* Posts by Salafrance Underhill

22 posts • joined 20 Jul 2013

Canadian family gives up modern tech to live like it's 1986

Salafrance Underhill

Errata...

I checked; 3.1 came out in 1992, so Linux was around at the time. This fits with my hazy memories, because I first heard about it not long afterwards from a friend. My first Linux install was Slackware version 1, which I'd downloaded and saved onto a billion or so 3.5" floppy disks. This is way after the 1986 cut-off point and so I'd imagine it counts as alien technology.

Salafrance Underhill

I can't remember when I first had net access (outside of work), but it was via Demon Internet's dialup, using a homebuilt 386sx machine running Windows 3.1. The internet protocols were handled using Clarkson packet drivers and KA9Q. I wanted a 386-based UNIX system, but I wasn't prepared to pony up the grand or so for a Xenix or SCO license. The PoP wasn't local and it was distressingly easy to run up a huge phone bill.

Salafrance Underhill

Re: I feel sorry for the kids

I think *everyone* missed the irony on that remark.

Salafrance Underhill
Coat

Re: I feel sorry for the kids

I read an 'article' recently - dick quotes because it was pushing a book about the Amish - which suggested that one's use of technology is dictated very much by the particular clade of the Amish faith of which one is a member. The article went on to say that there's a specialised market for computer electronics, used for any relevant mercantile endeavour, that have been made Amish-friendly by removing net access. I don't know whether this is true or not, but it wouldn't be particularly surprising.

Okay, Amish-vs-technology jokes are pretty widespred and one of the funnier ones I've seen was an off-the-cuff remark from someone logged into Eve, who claimed that he was Amish and that he'd logged on from a potato.

Aw, cute.

I wonder what the driver support is like under Linux.

Tesla tops $20bn as Elon Musk claims arm-wave design tech

Salafrance Underhill

Off-topic

I thought I'd lost my sense of humour, but in retrospect, I think I've been listening to too many Americans on Slashdot.

Salafrance Underhill
Devil

Re: Sure, but the problem is...

Well, you could do 2 dimensional hardware design by using the time axis and a one dimensional bit-stream and, okay, perhaps that's how it happens at the lower levels, but does anyone think that's a good way for humans to design things?

Salafrance Underhill

It's one of them temporal paradox fings, mate.

Salafrance Underhill
Happy

Re: "High frame rate hologram generator."

Totally. I think he's shuffling off the end of the pier in the sheer exhilaration of pursuing a cool idea, but I think the basic idea is noteworthy.

Salafrance Underhill
Go

Re: The hard part remains, er, hard

Buuut, he already knows something about building rockets; or at least his orange jump-suited flunkeys know such lore. All he's suggesting is that a new approach to 3D design is, possibly, a smart idea. As he appears to be genuinely bright as opposed to merely pretending to the throne in the manner of legions of acerbic internets experts, perhaps he has a point.

Salafrance Underhill
Happy

Re: "High frame rate hologram generator."

It could work with 3D goggles/glasses vision system, and seriously, I think any 3D design package could benefit from genuine 3D visualisation and 3D interaction. Restricting such systems to a 2D rendition of a fundamentally three-dimensional problem is so mediaeval, amirite?

Salafrance Underhill
Trollface

Re: Battery life

Thing is, once you sort the electric drivetrain, you can replace the energy source, in the future, with anything that works. Internal combustion is a one-trick pony, Jeremy Clarkson's history of butthurt over electric vehicles notwithstanding. Guys, I know you love all of that cryptosexual male bonding behaviour and stuff, but Jeremy Clarkson is a fat, middle-aged bloke with loud opinions. He's not God; he's not Einstein and he's not your father.

Salafrance Underhill

Pfft! He wishes...

We all know Elon Musk is the real Iron Man.

Salafrance Underhill

Vive la France, you engleesh silleh person!

Windows NT: Remember Microsoft's almost perfect 20-year-old?

Salafrance Underhill

Re: NT 3.5.1

I think 4 was also the version in which the graphics driver moved from userspace to kernel space, with a corresponding drop in reliability.

Salafrance Underhill
Devil

Re: Linux is the new Windows

Actually, when NT came out, Linux was still getting up to speed, commercial Unices were either pants or cost a liver and kidney, and the ever trendy Apple crowd had the line leading up to OS/9 - a crashy task switcher lacking support for protected and virtual memory but oodles of style for the coloured-crayon department. NT wasn't perfect, but it was a nice apology for foisting MS-DOS upon the world.

Salafrance Underhill
Coat

They stuffed things quite a bit when they incorporated the video drivers into the kernel - I was like, OMG! WTF! and sundry other neologisms.

Salafrance Underhill
Big Brother

@Mr T >Re: I remember...

Moments earlier, I saw an advertisement for pre-paid funerals on Amazon.

Salafrance Underhill

Actually...

XP is frisky enough to run a passable game of Quake 3 under VirtualBox and Arch Linux, and a Turion RM74 based laptop with 4Gb ram. I've been wondering, actually, just how many concurrent telnet users I could support, given that an 1980s era IBM mainframe running VM/CMS could support something like 400 IBM 3270 sessions.

Admins warned: Drill SSL knowledge into your Chrome users

Salafrance Underhill
Happy

Re: Useless certificate system

Pay the power company to pour energy *into* a nearby wind farm.

Site your Navajo Code Talkers upwind.

2 in 5 top Brit biz bosses expect IT dept to drive 'technical innovation'

Salafrance Underhill

Re: No 'I' in team

What a bastard, ruining your life like that.

Confirmed: Bezos' salvaged Saturn rocket belonged to Apollo 11

Salafrance Underhill

Articles on the F1 Engine

There are two very good articles on the F-1 and its modern sister the F-1B, by Lee Hutchinson, on Ars Technica for the space cadets amongst you people.

Curiosity team: Massive collision may have killed Red Planet

Salafrance Underhill
Coat

Re: venus

I was under the impression that there was very little water in Venus' atmosphere, so the big rain scenario isn't likely to occur. Additionally, using an admittedly very simplistic application of the ideal gas laws, a temperature drop from 735K to 288K would see a pressure drop from 92 atmospheres to 35.

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