* Posts by a_yank_lurker

2550 posts • joined 16 Nov 2013

Oi, force Microsoft to cough up emails on Irish servers to the Feds, US states urge Supremes

a_yank_lurker
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Feral Criminality

The Ferals are taking lounging in the doughnut shop to an extreme. If this was a money laundering or drug case they would get off their asses and get the locals involved. So the question is why can't they do it in this case.

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Former Intel EMEAR sales director takes Chipzilla to tribunal

a_yank_lurker
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Re: Self-representation?

I do not the ins and outs of UK tribunals but on the side of the pond self-representation is always a mistake.

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Hitchcock cameo steals opening of Oracle v Google Java spat

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@Dan 55 - Most of the problem is those writing and interpreting how the law should be applied are acting like functional illiterates with IQs in the negative numbers, very large negative numbers. APIs and similar interfaces are not difficult to understand even for the dimmest of bulbs. The problem is shysters generally do not care to learn about how anything works and will likely tell someone who does know how ignorant they are. I have had a few run ins with shysters telling me how things work when I knew the shyster was full of it and ready to burst.

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It's a decade since DevOps became a 'thing' – and people still don't know what it means

a_yank_lurker
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Buzzword Bingo for PHBs

When I hear DevOps, Agile, etc. I wonder if the shills have ever worked on a real system. To be a good developer, tester, system admin, etc. takes a specific set of skills that do not overlap that much with the others. Expecting someone to good at all is a fool's errand.

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IBM opens emergency escape hatch to TSS volunteers

a_yank_lurker
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Re: Funny that financial thing...

Dumbsourcing probably is at best a net wash on the money. All you have done is moved the costs around at the risk of alienating customers.

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Sucks to be a... chief data officer, when they're being told: Boost revenues

a_yank_lurker
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PHBs playing Statistician

There must be no regard for what data was collected, why it was collected, and any rudimentary knowledge of statistics by the C-suite PHBs. One flaw about analyzing 'big data' is that is often actually very disparate data silos that are not easily linked together.

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Former US State Department cyber man: We didn’t see the Russian threat coming

a_yank_lurker
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Feral Stupidity

So the ferals are so stupid not to realize that their spying antics will be used against them. If you vaguely understand how computer networks work, everyone is vulnerable to the same types of attacks. But the part of vaguely understanding is too much of a stretch for these imbeciles.

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New Jersey lawmakers propose ban on folks drunk droning

a_yank_lurker
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Re: Is this a huge problem in the fine state of New Jersey?

More like a busybody who has nothing better to do than take care of the state budget and debt.

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Did you unwittingly support the destruction of net neutrality rules?

a_yank_lurker
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Schneiderman the Shyster

The commenting system will always be a bit of a mess as various groups try to 'stuff the ballot' with friendly comments. To some extent, these comments can be filtered out if those monitoring have a couple of functioning brain cells. Looking at the comment search for myself, I did not find any unusual activity.

Given the Shyster's histrionics on other issues I tend to dismiss his antics as those of spoiled brat.

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UK government bans all Russian anti-virus software from Secret-rated systems

a_yank_lurker
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Re: AV - Can we really trust any of them?

@AC - Short answer - No, none can be trusted. There have been too many reliable reports of spookhauses using a company as cover for their activities. Some cases the company is a true front but in other cases it is a legitimate company which has access to data the spooks want.

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US politicos wake up to danger of black-box algorithms shaping all corners of American life

a_yank_lurker
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Re: Not just credit scores...prison sentences.

@Charles 9 - There are three major causes to the incarceration rates: long sentences, overcharging, and the 'war on drugs'. The first is obvious, long sentences mean people in prison for years if not decades for crimes that have much shorter sentences in other countries. Overcharging means there probably a trivial, semi-bogus charge you almost will be convicted of. Combine this under feral criminal law intent is not required and a minor misstep is now a potential felony. The 'war on drugs' criminalizes what is a common human behavior; seeking escape via drugs/alcohol and the consequent medical issues. A lot of very severe sentences are in this area. Also, in many cases the underlying issue is either psychological or medical not criminal in nature.

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US credit repair biz damages own security: 111GB of personal info exposed in S3 blunder

a_yank_lurker
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Re: Yet they are still rushing

My problem with the cloud is very sensitive data does resides on someone else's hardware. Aside from misconfigured databases and services, if you do not own the hardware you really do not control the data.

Kim Dotcom got into trouble as Megaupload contracted storage out and one of the companies was US based.

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WW2 Enigma machine to be seized from shamed pharma bro Shkreli

a_yank_lurker
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More Fitting

Somehow his antics and crimes which as noted earlier probably led to deaths because of his greed will not get the proper punishment. So he has a stay at Club Fed and must surrender property; that is a better deal than the pine box some got.

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Royal Bank of Scotland culls 1 in 4 branches, blames the interwebz

a_yank_lurker
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Competence?

Over here, most banks are trying to keep branches open, if lightly staffed. The thinking is the convenience of a branch for customers when they need to walk into a bank is important. It is easier to keep a customer than to get a new one.

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Jingle bells, IBM tells more staff it is D-day ♫

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Re: walking dead

With the current crew of incompetents and bean counters ruining the company they are already a shell. I can not think of a product they have that someone is not doing better at a cheaper price. Itsy Bitsy Morons have been running on their past glories for a long time and it shows. Declining sales and profits is a signal to the morons in charge you are doing something very wrong.

One of their problems is a large portion of software is becoming a commodity product. On many products the used feature set is much smaller than the available features and a version 3 or 4 releases is more than adequate as far as features.

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Unfit to plead before a US court? You may face 'indefinite detention'

a_yank_lurker
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Re: The Case

The US shysters love to load up the charges with some fairly trivial and idiotic charges so they can get a sham conviction or plea deal on something. Various US law blogs have severely criticized the practice and some have called it unethical.

An infamous example predating Aaron Schwartz is Martha Stewart. The ferals tried to nail her for insider trading of a stock. However, she was not an insider and was only acting on a tip from her broker that a real insider was selling his stock. What the ferals were able to get her on was the trivial charge of making a 'false statement' to feral bureau of incompetence.

Read 'Three Felonies a Day' to see how bad the feral criminal injustice system is.

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Night before Xmas and all through American Airlines, not a pilot was flying, thanks to this bug

a_yank_lurker
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Nickname

Back in the day, there was an airline over here Allegheny Airlines that was called Agony Airlines. I think through a series of mergers they became UScare. I suggest the nickname should be revived for American and henceforth they shall be called 'Agony Airlines'.

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US intelligence blabs classified Linux VM to world via leaky S3 silo

a_yank_lurker
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Re: I can't believe it

Unfortunately Evgeni and Ivan are not a fault. It is just feral incompetency at its finest.

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Net neutrality nonsense: Can we, please, just not all lose our minds?

a_yank_lurker
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Posturing

In many of these 'debates' what happens is various people take a relatively extreme position and toss accusations of perfidious actions against the others. In reality, the ideal policy is probably a 'half-a-loaf' for both sides but neither are willing to actually talk.

Yes the networks are hurting for viewers and yes people need easy access to any website. The old networks need to find away to get their products were the viewers will be. If this means cutting deals with Amazon, Hulu, and Netflix then cut the deals. Also, recognize the market has changed tremendously in the last 10 years. Also, how many networks do we need that are producing crappy content. I would be more concerned about search engines engaging in censorship than 'net neutrality'. Comcrap owns NBC so high speed internet is valuable to them; throttling could easily backfire. But Google can influence what information one sees by manipulating the search results and this is probably harder to detect.

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Watch how Google's AI catches shoulder surfers spying on your phone

a_yank_lurker
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Re: 'The Googlers' work on this technique'

Given how many are sloppy where they use apps on their phones this sounds like a good idea if it can be implemented. I not convinced Google can make it work reliably but they should commended for at least trying to protect users.

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Linus Torvalds on security: 'Do no harm, don't break users'

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Re: “Because without users, your program is pointless..."

Linux's problem is not that it is too geeky but that it does not have a true major corporate champion who is pushing it as an alternative to Bloat and Fruit. Many Linux users understand that whatever users use they have to comfortable with it and the applications they use. Hence Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and many others. A corporate champion would be spending money on advertising and encouraging developers to produce a Linux version of their products. Linux's visibility frankly sucks and most who a 'nix are completely unaware of it (MacOS, iOS, Android, ChromeOS).

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a_yank_lurker
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“Because without users, your program is pointless..."

“Because without users, your program is pointless, and all the development work you've done over decades is pointless.” - Linus nailed it. Programs and OSes are tools for users. Some forget the users is the final arbiter of success and worthwhileness: not the developer, not the tester, not the project manager, not the security guru.... He said you need to fix bugs with an eye on the user and keeping the program working for them as they are used to. His complaint is some have lost sight of who the ultimate judge is - and it is not some musty academic journal or trade rag the public never reads - it is the final user.

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Forget Sesame Street, scientists pretty much watched Big Bird evolve on Galápagos island

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@ratfox - Breeds of cats or dogs are genetic populations that breed true to a breed standard. But they are not separate species. The mixed breed or mutts are just that. It takes several generations to develop a breed not 2.

Some domestic cat breeds have wild cat ancestry. Bengals, Serengetis, and Savannahs have an F0 cross between a wild cat species and the domestic cat (specific breeds actually). The cross is fertile enough that some of the kittens can be bred with a domestic cat producing another generation. Depending on jurisdiction one can legally own one of F0 descendants around F4 or F5. The cat is considered a domestic cat for legal purposes and acts like a domestic cat.

The problem is the somewhat sloppy definition of a species.

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Munich council finds €49.3m for Windows 10 embrace

a_yank_lurker
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Corruption??

When I here the buzzword bingo from a politician on a highly technical decision, I wonder how much was in those paper bags they were taking home. A bit cynical but I grew up in NJ amid corrupt politicians. Note Philthy and Gotham were major leagues, Jersey was high minors.

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Wizarding World of Harry Potter awaits Microsoft Office exam winners

a_yank_lurker
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Re: Florida?

Florida yes, Disney World, etc. NO. There some interesting things to do in Florida besides the overgrown tourist traps around Orlando. And it is not too far away (from Atlanta) at least to the 'Redneck Riviera' (Panama City). Though the history buff would rather go to Mobile, AL (Farragut's 'Damn the torpedoes...').

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Sci-Hub domains inactive following court order

a_yank_lurker
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Working as of Thanksgiving morning

80.82.77.83 and https://sci-hub.bz/ appear to work fine so far, just tried them (did not download any articles if you are wondering). So the blockade is a failure as one can get around it without too much difficulty. It looks like another game of whack-a-mole is commencing.

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Stick to the script, kiddies: Some dos and don'ts for the workplace

a_yank_lurker
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Issue with Scripts

The real issue is not scripts but a lack of a proper life cycle including a rudimentary spec (why are you doing this), peer review, testing, version control, and documentation. Some of the spec and documentation can be in the script itself but should exist. Also, testing as much as possible should be on development system not production. Yes this could add a few hours or days to the development time but scripts are actually small programs and should be treated as a program.

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Aussie Catholic School forced into hasty cover-up over suggestive Saint

a_yank_lurker
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Oops!

I laughed when I looked at the picture. It does look with a quick glance that the saint is holding his ahem. Swambo also thought it was funny when she saw it.

Were any sketches made before the statue was created?

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When it comes to ML, reports of JavaScript's death are exaggerated

a_yank_lurker
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A couple of observations

Python has some intentional limitations from its original design (interpreted vs compiled mostly). Otherwise it is a reasonable generic, general purpose programming language. Its syntax and paradigm support makes it easy for non-programmers to learn become at least sort of competent relatively quickly. Also, it has many libraries available to do some serious having lifting. The major real problem is that Python code can be slow. Some complain about blocking by indentation when indenting in every language is consider good programming style. So Python kills to birds at once. Overall a solid language that has a wide useful range. Another language of similar capability and utility is Ruby but Ruby never got popular with scientists or engineers.

JavaScript was not designed as a general purpose programming language but a way to add interactivity to web pages. Obviously, you need some programming constructs to do this. Its primary problem has stemmed for its initial half-baked at best initial design. Netscape did not do anyone any favors rushing it out the door as fast as they did. It suffers from a confusing mishmash of syntax and paradigm matching. It use prototypes not objects but uses conventional object oriented syntax; an annoyance. It use C like syntax when it does really derive any ideas from C (why bother?). It has a sloppy scoping system (more like poorly thought). Some are more aggravations but some make programming JS trickier than it should be. In fact there are three languages (TypeScript, Dart, and CoffeeScript) that produce JS code when 'compiled'. These languages are attempts to fix the serious deficiencies of JS. If JS is that good why are three other languages trying to fix its problems?

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a_yank_lurker
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Re: it allows you to perform a subtraction between a string and an integer without raising an error

If the variable accidentally hold a value that can be coerced to an integer this could be disastrous.

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HPE CEO Meg Whitman QUITS, MAN! Neri to replace chief exec in Feb

a_yank_lurker
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@Gene Cash - Ouch, forgot about her. There are few more has beens and never weres wondering the tech landscape that should be fired forth with but won't until too late.

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Microsoft's memory randomization security defense is a little busted in Windows 8, 10

a_yank_lurker
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Re: Negligence or malicious?

Probably both. Slurp has be skimping on testing for awhile as evidence by the late alpha releases of Bloat 10 given to the masses, got negligence covered. As a result 'telemetry' is used to getting data from the alpha testers (users) which can get all sorts of juicy details for various doughnut eaters, got malicious covered.

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Twitter's blue tick rule changes may lower the sueball barrier

a_yank_lurker
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Authentic vs Approval

Certifying an account belongs to a prominent person is was and I doubt there will be much debate about this. Also, certification does not imply agreement. Thus, what bile is spewed on the account is the sole responsibility of the spewer.

Using it grant editorial approval is much riskier as Twitter is taking an editorial position. I doubt they are doing much 'due diligence' to verify the accuracy of each tweet. If some approved bile-spewer says something extremely obnoxious they have possibly created a legal liability because of the implied editorial control and the definite editorial approval. This system might work under US law but I doubt it will work other countries as each country has somewhat different laws on editorial responsibility and defamation.

But look at the bright side, a few Hulk Hogan lawsuits later lost and we maybe rid of Twitter forever if they persist in this.

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Level 5 driverless cars by 2021 can be done, say Brit industry folk

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@Olaf - Many who can not drive for medical reasons are not confined to a wheelchair. So are quite ambulatory. But still a game changer if it occurs in the next few years.

However I doubt it will occur in 4 years (40 might more likely) as there are numerous issues to be learned and resolved.

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Cops jam a warrant into Apple to make it cough up Texas mass killer's iPhone, iCloud files

a_yank_lurker
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Re: Clueless Doughnut Eaters

The only loop hole in the system is a private sale to another person. But this is risky as there is no record of the transfer and you are still listed as the owner of the gun. The paper trail stops with you and if the gun is used in a crime the flatfeet could come a'knockin. Legal but risky. You are better selling the going to licensed dealer which will create a further paper trail showing the transfer.

The only way some try to get around is the straw purchase where someone with a clean record buys the gun for a criminal. However, this is felony for both the purchaser and criminal with some very harsh feral penalties.

All dealers are required to run all sales through the database before the finalizing the sale regardless of sales location, the gun show 'exemption' does not exist. The process is basically fill out a one page form, provide proof of identity, and then check the database. Maybe takes 10 minutes with most of it being the customer filling out the form. Who all gets copies of the form, I am not sure, other than dealer must retain a copy.

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a_yank_lurker
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Clueless Doughnut Eaters

If there are any subsidiary charges they should be brought on Air Farce personnel who failed to do their duty. This is the real breakdown in this case as he was found guilty of domestic abuse in a court martial. By US law, this should automatically bar him from ever buying or possessing a gun. In his case possession would have been a feral felony. However, the Air Farce (the same idiots who brought the F-35) did pass this conviction the national database.

Over here, when you buy a gun there is a mandatory feral background database check. If you are in the database, you can not buy a gun period. There are several specific reasons you can end up in the database (mental illness, felony conviction, etc.) States may add more restrictions like a waiting period before actually taking possession. Obviously the system requires diligence by low level bureaucrats who often do not care about doing their jobs correctly to make sure information is passed on.

Also, I doubt there is anything of real investigatory interest on his phone (or backups) that they probably do not already know from talking to people who knew him. They should have the phone logs by now and know who to talk to. Plus, who else are they going to charge as some of his intended targets appeared to be his in-laws.

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Container ship loading plans are 'easily hackable'

a_yank_lurker
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Re: Would it be possible to destabilize a ship by reducing the cargo during transit?

The easier way is to reassign the container weights so the heavier ones one carried high. If the weight distribution is bad enough the ship could easily capsize. Might a great idea of marine insurance fraud (with a few murders thrown in).

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Anonymized location-tracking data proves anything but: Apps squeal on you like crazy

a_yank_lurker
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Re: Home address big deal

Home addresses are well known for most as one tends to live in the same place for several years if not decades. So at some point your address will likely make it in semi-public database. In the landline days, unless you had an unlisted number, it was published in the phone book ('White Pages' over here) and distributed to everyone in the service area with phone service.

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a_yank_lurker
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Re: The Clancy method

A variation of this method has used to break alibis in murder cases. If you know the person's phone number with the reasonable assumption they normally have it with them or in easy reach then you can track their location at least approximately just by the cell towers. If the suspect claims they were at home on the night of the murder but the phone is known to be in area and at the approximate time of the murder even the dimmest flatfoot can work out you have some serious explaining to do. I have heard of this technique being used several years ago to aid in solving several murders over here. Now add finer location determination via GPS, if the flatfeet can get their hands on it, you will have a harder time getting off. Google Maps on Android phones is very good at getting one's location with a few feet of the actual location. I assume Apple Maps has similar accuracy. Thus, as long as you have a phone, your location is known to someone at all times. The only privacy hope (faint one) is the data collectors don't keep the data for any length of time.

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a_yank_lurker
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Re: But...

@DougS - There are a couple of weaknesses the suggestion. One most criminals are not very bright and definitely not tech savvy. The planning skills required are beyond their capabilities; way many get caught in the first place. Second, the analysis covered several weeks so a couple of nights not at home would be ignored by someone smart enough (assuming the flatfeet flunkies in the doughnut shop have enough brains to understand this).

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Windows Update borks elderly printers in typical Patch Tuesday style

a_yank_lurker
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Re: The are still used!

@Updraft102 - Where I work, the testers like to tease us developers when one of us make a really dumb one. But we take as what it is, as good-natured teasing. In our case, we literally share cubes with each other so it is not like our code is being tested by someone we never really talk to or do not know. So with us there is a unity of purpose rather than one of opposition. They respect us and respect them.

The problem with amateur testers is they have no idea how to test something properly, necessarily even think to test something, or even have all the necessary equipment. For example the relative infrequency I print something means I do not check the printer with every OS update of any OS. Plus for this bug, I do not have specific type or brand of printer and no need to buy one. So even if I where to test my printer I could never find this particular bug. And this assumes I have a good idea how to test printing (color, black and white, paper sizes, are a few of the variables I can think of).

The long term damage to Slurp is a lack of a total confidence when 'Broke Tuesday' rolls around every month. (Askwoody.com has updating at 'Defcon 2' - do not do it if at possible). Constantly trying to figure what is the culprit and how to mitigate the problem is not something users will have much long term patience for. Especially when there these things called Chromebooks and Macs available and this geeky OS called Linux available. Users may not yet realize they might have numerous viable options to ditch Slurp. As their friends and family get more familiar with the other options they will pay attention.

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a_yank_lurker
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Re: The are still used!

@Updraft102 - There two very solid reasons to have a separate testing group (I speak as developer). First, you have a team experienced at testing and trying to find the edge cases that break the code. This is a skill that developers normally have not honed to degree. Second, there is another set of eyes looking at the specifications and looking at the actual output. Often they will catch something that developer screwed up. As one tester commented, the more complex the code the more likely the developer made a mistake somewhere even if it is a trivial one.

By firing their testers Slurp is at the mercy of the people who not skilled at testing to find errors and fix them before release. Whether it is the developers or end users, neither are doing proper systematic testing nor should they be expected to do so.

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a_yank_lurker
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Re: backward compatibility NOT a thing with Micro-shaft

Backward compatibility with drivers should not be a problem. Over the years I have seen devices that worked on version of Bloat not work on the next version. Apparently with every release Slurp likes to fiddle with the device driver model. However these devices worked fine a various current edition Linux distros.

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US govt to use software to finger immigrants as potential crims? That's really dumb – boffins

a_yank_lurker
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Feral Blundiering

The adage 'to error is human but it takes a computer to really screw things up' comes to mind. It has the ring of doing something that fails miserably because it cannot understand subtle nuances.

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Microsoft touts real-time over-the-network pair programming in Visual Studio, GitHub ships it

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"Pair programming: perpetually training uninterested developers." or too many cooks ruin the pot.

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Oracle stockholders don't like exec mega-awards or gender pay gap transparency

a_yank_lurker
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Another Biting the Dust

The fact shareholders are restless should be an alert to the clueless wonders including Leisure Suit Larry. Restless natives are a good sign that something is really rotten even if it is not showing up in the balance sheet yet. The Minions are relatively minor cloud players and are relying on existing customers renewing their leases. Even though migrating from one relational database to another is no picnic is it not impossible if management decides they are much better off ditching Leisure Suit Larry. And from what the scuttle butt is dealing with the Minions is a royal pain when comes to shakedowns aka 'audits'.

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$232m blockchain startup Tezos faces sueballs for alleged investor fraud

a_yank_lurker
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Re: Burn baby burn...

ICOs, from what I have read, have less strict requirements than an IPO. One can argue whether this should be so. But less strict requirements means more due diligence and little bit of 'Caveat Emptor'. At best they should be consider like junk bonds - an 'investment' that is likely to go south but if it doesn't you stand to make a lot of money.

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Crouching cyber Hidden Cobra: US warns Nork hackers are at it again with new software nasty

a_yank_lurker
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Maybe Hire Them?

It seems every time there is a new nasty making the rounds the ferals spout off about the Norks. Given there are many who have the requisite skills world wide, I would not be surprised that the real source was a group out of France (to pick a random country) as it to be actually from the Norks. Also, most hacks are ultimately about getting money illegally by some means. Also, I would look at the location of the targets for a clue as to the origin. It is easier to mimic someone the more the attacker shares culturally with the target.

Computer security is not conceptually difficult however execution can be very difficult. A well done spearphishing attack can be hard to block as it relies on looking reasonably legitimate to the target. Even if the target is well trained and normally very alert, one mistake can undo all the security measures in the world.

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80-year-old cyclist killed in prang with Tesla Model S

a_yank_lurker
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Re: The Man Who Fell To Earth

@pbm00cs - Not just UK law but worldwide. Bicycles are vehicles per international agreement and various national laws with the same right to the road as car. What is unknown is what maneuvers both were doing at the time of the collision.

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Estonia cuffs suspect, claims he's a Russian 'hacker spy'

a_yank_lurker
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Re: Round up the usual suspects

Actually, hacking from inside Estonia or another friendly country (or having the VPN so configured) might buy some time before it is realized who is behind the hack.

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