing?

" The first thing they always ask it to start TeamViewer. It usually takes the support tech at least 15 minutes before they accept that they won't get remote access to the device and have to use good old telephone diagnosis."

@big_D: One wonders what the other companies with CNC machines of similar vintage are doing if the default assumption is that the controller PCs are accessible via the Internet.

Pint: for one company at least making a sensible short term compromise by isolating their machines.

16
0

Former UK.gov IT man and Python king's guide to neural networks

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Deserves the best

Just ordered a (paper) copy.

About time that I upgraded my modest programming skills.

Python seems like a good language to learn (I teach basic Maths and often need to produce graphs, diagrams, charts &c) and the subject matter looks interesting.

We shall see.

0
0

User demanded PC be moved to move to a sunny desk – because it needed Windows

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: As any good medical professional will tell you

"...or the old prank about sending the apprentice to the stores for a 'Long Stand'..."

I still have my Round Tuit somewhere in here.

You forgot the skyhook.

0
0

What's your flava? Ooo, tell me what's your flava... of Ubuntu

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Ubuntu MATE user here

@Allonymous Coward

We face the real prospect of it not being the Year Of The Desktop again for any platform/system/kernel/ecosystem. I've spent a few days working with colleagues advising people coming into various educational centres. Tablets/phones/phablets being used by just about everyone now to find info &c.

I agree that just about any DE on top of just about any maintained distro on hardware that is not totally bleeding edge/released last week will work and work well.

4
0

It's happening! Official retro Thinkpad lappy spotted in the wild

keithpeter
Silver badge
Windows

Re: Reactionaries everywhere

@ ChrisBedford

Objectively speaking, I like to think I'm fairly progressive.

Still a strong preference for electronics that can be upgraded and that can be tossed into a rucksack &c. Capitalism being the lowest form of socialism we have to grasp our advantages when they are offered.

Each to his own.

3
0
keithpeter
Silver badge
Windows

New screens...

"Or you could get a second hand one without operating system on ebay, stick an ssd with linux in it and have a fast system for peanuts as I did."

I have done this for getting on for a decade now starting with a T42. Now an X220.

I am tempted by this new retro Thinkpad. Strictly speaking I have no need for the extra computing power, but a new bright screen with higher resolution is of interest. Battery life above 10 hours would be magic as well.

Mind you, if some enterprising Szechuan company did drop-in replacement screen/inverter/cable packages I'd be first in the queue!

PS: lets hear it for the venerable X60. Just the right form factor.

5
0

NYPD head of IT doubles down on Windows smartphone idiocy

keithpeter
Silver badge
Windows

Spares and replacements...

"As a gentle aside, the UK forces are switching to Windows Phone right now"

I thought that Microsoft were not making any more phones. Do you have details?

0
0

UK council fined £70k for leaving vulnerable people's data open to world+dog

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Single sign on - Re: Train them

"My point about training is that everybody who would access such a database should be aware that if they don't need any authentification to access it, then nobody else does."

@Chris G

I log into a PC that is a network client on my employer's system. I access stuff on Intranet, say a business application. I notice that I can access the application directly, but I'm assuming that is because I have logged into the PC because most of the business applications I use are single sign-on. If I had advanced knowledge, I might notice that the application does not obviously reflect my user name, but, then it may be that the nature of the task does not require my details especially or depend on my 'role'. It would not occur to me normally to access the application from a device outside the organisation because, well, its for work isn't it? I would not therefore realise that the system was wide open.

The system in the OA was found using a search engine query from a random member of the public. It strikes me that the outer portal may have had a username/password challenge but that the files inside/cached pages whatever may have had incorrect file permissions/acls set by the original designer. As others have said, the original designer may have been the employee of a contracting company, possibly as part of a semi-shadow IT project (penumbra-IT?). The lack of a cynical BOFH type poking sticks at the thing just to see what they can see does strike me but perhaps they have been outsourced.

Perhaps certification of some kind for any application (business to business or whatever) that holds confidential information would be the best route? Ensure the ruddy thing doesn't leak round the edges in the first place. What I think I'm saying is that you need a technical remedy for a technical issue of design rather than a social remedy in the form of 'training' and the resultant dumping of accountability onto end users. A technical solution is applied once in the form of robust design. The social solution has to be repeated indefinitely and results in many possible points of failure.

Coat: Mine's the one with completion certificates from 9 (yes 9) mandatory training courses I have had to complete this year - I'm a teacher.

2
0

Mozilla ponders making telemetry opt-out, 'cos hardly anyone opted in

keithpeter
Silver badge
Childcatcher

sigh...

HN https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15071492

Reddit (!) https://www.reddit.com/r/firefox/comments/6vapu5/firefox_planning_to_anonymously_collect_browsing/

Anyone got a cattle prod?

Redux: Firefox has a small 'market' share. Apparently that demographic chooses not to share browsing habits. Just possibly the demographic has chosen Firefox as it is privacy friendly to some extent.

Actionable content: I went as far as compiling midori on Slackware current after I read this. Not bad, still some rough edges.

Icon: In Loco Parentis

2
0

Pssst... wanna participate in a Google DeepMind AI pilot? Be careful

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Ethics committees?

"Smith says that such work should go through review processes akin to those for drug trials – which would probably have rejected the handover of 1.6 million patient records. "

Strange how shiny IT makes pretty standard ethics procedures fly out of the window. Special case of Jaron Lanier's 'siren servers' perhaps??

Coat: glad they didn't get fined. Mine's the one with the appointment card in the pocket.

4
0

Ubuntu sends trash to its desktop's desktop

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Gnome 2?

The default desktop was Gnome 2 in Ubuntu for a fair number of releases. I seem to recall that there was a Trash icon on the desktop in those releases and a quick image search confirms my suspicion.

Coat: back to work

3
0

Guess who's hiking their prices again? Come on, it's as easy as 123 Reg

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: That picture

"Who knows what goes through the minds of the people that pick the pictures?"

It is a bot. Has to be.

Coat: I just use the registration service provided by my hosting company. No big investments.

0
0

Hell desk to user: 'I know you're wrong. I wrote the software. And the protocol it runs on'

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: HR Fail

"I realised rather quickly when I was asked not to mention this in certain other showrooms when training. I had a few nice lunches out of that feature, my waistline suffered a bit though."

Just wondering how many days early the clocks got and if any customer accounts 'time shifted' into a previous month...

2
0

Systemd wins top gong for 'lamest vendor' in Pwnie security awards

keithpeter
Silver badge
Trollface

"Fine lets replace it with java."

That would be android

4
0
keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Don't worry

"Ah, I think I understand now. The problem with systemd is its too good at what it does."

@dbannon: excellent reply, but of course it does not have to be 'too good' just 'good enough' and easier/less work than what came before. That is why software generally needs faster processors/more memory/ big libraries in layers &c over time. And it works.

Redhat must ensure that systemd-* is fit for purpose and that bugs are responded to rapidly as they have bet their business on it until around 2028(?) (RHEL 8 support EOL based on past releases). I imagine that people with more of a mindset around responsive bug-fixing and quality will take over the maintenance from those who 'move fast and break things' (to mis-quote)

Coat: usual disclaimer - clueless end user

2
1
keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Don't worry

"Now, there's non-stop freakout about Linux possibly "collapsing into a stable mono-culture""

Can't speak for others, I'm not actually freaking out as such, just trying to understand the dynamics at a whole system level.

FOSS has been pumping out lines of code for - what - 30 odd years without much in the way of an overall plan (bazaar c.f. cathedral &c) except building something that keeps working. Complex systems with strong linkage between elements will tend to exhibit a limited range of behaviours.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complex_system

A dose of mono-culture might be for the best - we'll have to see.

Coat: Remember I just consume this stuff.

2
2
keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Don't worry

"Any binary with a "systemd-" prefix is part of the project and completely optional."

Agreed. However upstream programmers may well be tempted to support only the systemd-* components as it makes their job easier, and packagers for various distributions may be tempted to include hard dependencies on the systemd-* components because they assume their presence.

So in effect the random walk that is Linux development (lots of projects all producing code that depends on the state of other projects also producing code with many feedback loops) may collapse into a stable mono-culture. Consequences to be witnessed. Possibly detrimental. Bit early to tell.

16
1
keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Modern(ism)

"...and has a clear future in tomorrow’s technology..."

@GrumpenKraut and all

A cultural studies Masters' thesis topic could well be the use of phrases such as 'modern' and 'tomorrow's technology' by Dr(?) Poettering and his colleagues. The framing is outrageous - it is less than half a lifetime since we were writing programs on punched cards.

I'm sure that RedHat will make it all work because they have a $2.5 x 10^9 business that depends on it all working. It will be interesting to see how things go when the bulk of servers depend on operating systems that use the technology. I predict a far more responsive approach to (properly written) bug reports by people with a practical mind set.

7
0
keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Don't worry

"Is that irony or a clever ploy?"

@Dr Syntax: I'm assuming that you are referring to RHEL 6. I suspect that it is just the releases working their way through the Gantt chart. My hypothesis will be disproved if and when a special 'extended life' subscription (at a premium price) appears for RHEL 6 near 2019. A further disproof would be a Fedora release coming with a choice of init (cold day in hades &c).

Coat: Centos 7 actually works fine for this clueless end user desktop operative, so off out.

8
1

Linus Torvalds pens vintage 'f*cking' rant at kernel dev's 'utter BS'

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: As I've said before ...

Redox...

https://github.com/redox-os/redox/releases

https://www.reddit.com/r/Redox/

Looks most interesting. Getting close to self-building, and they have ported gcc so there will be some applications to run on their GUI when it is a bit more stable. My favourite quote: "I am currently struggling with getting autotools based builds to work on Redox (warning: trying to read and understand a ./configure script may cause mental illness)."

Wondering if the focus is a GUI/desktop or server workloads, obviously shiny motivates the younger contributors but a minimal system that can sit somewhere on a network and run an application or two written in the system language could provide a niche that encourages adoption and a show-case implementation.

The more the merrier, but I think Linux has a significant incumbent advantage over the BSDs, Illumos based OSes and new ones like this.

Coat: 9front for the win!

6
0

The Italian Jobs: Bloke thrown in the cooler for touting Apple knockoffs

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Not really victimless

@cb7

Agreed, but has any news org managed to find one of the fakes and give it a test/strip down?

Can't have IoS or Apple firmware in it I'm presuming or there would be piracy on the charge sheet as well as fraud.

3
0

Ubuntu Linux now on Windows Store (for Insiders)

keithpeter
Silver badge
Trollface

Just think the unthinkable for a bit...

Suppose you had a proprietary operating system that was decades old and which has accumulated a fair degree of technical debt. You are finding it hard to recruit programmers and onboard them in the arcane knowledge of millions of lines of code and obscure work-arounds for problems that existed in the 90s. Part of the reason for these difficulties is the availability of a robust free/open source operating system (in fact several) that students in Universities often learn in some detail in their systems and hardware courses, *and* that many of your potential recruits have worked on extended projects deep in the grungy legacy bowels of these systems, because they can get access to the code.

Times are hard: the market is saturating, and the free/open source OSes are well entrenched in the server market and on some classes of consumer devices. All you have left is the network effect of organisations that depend on your proprietary *middleware* and very successful end user productivity software. Increasingly, you want to move maintenance and routine systems work to low cost countries in preparation to the ultimate automation of the basics.

Would you not be tempted to eliminate the maintenance cost of the underlying OS by ensuring that the middleware and productivity software could run on a 'good-enough' endpoint/client OS based on the free/open source alternatives?

Would a way of exploring this radical move be to coopt free/open source OSes into your cloud offerings and in your software distribution channels so that users become more familiar with the endpoint/client interfaces, and so that your programmers and systems people become familiar with the new metaphors?

Might be one to watch over the next decade. Canonical is after investment as evidenced by their recent streamlining. Mr Nadella was a UNIX kind of chap was he not?

3
1

Microsoft boasted it had rebuilt Skype 'from the ground up'. Instead, it should have buried it

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Market research

"The dev has to sit beside the secretary first, before any dev work commences and watch what she does, and ask her why she is doing it that way."

I recollect that one of Englebart's researchers actually did sit with book editors to gather requirements for supporting their work. One result was the I beam cursor *between* letters instead of the block cursor *on* a letter. I suspect that windows and 'full screen editing' was in there as well.

My GoogleFu is rusty and I'm having problems finding references.

Coat: blue pencil in the pocket

2
0

TfL, WTH is my bus? London looks up from its mobile

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: There, there children. Sorry your pacifier is b0rken.

@Just Enough: Shadow of the old tree falling on the fourth kerb stone beyond the parish boundary and Summer? Must be 2pm ish.

All: I recommend The Maintenance of Headway by Magnus Mills to anyone who can remember when it was possible to run and jump onto the platform of the last bus as it left the station...

2
0

One-third of Brit IT projects on track to fail

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: 257%

@JimC and all

What we want is a Venn diagram or similar showing the percentages of projects that where judged to have failed for various combinations of factors.

A similar diagram showing the percentages of projects that were judged to have succeeded despite various combinations of the factors would be of interest as well. Might be interestingly similar to the first diagram.

Off out to Lidl for croissants

4
0

Photobucket says photo-f**k-it, starts off-site image shakedown

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Lolwut

"So a post from 2002 will say some shit about Photobucket 3rd party linking. You're seriously suggesting anyone gives a shit... even a post from a week ago is old news"

It is that long-tail thing again isn't it? 99% of posts have a shelf-life of minutes to days, and 99% of interweb fora are instantly forgettable. But there are some special interest fora with considerable history, and within those, there are some threads that have lasted for a long span of time and that contain much useful information. Those will be significantly degraded.

21
0

Ubuntu 'weaponised' to cure NHS of its addiction to Microsoft Windows

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Modified distro

Currently the NHSbuntu proof of concept .iso appears to be a more or less standard Ubuntu 16.04 live image with some nice theming in 'classic' mode. Screen shot below from within a live session

http://sohcahtoa.org.uk/nhs2.jpg

Note use of MS Office-like icons for LibreOffice and standard Ubuntu repositories. Can't use ssh at present (keyring?) but apart from that looks bog standard. Now if someone could convince the Gnome project to just allow the top bar to be the bottom bar in classic mode...

I take the point that a real system is going to need custom software and then that implies maintenance. I hope this initiative gets gradual acceptance with a careful roll-out to appropriate client machines.

2
1

Heaps of Windows 10 internal builds, private source code leak online

keithpeter
Silver badge
Black Helicopters

Re: About time..

@Kiwi

"Wonder if this was deliberate. Rather than pay a team of programmers to hunt for bugs, open-source it and wait for the exploits."

I was thinking more of a leak to cover tracks... any future major hacks/exploits that were secret - perhaps even sponsored by certain actors - can now be tracked back to this code release. Very convenient.

Or possibly a canary: someone inside saying "read this and discover, we can tell you because they would know who we are then"

Icon: we've had a couple overhead for hours

9
1

Tesco Online IT meltdown: Fails to deliver thousands of grocery orders

keithpeter
Silver badge
Pint

Re: It may be related.

Excellent team work there, so in addition to upvote, see icon.

7
0

IBM's contractor crackdown continues: Survivors refusing pay cut have hours reduced

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: “be forced to reduce their CLAIMED hours by 15 per cent.”

What is IBM actually providing? Access to software? Access to servers? What is to stop people dis-intermediating the big blue fairly aggressively and at scale?

Coat: actually shorts and flip flops at present in UK

8
0

Debian devs dedicate new version 9 to the late Ian Murdock

keithpeter
Silver badge
Linux

Slackware and Debian

Interesting to reflect on the contrasts between the two oldest surviving Linux distributions.

Debian: tightly coupled dependency graph, heavy repackaging/patching of upstream applications, large developer community big on ideology

Slackware: one man plus a small number of major contributors, no dependency graph to speak of but you can install package managers, what-you-get-is-what-upstream-push-out, pragmatic approach

Interesting to see what the next 20 years will bring.

PS:Ian Murdoch - was reading some interesting stuff on his blog when the news came through, horrible business.

0
0

Trump nominates a pro-net-neutrality advocate as FCC commish

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Coalitions

"Trump is a Republican. The Republicans have majorities in both houses.

How can bills and even a budget still not get passed?"

@John Smith 19

I imagine for the same reason that the Conservative party always has problems about Europe. Both parties are really coalitions of people with diverse and sometimes contradictory views on policy. The Labour party is also a coalition but the cogwheels and pulleys are easier to see.

As a Brit, I found Robert Caro's The Power Broker a very useful guide to how stuff works in the US, specifically New York's planning processes. Views from actual US citizens welcome.

Coat: off out now, not my circus and not my monkeys.

1
0

It's 2017 and Microsoft is still patching Windows XP+ – to plug holes exploited by trio of leaked NSA weapons

keithpeter
Silver badge
Windows

Re: XP

@TechnicalBen

Perhaps some AC might pop up and give us some hypothetical examples of possible enterprise configurations, purely for academic discussion.

PS: signeage seems a hold-out judging by the error screens I see now and again...

0
0

Ta-ta, security: Bungling Tata devs leaked banks' code on public GitHub repo, says IT bloke

keithpeter
Silver badge
Windows

Re: Geezer's blog posts

"No. Not sure why he has a problem with it."

@AC: I suspected that would be the answer.

2
0
keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Geezer's blog posts

Yup, the lad with the iPad and the chip'n'pin thingy. He always points out that I can get identical services from home. I always point out that by coming in and queuing up and accessing the system via a member of bank staff, the liability for any subsequent security issues is clear.

Coat: annual gas check done, off out to dodge the smart meter salesman

10
0
keithpeter
Silver badge
Windows

Geezer's blog posts

http://coulls.blogspot.co.uk/2017/05/how-do-you-fix-mobile-banking-in-canada.html

Is it true that having urls embedded in the code of the application but not obfuscated in any way is really a major security issue? I'm guessing the queries sent to the server side of the application constitute the threat.

Icon: Clueless end user who does not make use of any form of online banking out of a natural tendency to prefer face2face transactions.

2
0

BA's 'global IT system failure' was due to 'power surge'

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: State of IT

"I've worked in IT for nearly 30 years and have seen the gradual dumbing down of IT, some in part due to technology changes, others due to offshoring."

@Jaded Geek and all

Disclaimer: I'm an end user

Could the increased demand for 'live' and 'real time' data be a factor as well It strikes me that results in the layering of systems to considerable depth and possibly unknown spread Again as you say later in your post, the dependency graph for a restart becomes very complex and may not be known/documented. The graph could even be cyclic (so System A version 9.3 expects System B 3.7 to be running, but System B 3.8 has been installed that depends on System A 9.3)

Coat: not my mess so out for a walk

1
0

Distro watch for Ubuntu lovers: What's ahead in Linux land

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Distro not DE

"Even if you give Canonical the benefit of the doubt - that it will continue working on desktop Ubuntu - at the very least, desktop Ubuntu's future looks uncertain."

Er - no not uncertain.

Has not the Stubbled One said that Ubuntu will ship with Gnome by default as Ubuntu used to before the Unity excursion? Said excursion into potential new markets the wisdom of which I am not competent to evaluate.

All the other DEs will be in the repos. Strange article seemed to confuse distro with DE.

Coat: Mine's the one with the 5.04 dual CD-ROM in the pocket

1
0
keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: "ahead of the curve on some somewhat esoteric [...] for example color management"

@LDS

"While working on a catalog software for a museum years ago, I worked with people with an astounding capability of discerning colors - and if they didn't seen on the screen or prints the "correct" ones, the software wasn't working."

So colourimeter and Eizo or NEC monitor for photo? Or Pantone for spot? I imagine former.

0
0
keithpeter
Silver badge
Windows

@gv

OpenBSD seems OK on laptops (especially Thinkpads). A little spartan but functional.

1
0

Capita and Birmingham City Council 'dissolve' joint venture

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Sun Java Desktop in Central Library

Talk of partying like it is 1999 (and we had some good parties then) does anyone else remember the Sun Linux based client computers in Birmingham Central Library? Circa millennium or a little after. Netscape 4 and StarOffice and I think it was a Gnome desktop.

I asked the library assistant how people coped with these and she said "the younger ones just sort it and the older ones need help whatever system it is".

Coat: off out now to admire the view from the top of our new and hugely expensive Central Library as I heard a rumour that the Shakespeare Room is actually open today.

http://www.computerweekly.com/news/2240075813/Birmingham-trials-Linux-in-40-libraries

Above is a later experiment. Perhaps we can have another try as email is Zimbra?

1
1

Bankrupt school ITT pleads 'don't let Microsoft wipe our cloud data!'

keithpeter
Silver badge
Windows

Re: Once you send your data to the cloud

"I see this as like renting an apartment."

Eviction for non-payment of rent does not mean the landlord owns the possessions of the tenant, at least in the UK.

https://england.shelter.org.uk/housing_advice/eviction/what_happens_when_bailiffs_evict_tenants

So I guess your analogy fails to fit exactly at the crucial point of what happens to the data. I guess you can't put it in plastic bags and leave it on the step.

4
0
keithpeter
Silver badge
Windows

Re: Don't forget the fees.

Preservation fee is roughly 12x the outstanding rental payment. Is 2.5 x 10^6 dollars reasonable for a data dump? If so, should cloud agreements not have a 'data escrow' clause?

Disclaimer: clueless end user just wondering...

18
0

European Patent Office dragged to human rights court – by its own staff

keithpeter
Silver badge
Windows

Re: On a practical level

Quote from OA

"The situation has grown so bad that the ILO's management felt obliged to warn its governing body earlier this year that the backlog of complaints it had against the EPO was impairing its ability to function. No less than 73 per cent of the hundreds of cases it was reviewing resulted from EPO actions."

I thought that as well. Any situation where a relatively tiny organisation is causing a bottle neck in an important international conflict resolution org needs sorting out.

2
0

Linux homes for Ubuntu Unity orphans: Minty Cinnamon, GNOME or Ubuntu, mate?

keithpeter
Silver badge
Pint

Slackware default install with KDE

I personally would recommend some careful reading, experimentation on a test machine, and adoption of Slackware full install with KDE as desktop environment. This is assuming that readers of this particular forum have problem-solving abilities, a general background of IT skills, and curiosity. You can add package management, compile from source, and/or download binaries. It is remarkably difficult to break Slackware. I've tried.

What you get is what upstream pushed out. With choices, e.g. OpenOffice and LibreOffice installed and functional along with the default Calligra.

Some other observations on the OA follow...

"If you're going to use GNOME, right now, not having seen what Ubuntu is going to end up doing, I suggest trying it via Fedora."

Fedora Workstation is very nice, but the Korora Project makes it nicer with the Arc theme, a 'traditional' overlay on Gnome (Windows 7 work-alike), multimedia codecs/software installed, and a range of applications. Chapeau Linux is another 'batteries included' Fedora flavour that has less radical tweaking of the Gnome desktop.

"If you just click your way through the Debian installer you'll end up with a GNOME desktop, which offers a decent experience, but I find Xfce more suited to Debian."

Debian installer tasksel will provide a choice of desktops at the 'select software' stage. You can select more than one. Debian is also the only distro to allow offline installation of a YUGEtm range of software.

Finally OpenBSD. Just saying.

PINT: to all those involved with this outrageous, distributed, self organising, wonderful, argumentative, opinionated mud-ball of a project of totally free and unencumbered software. I clearly recollect the day I downloaded a live Ubuntu iso, burned it, and tried it out. Amazing. Thanks Mark, Pat and all.

3
0

Secure Boot booted from Debian 9 'Stretch'

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Cores - Re: Most Linux distros are such flimsy OSes..

@Field Commander A9

What do you suggest people use on larger machines? Perhaps something like this...

http://www.sns.ias.edu/computing/hyperion_cluster/overview

...or the machines that run Google, Facebook and all the rest of the Interweb.

0
0

Linux-using mates gone AWOL? Netflix just added Linux support

keithpeter
Silver badge
Windows

Client?

Cheap tablet running a locked down Linux with a browser pointing at Netflix servers (branded alternative to ChromeOS)?

0
0

O (n^2) Canada! Code bugs knacker buses, TV, broadband, phone lines

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

"What's the O(n^2) connection?"

I was thinking combined probability of two independent events, but then that should be pq or something.

0
0
keithpeter
Silver badge
Pint

Headcount

>> "A significant number of Shaw customers across Western Canada [were] impacted," said the comms giant, which has more than two million subscribers and employs 15,000 people. <<

That is one employee for every 130-odd subscribers. Seems a tad high to me - is this a normal ratio in the telecoms business or is the headcount larger because of the distances involved?

Pint: to anyone made redundant for whatever reason

0
0

Apache OpenOffice: Not dead yet, you'll just have to wait until mid-May for mystery security fixes

keithpeter
Silver badge
Coat

Re: I admire their spunk!

"Personally I would like a healthy OO as another option against Slurp and I like LO. Having a couple of options also means there is some different ideas about the feature set and UI available."

Yup - LO are refactoring the code base - I remember them saying that earlier in the fork - quite a lot of the code goes back to StarOffice days apparently.

oOo are taking different tack and keeping quite a lot of the legacy code I gather so you have diverging back ends and, as 'lurker' says, a choice of UI models should LO do anything too ribbon like as default.

Note quite Joel Spolsky but it will be interesting to see how the code bases evolve if oOo survives.

2
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017