* Posts by The_Idiot

238 posts • joined 20 Sep 2013

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'Don't Google Google, Googling Google is wrong', says Google

The_Idiot

Since...

... we're wandering the Plains of Pedantry (and at the welcome risk of being burned in olive oil with a touch of garlic and rosemary), the devil is ever in the detail:

"...and we learn that Google follows the usage of all civilised persons: it instructs devs not to capitalise the first word after the colon."

Hmmm. So they would require a lower case version of the word I (referring to the personal pronoun, and yes - I is a word in this context)? Or a lower case R for Richard if Richard were the first of a list of names? I sincerely hope not, and hope further that no 'civilised person', never mind 'all' of them would either.

And now, just for fun, we can perhaps proceed to the question of whether it is grammatically correct to begin a sentence with a conjunction. And before the flames begin, just let me go grab my Fowler, Chicago and Garner so I can quote page numbers :-).

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British snoops at GCHQ knew FBI was going to arrest Marcus Hutchins

The_Idiot

Re: @The idiot... you really don't get it...

@Ian Michael Gumby

"you really don't get it"

Sir, there are indeed many things in life I 'don't get'. And some I hope never to 'get' (medical science permitting (blush)). However, the point I was attempting to make, no doubt badly, was that a presumption of innocence, as opposed to a presumption of guilt, may be worth considering as a personal tenet as much as it is a legal one (in some jurisdictions). However, it was and is only a suggestion, as any decision regarding such a tenet is, of course, purely personal. Though I would rather live in a society where others hold that tenet than one in which nobody else does. Of course, I'm an Idiot... :-)

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The_Idiot

@streaky

"I'd like to believe that they have the wrong guy..."

And a small principle generally referred to as 'innocent until proven guilty' would suggest, to me at least, that that belief should be a starting point - but what do I know.

"... but all the best white hats learn their craft by having been black hats..."

If I may, a citation? Or were all the best police officers once criminals, by the same logic? Were all the best bodyguards once international hit-people?

"... - it's entirely plausible that he is their guy."

If you say so. It's not for me to comment, positively or negatively, on where you set your bar for 'plausibility'. But the fact that something is 'entirely possible' is hardly grounds for arrest, at least, so I would suggest. Or if it is, then the next time there is an apparent impulse burglary in your neighborhood, you should not be surprised if everyone within a given radius, including yourself, is arrested. After all, it's 'entirely possible' _anyone_ did it... no?

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Schoolboy bags $10,000 reward from Google with easy HTTP Host bypass

The_Idiot

Hmmmm....

Hacking US of A commercial web pages?

Obtaining monetary gain from the activity?

He should probably stay away from DEF-CON... (Yes, I know. I'm joking. Well, probably... :-( ).

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Our day with Larry Page: Embedded with one of the world's richest men

The_Idiot

At the beginning...

... I found myself remembering 'Jack Reacher - Never go back'. Jack is in Colonel Morgan's office:

**********

Col. Morgan: You're under no obligation to say anything, Major.

Jack Reacher: Ex-Major

Col. Morgan: Upon leaving yesterday, did you attempt to contact Major Turner?

[pause]

Col. Morgan: Did you confront her attorney, Colonel Moorcroft, at Fort Dyer at 1100?

Jack Reacher: [long pause] You told me not to say anything.

Col. Morgan: I said you didn't have to say anything.

Jack Reacher: Yes.

Col. Morgan: Yes, you confronted him?

Jack Reacher: Yes, I understand I don't have to say anything.

Col. Morgan: For the record, you did confront Colonel Moorcroft yesterday. Can you state your whereabouts last night between 0130 and 0500?

Jack Reacher: Yes.

Col. Morgan: Yes, what?

Jack Reacher: Yes, I understand I don't have to say anything.

**********

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WannaCry-killer Marcus Hutchins denies Feds' malware claims

The_Idiot

Re: Oh dear... maybe

@Commswonk

"He may well have "witten and shared malware code for research purposes" but it is perfectly fair to argue that he has to accept some responsibility if some of that code is subsequently used for malicious purposes."

OK - while I do not necessarily agree or disagree with your view, and of course fully support your right to hold it, let's run with that argument a little.

"Recently there have been a large number of road deaths associated with driving motor vehicles. While, of course, motor vehicle manufacturers do not intend for the vehicles they make and sell to be used to cause death, it is perfectly fair to argue that they have to accept some responsibility if some of those vehicles are subsequently used for malicious purposes."

Hmmm. OK (er, again (blush)). So you say the vehicle thing is a bit of a stretch? Well, let's try again. "Recently there have been a large number of road deaths associated with gun possession (legal and otherwise) in the US. While, of course, gun manufacturers and suppliers do not intend for the guns they make and sell to be used to cause death, it is perfectly fair to argue that they have to accept some responsibility if some of those guns are subsequently used for malicious purposes."

Would prefer a world where researchers do not research, and where research results are not shared because those results may be misused? Do you believe your world would be safer as a result of that lack of research, that lack of sharing, because people who could do the research don't, and even if they do then never tell anyone of their findings? I confess I do not - and wouldn't even try to think of the list of things we wouldn't have if researchers in many fields hadn't in fact researched and shared their findings. Of course - I'm an Idiot (blush).

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Creepy tech tycoons Zuck and Musk clash over AI doomsday

The_Idiot

I regret to say...

... I sort of agree with Mr Musk.

Not because of AI - but because of AS. Artificial Stupidity.

So far (at least, as far as I am aware), systems aren't self-coding. So they're coded by humans. Generally they're coded by humans to take action without human intervention. Thing is, they're coded _by_ humans to do what the humans think should be done in a situation that hasn't happened yet, in circumstances that are not yet known. And lord knows, we humans don;t exactly have a perfect track record of making those decisions when events _do_ happen and the circumstances _are_ to some degree known.

So humans code, and they code in line with their own prejudices and assumptions. Hence, AS. And results more potentially Musk-y than Zuck-y - though Sucky might well be the case... :-(.

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HMS Windows XP: Britain's newest warship running Swiss Cheese OS

The_Idiot

Hey!

@boltar

"A far more likely attack vector is The Idiot."

No fair! I was nowhere near that cable when it, um, fell off in my hand! And it wasn't a USB key! It was, um, er, a licorice all-sort! So it was all that Bertie's fault really... (blush)

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Australian govt promises to push Five Eyes nations to break encryption

The_Idiot

Re: Farenheit 451

"You can't use a book code if you don't know how to READ."

Well, technically I'd suggest you _can_. A 'book code' could be based on collection of characters, 'readable' or not. You just have to know how to count, point and copy. Id suggest the concept of a 'book code' based on a 'readable' book is more directly relevant to not having to carry big volumes full of random characters across border, but rather being able to walk into a nearby book store or library for your 'master sheet'.

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Microsoft court victory prompts call for data-grabbing regime

The_Idiot

...and

@William3

... your saying 'NYT is a propaganda shit rag' doesn't make it so - or not so - either. At least, in this Idiot's view. While the words 'in my opinion' may have (apparently) lost their popularity, in my opinion they still have value.

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Republicans go all Braveheart again with anti-net neutrality bill

The_Idiot

Re: Self-aggrandizement Central

@Someone Else

Ah, yes. The Filibuster. From @realDonaldTrump:

"The reason for the plan negotiated between the Republicans and Democrats is that we need 60 votes in the Senate which are not there! We...."

"either elect more Republican Senators in 2018 or change the rules now to 51%. Our country needs a good "shutdown" in September to fix mess!"

Sigh.... I wonder if he's even considered that if he did change the rules that way, he'd be changing them for every future Senate as well - including ones he might not want to have that sort of power.

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Plan to kill net neutrality is the best thing/worst thing ever! EVER!!1

The_Idiot

Re: Well...

@Charles 9

And I'm not saying I disagree. But (to my eyes at least) Vanguard's post seemed to suggest it was the large land area that somehow meant overlap and competition couldn't grow (for the foreseeable future) in the US.

Well, Canada has a large (depending on how you measure, even larger) land area. And I wasn't suggesting all of it was equally well served, but rather saying that in some of the more densely populated areas there is, in fact, competition even with that large land area. So why doesn't the same hold true for, for example, in New York, San Francisco, Jersey City or Boston? And it might - but all I read/ hear about is how in the US folks don't _get_ a choice. Because while I freely admit I do indeed live in the denser south, I do have choice.

And further, the original thread was about net neutrality. A subject on which Canada has (currently at least) taken a very different view from the US, despite US urging to the contrary. So (again), if the response from Vanguard was meant to imply this was somehow a result of land area (and my genuine and sincere apologies if it wasn't), then I have to offer Canada as an environment in which land area has _not_ led to the US view of neutrality, despite it's size.

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The_Idiot

Well...

@VanguardG

... according to most references I can find, the US is actually 3,537,438 sq miles. Canada, which recently adopted a rather different view of net neutrality, is 3,855,100 sq miles. OK - so that includes the wet bits :-). But it does lead me to wonder what the point of the land area comment was in terms of net neutrality - might I ask for enlightenment?

Oh - and I'll avoid mentioning my 250Mb, symetric, uncapped fiber-to-the-apartment ISP provision. For, um, less than US$40 (or UKP30) a month.

Oh. Rats. I already did. mention it, I mean...

4
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Internet Society tells G20 nations: The web must be fully encrypted

The_Idiot

Cure...

... response from Ministers:

"Yes, of course! We agree _entirely_! Well, and we know _you_ agree you'll only use that special encryption only _we_ can backdoor into. So we have a deal, yes? Oh, I suppose the other Ministers too. And our police. Well, and _their_ police. And our security services. Yes, and theirs. Unless it's an even numbered week - we don't like them on even numbered weeks. So you have to be able to turn _their_ backdoors off on even numbered weeks. So - we have a deal? What do you mean it's impossible? I thought we were having an adult conversation here!"

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Democrats draft laws in futile attempt to protect US internet privacy

The_Idiot

So...

... as a genuine question, but one from a non-USA-ian, how does this work under US law? Especially if it's t'internet? For example, assuming (say) New York passes its law:

1: I'm an internet user living in New York. My ISP is also based in New York. It sells my information to a buyer in New York. Illegal? (I'm assuming that's the easy one)

2: I'm in New York. My ISP is based in, say, Texas. They sell my information to a buyer in New York. Illegal?

3: I'm in New York, my ISP is in Texas, the buyer is in Minnesota. Illegal?

4: I'm _not_ in New York. My ISP isn't in New York, and neither is the buyer. But my internet traffic can be shown to relate to sites that _are_ in New York. Illegal?

I'm not trying to be a smart-a$$. I'd genuinely like to understand. Or is it like most things under law? It depends on who has the best lawyers, and who gets to pick the judge?

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China-based hacking crew pokes holes in UK firms and drains data

The_Idiot

So tell me again...

... Ms Rudd, about how weakened encryption with 'secret' (at least, according to some government definition of 'secret') backdoors is a really, really good idea.

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D'oh! Amber Rudd meant 'understand hashing', not 'hashtags'

The_Idiot

""Last week's attack has highlighted the need for a proper public debate on this issue."

Ben Wallace - for Amber Rudd, I assume.

"Because what we want to do is collect information this year so that next year we can have an adult conversation in this country."

James Comey

I would be fine with said 'public debate' - or even Mr Comey's 'adult conversation' - if either had the right subject. But, for me, that subject is _not_ 'should we be allowed to insist that technology providers give us some magic back door only we will be able to use, like, _evah_, and Bad Folks won't ever be able to find out.'. Mathematics, in the context of _that_ question, has already spoken, and a debate has no purpose.

No - for me, the subject of that 'debate', that 'conversation' should be something like 'are you, the people, both willing and happy to accept that you should not be permitted any privacy, any discreet communication (because anything we do Bad Folks will find out how to do) to try to reduce the risks of terrorism/ other threats. By the way - your chance of being impacted by those threats has been independently and verifiably assessed as (insert number here).'

Somehow I don't see them asking the second question though - they'll carry on with the first one. Sigh...

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Ex-military and security firms oppose Home Sec in WhatsApp crypto row

The_Idiot

I remember reading somrthing...

... once. Something Oppenheimer (or it might have been someone else) said after the atom bomb was tested, or after it was publicly used. Whoever it was, they said it wasn't the 'spies', the Fuchs et al, that gave the atom bomb to other nations. I mean, yes, those folk maybe speeded things up a little - but they didn't 'give the secret away'.

The Americans did.

Because, whoever it was said, it wasn't 'how' to build an atom bomb that was hard - any halfway decent physicist could do that. But they could only do it <u>once they knew it could be done</u>. Or rather, it was much easier to start, to get funding, to put a project together, when the people paying you knew you weren;t just going blue-sky - you were just going to repeat something pretty obviously able to succeed.

Backdoor encryption? It could be just like that.

If you're a nation state, or a criminal, or script kiddie in your mom's basement, yes. You can go looking for possible security holes in all kinds of things. But if you're a _real_ black hat? Well, if you know Guv'mint X insists on backdoors, and Guv'mint X allows Product Y to be used? Well, you know the only reason you don;t know the backdoor into Product Y is because you haven't found it yet. Because whether they admit it or not, whether they publish it or not, just by allowing Product Y to be used, Guv'mint X is telling you the door is there to be found.

And, just like the atomic bomb, knowing the door is there will likely make it a damn sight easier to get the resources, or project approval, or just sheer bloody mindedness that will _let_ you find it.

Because you know it's there.

And it won't just be one - one hypothetical black hat, I mean. When folk _knew_ there was gold in the Klondike, they didn't say 'hey, let's not go there! Let's go look at some other damn river, it'll be quieter!'

No.

They Rushed.

They Rushed, and even if not everybody found gold, a lot did. But the Klondike? It was never the same again, and after a while - it was dead.

So, yeah. Guv'mint approved apps. With Top Secret Guv'mint backdoors. Because sometimes, all you need to know is where the gold exists - finding it's the easy part.

Sigh...

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Lloyds Banking Group axing hundreds of jobs again

The_Idiot

So...

... Lloyds are announcing staff cuts, and sending their IT work to IBM. Who, um, are announcing staff cuts...

Sigh.

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Now UK bans carry-on lappies, phones, slabs on flights from six nations amid bomb fears

The_Idiot

Text search challenge...

... for government and corporate announcements.

"The safety of the travelling public is our highest priority"

I wonder what would happen if someone searched all available material for the phrase 'is our highest priority'? I'm willing to bet there'd be rather more than one 'thing' apparently 'highest' on the priority list.

Sigh...

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Force employees to take DNA tests for bosses? We've got a new law to make that happen, beam House Republicans

The_Idiot

During the process, Democratic Party members tried to introduce a number of amendments to the legislation, including:

Employees' health information could not be sold.

Family members should not be asked for their genetic information.

Employers should be prohibited from discriminating based on the results.

So. Based on the voting pattern demonstrated, the Republican members appear to want to preserve options for employers and health insurance providers to sell health information, demand family member genetic information and discriminate based on genetic testing results. Because, of course, all of those points 'deliver more choice for working families.'

Yes - and I suppose offering your next mugging victim a choice between a bullet in the head or a blade in his back 'delivers more choice.' Whether that makes it a Good Thing(tm) is a rather different question.

Sigh...

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FBI boss: 'Memories are not absolutely private in America'

The_Idiot

OK - let's try....

... a small modification:

"Comey said that America's founding fathers had set down that there is a right to (bear arms) but that the government has a right to intrude in the name of security. It was part of a 200-year old "bargain of ordered liberty," he opined ..."

Now who thinks _that_ bird would fly very far in the US of A? And if it wouldn't, then why should his comment on 'privacy'?

Oh, bugger it. If (or rather, when) the howling masses let this sort of stuff happen, we really are our own worst enemies. Sigh...

1
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Spies do spying, part 97: Shock horror as CIA turn phones, TVs, computers into surveillance bugs

The_Idiot

So the secret people...

... who can't keep their own 'secrets', um, secret, want 'backdoors' into everything so they can make sure they don't keep _our_ secrets?

Because, obviously, those backdoors will _never_ be leaked, right? Er... right?

Sigh...

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Ex penetrated us almost 700 times through secret backdoor, biz alleges

The_Idiot

And this...

... should be a salutory lesson for 'authorities' who want 'secret, impenetrable to unauthorised users' backdoors into security protocols and the like. Because 'secret' doesn't stay that way, and 'impenetrable' isn't - especially when 'authorised' users can become or act as 'unauthorised' any time they choose.

Sigh...

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Deutsche Telekom hack suspect arrested at London airport

The_Idiot

Re: It's like rattling on a door to break in...

@Anonymous Coward

My reading of Mr (my assumption) Berger's original post does not reveal, to my limited wit, any view that the perpetrator, if the suspect did indeed perpetrate the penetration, should not suffer consequences.

What I did read was a prediction/ opinion that the company penetrated will suffer _non_ consequences (legally or financially at least) for not bolting the stable door properly in the first place.

While no infrastructure or application can ever be declared 'impenetrable', bean counters and people who's bonuses depend on short term cost cuts and shorter term apparent profits will never decide to spend money on stable door bolts until and unless there is a penalty (and a painful one) for not doing so.

At least, that's my view. Of course, I'm an Idiot... (blush).

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OK, it's time to talk mass spying again: America's Section 702 powers are up for renewal

The_Idiot

Scope creep...

... it's a right bugger :-(.

And I don't think any jurisdiction has a great deal to be pleased about in this context. Or, more likely, they all feel very pleased indeed and are chortling into their double scotches (or bourbons, or alternative of choice in locale of relevance).

To use the example here - FISA being 'only, absolutely, definitely about nasty foreign folk, and even then only about Big Bad Threats', morphing into a way to track car thieves and, for all I know, people who forget to take library books back. To use another - from the UK - RIPA being passed for much the same justifications as FISA, but turning into a way for town councils to get nasty about folk who don't put their garbage out on the right day. Or try to send their children to the 'wrong' schools.

Sigh. Or grump. One of those. Probably both... :-(.

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Munich may dump Linux for Windows

The_Idiot

If I may...

"But the desktop is arguably the only market in which Linux has not done exceedingly well."

While I understand the 'market' and 'desktop' under discussion in Munich is a more corporate one, taking the words as quoted above at their face value I'd suggest the mid to high end gaming one, a market inhabited by creatures who often have money to spend and spend it (whether on hardware or software) is _not_ in fact one in which Linux has done 'exceedingly well'. at least, not so far. I would therefore contest the view stated. Of course, I'm an Idiot... (blush).

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Sage Business School founder imprisoned – but you wouldn't know it

The_Idiot

Re: You say "term of imprisonment..."

Hmmm. 'Peaked' or 'piqued'? I'm pretty sure this is a context where either/ both could apply, grammatically or practically :-).

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New US Net Neutrality law coming 'within three months' – advisor

The_Idiot

If I may...

... "New US Net Non-Neutrality law coming 'within three months' - advisor

What, cynical? _Moi_?

2
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Who do you want to be Who? VOTE for the BBC's next Time Lord

The_Idiot

As a Matt-er of fact...

... much as I'd love to see the good Mr Tennant back (highly unlikely), or even Mr Smith (I've read he's said he'd like to come back) - can I go with another Matt? Constantine meets the Doctor, shabby raincoat and all - Matt Ryan! :-)

0
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Axe net neutrality? Keep the set-top box lock-in? Easy as Pai: New FCC boss backs Big Cable

The_Idiot

The thing that...

... pushes my buttons isn't 'Wheeler right, Pai wrong'. It isn't 'Pai right, Wheeler wrong'.

Nope - it's @$^ metrics!

One of the basic tenets I was taught back when they didn't actually teach you how to write Business Cases, because you just followed Bob (or Jane), who'd written great ones for years, round and watched how they did it, was just that. Metrics. That you had to identify, _in_advance_, how you were going to measure success or failure, over what time those measurements would be taken, who would measure and how. And not only identify it, but publish it and get buy in - again, _in_advance_ - from interested parties and consumers. And then live or die by those metrics.

Where are the advance, agreed metrics to decide/ prove ('prove' in the sense of 'test') the chosen solution path is working, or indeed isn't? You know, the ones both the money men _and_ the public can look at, read results of and use to make future decisions?

Or maybe it's Door B. You know - the 'modern' way? That is, just do it whatever partisan choice says must be done, wait a while, then look for anything that looks like it measures better today than yesterday (whether it has anything to do with the 'solution' or not) and call it a win?

Sigh. I know. Door B, right? Can I cry now?

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With net neutrality pretty much dead in the US, your privacy is next

The_Idiot

Re: If I may...

@dan

Heh - yes, I am indeed splitting hairs (blush). I have so few left myself, I try to spread them as wide as I can (blushes again). And i certainly intended no offense, nor a major disagreement - I just had an 'Oscar Wilde' moment - 'I can resist anything except temptation' :-))).

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The_Idiot

If I may...

"The goal of capitalism is for every person and company to go and make as much money as they can."

Er - that's not capitalism. That's called 'forgery' - unless you're the guv'mint :-).

If the guv'mint ain't making more (printing it), then for Jane to _have_ more, some John (or Janet or Bill) must have less. The goal of capitalism is, as far as I can tell, for 'some other bugger' to have less - and who said 'other bugger', and the consequences of said 'other bugger' having less don't matter none to the ones having more. Or did I get it wrong? (blush)

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PDP-10 enthusiasts resurrect ancient MIT operating system

The_Idiot

Ah, me...

... memories of lying on the floor each morning at the Tech College I worked in, flipping lines of bat switches in sequence to boot up the PDP-8. Bugger, I'm getting old...

3
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Trump decides Breitbart chair Bannon knows more about natsec than actual professionals

The_Idiot

Glory Road, Chapter 17, Doctor Rufo

Sigh. No - I'm not going to put the quote here. I'll put something else. How about 'impossible questions, 101'. Here goes:

Q1: Which of these three tenets do you hold most true?

A: Democracy leads to the greater good.

B: Democracy leads to the greater bad

C: Democracy is irrelevant, because nobody can agree WTF it means.

Answers that do not include a definition 'democracy' will get zero marks.

Answers that define 'electoral systems' instead of 'democracy' will get zero marks.

All students who actually try to answer the question will be submitted for immediate psychiatric evaluation.

Sigh. I know. I'm an Idiot... :-(.

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Oracle lied: Database giant is axing hundreds of staff – at least 450 in its hardware div

The_Idiot

Re: Oracle LIED: Database giant IS axing hundreds of staff

Lied? Oh, that's _so_ 2016. They simply told an 'alternate truth'! That's the 2017 way - and guv'mint approved!

Sigh. I only wish I _was_ joking... :-(.

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Apple, Amazon smash audiobook cabal after European pressure

The_Idiot

On a more...

... (or indeed less, from the perspective of those here (maple flavoured blush)), it makes me wonder if this might finally spur ACX into accepting authors/ producers beyond those they currently do (US based, UK based and, I think, Australian).

Still, none of that is in any way Trump-ian, so likely not relevant to the subject at hand :-) :-(.

0
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Verizon is gonna axe its 'unlimited' data hogs

The_Idiot

Re: To all the wireless carriers...

@whoseyourdaddy

"Oblivious to the impact to users around you"

I see no indication of that in the post to which you are responding. I do see a view that an advertised 'unlimited' should mean 'without limit', not '200 _anything_ or less'.

It's Verizon (in this case, many others do the same) who seem to care little for either accuracy of language, or acceptance of the possible uses people might make if those people were foolish enough to believe Verizon actually meant what they said.

At least, that's my view of the OP - yours must and should of course be whatever you choose. Sigh...

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Top cop: Strap Wi-Fi jammers to teen web crims as punishment

The_Idiot

To paraphrase...

... 'Yes Minister', because I can't remember the precise quote, which would you rather have? A bunch of bored, anti-establishment script kiddies running round with access to computers, or a bunch of bored, anti-establishment script kiddies _with_combat and firearms_training_ running round?

Besides - a modern, high-tech, highly skilled army wouldn't bloody want them (again, my thanks to 'Yes Minister')!

4
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FBI let alleged pedo walk free rather than explain how they snared him

The_Idiot

'We...

... have to let this one go, because if we say how we got him, we might jeapordise future investigations'.

Time passes.

Future investigations are, um, investigated.

'We, um, have to let this one go, because if we say how we got him, we might jeapordise future investigations.'

What's wrong with this picture? To me, pretty much everything. The Bad People don't get put away, and the Bad Things keep happening. So what if telling folk how you got the evidence _does_ increase the chance the Bad People won't fall for it next time? At least _some_ Bad People get put away.

Yes, I know. Bigger fish to fry and all that. But if you know you won;t wan t to put your evidence on the table, don;t bother prosecuting. And if you're not in the business of prosecuting? Get off my bloody law-enforcement lawn!

I know. I'm an Idiot... sigh.

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China to Donald Trump: Twitter diplomacy 'undesirable'

The_Idiot

I wonder if...

... the man who (for once rightly) appears to have said 'no computer is safe' has considered the potential for a Twitter account known to be some sort of official organ of the US Presidency to be hijacked? We've already seen possible impacts on stock prices from Trump-eets - I'm sure other possibilities suggest themselves.

Of course, it's possible Twitter accounts are absolutely secure, with no possibility of being faked or stolen. And it's also possible I might win the lottery this week - but I'm not holding my breath.

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It's round and wobbles, but madam, it's a mouse pad, not a floppy disk

The_Idiot

My apologies to those...

... who have no doubt lived through similar experiences in years past, and posted them above. But I still grind my teeth (those few I have left) from time to time when I remember a home visit I made to one of the profs at the Tech College mad enough to employ me.

The individual in question explained to me he'd been doing some disk house keeping on his state of the art 10Gb hard drive Olivetti PC. Clearing up some old files. Deleting them. From the command prompt.

I know. I suppose it wasn't _his_ fault WordStar let you use * as a file name character. And even *.*. And yes. He'd used that as a name for one of his files. Sigh...

So. His machine was in an ongoing state of 'I'm buggered'. So I asked him if he still had the release floppies he'd got with the machine. Of course, I was expecting something like 'no'. But lo! Very meticulous he was! He said 'of course', and went to get them. I figured, maybe half an hour and I'd be done.

Then he bought them. The floppies. All neatly indexed, with little labels on them. In ring binders. Guess how he'd put them in the ring binders. anyone who suggests 'in little packet sleeves with neat pairs of punched holes in them' will be absolutely right. So long as they delete the 'in little packet sleeves with' bit.

AAAARGH!

7
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Cyanogen parts ways with its founder

The_Idiot

Hmmm...

"A post by CEO Lior Tal says the company is closing its Seattle office and consolidating a single Palo Alto abode... Folks who work in Seattle will be offered the chance to make the move south."

https://www.rentjungle.com/average-rent-in-seattle-rent-trends/

As of October 2016, average apartment rent within the city of of Seattle, WA is $2133.

As of October 2016, average apartment rent within the city of of Palo Alto, CA is $3224

So they're giving those staff 'offered the chance' generous pay rises too, huh? Huh?

Ah. Riiight...

2
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European Council agrees to remove geoblocking

The_Idiot

Not just...

... Belgium and the Netherlands.

Here's 'the only library in the world that operates in two countries at once':

http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/the-us-canada-border-runs-through-this-tiny-library

0
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Clients say they'll take their money and run if service hacked – poll

The_Idiot

Re: Gut reaction

@Version

Unfortunately, by that logic Flash should be the most secure technology and most reliable Adobe product in this or any other universe.

It, um, isn't. Er - probably (ducks the salvo of incoming lawyers (blush)).

5
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Super Cali goes ballistic, considers taxing Netflix

The_Idiot

Re: taxing the intarwebs is stupid

@Charles 9

One of the fundamental benefits of any good proxy provider is that they don't know, for any point in time activity, who is doing what. They charge for an account - by a combination of shared IPs, encrypted traffic and not keeping logs, they take positive steps to be unaware of what account holders actually _do_. That's sort of the point :-). I'd suggest that taxing every VPN provider for what their customers _might_ be doing would be a little much... but then I'm an Idiot (blush).

0
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London cops' tech slammed for failing abused kids – report

The_Idiot

And once again...

... we see (or at least, it looks like to me) that while the TLAs and police forces make their cases for having even more data,and more, and more and, well, _more_ - they can't necessarily make the best use of what they already have. Without in any way intending to be facetious or to minimise the real prices that can be paid by those at risk, whether it's needles in haystacks, or a thirteen year old girl in a house with three men there's bugger all point in having the data if the right people don't find it and act on it in a timely fashion? Or if they aren't _able_ to, because of limitation in the systems? Well, adding more bloody data isn't going to help!

I know. I'm ranting. And blethering. But while the right data _can_ be a good thing? sometimes it's all too easy to have too much of it - and that's apart from when it doesn't not get to the right people, or isn't assessed appropriately when it does. And if it doesn't get assessed properly - maybe the 'right' people are the ones who shouldn't be let any bloody where near it..

I think I'd better shut up now. Nurse! The red pill! Sigh...

15
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UK prison reform report wants hard-coded no-fly zones in drones to keep them out of jail

The_Idiot

And as well as all...

... the other reasons mentioned here why this is as dumb as it really is - what happens when/ if a new 'place drones aren't allowed to go' is built or torn down? A place not on the extant 'hard coded' list of Bad Places(tm)? World wide recall of all drones, by authority of HMG (which doesn't have any. mostly) to jave the list updated?

Sigh.

1
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America has one month to stop the FBI getting its global license to hack

The_Idiot

Re: Read It!

"The amendments would apply in two narrow circumstances:"

"First, where a suspect has hidden the location of his or her computer using technological means, the changes to Rule 41 would ensure that federal agents know which judge to go to in order to apply for a warrant..."

I rather think the author of the quote above may have a different dictionary than the one I use - at least as far as the word 'narrow' is concerned.

"where a suspect has hidden the location of his or her computer using technological means"

Would all VPN users qualify? On a first pass reading, does VPN qualify as a means of hiding your computer using 'technological means'? I'd say yes. So if that's right, all VPN users fall into this 'narrow' band. Add in all the TOR users, and the word 'narrow' seems even less applicable to me. Slide laterally, and add in https and encryption (yes, I know it's a stretch to call those 'hiding the location', but that's why lawyers get big pay checks), and 'narrow' starts to look rather more like the type of lady generally quoted as singing once it's all done and dusted.

Of course you should probably ignore me - I'm an Idiot (blush).

2
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Rise of the photon clones: New method could lead to 'impenetrable' comms

The_Idiot

Re: "impenetrable privacy"

"Basically, if you can secretly tap a quantum communique, you've opened a much bigger can of worms than just breaking "bulletproof" secrecy."

Which doesn't mean it can't be done - just that 50 % of quantum physicists would have a nervous breakdown if it was, 50% would think all their birthdays had come at once, and 50% would do both.

Yes - I know the maths smells funny. That's quantum, that is... :-)

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