* Posts by Oh Homer

810 posts • joined 18 Oct 2013

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Behold iOS 11, an entirely new computer platform from Apple

Oh Homer
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Headmaster

Re: "Hazy watercolor memories... Of..."

About five minutes ago, as I have a bank of working Amigas right here on my desk :)

Admittedly one of them has a CyberstormPPC accelerator running at a whopping 233MHz.

Even so, it's unfeasible that a quad-core, 1.9GHz device could be outperformed by a 233MHz machine, much less a 7MHz one, and yet...

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Oh Homer
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Meh

Re: "you'd have almost no apps"

This modern idea that software has to be written in some bloated framework with a bloated VM or else there will be "no apps", is in blatant contradiction to the fact that the likes of Amiga OS was written in BCPL and it's games and apps were mostly written in low-level languages, and yet there was no shortage of software available, in fact there was a veritable explosion of it.

The inevitable conclusion is that today's programmers, or at least the millennials, are lazy, uneducated and incompetent, and the centrepiece of their workflow is something that would look more at home in Toys R Us than at a software engineer's desk.

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Oh Homer
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Paris Hilton

Re: "network lag"

Not sure why you were downvoted, as that seems like one perfectly reasonable explanation.

I also suspect a lot (most?) of it has to do with the VM bloat of Java Dalvik/ART, and the fact that Android in general is a convoluted mess under the hood. That wouldn't explain why iOS has roughly the same performance issues, though, since AFAIK it's fully native. I presume Windows mobile is using some .Net/CLI garbage.

Or maybe it's that relic known as Secure Digital storage, or the pitiful speed of ARM main buses, or some other bottleneck that isn't obvious.

Whatever it is, it's truly shocking that the technology is moving so slowly that it's still outperformed by thirty year-old systems from the 16-bit era.

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Oh Homer
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Alien

Innovation? We've heard of it

Good to see Apple finally embracing the forty-year-old desktop paradigm of multitasking on mobile hardware.

Not that other mobile vendors are any better.

Seriously, it never ceases to amaze me how multi-core, multi-gigahertz, multi-gigabyte mobile systems can be so excruciatingly unresponsive compared with my 16-bit, 7MHz, 512KB Amiga from the 1980s.

How can this even be possible?

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RIP Stanislav Petrov: Russian colonel who saved world from all-out nuclear war

Oh Homer
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Headmaster

Re: Without MAD we would have had several other World Wars

The problem with that is the assumption that there will never be anyone insane enough to ignore the "mutual" consequences of the "assured destruction", and judging by the warmonger mentality of the players, that assumption would seem to be false.

That's without even considering the possibility that such consequences might be triggered accidentally, as per this article.

There had never been a world war prior the WW1 either, but it still happened eventually. The assurance of a sustained period of relative peace is sadly a false sense of security (I say "relative" because the fact is that humanity has never actually experienced an era without war, somewhere, to some extent ... most of which these days is instigated by the US, supposedly in the name of Freedumb®).

The law of probability dictates that anything that can happen, will happen, eventually, and with lunatics like Trump at the helm, it may be sooner than we feared.

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Downloaded CCleaner lately? Oo, awks... it was stuffed with malware

Oh Homer
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Terminator

"CCleaner, was recently acquired by Avast"

Damn, there goes another of the very few half-decent apps for Windows.

Like the "food" manufacturing industry, eventually your choice of software vendors will be reduced to about half a dozen, and then one. In fact, the way things are going, eventually there will just be one company that owns everything, with one CEO who is, for all intents and purposes, the new emperor of planet Earth.

I read a fantasy novel once that described a world in which monopolisation is considered to be a bad thing, and a mythical beast called a "regulator" is supposed to stop it happening. It must be out of print now, because nobody seems to be reading it.

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New HMRC IT boss to 'recuse' herself over Microsoft decisions

Oh Homer
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Unhappy

Re: "Lets just privatise the Government"

You're about 40 years late to that party.

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Apple's 'shoddy' Beats headphones get slammed in lawsuit

Oh Homer
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Headmaster

Re: "They used to be good, though!"

You have to go back much further than the turn of the century, to around the time of Wozniak.

Since then, Apple's philosophy has pretty clearly been to gouge rubes with polished turds.

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Oh Homer
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Headmaster

Nothing new here

Apple gear has always been all style and no substance.

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123-Reg customers outraged at automatic .UK domain registration

Oh Homer
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Mushroom

Nominet is behind this

Given some of the comments below, it looks like this is some sort of "initiative" driven by Nominet to promote their latest fad TLD, since a large number of supposedly unrelated registrars all seem to be using uncannily similar spiels.

IMO these registrars are certainly in violation of the Unsolicited Goods and Services Act, the Data Protection Act, and probably more besides, but as the instigator of this criminal activity Nominet should also be held accountable.

Therein lies a fairly large problem, though, as Nominet seems to be a law unto itself, with basically no oversight whatsoever, much like the EPO.

Of course, referring to Nominet as though it's somehow a separate entity from the registrars it's supposed to regulate, belies the truth that it is in fact "controlled by a very small number of large internet registrars". So going after Nominet actually requires chasing the registrars that control it. And where does one go to complain about those registrars? You guessed it ... Nominet.

That's a nice little racket they have there.

Might be time to have a quick word with the House of Lords Select Committee on Communications, and see if they can put this dog back on a leash.

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'Don't Google Google, Googling Google is wrong', says Google

Oh Homer
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Pirate

Don't "Google it"!

This demand will likely be obeyed with the same rigour as Hormel's demand that we stop blocking "spam" and Adobe's demand that we stop "photoshopping" images.

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Apache Foundation rebuffs allegation it allowed Equifax attack

Oh Homer
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Mushroom

Re: "You get what you paid for"

Right, because no proprietary software has ever had a years-old unpatched security vulnerability that the vendor sat on for months before fixing.

Oh wait...

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Boffins: 68 exoplanets in prime locations to SPY on humanity on Earth

Oh Homer
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Alien

Fait accompli, mate

My theory is that alien civilisations already discovered us a long time ago, took one look at us killing each other in endless wars, keeping most of the population living in abject poverty while a tiny minority live in obscene opulence, and strip-mining and poisoning the planet, then shuddered in horror, before quickly panning the telescope to the next system, marking the spot on their chart with a biohazard symbol.

Incidentally, I really want that telescope.

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Dude who claimed he invented email is told by judge: It's safe to say you didn't invent email

Oh Homer
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Headmaster

"Invented" vs "Produced"

I see this bullshit all the time, mostly from Apple (or rather its starry-eyed fanbois, since I can't ever remember any statement from Apple claiming to have actually invented anything, although they are very fond of the word "innovate", which is supposedly a different concept - improving rather than creating).

And here it is again, this time some guy who merely "wrote a program", but who thinks that somehow qualifies as an "invention", because it's (correctly) protected by ... copyright, which has absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with invention.

Executive summary: Invention is the method, production is one implementation of that method.

Neither is ever entirely unique, but is merely the accretive result of existing works, which is then temporarily afforded state protection for the purpose of "promot[ing] the progress of science and useful arts".

This is a privilege to induce participation (or more bluntly, a bribe), not any sort of moral entitlement (specifically because your work is merely the result of "standing on the shoulders of giants"), hence the temporary status.

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Stand up who HASN'T been hit in the Equifax mega-hack – whoa, whoa, sit down everyone

Oh Homer
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Re: Can't even be arsed to use an Equifax cert?

I rebelliously ignored my antivirus' "phishing" warnings and had a peek at equifaxsecurity dot com, which turns out to be a page entitled "M-I-C-K-E-Y-M-O-U-S-E" and has an embedded YouTube video of some weird Japanese pop thing called "Hinoi Team - Night of fire".

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Oh Homer
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Holmes

Re: "Did I miss something?"

Yes, a British upbringing.

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Oh Homer
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Flame

Re: Assisting "every US consumer in the country"

And screw everyone else, such as the "unknown number of Canadian and UK customers"?

I'm asking seriously, because unfortunately I'm probably one of them.

But then, as per the headline, probably so is everyone else who's ever had a bank account.

It certainly looks like enough of the right sort of data has been pinched to commit identity theft, on an epic scale.

Personally I'd like to know why such sensitive data is even accessible over the internet, instead of being secured behind a private network, as per trading systems and other sensitive financial data.

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Oracle 'systematically denies' its sales reps their commissions, forces them to work to pay off 'debts', court told

Oh Homer
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Headmaster

Re: "get behind bad things happening to salesmen"

The sort of cold callers that everyone complains about are not salesmen, they're canvasers, and their "wages" are shit, so you'd have to be pretty desperate to be one. Been there, done that, couldn't afford the t-shirt.

Actual salesman only ever follow hot leads, which is to say you have explicitly expressed an interest and he's just responding to your request. You had to get past three other people to get that far: a lead generator, a canvaser and a confirmer, or in other words you ticked the "yes" box, answered a cold call, then accepted the follow-up. Decline any of those and you'll never hear from the salesman.

Canvassing is a shit job and I hated it, but you should pity us for having to prostitute ourselves out of desperation, don't hate us. Hate the companies that employ such spammy tactics then pay sub-minimum wages to those who actually generate all the profits but never see any of them.

The all-in-one roving salesman who generates his own leads, canvases door-to-door then closes and takes the commission is a relic from a bygone era, and that's probably just as well because in the present climate he'd probably get his head blown off by some trigger-happy "patriot" defending his "whatever-amendment" rights on his porch.

As for Oracle's salesmen, I'm sure they're on very good money, but it'll still be a small fraction of what they're making for the firm, so stiffing their salesmen is pretty low even for Larry's mob.

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Indian call centre scammers are targeting BT customers

Oh Homer
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Mushroom

The solution

Personally my solution is to never answer the phone. Ever.

Frankly the only reason I even have a phone line at all is because it's the only way I can get an internet connection, although I'm reliably informed that a so-called "copper pair only" service is technically feasible, except the only UK ISP that actually provides this service (A&A I believe) doesn't cover my area.

I used to do call screening, but now I don't even bother listening to messages. Anyone who has any legitimate business contacting me does so by email. If you attempt any other method, or you're not on the email whitelist, then I remain blissfully unaware of your existence.

Meanwhile, for those looking for something a little more aggressive than mere defence, this guy (SFW-ish) has a rather interesting solution.

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It's official: Users navigate flat UI designs 22 per cent slower

Oh Homer
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Windows

Re: "Billions in lost revenue"

Can't attest to the veracity of the number, but I can tell you that I have never personally met anyone who likes "flat" designs, and as a matter of simple observable fact most people tend to avoid things they don't like. So the question of how long you spend looking at "relevant" (i.e. money making) content versus trying to figure out navigation is actually moot, when you're disinclined to view that page or any other part of that website at all.

Considerably less anecdotal proof of this can be found in the pitiful market share of Windows phones, and the fact that the only way Microsoft could get anyone to use the flat-UI desktop equivalent was by sneaking it onto their machines by stealth. Although having a global monopoly on the desktop pretty much guarantees a captive audience that you can foist any old garbage onto with wild abandon anyway, so its debatable how necessary this subterfuge really was, other than as a means of continuing to spread its tentacles into a PC market that is essentially dead.

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UK engineering software firm swallowed in £3bn merger with France's Schneider Electric

Oh Homer
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Re: Tart

Cherry Bakewell is obscure slang for a certain activity that begins sexually but ends in violent humiliation, so this may be an example of very dry humour, suggesting that what at first seems mutually beneficial is really just a hostile takeover, and the pleasure will end abruptly with a bloody nose.

Or maybe I'm overthinking it, and it's really just about "swallowing a tart".

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Leaky S3 bucket sloshes deets of thousands with US security clearance

Oh Homer
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Coffee/keyboard

Here comes the LinkedIn spamocalypse

9,400 LinkedIn invitations later...

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Microsoft sets the date for Fall Creators Update

Oh Homer
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Re: Android names

Of the 15 Android releases, only 4 were named after American products, and 3 of those were internationally recognised words. The one exception was Froyo, which as a word, basically doesn't exist outside America, much like "Fall" (meaning Autumn).

However, naming an OS after internationally recognised food is one thing, but giving pet names to a set of patches is taking things to new heights of silliness, especially when 95% of the world's population has no idea what the hell you're talking about.

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Oh Homer
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Mushroom

Re: This is a UK site

Yes, but the phrase "Fall Creators Update" is being peddled by Microsoft, and El Reg is just the messenger.

Apparently it's Microsoft that believes this is Planet America.

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Oh Homer
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Headmaster

Re: "You don't have to use Windows, there is choice."

Maybe you don't have to use it, but you do have to pay for it anyway, whether you want it or not, as a non-optional component of every new PC.

As ever, in that respect, there is no choice.

There wasn't much choice presented to the victims of Microsoft upgrading Windows by stealth either, and even those Microsoft bothered to warn first were simply presented with a dialogue box that stated, in essence, that they could agree to the upgrade now, or later, but presented no option to decline. Most people assumed, wrongly, that the close button would be interpreted as declining the upgrade.

There also isn't any choice if you are merely one of the cubicle monkeys forced to use whatever your company procurement team have foisted on you, which 99% of the time will be the latest version of Windows.

You also don't have any choice if you are a commercial software developer who absolutely requires a copy of whatever garbage Microsoft has foisted on the great unwashed masses, or face destitution pursuing an alternative career in janitorial services.

The false "choice" presented by Microsoft apologists is highly disingenuous. It's like one prison boss telling Cool Hand Luke to Dig a hole, and the other telling him to fill it back in. Oh yes, we have a "choice", and either way we're screwed.

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Oh Homer
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Alien

WTF is a "Fall Creator"?

Is that the formal job title for someone who trips people up?

And WTF has an OS update got to do with "Creators" anyway?

Does this mean that only arty farty types have the privilege of Windows updates now, and we cubicle monkeys, pointy hairs and the rest of the 99% who never create anything are left to rot?

Please, will one of Microsoft's semi-human MVP bots explain this alien syntax, because it doesn't compile on anything I have here?

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Snoops 'n' snitches auditor IPCO gets up and running

Oh Homer
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Big Brother

Ministry of Truth

Someone should let the UK government know that Nineteen Eighty-Four is supposed to be a work of fiction.

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Net neutrality comments close: Let the BS begin!

Oh Homer
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Terminator

Framing the argument and loading the question

Dear survey participant, we in the Global Corporatocracy want to be the gatekeepers to our the Internet®, as part of our larger ambitions to monopolise every last speck of dust on this planet, so we would greatly appreciate your views on the current Threat® to National Security called "Net Neutrality", and what we can all do to stop it.

How strongly do you agree with the following statement?

I am happy to pay forty times the current rate for an Internet service that guarantees that I will receive an equally slow connection from every website and cloud service, in order to uphold some unpatriotic ideological principle favoured by communist terrorists.
  • I very strongly agree that the above is a statement
  • I strongly agree that this is an important statement
  • I don't disagree that the statement is strongly agreeable
  • I agree to make strong statements
  • I am strongly in favour of making agreements
Thank you for your participation. With your help we should be able to retrieve your money that was stolen by communist Net Neutrality terrorists and return it to its rightful owners, to further fund our ongoing efforts to ensure that you will always have a high speed internet connection directly to our paywall.

Love,

The Global Corporatocracy Umbrella Corporation.

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Judge: You can't call someone a c*nt, but a C∀NT is a cunning stunt

Oh Homer
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Headmaster

Re: Etymology of cunt

The earliest reference I could find was the Latin cuneus meaning "wedge".

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Oh Homer
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Headmaster

Re: Etymology of cunt

According to my offline etymology dictionary, the term was actually coined by the eponymously named Cunty McCuntface, a primary school headmaster in rural Scotland, circa 1975.

Admittedly I actually wrote that dictionary, when I was 8, so I may be somewhat biased (and off by a few centuries).

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Linus Torvalds slams 'pure garbage' from 'clowns' at grsecurity

Oh Homer
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Linux

Re: SELinux is not the answer.

I used to have to deal with SELinux a lot, in QA and package maintenance. It's been a long time, but IIRC the thing I disliked most about it was the fact that it was so obscenely complicated to administer, mainly because it required learning a whole new "language" (obscure "contexts"), and the resultant policies actually needed to be "compiled" into very inaccessible binary blobs, that even developers had a hard time understanding it, so your typical end user wouldn't have a hope of configuring it properly if at all.

Indeed the only actual "configuration" we saw from pretty much all the users was to disable SELinux to save having to deal with it, and the number one complaint, other than persistent breakage from buggy or incomplete policies, was the fact that no one felt comfortable blindly accepting security policies that needed to be created by complete strangers, because they were the only ones who understood SELinux well enough to write those policies (broken though they often were).

Any security mechanism so complicated that nobody understands it is patently not really secure, no matter how good it might be in theory.

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New York Police scrap 36,000 Windows smartphones

Oh Homer
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Childcatcher

The Broken Windows Theory is Broken

Because it completely ignores the real cause of the problem: poverty, and instead further disenfranchises the victims by treating them all like criminals (including those who are not yet criminals), thus actually transforming them into the very criminals that this flawed theory purportedly seeks to avoid creating in the first place.

The result is a sort of "genocide" of the poor, where the police end up adopting a shoot-first mentality, typically armed with military surplus weapons, and the victims end up rioting, causing further escalation of this vicious circle.

Meanwhile the actual criminals on Wall Street, who created this mess in the first place, get off scot-free.

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Oh Homer
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Windows

"I don't care if you're Jesus fucking Christ"

Yup, definitely NYPD :)

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Linux for weirdos ..

Oh Homer
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Seems normal enough to me

Sounds like a guy who just really likes raisin toast and jam, whilst talking about Void Linux on a lazy Sunday morning.

Personally I'd have gone with a bacon butty and Gentoo, but that's just me.

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'Open and accessible' spambot server leaks 711 million records

Oh Homer
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Linux

UIN aliases

Been doing that for years. Not only does it allow you to stop the spam by simply removing the alias, but it also irrefutably fingers the culprit.

One memorable example, a few years ago, was when I signed up to Interflora to buy flowers for someone, using the address {YYYYMMDD}-interflora@{domain}.com, and some time later I started getting spam from a completely unrelated company, sent to that address (no I didn't tick the box that agrees to share my details with third parties).

Dead giveaway, plus no way for Interflora to deny responsibility.

After much escalation to increasingly senior staff, eventually some operations manager conceded that they had outsourced their CRM to a company called CheetahMail, which had "mixed up some mailing lists". Purely by accident. Honest.

Whatever. Terminating my relationship with Interflora was literally as easy as hitting the "delete" button.

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Two million customer records pillaged in IT souk CeX hack attack

Oh Homer
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Terminator

Re: "What is safe today will be hackable tomorrow"

But that is in fact the definition of "secure", to anyone who really understands security.

Anything that can be made can be broken, and will be broken, eventually. That includes everything from encryption to parking meters.

The real objective of security is to delay breaches long enough to mitigate them by other means (e.g. escape or obsolescence), not to prevent those breaches forever, because that is impossible.

That is the only sensible approach to security. Don't start by assuming it's infallible, but know absolutely that it will fail, then race to the next security measure before it does.

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AMD agrees to drop $29.5m to make Llano go away once and for all

Oh Homer
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Paris Hilton

Is it just me...

Or is AMD being sued because, essentially, the PC market is in the toilet?

Strange.

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Trump-hating Iranian is the new Uber CEO

Oh Homer
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Trollface

Clearly Muslims hate America...

Which is why they flee their Muslim regimes and flock there to be paid huge salaries, fully embracing the American Dream® of worker exploitation.

BCC: D. Trump.

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Tech firms take down WireX Android botnet

Oh Homer
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Meh

No software solution for stupid

Well, there is, but the solution may actually be worse than the problem, in some respects. It involves treating all users like children, penning them into a walled garden, and "protecting" them from things that are, in many cases, not really dangerous at all, but are just in conflict with the vendor's attempts to sell your soul to the highest bidder.

Oh, and some are legitimately dangerous, which makes a fantastically convenient pretext for that nice big wall.

And ... it turns out the this wall doesn't actually keep nasties out after all, but just ignore that and look at the Wookie!

The result is that the rest of us suffer restrictions imposed for the sake of, erm (how shall I put this kindly?), the Great Unwashed, who frantically click on all manner of shite, without the slightest care in the world about such trivia as user reviews, provenance or developer reputation, in a seemingly desperate bid to stuff their devices with as much malware as possible.

One of the more annoying consequences of this mindless stupidity is that people like me, who root their phones to be able to do a few things that might actually be useful for a change, become technical pariahs to the likes of banks and, much more bizarrely, as I discovered quite recently, bus companies.

Yes, rooted devices are blacklisted from viewing a fucking bus timetable.

So, to the idiots of the world, I'd just like to say a big "thank you". You bring joy to my life.

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NSA ramps up PR campaign to keep its mass spying powers

Oh Homer
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Headmaster

Re: "a pretext to justify oppressive legislation and powers"

Sorry to answer myself, but I just realised that the bigger interest served by this pretext is actually the weapons manufacturing industry, a.k.a. the War Economy.

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Oh Homer
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Big Brother

Re: "bad guys wanting to kill you"

This is not new. There have been "bad guys wanting to kill you" for millennia. So why, after thousands of years of murders, including everything from alleyway muggings to full scale genocide, is it only now supposedly necessary to violate the entire world's privacy, and transform supposedly "free nations" into prison states that treat every citizen like a criminal suspect, ironically in the name of protecting the very freedoms that have now been decimated as a supposedly necessary measure to protect our freedoms?

That's like executing someone to protect them from being murdered.

It's ridiculous.

It's even more ridiculous when you consider that you are more likely to be killed by your bathtub than by a terrorist, so why is the government not spending trillions in taxpayers' money on fighting a War on Bathtubs®?

I also suspect that the "threat" was entirely manufactured by the same people who now offer us "protection" from that threat, as a pretext to justify oppressive legislation and powers that would otherwise have been violently rejected by the electorate. The majority still complain about the inconvenience of it all, certainly, but ultimately they reluctantly accept this oppression as a supposedly "necessary evil".

To quote William Pitt the Younger:

Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves.

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Ad blocking basically doesn't exist on mobile

Oh Homer
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Re: Doesn't exist.. my ass..

Yup. Root -> Xposed -> AdAway -> AdBlocker Reborn.

Done.

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AccuWeather: Our app slurped your phone's location via Wi-Fi but we like totally didn't use it

Oh Homer
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Trollface

Re: "Windows is becoming more and more unusable"

Becoming?

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Oh Homer
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Headmaster

Re: '"Unix Philosophy" would be utterly unusable'

You're conflating the Unix Philosophy, which is basically just a set of engineering principles applied to the field of software development, with an existing ecosystem of software that has, historically, failed to implement those principles in a manner that is stupidly simple to use by novices (mostly because software developers are engineers not nannies, and unlike commercial software operations Free Software developers don't have departments of non-engineers dedicated to dumbing-down their software for the masses).

There is no particular reason why those principles could not be implemented in a novice-friendly manner, and indeed most mainstream distros have already accomplished that, indeed in many respects they're far easier to use than Windows, as a visit to any Windows forum will confirm.

But certainly you're right in that if a typical Linux distro were simply ported straight onto a smartphone (and many already have) then the result would not really be a smartphone, it'd be a small portable device running desktop Linux, and largely unusable in the context of a smartphone.

My wish is not for Arch Linux running on a pocket-sized device, which has already been done anyway, it's for a smartphone OS that adheres to the principle of engineering simplicity, removing the bloat and complexity that causes the sort of issues we see here, yet still provides a highly functional and intuitive UI that is accessible to everyone.

The Unix Philosophy is not somehow antithetical to that goal, in fact it's absolutely essential to it.

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British broadband is confusing and speeds are crap, says survey

Oh Homer
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Childcatcher

Re: "usable speeds"

I agree completely. If you pay more then you should get more, but that doesn't mean that if you pay less then you should get something that is not fit for purpose, because that's just paying for nothing, which is basically just theft.

The internet should not only be for the rich. A basic, usable service should be accessible to all.

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Oh Homer
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Re: "270 african parrots"

You mean up to 270 African parrots, because here in the deepest, darkest jungles of Scotland I get a maximum of about 4½ parrots, or less when it's raining (which is 364¾ days of the year).

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Paris nightclub red-faced after booze-for-boobs offer exposed

Oh Homer
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Childcatcher

Re: "the more pissed you are"

What? You mean businesses whose sole purpose is the sale of alcohol exploit drunk people for money?

Outrageous!

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Oh Homer
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Headmaster

Re: What is a leftie

Lefties were Montagnards who sat on the left-hand side of the French Assembly, initially at the Palace of Versailles, and represented the interests of the common man, mostly the commoners of Paris, in opposition to the Girondistes, who represented the interests of the elite, primarily King Louis XVI of France.

Today, a Leftie is anyone who opposes any political ideology, policy or initiative that could most succinctly be characterised as Social Darwinism, which for the most part encompasses Neoliberalism and Neoconservatism, or in other words that which now sadly qualifies as mainstream politics.

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Oh Homer
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Joke

Re: Staline

Salt mines were a Staline solution.

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Germans force Microsoft to scrap future pushy Windows 10 upgrades

Oh Homer
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Coffee/keyboard

"great upgrade experience..."

Haha! Yes, "great" ... for Microsoft.

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