* Posts by Oneman2Many

66 posts • joined 15 Aug 2013

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Tech giants at war: Google pulls plug on YouTube in Amazon kit

Oneman2Many

I really don't understand how people are comparing YT to netflix and amazon prime. Pretty much two completely different things. The clue is in the name, YT is mainly about user generated content, not the mostly dross produced by film and TV studios.

Its also worlds biggest jukebox, something that netflix doesn't even do and amazon prime barely scratches the surface with. Spotify is around 30m tracks, SoundCloud has around 120m of user uploaded tracks, YouTube is over 250m, of course a lot of crap quality stuff on there but also a lot of stuff you just can't find anywhere else. How often have you come across a track that you can't find on there ?

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Oneman2Many

Re: One winner - not really.

There is a Youtube for kids but I still wouldn't let kids go on there unsupervised.

YT is a great resource, there are plenty of great tutorials for kids to help with homework but keep it supervised.

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Is Oomi the all-in-one smart home system we've been waiting for?

Oneman2Many

I won't trust the house wifi for the alarm sensors.

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China plots new Great Leap Forward: to IPv6

Oneman2Many

Surprised that Africa is not in danger of running out. Much like asia, everyone pretty much has a feature or smart phone and home connections are quite common these days.

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Gulp. HPE's InfoSight self-repairs and makes 'proactive decisions'

Oneman2Many

not a troll, we've tried their kit and they don't have any must have features. Maybe infosight is it but past records says it will have some stupid 'feature' which makes it useless in real life like much of HPE inventions.

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Oneman2Many

Ask Oz tax office how 3PAR is doing for them.....

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/03/06/hpe_3par_outage_report_to_be_redacted/

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Computing in schools improved, but still needs major patching – report

Oneman2Many

Re: School is useless

I think that learning apps actually is of more use to a larger percentage of kids if they are allocated a very limited time each week. If they are interested in IT that can be studied later or as an additional subject. Most schools run coding clubs were they learn about IT rather than apps.

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Tesla buys robot maker. Hang on, isn't that your sci-fi bogeyman, Elon?

Oneman2Many

Re: There's a slight difference

Its a commercial made with VFX, there is a behind the scenes video to show how it was done.

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Oneman2Many

Things for him were all fine when he was small manufacture. I think he has now realised that the problems of scaling up a complex manufacturing process. Buying suppliers isn't the way to fix the issues.

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Card shark Intel bets with discrete graphics chips, shuffles AMD's GPU boss into the deck

Oneman2Many

Re: Well then...

Games is a small segment of the GPU industry, even nVidia will tell you that. The real money is in ML, AI and XR. Just an example there are going to be millions of cars driving around in the next 10 years that will have more compute power then your home PC.

Volta pro range costs 10x the price of a consumer graphics card yet probably doesn't cost much more to manufacture. Server farms aren't just buying one or two of them but thousands you can understand why gaming just happens to be a byproduct rather than a target.

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Look, ma! No hands! Waymo to test true self-driving cars in US with Uber-style hailing app

Oneman2Many

Phoenix, an area bigger than greater London but 1/5th the population. So basically driving around on half empty roads ?

https://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/business/2015/12/phoenix-traffic-congestion-ranks-best-among-major.html

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Tesla share crash amid Republican bid to kill off electric car tax break

Oneman2Many

That is the case with most of these 'subsides'. Solar panels is another case, you need to be able to invest in panels in the first place which means the people who receive the subside would have done without it in the first place.

In both case of electric cars, the argument could be that it helps kick start infrastructure changes that will be required before a mass rollout.

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Slashing regulations literally more important than saving American lives to Donald Trump

Oneman2Many

Re: Calling BS on the effectiveness

I have yet to see a driver aid that can't be switched off unless it's a legal requirement

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Oneman2Many

the problem with your photonics approach is that it's processed by a organic system

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Oneman2Many

Re: I'm actually fine with delaying these regulations...

Insurance companies will ensure you don't have a choice about participating

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Bored 'drivers' pushed Google Waymo into ditching autopilot tech

Oneman2Many

That is fine, you know when you are going to get to the end of the main road or slip road and have plenty of warning.

Personally I won't give over steering control at any point and do away with level 3 all together. Driver assist like adaptive cruise is fine. But what will car manufactures push for the next 5 to 10 years till level 4 is ready ?

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Oneman2Many

Waymo, Ford and government studies showed this months ago. Ford at least are saying they are going skip Level 3 because of this issue and going straight to level 4. Tesla, the germans and other are still talking about releasing level 3 cars,

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/02/20/ford-skip-level-3-autonomous-cars-even-engineers-supervising-self-driving-vehicle-testing-lose-situational-awareness/

My guess is a few crashes and level 3 will be banned or restricted to motorways or other main roads.

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Google reveals rapid Bluetooth gadget connection tech

Oneman2Many

Re: Protocol could easily have been designed without the Google backend roundtrip

Is there any indication that Google don't have this information already, or the car manufactures or insurance companies for those with a black box

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BT agrees to cream off less profit from landline-only customers

Oneman2Many

I see that VM and Sky aren't cutting their landline only prices.

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Dell forgot to renew PC data recovery domain, so a squatter bought it

Oneman2Many

Re: How do domain names expire?

Obviously never worked for a mega-corp. The 'official' process where the names are monitored are usually a PITA to use so a lot of names are registered at department level using company credit card. Then the person leaves or the card expires and the names which by then have become critical expire. Happens all the time.

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Google and Intel cook AI chips, neural network exchanges – and more

Oneman2Many

Re: Remember folks

I think you are confused about 'owning' things in the future and worrying about them becoming obsolete. Devices and services will be provided on a subscription model for the masses and they will be in a continual upgrade cycle.

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Australia launches critical infrastructure security reforms

Oneman2Many

Australia has a population 1/3 of that of the UK. If they can't get a handle on the security of their key infrastructure, what chance has the UK let alone the US ?

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Storage pizza from The Register's wood-fired oven

Oneman2Many

Re: Other types of storage and Pizza!

Nobody ever pays full price for their pizza

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Kebab and pizza shop owner jailed for hiding £179k from the taxman

Oneman2Many

The giants can afford to stay within the law

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Shock: Brit capital strips Uber of its taxi licence

Oneman2Many

Re: Ben Hur Moment.......

I'm not sure how this will take any cars of the road, all those journeys currently done by uber will still happen even if uber disappear.

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Futuristic driverless car technology to be trialled on... oh, a Ford Mondeo

Oneman2Many

Re: Left-Hand Drive imported Ford Mondeo Hybrid

I don't LHD is an issue here, the other vehicles in the scheme are RHD.

I am wondering if they are using Ford tech for this test as Ford have AV fusions running in the US already.

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Oneman2Many

Re: Testing in Oxford

Level 5 in the UK is a breeze compared to Asia or many parts of Europe.

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Oneman2Many

To be honest it could have been any car, I don't think they are planning on using any of the existing on board tech or sensors of which there are quite a few.

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Whoosh, there it is: Toshiba bods say 14TB helium-filled disk is coming soon

Oneman2Many

How long is that drive going to take to format ?

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Mazda and Toyota join forces on Linux-based connected car platform

Oneman2Many

All those people complaining about connectivity, its an EU requirement eCall that from April 2018, new cars can call emergency services and report their position in the event of an accident. This will require a SIM in the car plus GPS.

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Horsemen of the disk-drive apocalypse will ride upon 256TB SSDs

Oneman2Many

I pretty certain that the whole 'can read data that has been overwritten' has been debunked now.

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Welcome to the Rise of the Machine-to-Machine. Isn't it time to 'block off' some data ducts?

Oneman2Many

Re: Web 1, 2, 3

You getting something in return for being tracked, all those 'free' services, you are not having to part with money just your information.

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Really – 80% FTTP in UK by 2026? Woah, ambitious!

Oneman2Many

Re: The same goes for Solar Panels (PV arrays)

You can retro fit a 16 panel system for around 4 grand. If you did it at build time and in bulk the cost should be around 2 grand or so. In addition you could actually design houses to maximise benefits of solar panels (both power and heating) instead of trying to find good cases where to retro fit them.

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Jodie Who-ttaker? The Doctor is in

Oneman2Many

Bigger change is Moffat leaving and Chris "Broadchurch" Chibnall taking over the reins. I thought Broadchurch had a cracking first season but season 2 and definitely 3 were a bit so and so. Be interesting to see what he does with DW. Rumors are that it will be more mass appeal rather than sci-fi geek.

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Burglary in mind? Easy, just pwn the home alarm

Oneman2Many

Re: That implies targeted burglary

Having been the victim of a break in myself at the end of last year, I've since spoken to CID, security companies and shall we just say 'others'. Yes there are crimes of opportunity but the majority of break ins actually have a bit more thought behind them. Police think we were targeted because of my ethnic background and the increased chance of having a lot of jewellery at home (we didn't). They almost certainly knew our patterns of work / school and when the house was empty. We got broken into during the late afternoon rather than nighttime. My neighbour works from home and his office overlooks our house. Still didn't put them off.

Everyone I have spoken to said the same thing, an alarm will increase the chances of them just moving onto somebody else and sorry neighbours but that is what you want. CID said in over 500 cases he had dealt with, only a handful had an armed alarm. There is little doubt they do work.

In terms of notifying people, the bell unit is effective. not because your neighbours may poke their head round the corner (ours probably would) but because burglaries know that the chances are that somebody has been remotely notified. That gives them a few minutes to get in and out and less chance of finding 'the good stuff'. Saying that, according to my neighbours CCTV my place was turned over in less that 10 minutes by a gang of 4, including going into the loft.

Anyway, if it takes say 2 minutes to notify you via cloud app or text or whatever, then another 2 to check your internal CCTV and then a couple more to call the police (avg 10 minute response time) or a neighbour (I don't want my neighbour to risk their safety to confront some tooled up twats who are trying to get away) and time for them to respond they will have been in and out by then.

In all this, its no surprise that alarms are vulnerable. Software doesn't make money and who questions how secure their systems are as long as the function work, even security companies who sell this stuff for a living don't.

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VMware-Dell integration kicks off with on-prem VDI-and-PC-as-a-service

Oneman2Many

There are many reason for VDI including keeping clients close to data to reduce latency, controlling data access, allowing access for off-shore development, and plenty more. Its not all about reducing desktops. The three year commitment and no option for machine pooled licences as opposed to user based is a bit of a pain.

Looking at the prices, its unlikely to include desktop licenses, but as MS have such widely varies pricing models its hard to include those. And to be honest, on prem hosting costs is likely to exceed hardware and license costs.

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Microsoft offers cloud to Baidu, gets autonomous car in return

Oneman2Many

They may do for infomatics but they are on the Apollo list. And it looks like Fords own connected car platform Ford Pass runs on guess what..... Azure

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Hyperconverged infrastructure. It's all about the services

Oneman2Many

Re: HCI is more expensive than traditional SAN + servers

To be honest SAN has been relegated to specialist workloads like super clusters, mainframe, etc. All flash NAS has enough performance and flexibility for a majority of workloads and is a fraction of the overall price.

As per usual, IT moves in circles. For high transaction patterns where you want low latency, I see a move back to software managed DASD and get the data off the network. We could even give it a buzz word like composable.

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Sorry Google, it's boring old workloads that are pumping up AWS and Azure, not sexy AI

Oneman2Many

Went to the Google Next event a couple of weeks ago and Google really are no where in the enterprise environment. LOTS of focus on ML but that would involve putting your core data in Googles hands and as far as I can see most enterprises are not interested in doing that. Spoke to a couple their guys and they are not looking at providing their tools for on-prem hosting whereas MS are quite happy to sell you a on-prem Azure, Dynamics and other tools even if it affects their cloud hosted profits.

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Openreach hints at fibre network strategy rethink

Oneman2Many

I bet the 10m FTTP premises will be premises that VM already serve.

Also I think VM annual report shows that 80% of people don't want to pay for top tier, I am guessing there isn't demand at the moment for FTTP. Good that they are doing it but it is going to take decades to payback. VM have realised this and have scaled back project lightning.

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Virgin Media scales back Project Lightning target in first quarter results

Oneman2Many

They actually made quite a few changes to their customer relations department and billing system while under VM brand. Apparently more changes coming now they are owned by LG

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Oneman2Many

Are the figures the take up or availability ?

Also anybody heard how DOCSIS 3.1 testing is going ?

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Debenhams Flowers shoppers stung by bank card-stealing tech pest

Oneman2Many

Especially when companies begin to realise that under GDPR they can be fined for breaches upstream or downstream so best start looking at all those 3rd parties who are collecting data on your behalf and those you are supplying data to.

Regardless as Debenhams are finding out, its their brand that is going to hit regardless of where the breach occurred.

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Cloud computing is bigger than AWS and Azure

Oneman2Many

You seem to be confused about what cloud computing is. While its 5 years old, NIST has a pretty definition and its a lot more then a remote hosted VM server.

http://nvlpubs.nist.gov/nistpubs/Legacy/SP/nistspecialpublication800-145.pdf

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Ford to build own data centre to store connected car data

Oneman2Many

Re: 200PB by 2021..

"Where have you been data" is peanuts compared to rest. I did read that a smart vehicle (not autonomous) generates about a 1 TB an hour of data. I am going to assume that the vast majority is aggregated but that is still a lot of data to manage.

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Google after six-year tax foot-drag: No they're fine about the fine. We're fine. No fine

Oneman2Many

Re: split up Google

You do realise that they have just done that themselves recently ?

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Remember Netbooks? Windows 10 makes them good again!

Oneman2Many

Re: Netbooks had one good use

Speaking of education, the school I support had 50 odd Asus EeePC not doing much. When the school converted to Google Apps for education I had a look at what we could do with the netbooks. Thought about putting linux on there but too much support hassle, so ended up installing ChromeOS on there. The only issue with the conversion was the wifi cards were not compatible but managed to source 50 cards on alibaba for less that hundred quid delivered. My 10 year spent the summer swapping the cards out and reloading the netbooks which was a nice little earner for him. been a year and a half and aside from 2 of the netbook suffering HDD failures the rest are doing fine without any support calls.

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Supplier promises to nudge UK schools towards secure webmail

Oneman2Many

RM are a heap of donkey poo

Got rid of RM at my kids school years ago when they wanted 2 years worth of ICT budget to 'upgrade' to CC4. Used the money instead to buy 60 chromebooks and move everything to the google apps for education. Haven't look back since, virtually zero support calls, far more flexibility and much easier to use. Last year the ICT support person retired, didn't even need to replace them.

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Vodafone exceeds own upper broadband speed limit to hit 80Mbps

Oneman2Many

Re: Ah but wait a moment...

AFAIK the only throttling is to usenet and P2P traffic ?

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All right, who guessed 'street mapping' for those mystery Apple vans? Congratulations

Oneman2Many

Re: Bah humbug

navteq have been driving around for sometime gathering information using lidar equipped cars. This is better than google street view, don't know how if compares to what apple is doing.

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