* Posts by corestore

365 posts • joined 13 Jul 2007

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America's drone owner database is baaaack! Just in time for Xmas

corestore

Re: Not disputing that a national drone database is a good ideia

Nah. We don't even register guns here in NZ.

Canada gave it a go but scrapped it because they decided it wasn't worth the effort.

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corestore

If you want a laugh...

Have a read of this. It's long and in lawyerese but your jaw will drop on numerous occasions when you see just how breathtakingly incompetent the FAA have been in pretending they can regulate drone operations previously:

https://web.archive.org/web/20160308050730/https://www.kramerlevin.com/files/upload/FAA-v-Pirker.pdf

(The result of this brief? Executive summary: The FAA got their arses completely handed to them in court and their case was dismissed with prejudice; they had insisted they could ban commercial drone operations based on illegal improperly made regulations - which would still have been illegal even if properly made because they cited authority that didn't exist! They're deluded and demented; how did they ever think they could get away with this?!)

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Oregon will let engineer refer to himself as an 'engineer'

corestore

Re: Oregon is a nanny state

I would honestly run up the skull and crossbones and start opening gas stations with after-hours automatic pumps in more remote areas - and let the law be damned. One of those weird old laws that wouldn't actually be enforced is my bet. What on earth is the rationale behind it anyway?!

Sheesh, I remember my dad telling me about a station with an automatic petrol pump on the A9 in Scotland back in the 1960s - a long and, at night, notorious dry stretch of road in terms of petrol. Saved his arse on one occasion when he miscalculated his fuel consumption at 2am! This was in the days when credit cards were still fairly exotic and rare - so it took pound notes! If Scotland could do it 50 years ago, America can do it today! :D

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corestore

Re: I wouldn't trust his second opinion on a medical issue, so why roads?

"he's arguing that HIS information on how traffic and traffic signals work is just as valid as that of an actual certified Professional Engineer"

No, he's arguing - **with evidence** - that the engineers who implemented the system left bugs in it.

*facepalm*

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corestore

Re: Oregon is a nanny state

Eh? That's bizarre! What about after hours service? They must have an automated 'stick in your credit card and pump your gas' mode for after they close for the night!

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Canadian court gives limited OK to warrantless Stingrays

corestore

And what exactly...

Are the telcos doing to protect their customers from such devices?

After the Snowden revelations, various companies - Google, Microsoft etc. - moved publicly to help protect their customers privacy from the spooks - encryption on by default, encryption on the backbone, end-to-end encryption etc etc.

What are telcos (and indeed phone manufacturers) doing to combat Stingray? The square root of sweet fsck all as far as I can see. Do they have ANYTHING, or anything in the works, to ensure that customer devices ONLY connect to, and exchange data with, genuine cell towers???

It's THEIR networks the spooks are spoofing; they have both a right and a duty to secure their networks so they can't be spoofed! But over the years since Stingray has been known about, what have I heard? Oh, crickets. El Reg should be asking the telcos hard questions.

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London mayor: Self-driving cars? Not without jacked-up taxes, you don't!

corestore

Re: I've never understood...

Why? What's the point in taxing electricity differently according to the use to which it's put? it's _electricity_! There is NO logic to that.

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corestore

Re: I've never understood...

Increasing general taxation isn't very popular - unless it's perceived as very FAIR.

Abolish fuel tax. Increase income tax fractionally to make up the shortfall. Poor people will pay less. Average people will pay about the same. Rich people will pay more. People will see the fairness in that.

I have triple citizenship (long story!) including US. The US healthcare system in a soundbite: "Never in the field of human healthcare have so many paid so much for so little" - me!

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corestore

Re: I've never understood...

The unfairness is that it's paid by the same rate by rich and poor alike! That's not how a fair tax is supposed to work and I'm astonished so many people don't see it! Poor people should pay little or no tax; rich people should pay a lot of tax. Who would object to that as a principle? Why has it been ignored for many decades when it comes to fuel tax?

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corestore

I've never understood...

I have no idea why Brits (and to be fair many other countries) tolerate the confiscatory levels of taxation that currently apply to fuel. I suspect the 'boiling frogs' analogy applies. It defies all logic; roads are a common good; a necessary service best provided by government. Since they benefit all (directly or indirectly) they should be paid for by all, in a fair manner - paid for by revenue from taxes such as income tax where the poor pay little or nothing and the rich pay their fair whack (at least in theory). Taxes and charges HAVE to be related to ability to pay to be fair.

Fuel taxes (and things like the ridiculous 'congestion charge' or road pricing) are paid at the same rate by rich and poor alike; that's bad and wrong and evil; ALL products sold at retail shouldn't carry any more tax or duty or charge beyond basic VAT or sales tax - and that should be kept low. And, as Mr. Khan indirectly points out, it can cause a big problem for government revenue when people switch to an untaxed fuel! But the fair and correct solution is the opposite to the one he proposes; put a penny on income tax and abolish all fuel taxes.

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UK.gov 'could easily' flog 6m driver records to private firms this year

corestore

No. I checked. They have only two rules:

- it must be a UK address

- you must be able to receive mail sent there

You don't have to be the owner of the car, you don't have to be a UK citizen or even hold a driving license, you don't even have to be resident in the UK; you just have to supply a UK address where they can write to you.

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corestore

And THIS is exactly why the DVLA haven't had my actual real home address for many years, and never will have again. I register my cars at an address which is entirely 'air gapped' from my real life, so to speak - and anyone obtaining the address from the DVLA will learn precisely *nothing* about me, other than that I can receive mail sent there. I would urge others to pursue a similar course of action.

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From Vega with love: Pegasus interstellar asteroid's next stop

corestore

Oh sh!t!!!

It's the Pak!

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US government seizes Texas gun mass murder to demand backdoors

corestore

"But the company that built it purposely designed the operating system so that we cannot access it."

No you gibbon, it's not personal; they purposely designed the operating system so that NO-ONE can access it.

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European Commission refers Ireland to court over failure to collect €13bn in tax from Apple

corestore

This is bad and wrong. Before you get all huffy and grumble about 'Apple' and 'Billions', think about the *principle* here.

Apple complied with all Irish laws. They paid all the taxes that were due under Irish law. They did nothing wrong and nothing illegal.

The EC now says those laws themselves were illegal - laws made by the Irish government, which has sovereign and complete responsibility for the laws in their country. THEY made the mistake; why should Apple pay the price??!! If there's any penalty to be paid, it should be paid by the Irish government - NOT by Apple.

If the EC can do this to Apple, they can do it to ANY company - big or small. Think it through.

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Out, damned Spot! Amazon emits Echo ball with screen, inevitable ever-listening mic

corestore

It looks like...

A bedside Nest.

Can I hack it and put Linux and Hercules on it and run MVS on it? Time will tell!

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US Homeland Security Dept to collect immigrants' social media handles and more

corestore

Re: We don't DO second-class citizens

Talk about pedantic; you entirely ignored the second part of the sentence referring to AJA internment - which made it bloody clear exactly what I was talking about.

I fail to understand how punishing criminals equates to 'second class citizenship' anyway; all countries do that in some form or another. UK has 'second class citizens' by your definition too - like that chap in the news not so long ago who got an 'order' requiring him to inform the police before he had sex despite the fact that he had never been convicted of anything!

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corestore

Re: We don't DO second-class citizens

You pick the *one single exception* which is written into the constitution; yes the president must be a natural-born citizen. Otherwise this is slam-dunk illegal. Government can't treat natural-born and naturalized citizens differently.

The disbarring voting thing applies to felons and doesn't distinguish between natural-born and naturalized so that's a complete red herring.

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corestore

"The new rules apply to naturalized citizens of the United States and new immigrants"

I'm a naturalized citizen and best of fucking luck; you'll need it if you try that with me. We don't DO second-class citizens; that last time we tried that was when we put Americans of Japanese ancestry in internment camps. All citizens are equal - natural-born or naturalized - and have an absolute right to enter the USA. Try this and SCOTUS will tie you in a pretzel.

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It's high time we extend Freedom of Information Act to outsourcers

corestore

Massive DING there. And one of the biggest and best examples of why that should be is... internet censorship. Long ago the government outsourced the creation and maintenance of a secret list of 'banned' websites to the Internet Watch Foundation; almost all ISPs use that list to block websites. But since it's in the hands of a private organization the list is exempt from FOIA requests and cannot be independently investigated to see what's on it. That's absolutely bloody scandalous. Censorship is bad enough (IMHO) - but secret censorship is revolting.

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Don’t fear the software shopkeeper: T&Cs banning bad reviews aren’t legal in America

corestore

"Some publishers even specify a fine – up to $25,000 in some cases"

I hate it when every jobsworth with a clipboard and a yellow waistcoat pretends they can 'fine' people.

A fine is a form of punishment which may be imposed by a court after a criminal conviction as an alternative to prison.

What these people attempt to do is issue *invoices*. Only the nature of the paper used makes them unsuitable for toilet paper.

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Monkey selfie case settles for a quarter of future royalties

corestore

Re: There's an infinite number of monkeys at the door

Paging Mr. Hilbert! Mr. Hilbert to the front desk urgently!

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corestore

I fscking loathe PETA

This case for starters - but perhaps more importantly, this entire fscking thread:

https://twitter.com/BootstrapCook/status/905791298334023680

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The new, new Psion is getting near production. Here's what it looks like

corestore

Put a small screen and a numeric keypad on the front...

...and you've also reincarnated the Nokia Communicator! Now that I would also go for.

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Scientists, free software bods still worried about EU copyright proposals

corestore

An UPLOAD FILTER?!

Is this fscking CHINA?!

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Australia reviews defence export controls, perhaps easing cryptography research

corestore

What an appalling law!

This smacks of trying to police something that every single person concerned knows is utterly unpoliceable and unenforceable - but nevertheless gives a handy charge to pull out of the folder on occasions when the government decides it wants to make an example of someone; that's clearly the reason it's on the statute book at all.

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Northern Ireland cops hired cybersecurity biz to ID critics on Twitter

corestore

"Criticizing the police, while technically legal, will often turn out upon investigation to be linked with other offences..."

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Japanese sat tech sinks Sea Shepherd anti-whaling activists' hopes

corestore

Re: a matter of pride?

Big DING there. Nail, head, BANG.

A large part of the reason Japan is so determined to continue whaling is - IMHO - precisely because most people are pushing them so hard to stop! No-one likes being told what not to eat! Especially not in such a bullying judgmental way. Ignore them, leave them alone, and they'll probably give it a rest within a few years. Keep pushing them and they'll only get more stubborn.

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corestore

Re: I don't get it...

I tried it in Iceland. Wasn't bad at all; would definitely eat again. Tasted oddly exactly as you might expect - bit like a cow that had lived in the sea!

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corestore

De gustibus non est disputandum

Not sure why some people obsess over the diets of others. I'd sooner eat wild caught sustainably hunted *anything* than most 'products' of modern intensive farming. And it *does* appear that whale hunting at current levels of currently hunted species is sustainable.

I probably won't win many friends with this comment but it is what it is!

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Look, we know you're all hacking DJI drones. How 'bout a bug bounty?

corestore

Problem I've encountered is software unable to distinguish between altitude and height-above-ground.

If I want to fly a DJI up the side of a mountain (which I do when filming volcanoes!) I will fly up the slope in a kind of terrain-following style, never exceeding a height above ground of - say - 50m - but the bletcherous ghastly firmware is too stupid to realise I'm not flying straight up in the air and imposes an altitude cap of 500m above takeoff altitude irrespective of the fact the bloody thing is STILL only 50m above the ground! It's no wonder people have to hack them!

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India responds to internet shutdown criticism... by codifying rules to make it legal

corestore

"to ensure it is in accordance with the law – ie, that it was ordered "due to public emergency or public safety."

In what universe can public safety be enhanced by disabling communications?

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VW engineer sent to the clink for three years for emissions-busting code

corestore

That's more than a bit off. Creating code that's smart enough an engine can tell if it's been tested is pretty bloody impressive. Deserves reward rather than punishment; the punishment should fall on the company which took that code and misused it in production vehicles. Writing the code was no crime. IMHO.

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US cops point at cell towers and say: Give us every phone number that's touched that mast

corestore

Why do they think they NEED to store that information long-term? It's transitory by nature!

As always, the best thing an organization which cares about the privacy of their customers can do is **not store the data in the first place**. If they haven't got it they can't be compelled to hand it over.

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What code is running on Apple's Secure Enclave security chip? Now we have a decryption key...

corestore

Surprised this was even secret. Isn't it a fundamental principle of encryption & verification that the key should be the ONLY secret?!

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Read IBM CEO Ginni Rometty's letter to staff: Why I walked from Trump's strategy forum

corestore

IBM owns the government.

Seriously.

Remember they don't sell their mainframe operating systems; they *rent* them.

Who owns your OS owns your operation.

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So you're thinking about becoming an illegal hacker – what's your business plan?

corestore

"The basic difference is this: hackers build things, crackers break them.

If you want to be a hacker, keep reading. If you want to be a cracker, go read the alt.2600 newsgroup and get ready to do five to ten in the slammer after finding out you aren't as smart as you think you are. And that's all I'm going to say about crackers." - ESR

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We all deserve a break. Pack your bags. Four Earth-like worlds found around nearby Tau Ceti

corestore

We've found Ceti Alpha... what?!

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Just delete the internet – pr0n-blocking legislation receives Royal Assent

corestore

This is nothing to do with porn or child protection...

Remember when Cameron said that the police and security services needed - and would be given - the capability to know exactly which individual is using any internet-capable device at any given time?

Yeah. That.

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corestore

Oh how we laughed in NZ...

I live in the capital within sight of the parliament building... 6Mb/s and no chance of improvement for another 3 years!

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Judge makes minor tweaks to sex ban IT man's order

corestore

"There is no requirement for an alleged perpetrator to be found guilty of anything before the SRO punishment can be imposed."

SOPOs

ASBOs

Football banning orders

TPIMS

Criminal asset confiscation

Serious Crime Prevention Orders

Slavery and Trafficking Prevention Orders

Public Spaces Protection Orders

Need I go on? The number of ways in which governments have extended the 'order' state in the last ~20 years is beyond comprehension. The number of circumstances in which the proving of guilt is entirely optional and the lack of a guilty verdict is no obstacle to punishment is beyond frightening.

You're not sleepwalking into '1984'; you've been there for some time. The frogs are well and truly boiling.

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EU U-turns on mobile roaming fees: No 90-day cap after all

corestore

"In the latest proposals telcos operators will be allowed to question customers whom they suspect are buying a cheap sim card in one country and using it in another country with higher phone bills."

Errrr why? Aren't there single market rules here? Isn't this precisely analogous to the clearly-established right to use cheaper decoders and subscriptions sourced elsewhere in EU to watch football? What questions will they be allowed to ask??

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Australian universities drop tech services to dodge metadata retention obligation

corestore

You know a point I've never seen in discussions about data retention anywhere in the world? How a *lack* of metadata can be used - or rather misused.

Let's say you're very privacy-minded. You always use TOR and other end-to-end secure protocols - riseup.net for email etc.

So you have no - or virtually no - 'data retention' footprint. There's no metadata; just encrypted traffic to obfuscated destinations.

"OK boys... give us a list of everyone who's using your system but *doesn't* have any metadata... let's take a real hard look at them to see what they're up to... that's our list of suspects right there..."

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Nest offers its thermostat in three new pretty colors!

corestore

But can we still root it and turn it into HAL? This is serious.

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OpenBSD 6.0 lands

corestore

Well I'm really more of an anti-VAXxer...

I don't care what people say...

36 bits is here to stay...

%DECsystem-10 continued...

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corestore

Bugger.

So I won't be able to run it on my VAX....

http://www.corestore.org/VAX780.htm

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Cops to let the private sector chase after cybercrims' assets

corestore

Not another one...

Where do we start?

ASBOs

Football banning orders

TPIMS

Sexual offence prevention orders

Criminal asset confiscation

Yet another addition to the list they've been working on for the last 20 years or so. A list of circumstances where the proving of guilt is entirely optional - and the lack of a guilty verdict is no obstacle to punishment.

I'm fucking glad I left this God-forsaken country 20 years ago. Place is going to hell in a handcart.

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Julian AssangeTM to meet investigators in London

corestore

He's not been charged with anything. They just want to question him.

Is there any good reason they couldn't have simply questioned him on Skype at any time in the last few years if they really wanted to?

Assange is a prize plonker with an ego the size of a small planet - but his present circumstances are just suspiciously convenient.

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Android's latest patches once again remind us: It's Nexus or bust if you want decent security

corestore

It's Nexus or bust - full stop!

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Get ready for mandatory porn site age checks, Brits. You read that right

corestore

This is nothing to do with porn or child protection...

Remember when Cameron said that the police and security services needed - and would be given - the capability to know exactly which individual is using any internet-capable device at any given time?

Yeah. That.

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