* Posts by DCFusor

130 posts • joined 12 Oct 2013

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Who's using 2FA? Sweet FA. Less than 1 in 10 Gmail users enable two-factor authentication

DCFusor

I don't even use plastic - I pay cash

Last I looked (been awhile) they wanted my mobe number, you bet - and I don't have one - security by non existence. SMS? I've heard of it, and will not have one until after I get a facebook account, sometime after I die.

They don't seem to understand that not all of us are phone addicts. When I'm out and about - that's MY time, not to be interrupted by any moron who has my number and who is bored and wanting free entertainment from me. I happen to have a car with a cel phone and have no minutes and don't even know the number. No need. If I need 911 - that'll work. Else, bugger off.

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VMware: New year, new job – you're fired

DCFusor

Shareholders == owners

In the case of most companies, they wouldn't exist at all without them - total jobs = 0 for that case.

Now, that's for money raised when the company sells shares to the public. That's relatively rare - most shares are just sold back and forth once in existence. But being able to sell shares from the company to investors is absolutely crucial - like having a credit rating vs being judged as a fraud - should the company need to raise more money (and many do, moreso when times are tough).

I'm not apologizing for the system here - my own company when I started and ran one - worked with my own funding (and as the sole shareholder, I also kept *all* the profits). I put in all the risk, so I got all the gain. I'd like to think I treated my employees well - nearly all of them would tell you so - they're all rich now, except one who embezzled, who was firied than then jailed.

The system is what it is. A company doesn't magically have huge flows of cash raining down on it, believe it or not. Try starting and running your own for a real education. Making ends meet isn't trivial. A lot of these RIF's are a case of a PC way to lose the non-performers. You can't just fire losers these days without a lawsuit, so any other excuse...

You find this out real quick if you put out a request for resumes and read them closely...there's no shortage of people who claim to be good at whatever, but a huge one of those who actually HAVE BEEN good at whatever and produced results - they all still have good jobs.

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Dear US taxpayers, 4.5 BEEELLION of your dollars were blown on unapproved IT projects

DCFusor

Not defending anyone here, but the deficit last year was 666 billion, about 40% of which was simply printed out of thin air, and thus pure theft by devaluing our money. Asset inflation makes some feel richer till they find out their portfolio will only buy 3 eggs and a loaf of bread. (See Zimbabwe for a recent example)

45 bil is chicken feed compared to that - it's actually far better than most parts of the government do. Not good, but if you look, it's not hard to find far worse...(cough f35 cough - and that's just one).

Now if you want to discuss our over 20 trillion debt - or the fact that that's only 10% at most of the total liabilities we keep in separate books (Social Security and friends) - we could get that all important sense of proportion, even if we accidentally eat that piece of fairy cake.

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PowerShell comes to MacOS and Linux. Oh and Windows too

DCFusor
Gimp

bash + awk + sed < perl

Really, more need not be said.

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Wondering where your JavaScript libs went? Spam-detection snafu exiled npm packages

DCFusor
FAIL

Foot gun fully operational

I'm having snark overload.

So, (no expert on web dev, I do REAL code) - programmers too dumb to either write their own or manage their dependencies - lo, even checking or unit testing them before deployment - depending on a questionable source that can change anytime, put online by someone who neither knows nor cares about them, working for companies too cheap to serve their own bits or pay real programmers, fail regularly when the things they depend on, but shouldn't, glitch? Do I have that right?

Is this a devops things or is it agile? The stupid all runs together for we old guys.

Too bad I retired 20 years ago. In today's market I'd be worth SERIOUS bucks. My stuff actually works.

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Mine all the data, they said. It will be worth your while, they said

DCFusor

Riiiiight

Sure, as a friend of mine at CERN says - apply enough filters and you're guaranteed to only see what you thought you'd find....and your setup becomes useless if something unexpected happens. In other words, just plain useless.

Did I see "and the old approach wasn't friendly to app developers"?

It's supposed to be their adversary and tell them where they messed up. Test equipment isn't something you're supposed to fool with - or have to - old school, its's supposed to be around 10x better than what you're measuring, which generally comes with maturity, not fiddling, despite that being the DevOps religion.

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1 in 5 STEM bros whinge they can't catch a break in tech world they run

DCFusor

Had I not been a white male

I'd have been dead sure I was being discriminated against. I was the hottest thing in engineering, or so I thought, and I did have fantastic results - patents (for the company) projects on time and in budget, you name it, I stormed the heights. This was back in the day and I noted no real discrimination in the outfit other than ageism, in this case, the older, more experienced people did well, and yes, even back then being black or female was good for your career - if you were good at your job. So was there discrimination in favor of those people? Not really - they were good. Maybe they had to be better than average to even get an interview, but since I took part in those too - there just weren't many applying.

On the other hand, half-competent other white males had a vise grip on any higher level jobs. Comging as I did at the very tail end of the boomers (I'm now 64) - everyone was 5 years older than me, and no matter what, I was "the kid".

Well, experience (and then running my own company - I really was good at this stuff) showed me that for one thing I was a right arse back then, and frankly, quite well suited for the job I had, but would have been a disaster had I been promoted to management - only doing that in my own outfit showed me that being a great engineer has little to do with being a good manager/owner.

It still frosted me. And as I said above, I'd have been DAMN SURE it was discrimination if I'd had the least excuse to believe that, and even being white male, I latched onto age as a discriminant.

The sad truth is, it's a pyramid and it's narrower at the top. No matter how many would be a good fit there - and I wasn't - there's only so much room anyway. And those who are there and have the power, naturally tend to hang on to it - and can, because they have the power.

Thus in my older age, I put most of this down to human nature, race and gender independent. Our best two software people were a white male and a purple female (who was in town for NIH to study how she was alive despite essentially no heartbeat - she really was purple).

I do agree with Damore very slightly - there are differences between all pigeonholed types, with a lot of overlap. So what? If you suck at math, don't whine non one's offering you a math job (and sucking at math increasingly means you're likely to be male - last 3 really good maths types I met were female). If you're great at facilitating - you might be a manager or a secretary, male or female - and anyone who's been in or run any big outfit knows damn well it could mostly function without any but the secretaries...

In short, in a highly competitive business like I used to be in - beltway bandit consultant to the IC - there was no discrimination that mattered at all - it was pure meritocracy. Whining about the outfit not obeying the peter principle is just human nature...Honest, you're better off if they don't - the Reg is full of tales of clueless bosses and other jerks promoted for some reason other than they'd be good at their new job.

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FBI says it can't unlock 8,000 encrypted devices, demands backdoors for America's 'public safety'

DCFusor
Mushroom

Public safety issue

To copy someone I modded up on slashdot -

A generous reading would agree that good encryption IS a public safety issue - we're all safer as a result of having it without backdoors for anyone, including thieves in blue, who are known to lose keys and abuse every power given them as well as some they weren't given - repeatedly and since their very beginnings.

They lost our faith deservedly and should have to earn it back.

If they protected us at all, much less against those others we'd use encryption to be safe from, maybe we'd consider it. But as they remain one of the main threats to our safety and welfare, while taking our money in both taxes and civil asset forfeiture, I do't think we should give them any faith at all.

This feels like a water torture attack (um, yet another abuse they're guilty of). If we just give in, they'll shut up about it (they say) - like a spoiled child - and like that child, will just figure out something else to whine about anyway.

Did they notice that if they get backdoors to encryption, that online finance (including bank to bank) will not work anymore, and we'll step WAY back? Oh, in that case my understanding is that they have complete compromise of the plaintext via intimidation and things like FATCA already.

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In 2018, how are the big storage 8 handling the industry's challenges?

DCFusor
Happy

Maybe funny

At least to me...my off-grid infrastructure has always been hyper-converged with itself..snicker.

But what makes me chuckle is the indistinguishability between the acronym for this made up hype term and that for...hydrochloric acid.

Bet it sells really well to anyone with a smattering of chemistry?

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Cool disk drive actuator pillar, Seagate – how about two of them?

DCFusor

Race conditions galore

Is what I forsee, especially when files are used for locking or are shared.

One head set could be reading stale data while another set could be overwriting it with something else - which might not even be the same file in today's filesystem allocation schemes.

Therefore there would have to be a layer keeping track of all this to ensure that a write queued up for one set of heads wasn't going to mess with a read in the que for the other set.

On the head per track thing...been there, done that. Waaaay back in the day there were "drum memories", they were fast as crap - and hideously expensive compared to other means of storage even then. I fixed a few as a DEC field service guy back then, and have an old mil-spec one in my junkpile. The idea died out for good reasons.

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Azure VMs borked following Meltdown patch, er, meltdown

DCFusor
Trollface

Heh

Obviously, Rust would have prevented all this. /sarc

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Bug-finders' scheme: Tick-tock, this tech's tested by flaws.. but who the heck do you tell?

DCFusor

False hits

If adopted, this will be:

DOSed to death

Falsely reported by people who aren't qualified to know a true bug or give replication info

Cost more than it's worth to separate the wheat from the chaff.

I'm sympathetic to getting real bug info to the right place more easily, but I don't see how this solves anything much - there are reasons, some listed above, why manufacturers don't already make it easy for any random person to waste the time of their developers.

Obviously, the manufs have gone too far here and just ignore it all, but any real solution is going to have to have someone "watch the watchers" and come up with money/effort to do the screening.

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Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

DCFusor

Re: Hmmm... @AC Might not even leak data

Now that would be embarrassing to the Rust evangelists, who think their one trick pony solves every possible security issue! They'll suppress that idea with their usual fervor I bet. To me it's the height of vanity to think you can pre-define and therefore pre-solve every possible side channel and backdoor attack. The endless game of thief vs locksmith is...endless...

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Facebook folds fake news flag: We're not disputing that

DCFusor

Well, that's disputed

What *I* heard was that the stories tagged as fake were actually shared a lot more - not as the article said about the tag having no effect.

When the "liberals"* call it fake, it only means it doesn't agree with their confirmation bias, and is therefore _more_ likely to be real, not less, at least in many eyes.

In my own experience, for events at which I was present, there's little correlation between what happened and what was reported in the official news. Ever. This includes my time working in the intelligence community where we had some access to data the rest of the world did not.

No relation. Or, more accurately, it's all public relations. Buy that soap! Believe your government cares about your welfare. Pay those taxes. And so on.

*liberals for example invented the idea of political correctness, regardless of actually being correct. That's not liberal - that's more restrictive - I have to think their way.

Liberals make up the majority of controlling interest at FB and in the Deep State they serve.

I promise you that exactly zero news marked as fake was pro conservative (not that conservatives are conservative anymore than liberals are liberal - both defy the dictionary). Of course, this is only obvious to those who have a brain and pay attention using an attention span longer than a goldfish.

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US senators rail against effort to sneak through creepy mass spying bill

DCFusor

Forget partisan politics here

Mike, were you just born, or did you miss things like "we have to pass it to find out what's in it"?

This isn't partisan - it's big and powerful vs little.

What was of, by and for the people is now above the people - at least in their own eyes....

And while it's good when a government is afraid of its people, that's not true about this kind of afraid - the reason for this internal surveillance is obviously to avoid the pitchforks and lamp posts by nipping serious dissent in the bud.

This push has been going on for longer than a lot of Reg readers have been alive...I used to work for the community myself. It's just that now, they're not even trying to hide it.

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How Google's black box Knowledge Graph can kill you

DCFusor

Duh

"Is it OK to treat truth as collateral damage in the supposed march of progress?"

Ask any politician and don't get partisan on me - it's not like one of the two false dichotomy sides is pure.

Just different spin on the same lies.

Mencken:

Elections are an advance sale on stolen goods.

"Those other people will pay for it - I'll pick their pockets to give you stuff."

Thing is, you're always those other people. Because we're all in this together, like it or not.

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Critical US mass spying program scrutiny lost amid partisan nonsense

DCFusor
FAIL

Wrong bias

Hey, we yanks are in the midst of a 3 way civil war here, you don't understand.

The so-called "IC" didn't get their way in the elections, and as a result the blow back is revealing serious corruption, and a distinct bias in matters that amount to sedition and treason. This all being masked by yes, partisanship, as though one side being "wrong" made the other "right". Both sides thing wrongly that they can overcome the corrupt bureaucracy, which is being seditious at the very least.

While it's just about universally agreed that our current president is a buffon at best, it would pay to look past that long enough to note that serious crimes - THAT WERE ADMITTED TO - like rigging the primaries, pay for play, and malfeasance in office prior - are being ignored by the lap-dog media, while witch hunts by obviously biased and untruthful are going on - the partisans - both sides, are more interested in winning than in truth, as both are dirty as can be, right along with the 3rd side, the entrenched bureaucracy. That 3rd side, yeah, needs to be reigned in, fer sure. Is it going to happen? To a group who spy and have all the dirt - real or imaginary - on the very people in charge of oversight, who are in turn the only ones who really care about dirt about them being revealed? If you're holding your breath on that one, I won't even ask what color the sky is on your planet, I'd be more interested in how many suns are in your sky, cause you ain't from around here at all.

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Why bother cracking PCs? Spot o' malware on PLCs... Done. Industrial control network pwned

DCFusor

Not a real view of how things are, Ivan

I know someone who does industrial control setup - he does it *all* for about 10-20 large chemical plants, distilleries and so on. There is NO IT department in any of the smaller ones. Zero. So how competent a nonexistent entity is is irrelevant. They also have time according to how many there are to check stuff like anomalies in ladder logic, or apply updates at all - zero if things are working, my high paid friend as a consultant for a day at most when they stop.

My friend is somewhat interested in security, and far more skilled in computers generally than nearly all of his ilk. He tells me there's simply no way to put in security as it's utterly politically infeasible. There's always some idiot in the C suite that wants to remote monitor their money maker during the few hours a day they're not playing golf (the plant usually runs 24/7/365), and the existing software for such things - all of it - can't do that as a read-only thing. In fact, most of it has to poll the PLC's in the plant to get the reading to display on the cool picture/flowchart of the plant. If you have to send commands to poll for data, the barn door is unlocked already.

And of course, those same PHBs often want to see it on their laptop or phone, which is almost surely internet connected - despite all the rest being air-gapped, it's always one of those guys crossing the line and the gap...and who never admit it when things go south.

In many ways, this is otherwise the most conservative business ever - downtime is super expensive, if it ain't broke, don't fix it, and my friend has had to replace PLCs older than himself - and he's no spring chicken. Only when a plant is relocated or otherwise rebuilt does any of this change.

Downtime or any change can also be pretty risky when you have hundreds of thousands of gallons of flammable solvent at the boiling point in various places around the plant...you don't go in just to patch some obscure PLC that's working the safety valve on a boiler that's been running for > 10 years and only making ROI for a few of them.

That's not great (to say the very least), but it IS the way things are now. "Ought to" is a funny concept if you've sunk a lifetime of money into something and are waiting for a payback...stupid or not, it's the way of the world. It's even worse if it's a public money with a fiduciary responsibility to the shareholders. If it blows up, they can cut and run, deflect blame with "everyone does this", but if they don't make money....it's even worse.

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Sloppy coding + huge PSD2 changes = Lots of late nights for banking devs next year

DCFusor

Re: Poorly written code is not down to the language *cough* PHP *cough* but the developer

One of my favorite rants - when you make it so easy to get something going at all, even if the developer doesn't really understand the nitty gritty details - eg make it possible for monkeys to write code - you get monkey code.

I don't let the devs off for a manager with unrealistic expectations either. Grow some spine, man. How do you think they get to have those expectations - no one stood up to them.

How about not "coding at the tube"? How about designing AT ALL? If partway through you find the original design won't work - then do the redesign, not some horrible bodge due to ego. It's often faster that way anyway.

It really does come down to humans. Tech solutions (languages that are "easy") to human problems never work out. Ever.

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Spy-on-your-home Y-Cam cameras removes free cloud storage bit

DCFusor

Re: Been warning of this since long before...

Depends on the timescale. Air in some places has been pretty hard to breathe of late - China comes to mind. Did we "pay" to not have a nuke war so we could have breatheable air and sunshine without nuclear winter? If not, all those taxes, I've got coming back, right?

Perspective. An amount isn't a rate. Just because our ancestors didn't waste it all, doesn't mean it'll all be around forever.

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DCFusor
Thumb Down

Been warning of this since long before...

Nothing free is worth what you paid for it (Robert Heinlein).

I've been warning about IoT and Cloud generally for quite awhile now - the subscription model always hurts the end user. It's like trusting someone else to handle your money - no one cares about your stuff like you do. (and if they could make you rich, why didn't they do it for themselves first, and then lose interest in "investing" your money? Where are the customer's yachts?)

I developed a LAN of things framework and pieces for my own homestead, being a developer myself. It works fine and I don't have to depend on some 3rd party's benevolence to have my dwellings and grounds work.

Stuff "as a service" is a very fragile construct and usually the first to go when things get tough.

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Intel Management Engine pwned by buffer overflow

DCFusor

Only more recent...

OrneryRedGuy, you're triggering my favorite rant, and it goes far beyond just the Intel ME.

I'm pretty sick of those who say "just use this language" (or technique, or process) and all your troubles will go away - it'll all become easy.

NO! Just because you want to believe that monkeys can write Shakespeare doesn't mean that it's going to happen with your set, and no matter what, it won't happen often (and who watches the watchers? Who notices the one critical typo?).

Rust ain't gonna fix it. Dev ops ain't gonna fix it. Drag drop or declarative programming ain't gonna fix it. Crappy software guys will find a way to code at the tube till it works, even if they don't understand why it worked that one time - and ship total crap. They'll get the job because, being crap, they don't get as much pay, and those who decide such things are short-termist MBA types who don't have a clue.

It was always thus and will always be thus. Technological solutions to human being problems NEVER WORK going forward. Never have. I await the first proof that it ever will.

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Apple sprays down bug-ridden iOS 11 with more fixes

DCFusor

root as the password?

I thought it was root as the username.

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The six simple questions Facebook refused to answer about its creepy suicide-detection AI

DCFusor
Trollface

What about trolls?

Won't someone think of the...No, wait.

Given the number of vicious trolls I've been encountering lately, (just mention any hot button topic), one would assume the trolls are going to figure out how to overload this with false positives pretty quickly.

So even if you think they're trying to do a good thing, it will fail.

I recall a time when "do good" was more important than "don't get caught" but it was a long time ago.

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What's that fresh, zesty fragrance? Oh, Linux Mint 18.3 has landed

DCFusor

Re: Up to date updates

You miss the point. The mythical grandma hasn't needed the command line for quite awhile now. But in any healthy ecosystem, you need to make some room for the vlllage expert to shine at arcane stuff that few actually need - else he won't be around when you need him - and don't pretend that any opsys exists that doesn't need that person sometimes - we'll all laugh at you.

Different strokes.

Easy things should be (and are) easy.

Hard things should be (and are) possible.

An old perl guy would say TMTOWTDI - there's more than one way to do it. Because I can do it "the hard way" doesn't mean I have to.

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Net neutrality nonsense: Can we, please, just not all lose our minds?

DCFusor
Thumb Up

Pretty good analysis

As a left-ponder I've noticed the fall from civility and reasonable discourse here - but not only here, just that when you're close, it's certainly louder.

I happen to be "for" NN as Wheeler put it forth. It's worked well for most of the people I know.

But it hasn't mattered to me, as I can't get enough bandwidth in rural VA for it to really matter how much someone charges differentially for their own content that I can't use, or someone else's I can't use. No one's willing to let me download it overnight so I can watch it the next day, at least if I don't cheat and pirate it (which is frankly, too much bother, the stuff is mostly not that good anyway).

None of this would matter if there wasn't this vertical integration via merger. IMO if you don't like the way it is, that's perhaps worth a look. If content creation and ownership were separate from the pipes that push the content around, there wouldn't be much issue...There'd be no reason for AT&T or Comcast to prefer one content source over another. That's the real source of problems the way I see things.

The other source of real problems is that...the best bandwidth I can get outside an expensive satellite plan with high latency is 4 mbit down and 1 up. I have NO choice. The big cable companies have shown their evil disregard for all of us by their anti-competitive law buying (one touch make ready and friends that make it illegal for even the people/government to create competition, and collusion to not step on each other's turf).\

So, at this point, personally it doesn't matter to me if Comcast (who I don't have the option to pay, perhaps I'm lucky) wants to charge more for out of network content, or AT&T, Verizon, Cox cable and so on - none of them are available to me anyway.

But I still resist the trend that's been going on for the 6+ decades of my life of the best law corporate money can buy, which is what we seem to be seeing here.

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Boffins pack more info onto photon for faster quantum key distro

DCFusor
Meh

Clearly

There are far too many "ifs" in their thinking.

First... Shannon - they need to do some reading about bit rate vs signal to noise. Even if they had an actually-new approach, it'd be covered there. Shame these young'ns don't know history of a field they claim to have some command of.

Second, this would all be "if" they could produce suitable photons on a tight time schedule, which I hear is still quite an issue, maybe not even theoretically soluble.

If your feet hurt, it's probably the spikes on my lawn, and there's an easy way to avoid those.

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Clone poster girl Dolly the sheep's arthritis was 'normal for her age'

DCFusor

One of the removed posts was mine. I guess they think if they make a mistake and you make fun of it, the world doesn't need to see it.

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

Germany slaps ban on kids' smartwatches for being 'secret spyware'

DCFusor
WTF?

But the reason

stated was that kid's watches were being used by parents to spy on lessons? So, inquiring minds want to know that teachers have to hide there!

All for banning spy watches. Just that it seems like the reason here was interesting in itself.

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WikiLeaks drama alert: CIA forged digital certs imitating Kaspersky Lab

DCFusor

Re: Another Day Another Lie

You are hardly alone. The problem is that such a small percentage pay attention to what's going on before it's too late to effect a change. Some could even argue that it's already too late - no doubt the agencies have plenty of dirt on those who write the laws and paychecks already. Or nowadays, can make it up so well no one could tell anyway. If we ever had it, there is now no doubt we've completely lost control of our government by now.

Personally, I'm tired of having to apologize for being American in my contacts with those who aren't.

Those of us who are awake and care are too few to do anything. The vast majority don't care yet.

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Tesla buys robot maker. Hang on, isn't that your sci-fi bogeyman, Elon?

DCFusor

What a hit piece

Cognitive dissonance much?

First we diss Elon for warning about AI (and yes, I'd like some of what he's smoking) and then buying robotics capability, then diss him for needing robots, assuming that the lack of them is the problem and robots are the solution:

" A more sceptical [sic] view is that Tesla is finding it so difficult to manufacture its long-awaited Model 3 sedan that it's hand-finishing them as they drop off the production line."

So you're going to diss the guy for realizing he needs to use the solution you approve of, really?

I'm sure he's (and other mgt) aren't perfect in all eyes - I've done the CEO/Owner/Vision-guy gig, and while things were successful, i'm pretty sure that those I made do what they promised weren't all happy with being held to it. So?

The thing about unreasoning hate, or even sour grapes, is it not only makes you wrong, after awhile you just look dumb. Yeah, no one in a huge startup gets it all done exactly as they said and on time, but this group of outfits does tend to get it done, unlike a ton of others the Reg hasn't bothered to heap abuse on.

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Google on flooding the internet with fake news: Leave us alone, we're trying really hard... *sob*

DCFusor

Because I'm a dependent loser

Who requires google's free services, they are therefore obligated to do the work I insist they owe me for using their free lunch? TAASTAAFL.

I have no other way of finding out the news. It's all google's fault I can't find the truth unambiguously without doing some work or otherwise lifting a finger. Because they're easy, I insist they be perfect, or I'll quit giving them no money. Making what's out there - true or false, available to me implies that it's all true by just being out there. Like you know, there's nothing out there if it's not true, or as we used to say "the paper won't take ink if it's a lie".

And after all, 100% of the other sources I have are 100% truth. Only google has this problem. I can count on "any big media" empire - you know, the ones who charge - to always tell me truth and ignore fake news except to debunk it.

Srsly?

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OpenSSL patches, Apple bug fixes, Hilton's $700k hack bill, Kim Dotcom raid settlement, Signal desktop app, and more

DCFusor

Re: I wonder what the Trump apologists' excuse will be this time?

Sure, lock them all up...

If there's a difference, I suppose it'd be that one of them was in office and playing loose with state secrets and doing that on purpose...specifically to avoid accountability, but hey, I just read and try to understand.

Limiting the locking up to just those two is a bit short-sighted, eh?

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$10,000-a-dram whisky 'wasn't even a malt'

DCFusor

Old lead better

Old lead from shipwrecks is better than old steel (and older yet) because, being lead, it also has some shielding properties. It's highly valued for use in Gamma Spectrometer "castles" to keep out the ambient radiation to the extent possible. Also ancient lead flashing on some old buildings...now sometimes a theft item.

Yes, I work with radiation.

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Hardware has never been better, but it isn't a licence for code bloat

DCFusor

Re: Java less buggy?

Yes, the advent of tools making it easier for the less skilled to code leaves us with code written by the less-skilled. I've been watching attempts at this since before the '70s and they always end the same. Not that anyone ever learns from this. And each newest (in my mind) fad has the fans that will viciously downvote anyone not on their bandwagon about how their new toy is gonna fix everything, when it's obvious it cannot.

As an experiment I'll just mention Rust here in that context. Really, you guys think you can define everything unsafe in the compiler upfront, and when it finally compiles without warnings it's gonna be good and secure? Vanity much? How about side-channel timing attacks to crypto (or worse, TEMPEST), for just one example no compiler or rule-set easily catches. Or will short of real AI, which we're pretty far away from.

How about the halting problem? Guys who think they can trivially solve it with their magic/special/new insight - I'm all ears, but extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof, and always will. Even if you don't overwrite the other guy or crash from a bad pointer, you can eat the whole machine unless some other program - the opsys - stops you from doing so.

Coding at the screen and editing till it stops complaining isn't the way...and for most, super-duper unit and system testing automation is too much work. But a skilled architect and avoid the need for either, or at least a couple 9's worth of that need. If we want our profession to be, well, professional, let's stop calling beginning low-value coders software engineers for a start. Code monkey might make management think a little harder about whether it's good to have a few really good people - at cost X, vs a ton of crappy ones - which may or may not be cheaper per time period, but will almost always cost more over time. Sadly, those morons can't seem to think beyond the next quarter themselves.

0
0

So, tell us again how tech giants are more important than US govt...

DCFusor

Re: So much bullshit

The support was by George Soros, who isn't exactly popular around the world...He's funded all the NGOs that are doing this crap. Get a better info source, my friend.

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DCFusor

Re: Your opinion is is nice to see ...

Yeah-but,

It's a topic of laughter among...well, anyone with the means to even have a CC when these guys call up.

Being the target of a scam doesn't automatically mean you fall for it, in fact there are plenty of youtube clips of guys doing fun stuff like hooking the fake IRS scammers to the Microsoft support ones and recording the ensuing hilarity...

If you want to insult yourself, fine.

0
3

Official: Perl the most hated programming language, say devs

DCFusor

Re: Python whitespace

@zanshin - I agree - lint is super good to have, whether automated, or with discipline, manual/visual.

Big projects, yep, there are often better languages if you assume it's all gotta be in one language.

But anymore, a coherent big project doesn't usually need that much "glue" to stick together a ton of existing and working functionality in libraries. If you have a clear vision, it usually doesn't turn out that complex - and the best code is the stuff that doesn't need to be there because you understand the problem space.

I like the glue aspect of Perl myself...and I will often use inline::xxx to incorporate other languages libraries to get the job done - the already-debugged (usually) stuff is a plus. And the ability to control other processes very easily.

I think the "other people's perl" comment is to the point - it's other people's code generally that is a pain, but perl does attract those who like it "tricksy" it seems. Luckily, I tend to be an originator, not a maintainer (other than my own stuff). As such, I stay far away from the tricksy stuff - or if I just can't resist, mark it with my signature #@@@ comment which I explain at top of file, and of course, I use comments copiously. It's my own butt I'm protecting, as if I need a change or there's a bug - I'm the one who has to make it right.

No one has ever whined about my perl code - a couple have asked what C library (or whatever) I used to *make it so clear and obvious what's going on*. Again, that's really self-defense.

While any sufficiently advanced programmer can write bad code in any language, it's also true for good code...(paraphrasing the old line about Fortran). The real deal, a quote from Douglas Adams - "People are a problem".

Weak typing has its plusses and minuses. ASM for example has the weakest of all if you think about it - only length is specified...C has unions to ease type munging - they all have "issues" when strong typing doesn't allow you to simply say what you mean. Weak typing (oh gawd, php), of course has it's own issues. And *different* weak typing, for example, between perl and python, has bit my arse a few times, to the point I use use some of it that's been worked out inline, instead of translating it, when something uses impllicit conversion between text, integer, and floating point - lack of really good knowledge of the precise rules in play leads to issues. Like SystemD, I don't feel I should have to learn arcane new things just because someone else tries to force them on me, when they aren't right for my use-case.

3
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DCFusor
Happy

Re: Python whitespace

xml and java are used by real programmers at all? Man, I've got it good, I can avoid them entirely!

2
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DCFusor

Re: Python whitespace

I agree that good indenting should always be done. But when things span multiple pages, it's darned hard to keep track of if it's the only thing defining scope. I often add "picky perfect" indenting before I'm done in whatever language.

I do have a use-case where it's actually a serious problem - I wrote a perl program to plot data from my fusor in 4 dimensions, mapping perhaps 10 or so parameters into 4d (x,y,z,color). To make this useful for the scientist (me) - I have the axis mapping set up so that I can type in a line or few of perl per axis, defining how the mapping is (with presets for the common setups, using Storable). If I had to use newlines here, I'd have to use full edit boxes in GTK and the extra complexity that entails, along with wasted screen space, to accommodate python there. Wheras in Perl, and most any other sane language, a semicolon will do - code ISN'T POETRY where a newline controls formatting, or it shouldn't be IMO, anyway. And I'd like to be able to split long lines sometimes too, with minimal fuss.

But, horses for courses, as they say. In my case, I can handle about any language, but my many years of learning not only languages but libraries makes me not want to have to start all over when what I have now works as well as, or better, than the language of the day.

Being able to go from zero to hero fast as in python seems to encourage more monkies to use it.

I cite nearly 100% of the hardware interface code for say, raspberry pies, where no one seems to get the concept of a ready flag vs a "keep increasing the sleep time till it works on this cpu at this speed".

(And no where else...and breaks if the speed changes)

Monkey code doesn't encourage me to go through the learning curve on yet another. I sat Java out too - and it turned out to be a wise move.

Not that you can't write horrible code in any language...it's just that "new lang of the day" does tend to get the beginners who can't code well yet, and many of whom will drop out when they find out they'll never be good at it (or their employers figure that out).

8
2
DCFusor
Happy

Regex

I note when people are shown "ugly and unreadable" perl code, it's really mostly regular expressions...which almost every other language since - has copied/adopted too.

Regexes make my head hurt too - and I'm a big fan of perl. Wonder why you see the above so often?

Is it because perl is so otherwise useful for text processing that it's widely adopted for that use, and regexes amplify that power even more? If you grew up in C, where text was so hard to handle (and for most languages, unicode still is) - you'd just try to work around the need for much text processing.

It's not a monkeys/typewriters kind of language, to be sure. It has a much higher think to type ratio than most of the others (which I speak and use too - from ASM to C++ and a few others). So, yes, when you can get what would be 5 pages of functionality in one of today's "fanboi" languages into a short paragraph of perl, it's by-definition going to appear hard to read at a glance, probably almost as hard as those 5 page solutions. Doh.

Perl gives you enough rope to shoot yourself in the foot. Just because there's more than one way to do it, doesn't mean you have to choose the way that is the "cutest, cleverist, and most likely to promote job security since no one else can get it" way every time.

As mentioned above, I write my perl as though it was a less dense language, only taking advantage of the obscure stuff when needed, as I myself might have to understand it later. Perl lets me do that, some others don't, or force that little clever one-line bit to be 5 pages, which is itself hard to read.... To each their own, I say.

FWIW, I have a lot less trouble with cross platform perl than "write once, debug everywhere" Java, which I truly despise...

With the python fad, and it's silly/stupid use of whitespace as a language element, I'm glad to be able to incorporate it into my perl via use Inline; - and it runs faster under perl than natively, as if it doesn't have a couple of rarely used python constructs, it's *compiled* and linked to the perl program. This reveals tons of bad python hardware interfaces that use a sleep instead of a busy test...

15
7

You're designing an internet fridge. Should you go for fat HTML or a Qt-pie for your UI?

DCFusor

Re: You can tell that guy is a web dev

Yeah, most native frameworks are a crap-ton faster than any web junk. Dunno if I'd go with wxWidgets, though, simply because support for it (and thus one of my favored perl editors, Padre) has been removed from most recent linux distros...oh well.

6
0

Healthcare insurance cheat-bot bros Zenefits cough up $1m to make SEC probe go away

DCFusor

Not quite. In nearly all cases like this, while a fine is collected, it just goes to the government, the shareholders just get an expensive lesson.

0
0

Panic of Panama Papers-style revelations follows Bermuda law firm hack

DCFusor
WTF?

Hope for a better outcome than this:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/oct/16/malta-car-bomb-kills-panama-papers-journalist

That's kinda hard to spin as a suicide, no? Someone had enough money and power to be pretty brazen about "whatever it takes" on the last one.

3
0

You may not know it, but you've already arrived at DevOps Land

DCFusor
Facepalm

If you have to sell it this hard...

It must suck. If you have to redefine what I was already doing - for decades as pointed out above - as your fad, then that kinda shoots your idea being innovative as BS too, eh? Is selling tickets to devops conferences so profitable as to have practically taken over the Reg editors judgement?

I mean, if you've got an idea, and it's a good one and it works, gives you a competitive advantage...you'd mostly be trying to protect your IP?

If an idea is no good, yet benefits the pusher in some way, then it gets sold hard. If people like your message you don't have to shove it down their throats (a concept it would do most religions to grasp too).

3
0

Facebook, Twitter slammed for deleting evidence of Russia's US election mischief

DCFusor

Re: AAAHHH MOTHERLAND!!!!!

@ST - reading comprehension would help you with this quote from this op-ed disguised as news:

"Which is well and good until you consider that both Facebook and Twitter's services were used extensively by the Russia government to sow misinformation and division during the US presidential election, and Kremlin agents have, for obvious reasons, done everything they can to destroy any and all evidence of that campaign."

So, who's not understanding what they read here?

1
1

Russian spies used Kaspersky AV to hack NSA staffer, swipe exploit code – new claim

DCFusor
Unhappy

This is stupid

The leak is the guy who stole the stuff from work and brought it home, against the law.

Now they want to blame someone else? Maybe it was Kaspersky this time, maybe next time it's some other AV or a hack, maybe even one written by "our boys in the alphabet".

Blame shifting - they are themselves to blame for mishandling their secrets, a goodly portion of which probably should never have been created - by them, we can remember - in the first place.

They're always whining that national security is harmed by this. In fact, it's their reputation being harmed, and their rice bowl is under threat. They themselves are a bigger threat to my and most other people's security than the Russians or Chinese are. We know it already - See FISA rubber stamping everything.

See their own leaks. OPM...did the Russians do Deloitte? A simple cross reference there would point out who's good to be bribed. It's the guys who collect all this crap on us that are risking our safety and security - they're leakier than a gossipy old lady with nothing better to do.

22
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What is the cyber equivalent of 'use of force'? When do we send in the tanks?

DCFusor
Unhappy

Poor, poor IC

Having their budget (black and white both) cut on every attack, the pressure must be enormous.

Oh, wait...

1
0

Billion-euro Intel EU antitrust saga goes on and on and...

DCFusor

mate 18.2 on 7th gen

Running without a hitch on an Acer aspire i5, I've added more ram and SSD disk to make it a yet more powerful machine. Even the nvidia geforce 940 works fine. I didn't have to do a thing to make linux do/support everything it normally does. Posting from it now.

Too bad if you're addicted to windows. That's a microsoft-specific issue you've got there.

It isn't Intel that doesn't support old stuff on new lamps here - it's MS.

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