* Posts by DCFusor

353 posts • joined 12 Oct 2013

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US cities react in fury to FCC's $2bn break for 5G telcos: We'll be picking up the tab, say officials

DCFusor
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Re: Pronunciation

Sadly, what he's doing isn't illegal, and government is full of such people, we're just noticing this jerk because he's pushing the outrageous limit - which seems to be monotonically increasing. (See SEC and banking regs) Every single person I know who is aware of the issues thinks this guy needs to go, no matter what his affiliation, in this case, that's obviously the "green money" party above all others.

If it was illegal, well....how many other revolving-door lobbyists and politicians and regulators would you have to bust. I vote for "all of them"...but it's not happening, is it.

I repeat, corruption isn't limited to a particular party or individual, and after enough time, it's really hard to root out, as the people who would are themselves implicated if for no other reason than letting it get this bad.

It's not like congress, which changes hands every so often during my life, couldn't have made this kind of thing illegal. Crickets. Follow the money. It's even more obvious when you look at who is getting money NOW than assuming (probably correctly) that there's a payoff later. You don't have to wait to see who gets telecom money, it's public record, and and save you looking - it's pretty much all of them.

Blaming on one of the fake-dichotomy sides is lazy thinking.

Both are guilty.

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DCFusor
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Re: Yet another GOP scam to pay for the $2 trillion giveaway to the rich

Obviously some partisan thumbs here.

Who forgot who just gave a huge gift to big Pharma, and the medical insurance companies with a bill they wrote for themselves where "you have to pass it to see what's in it".

And who gave Big Pharma the "we won't negotiate drug prices for gov aid"

And "we'll deregulate the banks"

And "we'll destabilize the Middle East (several administrations, actually) to the benefit of the MIC.

I see all sides of the aisle well represented in some very bad and corrupt things here, and it's probably why there isn't more investigation/firings/jailings - turning over that rock is dangerous to both.

It goes back to the time before I was born in the '50s. Give me a break...

It's just that no one wants to understand that the other guy being wrong doesn't make you right...

Thinking for yourself is too hard?

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DCFusor
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Re: Yet another GOP scam to pay for the $2 trillion giveaway to the rich

If you think this "best government money can buy" thing hasn't been going on for the last 60+ years (that I've been alive to watch), independent of who is nominally in control, you have a very short memory or are willfully being blind.

Pot, meet kettle.

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The curious sudden rise of free US election 'net security guardians

DCFusor
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Right - if it's free, you're the product as the author implied - "The acronym TANSTAAFL was used by Robert Heinlein, the science fiction writer, in his 1966 novel, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress."

Which, interestingly, is about a revolution itself. One aided by a real AI(!).

These days, you're the product even if it isn't free - plenty of double dipping to go around.

Who watches these watchers? Some of them have pretty obvious agendas. Most aren't competent to do the job. All would love to have that juicy data, which would inevitably leak and be used in some partisan manner.

Too slow to be useful would seem to be the best case possible, though recriminations after the fact also seem to cause a lot of pain and are used as weapons by whoever didn't win.

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DCFusor
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Coffee/keyboard

So

Any vetting that can be fooled, or that has an agenda already, can be a better attack vector than not having it at all - since once you have it, you tend to trust it. What could go wrong?

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Holy macaroni! After months of number-crunching, behold the strongest material in the universe: Nuclear pasta

DCFusor
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Re: Nuclear pasta

OF course this is utterly bogus. A gram of iron, say made into a sheet, in space has strengh x per gram.

A gram of neutron star material out in space would more or less instantly be a cloud of expanding and beta-decaying neutrons with zero strength. Ending up as a puff of mostly ionized hydrogen and a few low energy gamma photons.

Doh, it's well known and studied in labs that things under crazy high pressures act differently while under those pressures. Not that it has any use other than study of matter *under those conditions*.

For example, we can make some things superconductive under high pressures at higher than the normal transition temperatures. But they don't stay that way with the pressure off.

So the above is yet another science press release exercise in click bait. Real scientists are getting tired of this, as it tends to devalue and discredit the few real things we mange to accomplish.

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Flying to Mars will be so rad, dude: Year-long trip may dump 60% lifetime dose of radiation on you

DCFusor
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Re: Career != Lifetime

phuzz is correct, as I know from personal experience.

Due to a fusion reactor test that went "too well" despite being a nearly dry run at the smallest scale the lab could manage, I got some tens (maybe even 50-100) of milliSieverts in perhaps 20 seconds.

Mostly high energy neutrons but also plenty of low energy gammas from the power source, and some high energy ones from neutron capture events.

I was very sick for a few weeks, and maybe anecdotal, but have had to have two cancers cut out of me in a couple of years since. I'd not recommend the experience even to an enemy (if I had any).

The space dose intensity is far less than what I god, but it's no joke. A few dead cells here and there, the body tosses them out with the other garbage. A significant number, all sorts of nasty things happen including auto-immune response to the dead cells...weeks of puking and passing out the other end ain't fun at all. Honest.

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Ubuntu flings 14.04 LTS users a security lifeline, chats some more about Hyper-V

DCFusor
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Re: Why stick to 14.04?

While systemd has indeed made quite the mess of anything around here non-standard, when the workaround to some "WONT_FIX" bug breaks in turn in systemd rev n+1, saying an upgrade is no cost really misses things like -

it takes a long time to rebuild a complex machine, get all the apps again, set up all the stuff in /etc and so on if the upgrade doesn't quite work (which I've already had happen here).

I'm pretty quick and know a few tricks for getting lists of installed packages for the non custom stuff - some of which still work in the new rev - and editing that huge file to remove the old distro-specific stuff once I spend time learning what that even is, and usually remembering the custom stuff I have (for example, in-LAN discovery checks, monitoring, failover) and getting that all in too. Lots of times that only takes a day or so per machine with the testing one needs to do...

That's not even close to zero cost. That's some real heartburn.

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No, that Sunspot Solar Observatory didn't see aliens. It's far more grim

DCFusor
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Once the state discovers they can lie

without any real consequence, you can expect quite a lot more of this kind of thing...oh wait, there already is quite a lot more obvious "can't possibly add up" stuff going on.

Funny they indemnify themselves from any recourse/lawsuit/etc from the public, often using the words "national security" as if they were an unbreakable magic spell.

I agree - calling Bombastic Bob, where are you when we need you?

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No wonder Oracle exec Kurian legged it – sky darkens as cloudy tech does not make it rain

DCFusor
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If I understand,

It's simply cheaper to hire some on prem experts and use open source than to pay Oracle for just licensing alone, much less support. Even a bean counter can easily be made to understand that one.

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FCC boss slams new Californian net neutrality law, brands it illegal

DCFusor
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On track to get fired

If I read the law right, it's anything but illegal. CA can refuse to use any contractor for anything, the feds can't force contract terms. And Pai is supposedly a lawyer? His spiel looks like alternate facts to me.

And he's so universally unpopular - and I hang with a wide group of viewpoints - I know zero people, even the most "right wing" who think Pai should be in his job even 1 more minute. Most would assign a time in the past when he should have been booted. Doesn't matter what partisan religion one is, they are unanimous that this guy needs to go.

Now if Trump can get up the "you're fired" thing on this - which he evidently liked to do once - then he'd be a heck of a lot more popular. And that seems important to him. Hope he gets the same kind of info on Pai's lack of popularity I get. I doubt he'd miss an easy chance to be a hero - maybe he's waiting for the telecom checks to clear first, but man, what a political slam-dunk that'd be.

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Equifax IT staff had to rerun hackers' database queries to work out what was nicked – audit

DCFusor
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Sounds like a cover story

Someone with that access couldn't have diddled logs, and the DB, and used some ex-filtration merely to cover their tracks so there'd be a way to save face and keep on with biz as usual?

I'm not a black hat, but if it were me - I'd have more imagination than just to steal credentials. How about creating some? Make your associates effectively rich, fix bad credit, and so on.

If you were in OPM, why not give your spies good background checks and even security clearances?

It's pretty short sighted and crass to merely ex-filtrate or erase for ransom - which tends to get you caught as someone knows *which* money to follow. How about making so many false trails no one can find the one you used? Huge amounts of activity are normal in these DBs - look at all the articles here about storage and other products to help make them work under load - it'd be trivial to sneak a few fakes in. And very hard to separate them from the legit stuff without an extremely laborious, slow and expensive comparison with a paper trail I've not heard of anyone doing since the '70s.

Is is that both sides of the equation are 100% - no exceptions - that dumb, or is it that I'm the smartest guy in the room? I find the latter rather hard to believe. My previous posts prove I'm not!

Either it happens and no one notices, or they do and keep mum. Just copying a database is the silliest thing you can do with it. Other people call that a backup.

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Veeam holds its hands up, admits database leak was plain 'complacency'

DCFusor
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Black Helicopters

A VERY interesting issue

Was mentioned that I've been thinking about for quite awhile with all the reported leaks - including some important ones like credit agencies or OPM.

They never mention if the hacker modified the database, which as this article points out, is not hard at all if you have access - you needn't be so crass as to just delete the whole thing for ransom.

What if you had some other agenda - some version of "deep fakery" in mind. Screw up someone's credit rating or security clearance in a way that would be near impossible for them to dispute. Or, perhaps better - GIVE yourself a good rating in credit or security and pass yourself off as someone worth of tons of money or access to secrets.

It's interesting to me how silent the authorities are on this one...I didn't know there were that many crickets on the planet. It has to be a concern, else every security person having anything whatever to do with those outfits should be fired or maybe even tried in court.

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Microsoft adds Windows module support to PowerShell Core while Amazon unleashes it on Lambda

DCFusor
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Re: @"Two reasons:" How come they can't learn bash, perl ?

Not that anyone will do anything the easy way these days, but from perlfaq8:

How can I convert my shell script to perl?

Learn Perl and rewrite it. Seriously, there's no simple converter. Things that are awkward to do in the shell are easy to do in Perl, and this very awkwardness is what would make a shell->perl converter nigh-on impossible to write. By rewriting it, you'll think about what you're really trying to do, and hopefully will escape the shell's pipeline datastream paradigm, which while convenient for some matters, causes many inefficiencies.

Personally, I find perl easier than bash due to all those weird variable and quoting conventions.

(and having learned C and perl first)

Yes, you can write insane read-only code in perl but you needn't. I've been asked what language my perl source was as it's so readable, it's a matter of discipline, another quality in very short supply.

So I guess doing things right is right out, Bob.

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Russia: The hole in the ISS Soyuz lifeboat – was it the crew wot dunnit?

DCFusor
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Re: Zero G

Having the ISS control electronics inhale metal chips would be even less fun.

And, you're pointed out a way to look for where this happened - no loose chips would indicate the ground as a location for the drilling.

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Trump shouldn't criticise the news media, says Amazon's Jeff Bezos

DCFusor
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And with similar effects - pretty close to zero other than some idiots' blood pressure.

I think you win the innertubes today, AC. You should take credit next time.

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DCFusor
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Not to worry. By piling on with the ad hominem attacks, they've managed to ensure that those who voted and won the last set of referenda will not lose again for a very long time. They don't seem to realize that if they stop playing by the rules - and they clearly have, a consequence is that the deplorable opposition might also stop. s /Brexit/Trump and you have American social justice identity politics with no other changes, though this Brit said it the best I've seen yet. I probably don't agree with the rest of what this guy is pushing, and I've been around too long to believe that these clowns in the news - on any side - have much to do with the real powers that run the world, but this can be a fun circus to watch if taken with a grain of salt - or a shovelful.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9T4dGAxtO0

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Redis does a Python, crushes 'offensive' master, slave code terms

DCFusor
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Re: We can't be having descriptive nomenclature.

I have some old General Radio gear that had sexless RF connectors. What would we call them today?

Trans-??? They were used on RF signal generators, from the days when frequency was understood to mean cycles per second unless otherwise specified. Kind of like we don't say "liters metric" or "Feet imperial". No need.

More importantly, would be be fined in Canada for not calling them whatever the right thing is today?

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DCFusor
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Re: Makes me glad I'm old, accomplished,

Yeah John, I screwed up. Though it's for certain that there's a side in the fake 2 sided distraction that does this stuff, and one that never does this stuff, and it's pretty obvious. I will repent if I can manage.

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DCFusor
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Makes me glad I'm old, accomplished,

And have some actual virtue, so I don't have to do fake-virtue-signalling. I was unaware that my software had feelz, and am damn glad that in my code, slaves respond to their masters with far more alacrity than in any human relationship that ever existed. It'd be wrong for humans or even insects to act that way, but this is SOFTWARE, you morans. I am glad the valves in my petrol engine slavishly follow the camshaft. And my house heater slavishly follows that the thermostat tells it to do, rather than freeze me or burn my house down.

What a silly bunch of crap. Reminds me of some insights by CS Lewis who basically mentioned that if you want to destroy humans, the tool to use is messing up their ability to communicate by buggering their language - the holding places for the mind.

Look what's happened to "conservative" and "liberal" - conservatives (a label I used to be proud of) have become right-wing nuts - and liberals - these people with this CRAP - are anything but liberal or progressive, and since they are supported by huge mega-corps who are now doing censorship, are the actual Fascists - isn't the definition of that the point when you can't tell whether the oligarchs or the government actually are in charge? Bingo. The liberals aren't - they are forcing me to be like they want.

That's not liberal...that's totalitarian.

Hopefully I'm done with the subject. Partisanship has driven me off some otherwise worthwhile sites - I just want to talk tech, honestly, and am sick of the fake angst. This is one site I've been able to stomach as it's pretty low here, and usually with decent humor. A good laugh is, well, good.

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First it was hashtags – now Amber Rudd gives us Brits knowledge on national ID cards

DCFusor
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Re: Not wishing to trust Big Gov, but--

The doctor is right. Look at the US for example - we did our best to vote out business as usual...

and now we have intense media-driven discord, and a soft coup going on by those we never get a chance to vote for or against. I'm pretty sure that since the orange clown managed to skip the usual pre-election selection processes that really do the choosing - they don't care which preselected jerk we vote for after that; those status quo corrupt types are feeling uncomfortable and are dissing hell out of a guy (who is, in fact a clown, don't get me wrong here) who started out wanting to end the constant wars, eliminate tarriffs, and generally do actual change for the better - the previous guy didn't do one thing he promised (all those shovel ready infra structure jobs would have been nice...and so on). The joke here was "do you want change from that hope you bought that never worked?".

But establishment-slave O guy got a pass - and a Nobel prize for starting and running more war-days than anyone in history .... Two of them, one after he'd done all that murder - using our money.

Go along with the unelected, and you get a smooth ride. Don't and well, look around and see for yourself.

People don't seem to - or want to- realize that the Hitchhiker's guide had it right - those morons are there only to distract from the real power.n When they don't docilely read their teleprompter lines, there's issues from those we have no choice about. Can we vote the media or the bureaucracy out?

How did the government brainwash us into agreeing with the idea that populism was bad? Doesn't that derive from being popular with the populace and doing what they want? Yes, popular leaders have done bad things in the past, But that's just how they got in, it isn't what made them bad - it's when their popularity was based on lies that there's a problem.

Enjoy the migrants the MIC caused to think "anything would be better than staying at home being bombed by the west". /rant

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DCFusor
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Pint

Same here. Seems the politicians are real good at not mentioning the obvious places this stuff goes, but it's obvious that's why they are salivating to get it. Have one on me too.

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DCFusor
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When all you have is a hammer, everything starts to look like your thumb, is that it?

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Has anyone seen REM lately? No, we mean rare earth minerals

DCFusor
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Misinformation abounds on this

Daedalus is correct, there's a little more to it.

The US has plenty of ore itself - there have been several miners working it, last I heard of was MolyCorp.

The thing is, worldwide, it seems all or nearly all RE ores also have significant thorium in them - so not only is it hard to get the RE's apart from one another, you have this waste product that most people are pretty fearful of, it's fairly radioactive.

US regulations have shut down our miners and processors by making the cost noncompetitive.

China was cheap...so no one cared much. They are not stupid. For one, they've begun (awhile back) trying to sell only value-added products - magnets instead of the elements for example, by pricing the raw stuff higher, and for two - realizing the current situation, no competition because they drove them all out of business, can be a potent bargaining chip with the rest of us. Whether deliberate or not, it is what it is. Same idea as WalMart causing all the Mom and Pop shops to go out of business, looking around, and then raising prices (or Amazon, or...the idea is the same regardless of the actor).

Those who want to use up the thorium in breeder reactors need to lend me some of that they are smoking, or maybe it's just lack of education. Breeders all melt - 100% have. U 232 which is that Th breeds into is weaponize-able, and fission products are a little different from that, but just as bad. We're not short of uranium and aren't building more plants...hmmm. I could easily debunk molten salt but it'd take a long post to describe how that chemistry utterly fails when atoms are split - which one gets the fluorine/chlorine/whatever? Does it eat the reactor walls in the meanwhile? How do you add more as the number of atoms increases with fission? What about radioactive noble or electronegative elements in the products. Their dream is pure fantasy. If we want the stuff, we're just going to have to stash the thorium till we find an actual profitable use for it.

I do nuclear work for a living. India's been trying to get the thorium cycle working for a couple decades. I say let them figure it out first on their dime and with their lives.

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All aboard the Hype Cycle! What's DataOps? Well, it has no standards or frameworks. Got it?

DCFusor
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What about actually good and useful ideas?

Do those have to go through this cycle, or are they just adopted?

Seems to me the ones going through the cycle are the ones that give someone

the opportunity to "assume authority" and charge for teaching how to implement said

idea, which as JoS mentions, is often an old one anyway with a new name or spin.

Which does, of course, generate ad revenue and paid postings in media for those

selling "whatever we can spin that makes you need my services" - and without the

media component, there's no hype at all outside the watercooler...it's quarantined...

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Dear America: Want secure elections? Stick to pen and paper for ballots, experts urge

DCFusor
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Security guru Bruce Schneier pointed this out quite awhile back on his blog. While I don't always agree with the guy, he knows his stuff - but is often far too soon in today's TL;DR no attention span society. I think he pointed this out >12 years ago?

Well, no one is perfect. He also said, and not that long ago (when you get old 8 years ain't that long), that the internet was no threat in re infrastructure, because everyone was using leased lines (that is, everyone who'd hired his security biz maybe). But far from everyone.

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DCFusor
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Thus eliminating all independents - only the R's and D's in the US can afford to have someone at each polling or counting place, and those two toss ballots for 3rd party people over their shoulders. I've seen it.

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People's confidence in orgs holding personal data is... on the rise?

DCFusor
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I think

It's because by now *everyone's* personal data has been compromised...the value of mine is highly diluted. While things like identity theft happen, most people don't experience it - and why worry, as there's not much you can do when the credit rating agencies, the Office of Personnel Management, and others who know a lot more about you than Google or Facebook, or Amazon, or some Telco - have been hacked and the datasets distributed already. There's simply nothing more to know - if the "bad guys" know who works for the government and even details of their little kinks, your credit info - utterly intrusive - then how much does it matter if some "good guy" or at least someone I benefit doing business with ALSO has some, but lots less - of the same info?

Yeah, people avoid bad thoughts (some of them) or complex things, but they are also, rarely, - rational. How should you feel when there's no point and nothing you can do about it anyway?

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US military chucks $2bn at AI, Google touts machine-learning data search, and more

DCFusor
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Re: He shoots, he scores - one less enemy installation to worry about...or was it a primary school?

I agree, mostly, and the fear is that "AI" will be used past its ability, to be sure, in ways that can be lethal. I was doing NNs and ML in the previous craze in the '90s or thereabouts and am well aware of the limitations and how little actual progress there has been - just more data, more cycles...And doing some things (like using more layers with reduced precision as a substitute for proper design and data prep) we knew were wrong back then - and they're still wrong. It just takes less skill to produce "something I can show the boss/investors" to do it the wrong way.

A properly designed network/classifier, though, even back then, could produce as a byproduct or even as a parallel process, a confidence in whatever it was deciding - and even just produce a list of the top few most likely for another entity (process, or human) to handle...

So your comment about "throw up it's hands" at least used to be true for ML systems too - if the designers weren't hiding the flaws to keep those dead presidents coming. They frequently said, or could easily be made to say "I dunno, you take a look".

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Activists raise alarm over insidious creep of surveillance in the UK

DCFusor
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Not fond of the idea

that legislation will always be playing catchup. It's a frigging excuse for incompetence, and allowing some to take advantage over others.

Was it not illegal to defraud and steal and call in swat and on and on long before the internet existed?

We had plenty of laws, and still do.

We need around one more law - and it'll never happen due to who would be limited by it - government, and of course, the big money making outfits that exist only because there's no law limiting or banning the collection of whatever data on you and selling it one way or another.

Governments even buy data from these companies - Experian, Equifax, Google, Facebook, telcos...stuff they can't legally collect on their own without a warrant, but is legal to buy. And it's not like you can opt out of almost all of this to let free market forces work....I could go on to the point of death by boredom.

Seems like the last time a government passed a self-limiting law, or for that matter, one that didn't advantage the big scale outfits at the expense of the little guys - was in the US - around the time the constitution was written. And now...if you "identify" as a constitutionalist, that's one of the "indicators of possible terrorism" at least in the US. As is having a long term supply of food, like you know, all the farmers who built this country always had, because life...and things.

Not a fan of partisanship. Yes, the far-right is bad. The far left - cry-bullies, SJWs, and even "normal progressives", trigger and offend me as well, and have a track record of being more, not less, controlling over what I'm allowed to think/believe/do. Someone isn't being intellectually honest. They're ALL bad and want to use you like cattle. How about we all just try to be good to each other and leave it at that?

All the bad stuff is law *leading* tech, not trailing it....pay attention.

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Is someone chopping onions? Oracle cloud boss bids colleagues emotional farewell

DCFusor
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It could just as easily be

Leisure suit Larry left a message, like a revolver loaded with one bullet, on his desk.

He runs a department that Oracle really wants to push, yet has to hide the results of because they are so bad. Oracle is not known for being nice to failures. Or anyone else for that matter.

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Nope, the NSA isn't sitting in front of a supercomputer hooked up to a terrorist’s hard drive

DCFusor
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Re: How are they going to make sure the "enemy" buys back door kit?

Simples, make using kit without a backdoor a jail-able offence or equivalent.

After all, you have nothing to hide, right?

They already can force a password to be revealed in some cases. Forgetting is contempt of court.

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Uncle Sam wants tech toolkit to snoop social media stock scammers

DCFusor
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Sounds just like

Some of the contracts my ex-employer MIC company got when I worked for them - carefully tailored so that while looking like a competitive RFQ, it could only be fulfilled by the outfit I worked for. The real collusion that's been going on as long as I've been alive. Very rewarding for contract officer and contractor alike.

As if they couldn't just post an abuse email and read it, or heck, like any trader simply read the usual sources. Takes one guy.

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European nations told to sort out 'digital tax' on tech giants by end of year

DCFusor
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Not the owners

The customers, which always includes you even if you have no direct commerce. All businesses that stay in business pass ALL costs through. Even if you're not a customer yourself, the outfits you are a customer of pay, and then pass that cost to you.

It's a damn lie that gets propagated by those who'd pick your pocket to buy your vote that you can tax "those other guys" to get some goodies for you. It all, always, comes around...

And the suckers keep buying it. Don't let wishes make you stupid. It doesn't work like that.

I'm not saying don't tax these guys at all. I'm just saying there's no free, it takes some work to figure out who pays and whether that benefits the rich or poor more, and so forth. All I see here is "he's got some and I want it" level of analysis and understanding...

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Cloud-slingers get 3-week extension to pitch for Pentagon's JEDI contract

DCFusor
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Re: Enterprise-level computing in the war cloud

On one level, obviously not. No one is going to look out for #1 with more motivation than #1.

And with a multinational company - whoever it is - #1 ain't the USA, though it might be on up there on the list. Profits and job security are going to be above it a good bit.

On a deeper level it comes down to who owns who and why any war might be fought - in other words, who is getting the profit from "war is a racket"? Following the money gets interesting, if difficult.

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DCFusor
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Well,

They've screwed it up in-house, and of course, it'll be even worse outsourced. The only way that's not the case is if the contractor does better vision management and systems design than the customer - and can enforce that, which is exceedingly unlikely - even the customer doesn't understand what the best solution would be here, and who knows their issues better?

A good insight here: "critics object" are not named, but are there any without ties to one of the contractors unlikely to win the bid? Bueller? Anyone? Dontcha love the spin that implies some nameless source with great judgement is calling out some error (but never specifically). It's rare any entity without an agenda gets heard at all these days, outside things like this comment section - and some of the people here have agendas too (I'm not guilt-free myself).

Yeah, putting all your eggs in one basket is often stupid...but if the problem was in large part due to lack of coordination, then many baskets (the way things are) can be worse. This isn't a simple problem..

It's more complex than that wildly successful F-35 program with the trivial logistics issues, right? Oh, wait!

The temptation to allow or deliberately produce lock-in will be overwhelming, and and again, we'll find out who truly has the power here - how'd that attempt to break up Microsoft go, again? Or the breakup of the monolithic AT&T, which after a few years came back as Verizon....we just lost Bell Labs, no big deal, they never did any good, right?

And inevitable, as no one's going to want to take the time for a proper design anyway. As is usual with these things, some existing methodology will be jam fit to the situation, and will be a poor fit - no matter how this eventuates.

Reading this I should have posted as amanfromneptune or something...

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Spies still super upset they can't get at your encrypted comms data

DCFusor
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Re: Traitors

Yes, people who think things like Tor protect them are delusional. Someone has a record of this MAC being online at this instant talking to that IP address (which might be a Tor node) and someone else talking - connect the dots, that's what Utah is for, right? My golly, they think ISPs don't have logs?

That aren't routinely pass over under gag orders? We forget what we want to forget.

You could avoid having a tracking device (known as a phone), which I do, just because I'm cheap and happen to think my time is my own - anyone who knows my number is not entitled to free entertainment by me at their pleasure. If I'm out and about, that's my business.

But even that - or lack of social media accounts, now brands one as suspicious - "what are you trying to hide?". It's now hard to get a job without a reference to such (glad I'm self employed), hard to get credit without a long record (glad I don't need it - and they know more than the spooks do about you, oh wait, the spooks buy that info - the stuff they aren't legally allowed to just collect themselves).

It goes on and on. As I said, tyranny is already here. The frog is boiled, so to speak. It's all done by controlling the narrative and making people believe this is the best way - at least most of us.

They're just trying to nab the few with critical thinking who saw through it all and fell through the cracks.

Propaganda is now legal, passed by the political party most crying about the current situation, which is ironic, but also just plain sad. I keep leaving this link here - you can work it out.

https://phys.org/news/2011-10-darpa-master-propaganda-narrative-networks.html

Remember, anyone who resists tyranny can (and is) just be defined as a terrorist, and we're done.

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DCFusor
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Mushroom

Why is no one reacting to the obvious?

Unelected "officials" threatening legislation that can only be done by elected ones?

So, how? Blackmail of those in office? Yet another abuse of the spook's powers?

Tyranny is already here, they're just disguising it in the hopes we'll knuckle under more easily.

All they want is more...

Two:

Metadata is all they need anyway. If they can demand clear text from anyone producing interesting metadata, you're done. Don't tell me the known-comprised Tor is going to save you, that's nuts - and ask anyone they wanted badly if it worked for them - hint, it didn't.

Don't tell me the Swiss or others can't be turned - the IRS has already. These guys have more, not less, influence. People sure have selective memory when it's so nasty they'd rather pretend it doesn't exist.

If they see something they are interested in and can't read, they have other ways and use them. They just don't want to have to do it "in bulk" as the very thing they're trying to avoid by this push is the revolution it would spark when people notice a thinning out of their friends and neighbors by force - the pitchfork and guillotine kind of revolution, not some fake tech "disruption" that only changes who gets how much of the skim - a little.

It's clear they are not worried about *our* security, but their own - the obvious targets are people trying to organize around the truth. Governments are supposed to be afraid of their people, but not act this way in response - they're supposed to be our servants. This is a very thinly disguised attempt to make tyranny permanent - nip any resistance in the bud (other than state created fake resistance to some puppet to make it look like there's hope from escape from the true powers that be).

It's going to be so much fun when you can be jailed - or worse - for refusing to "decrypt" stuff from /dev/random - they can then claim it was anything they want, eh?

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Cobbler feels the shoe-leather: An IP address is still not a human

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Re: IPv4

I think the lack of need for NATting is one of the things preventing IPV6 wider adoption, myself. Maybe not the main thing, but it's there.

I'm super grateful that it's kinda hard to see my LAN through it, and really, little to nothing here needs to be directly accessible by the net at large. Responses to HTTP(s) requests - via NAT - are more than plenty.

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AI image recognition systems can be tricked by copying and pasting random objects

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Joke

Re: what is a chair?

I've seen pictures (or it didn't happen) of people sitting on elephants....thus, the AI just got lucky, it iS a chair.

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Windows 0-day pops up out of nowhere Twitter

DCFusor
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Re: Burning_this_is_fine_dog.jpg

No, it's China, in the bathroom, with Dept o State email server forwarding, get with the times!

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GlobalFoundries scuttles 7nm chip plans claiming no demand

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Pint

Wow

More intelligent analysis in 5 or so comments here than in a year's worth of punditry. At least that outfit that rhymes with Gardener.

Beer for all.

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Smut slinger dreams of AI software to create hardcore flicks with your face – plus other machine-learning news

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Re: Porn

That rates an upvote for "insightful", jmch. Most people don't think things through. Especially if that would hurt whatever other agenda they want to use spin to push.

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Judge bars distribution of 3D gun files... er, five years after they were slapped onto the web

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Bad Logic

Real guns aren't hard to get in the US, generally. Much easier than putting together 3D printing and so on, as well as cheaper, and easily made just as untraceable with a little grinding. Most crime guns long ago lost trace-ability - many are simply stolen themselves, anyway. At least if you believe the FBI, difficult as that is becoming. Or surveys of criminals in prison for violence.

Would you rather have some wacko using a plastic gun as likely to blow his own hand off with the first shot, sending a bullet weakly in some direction almost but not as intended, or a real gun that can accomplish a mass shooting?

I want all my attackers to have a plastic gun useful for somewhat less than a single shot. I'm in a lot more trouble if they use a good one, no?

And you can tell the agenda - an administration simply does nothing to violate the constitution - no constructive action of any kind - but somehow this thing is their fault!

Try stuffing crypto back in the box. OK that didn't work, lets have a war on poverty. Um no good, lets try war on drugs - that'll make them unavailable, and no one will shoot anyone over drug turf, since they have so many other means of making a living /s. See the pattern?

A decently working shotgun takes a piece of pipe, a cap, and a nail, if you want to get fancy, you can add the rubber band, and the only secret is the diameter of the pipe...and lots of people know that, or chemistry of explosives or whatever other nasty - if you have the will, you can find a way to do bad things - the will is what needs addressing.

This is ignorant virtue signalling that will have - if it works - a negative effect on the problem, lucky it won't work.

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Winner, Winner, prison dinner: Five years in the clink for NSA leaker

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Re: This is serious business

We have no way of knowing that what she "revealed" wasn't a completely made-up trial balloon to be used for "controlling the narrative". Get rational, people. These agencies tell lies for a living, to justify their own existence - and if you've worked for one for any length of time, you know that. A document on an agency disk drive isn't automatically verdicial.

Who is even going to check if she even serves that time, vs a couple paper records noted, an ID change and move to somewhere else with a nice reward for doing the work? No one checks, they know this, this would be more believable than a lot of other memes that get floated.

They even pay outsiders to help them learn how to lie...or whatever you want to all this stuff.

https://phys.org/news/2011-10-darpa-master-propaganda-narrative-networks.html

Note the date. This isn't a new thing, and they talked about it right in the open.

This is just one example. These people need enemies to keep themselves in business.

"If apple didn't exist, microsoft would have to invent them". Work it out.

So there's really no way to tell what actually went on, everyone who claims to know something either has an agenda to spin, or isn't revealing any actual check-able details. As computer-competent people here know, if you haven't seen the logs, someone's story doesn't mean a lot. Especially if your believing it helps them - time to be double cautious about it.

I'm not saying the Russians (and a host of others, probably) didn't try and sometimes succeed. That would be just as silly a thing to assert. I think the fact that all this foo-foorah happened only when the "wrong" person won an election - one who skipped the pre-election selection process by the two wings of the unitary party - is somewhat telling. Oooh, a threat to the embedded status quo - must destroy by any means possible, and we're too dumb to wait for it to happen naturally. No, I don't like him either, but dirty pool is dirty no matter who is doing it.

Follow the money and power, and well, a lot of the hyperventilating on the news seems, well, like an attempt to "control the narrative" and distract from the failures of our systems to do other than milk the average person - handy to always have someone else to blame it on, eh? Forget taking responsibility for ones own actions and the results, that's so trite.

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Chap asks Facebook for data on his web activity, Facebook says no, now watchdog's on the case

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Re: 'It's not clear whether he also has a FB account or whether he's a non-account'

Charles, that was kinda my point above, which collected some downvotes...maybe some SJWs feewings were hurt or something.

Point is - it's obvious where the power lies here. Any fines of any transnational never amount to even a day's cleared profits, as the Reg writers themselves often point out. Which shows who is in actual control, and the rest is theater.

These days, if you want to keep your data - which has value, like other stuff, you have to earn it by perhaps blocking the collection of it...even if you don't have a FB or Google or whoever account -

You might have to lift a finger or spend a little skull sweat, as you can count on the fact that those who are making money aren't going to figure out how to defeat themselves for you with "that one weird trick".

Sorry if I come across as too cynical. Being an old fart in this world,, and having touched matters of high finance, politics, and computer science, well, it'll get to ya if you keep your eyes open and "follow the money". Cui bono - except now you don't even have to buy it directly - you can be monetized without your own direct input. (taxes pay for it, the things you buy,...and so on)

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DCFusor
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Re: 'It's not clear whether he also has a FB account or whether he's a non-account'

djack - of course they have no justification. But this isn't the 1950's - they have "feelings" and "are offended" they can't make money by selling whatever they *want* to collect about you to people who *want* to buy it - and after all, they did half the work finding that stuff out about you - you only did the unpaid other half by giving it to them....

This is the new age - feelings matter more than what we used to think of as right and wrong. It is what it is. I don't have to like it, and neither do you, but that doesn't make people's lack of old-school morality revert to a good state. And might always meant right - it's just that these days, the might is more transparently NOT resident in governments - who are owned in fee simple by these big transnationals.

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Intel rips up microcode security fix license that banned benchmarking

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Holmes

Re: Silly season...

Well, while you can make a box secure...if you wanted to actually, you know, USE the thing - as in maybe take funds transfers from customers with it...you'd sorta need it connected to the customers. Kinda the only business model that actually exists that's really a business model anymore - other than defense contracting where they will mail you a fat check.

And this IS the age-old status of computers, and well, a lot of other things.

Make it super secure - it's unusable.

Make it usable, it's not super secure.

And all the king's horses and men want it different, and try to make it so, and at most make things a little better at the margins, while the lock pickers also improve their skills. It's the same old arms-race forever, with super job security for all the actors!

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'Oh sh..' – the moment an infosec bod realized he was tracking a cop car's movements by its leaky cellular gateway

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Re: It should just work

Oh, so the secret password of all the devices should still be the same for all and not need to be changed?

Oh, make it different for each and write it down for them - that'll work...it'll never leak...

Tun off the functionality? Then it just doesn't work.

People who use the word should be can't point to a working way to do what "should" be done...sigh.

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Shiver me timbers: Symantec spots activist investor Starboard side

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Yes, typically these sharks will borrow a ton of money using the company for collateral, pay themselves and a few others with the loan, then skip and let the company go bankrupt and attempt to pay out the loan in receivership. I've watched that one a few times.

While you could feel bad for the employees of a failing company, as it surely wasn't quite entirely their own fault (and if they're competent, should be able to find better employ) - you could also take some joy in the fact that whoever loaned the money - a different set of sharks, is going to get the short end.

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