* Posts by JeffyPoooh

3516 posts • joined 28 Jun 2013

Google lies about click-fraud refunds and tried to destroy us – ad biz

JeffyPoooh
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Google Ads on my many blogs

My share of the revenue quickly shot up to $50, $75, $80... before beginning to inexplicably slow. It took quite a while to reach $95, $96, $96.50, $96.75, $96.875, $96.9375, ...

Their payout increment is $100. I suspect that it'll NEVER reach $100.

They're holding *many* BILLIONS of dollars of other folks' money.

Too obvious when you see it first hand.

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New battery boffinry could 'triple range' of electric vehicles

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Re: Triple the range

AC, "Ontario....plug-in your battery heater overnight so that car starts in the morning..."

The battery pack could be designed to be heavily insulated (thermally) with a few CM of high tech foam, so that keeping it warm (given -40°C ambient) should only require maybe about 100 watts. Even that 100w assumes that the charging is completed.

For when the battery pack needs cooling, use flowing liquids or open the air vents. Like a well insulated home that has windows and skylights that open up. Yes, both good insulation and excellent cooling can coexist (one at a time).

The killer feature for e-cars in cold climates will be that the car will be toasty warm in the morning, what with it being connected to the grid all night.

My comedy vision is the guy with a Ford F450 Dually adding a fake E-car sticker, and plugging in his huge truck with a built-in 10kw heater, melting snow for 20-feet in all directions. Comfort first.

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Facebook announces ad revenue reroute: When Irish eyes are crying

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AMBxx offered: "They'll just charge expenses or royalties to the local offices."

Email exchange:

How much royalties does the head office want this year?

What are your taxable profits?

Taxable profits are $17,789,563.45 for the fiscal year just ended.

Your 'Trademark Usage' royalties for the fiscal year just ended are $17,789,563.45.

Okay, thanks. Cheers.

Cheers.

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: It's over guys.

djsd complained: "Too many obtrusive ads"

Every morning, spend a few minutes shopping for bikinis.

For the rest of the day, your ads will be much more attractive.

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A cracked window on the International Space Station? That's not good

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Re: Guidelines - credit to SpaceX...

RS offered: "Not sure what you've 'seen' from NASA and ESA, but all modern launch vehicles separate the payload fairings well below reaching orbit."

Mostly during the previous millennium. A famous example that springs to mind would be the "angry alligator".

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Boffins foresee most software written by machines in 2040

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One can make a lot of money by betting...

Requirements driven programming requires AI, and likely Strong AI.

One can make a lot of money by betting that Strong AI isn't as close as some folks seem to believe. This "AI is here soon" nonsense has been going on for many decades.

Every now and then I'll see somebody actually admit that what they're talking about might be something like 50 or 75 years in the future. At that point I'll agree that it's certainly possible.

PS: You might find that simple coding is faster than trying to explain everything about the Universe to a bucket of sand.

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You live in the right galaxy: Milky Way to eat Small Magellanic Cloud even sooner

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OMG NOOOOOOOO.....

"You've only got a few billion years, little buddy."

Oh, "BILLION"... ...Phew.

I thought that you'd written MILLION, and I was thusly *very* concerned.

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Pro tip: You can log into macOS High Sierra as root with no password

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Mistakes are inevitable

For example: "...the4 password box..." and "...kn own as OS X...".

:-)

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Apple embraces El Reg! iOS 11 is now biting the hand that types IT

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"...perhaps you're typing I.T. wrong?"

Missed opportunity for humour there -^ .

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Tesla reveals a less-long-legged truck, but a bigger reservation price

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Re: Electricity vs Petrol/Diesel prices

MO asked, "...have a capacitor bank for this?"

Understand that a Farad is one amp for only one second.

By way of comparison, a 1000mAh battery is one amp (1000mA) for ONE HOUR!!!

Even when supercaps get to 60sx60m=3600F, they're presently much larger size than an equivalent battery.

So they're still closer to greenwash decoration than practical at this point in time.

Maybe next year.

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Re: Electricity vs Petrol/Diesel prices

Timmy B suggested, "here in the UK and we could either go the Norway way ..."

And convert the UK to hydro, the Norway way?

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Re: Electricity vs Petrol/Diesel prices

Petrol's (or diesel's) energy content is converted about two-thirds into waste heat, by the thermodynamic laws that rule 'heat engines'. Electric vehicles (compared at the point of consumption!) can be much more "efficient". Any analysis needs to include that.

That said, electric vehicles on an island powered by coal (and Nova Scotia forests converted into "fiber" and tipped into the Drax plant) should be cautious. As opposed to Canada which is mostly hydro powered. Maybe somebody with a spreadsheet (and without an agenda) could bang out a white paper.

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Re: Electricity vs Petrol/Diesel prices

"Regenerative breaking" is when you drop broken spanners into the gearbox to slow down, and when you finally stop, the broken spanners emerge regenerated.

I think that you mean "regenerative **braking**".

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Permissionless data slurping: Why Google's latest bombshell matters

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"Google received the data....even if you didn't have a SIM card in your phone..."

I browsed the links (admittedly quickly), and I could not find any explanation of this.

Can anyone point to where this is claimed, and explain how data makes it through the Carriers network in the absence of a SIM card?

Thanks.

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JeffyPoooh
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"Nobody suspected Google did this practice..."

When I saw the Google Maps Traffic overlay, with red roads for slow traffic and green roads for free-flowing traffic, it was *obvious* to me that they were grabbing LOTS of location data. The reason that it was *obvious* is that I live in Nova Scotia (in Canada), moderately low population density, and the traffic isn't THAT heavy here that they could get enough data to provide that quality of information, just with volunteers. It seemed clear that they were siphoning location data, presumably anonymized, from just about everyone carrying an Android device.

Sorry. I didn't know that you didn't know.

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Intel finds critical holes in secret Management Engine hidden in tons of desktop, server chipsets

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e.g. ESP32's ULP Coprocessor

Coprocessors lurk everywhere.

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Massive US military social media spying archive left wide open in AWS S3 buckets

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Failing to secure data scraped from public postings on social media

What next? An unsecure database of images taken of advertising billboards?

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Car tax evasion has soared since paper discs scrapped

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DfT spokesman found to be 'paltering'

DfT spokesman said, "...the vast majority of motorists paid tax on their vehicles correctly."

Yes, but that 'truth' precisely fails to respond to the present point.

BBC: "Misleading by 'telling the truth' is so pervasive in daily life that a new term has recently been coined to describe it: paltering."

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20171114-the-disturbing-art-of-lying-by-telling-the-truth

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Some 'security people are f*cking morons' says Linus Torvalds

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Has Torvalds read Gödel yet?

I can't quite put my finger on it, but it seems like his unspoken (<- LOL) assumptions about correctness (nearly equivalent to 'completeness') haven't yet hoisted aboard the concepts embedded in Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem.

A million years from now, I suspect that software will still have bugs and security holes. Inherently.

That's my suspicion.

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Amazon Key door-entry flaw: No easy fix to stop rogue couriers burgling your place unseen

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The Axis of Time is my very favorite axis

Courier drivers have to deliver, for example, 147 packages in 8 hours. After driving to your address, they're then got about 12 seconds to dump the package and get back on the road to deliver the next package.

If they're going to be wasting time browsing through your wife's panties or committing other petty crimes during working hours, then they'll be fired that very evening. Because they failed to deliver 53 of those 147 packages on time.

So it won't happen a second time.

Still, valid point about System Design 101.

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Inside Internet Archive: 10PB+ of storage in a church... oh, and a little fight to preserve truth

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Re: distributed knowledge?

My first idea is that your valuable data can be watermarked into pr0nography files (e.g. naughty videos), and then uploaded to the 'net. Within seconds, dozens of thieving/freeloading pr0n servers will steal copies of these files, and host them on their own pr0n servers for fun and ill-gotten profit. So your valuable data, secretly watermarked into the files, will be widely distributed and publicly available. It's really the ultimate free, distributed, crowd-sourced backup system. It'll almost certainly survive nuclear war and asteroid impacts. And it justifies smurfing pr0n during working hours, 'cause ya know, "...just checking the backups."

My second idea is that precisely all this has already happened. Which would explain a great deal.

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80-year-old cyclist killed in prang with Tesla Model S

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Re: At 2 per year, what

AM1 asked, "...what does 'the vast majority' mean please?"

"The vast majority" = 40%

The Reverend Peter Leary told us so. And we believed him.

(Hi Pete!)

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: What's the point of all these anecdotal comments???

A13 reported, "not badly injured, but the bike is a write-off."

Nice that you're okay.

The explanation (maybe about 80% accurate) for car drivers running over cyclists is actually quite simple. Too many car drivers are using incorrect upside down logic in their driving. They're looking out for other cars, and proceeding if their reptilian brain stem doesn't see another car (includes trucks and buses). They're not looking for empty road, and proceeding only if the road is actually empty.

Their logic is backwards; dangerously wrong.

The drivers using the correct "empty road" logic will see anything. Car, buses, trucks, bicycles, escaped beasts from the zoo, anything... Doesn't matter what. They're looking for empty road.

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Thousand-dollar iPhone X's Face ID wrecked by '$150 3D-printed mask'

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Meanwhile, on Qatar Airways flight QR-962 (Doha-Bali)...

Recent News report: "A Qatar aircraft was forced to land midflight after a woman used her sleeping husband’s thumb to unlock his smartphone and thus discovered that he was having an affair. ...forced to make an unscheduled stop in Chennai, India, when the cabin crew was unable to restore order."

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ARM emulator in a VM? Yup, done. Ready to roll, no config required

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VMs meet Moore's Law

Eventually almost every computer will be replaced by a virtual machine running on-line. So we will really only need one big actual (hardware) computer, or perhaps one big computer running on each landmass-continent (due to communications latency).

So, eventually... [wait for it]

...I think there is a world market for maybe five computers.

- Thomas Watson, president of IBM, 1943

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Alexa, please cause the cops to raid my home

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Re: IT happens

AC mentioned, "My modern bedside radio..."

The Sony ICFCL75IP bedside clock radio with the glorious 7-inch LCD screen and a zillion complicated features and capabilities famously had a software memory leak, which meant that it would crash (lock-up) after about a month, and then simply and silently not bother to wake you up. An unreliable clock radio is a bit like a chocolate teapot, useless for its primary function.

I have two of them, and they were both the same. Both bought "refurbished" for half retail, presumably due to them being refunded for the exact same issue.

They FINALLY fixed the software YEARS LATER, bless their little hearts.

Now they're as reliable as a wood burning stove.

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You know what's coming next: FBI is upset it can't get into Texas church gunman's smartphone

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Meanwhile, on Qatar Airways flight QR-962 (Doha-Bali)...

"A Qatar aircraft was forced to land midflight after a woman used her sleeping husband’s thumb to unlock his smartphone and thus discovered that he was having an affair. ...forced to make an unscheduled stop in Chennai, India, when the cabin crew was unable to restore order."

"...unable to restore order." <- Sounds hilarious.

Has the FBI tried a finger ?

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Google's answer to the Pixel 2 XL CRT-style screen burn in: Lower the brightness

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Oh dear, that'll cause some mental trauma...

This doesn't apply to all, but it certainly applies to some.

Some people seek to have some small island of Utter Perfection™ in their otherwise tumultuous lives. In buying a Break-The-Bank High End $1000-price class mobile phone, they may be assuming that it'll provide that tranquil island of Utter Perfection™. It can cause them significant mental trauma when their Reassuringly-Expensive™ gadget significantly misbehaves.

Sympathies to those so afflicted.

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Geoboffins claim to find oldest trace of life in rocks 4bn years old

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Re: "...Canadian rocks 3.95 billion years ago..."

LeeE mentioned "Australians beat you to it with the 4.39 billion year old zircons..."

Microbes vs zircons.

One must be a lifeform to make the claim. Plus being a direct descendant helps.

Rocks can't claim rocks.

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JeffyPoooh
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"...Canadian rocks 3.95 billion years ago..."

Thus we Canadians will be submitting our territorial claim for the entire planet.

Canadians had it first. It's ours. The whole thing.

So the rest of you have to leave.

Except the Swedes, they can stay. We like the Swedes.

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Foiled again! Brit military minds splash cash on killing satellites with... food wrapping?

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If there's a changing magnetic field...

...then a loop of wire and a load resistor would convert kinetic energy into heat, dropping the orbit. Would work even in a hard vacuum.

The boffins can take it from here...

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Web uni says it will get you a tech job or your money back. So our man Kieren signed up...

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Congratulations.

Letter:

Dear Kieren,

We saw your column in El Reg. Congratulations on your employment as a professional writer. We've marked you down as 'employed'. Another success story, after only one day of classes. Amazing.

Relieved and dollars ahead,

Guaranteed Employment Office

The University

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HPE sharpening the axe for 5,000 heads – report

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Start with the folks that design HP branded laptops...

"Friends don't let friends buy HP laptops."

Strangely, the HP branded desktops seem to be fine.

Their lamp-stabilized Wein bridge oscillators are pretty nice too,

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If you need to replace anything other than your iPhone 8's battery or display, good luck

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"...the same score as last year."

"...gives the '8' 6/10 for repairability….the same score as last year."

I didn't realize that the iPhone 8 had been given a repairability score of 6/10....last year.

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Apocalypse now: Ad biz cries foul over Apple's great AI cookie purge

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Madison Ave

Geniuses.

They show me ads for things that I recently bought.

As if I may suddenly decide that I need three more, and I'll forgot where I bought the first one.

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Downloaded CCleaner lately? Oo, awks... it was stuffed with malware

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"The dodgy software was signed..."

"The dodgy software was signed using a valid certificate that was issued to Piriform Ltd..."

Huh? How? A "signed" bit of software is supposed to be blah-blah-blah and thus secure from such things.

"...by Symantec."

Oh, I see. The morons at Symantec strike again.

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Boffins' satcomms rig uses earthly LEDs to talk to orbiting PV panels

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Re: Signal to noise ?

Similarly, GNSS (e.g. GPS) have been operating digital transmissions (always) below the noise floor for decades, albeit (always) at slow date rates.

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JeffyPoooh
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The following quoted sentence seems to be nonsense...

"...reduce the accuracy you need to aim a signal at the satellite, by using a large photon-collection surface that's already common in space, the satellites' photovoltaic (PV) panels, as the receiver."

You'd only believe this claim if you image that a laser beam aimed from Earth to a satellite arriving at the satellite as a tiny red dot; the system struggling to maintain precise aim on the tiny phototransistor on the satellite.

If you understand real world dispersion of laser beams (small, but vastly non-zero), then you'll understand that the mythical phototransistor is *effectively* the same size as the PV array. Because the beam width of the laser beam is hugely vast in comparison, over such distances.

Especially on a tiny cubesat. Less so on the ISS, where this technique is not applicable anyway.

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Equifax backtracks arbitrate-don't-litigate plan for punters

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Equifax has "also bought a random number generator for PINs

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Google to kill Symantec certs in Chrome 66, due in early 2018

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I haven't trusted Symantec since 2007

I'm happy to see that others have finally caught on...

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As Hurricane Irma grows, Earth now lashed by SOLAR storms

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Re: the equivalent explosive power of 24,000,000,000 kilotons of TNT.

Theorized Solar Nanoflares may be responsible for raising the temperature of the Solar Corona. They're caused by twisted off bits of magnetic field. They're supposed to be about 50-Megatonnes equivalent each, and the quantity per second is just a buzzing noise.

Busy place...

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: People who link global warming to sunspots are wankers

Ah, Bob. I believe that Tom simply meant that whenever there's something astronomically-interesting in the sky, it's inevitably cloudy. I caught his drift because that's the way it typically works here too.

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Facebook claims a third more users in the US than people who exist

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"...18 to 24-year-olds..."

Facebook demanded to know my age, and then plastered it all over the place on my birthday.

So I changed my age to 100 years, as a sort-of 'None-Of-Your-Effin-Business' reaction.

I tried to change it back after my birthday had passed (once they stop plastering it all over the place) but they then told me that I could only change it one more time. So I didn't.

So now I'm 104.

Facebook, meet 'Law of Unintended Consequences'.

Idiots.

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Chinese smartphone cable-maker chucks sueball at Apple

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The Apple apologists are out in force on this one...

Frustratingly nonsensical.

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: A chip hidden in a charging cable?

Chas offered, "...designed to fail first to save..."

How does a genuine Apple DRM infested charger cable shorting out after 5 months use benefit anybody?

The only thing it saves is Apple's bottom line.

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: A chip hidden in a charging cable?

DougS "Pretty sure if something went wrong with your USB wall plug and it sent 120v or 240v AC down the wire, the USB-C socket in your phone or laptop could not gracefully sense that and cut it off without any damage."

Are you claiming that an Apple Lightning cable would ?

I'll bet not.

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: A chip hidden in a charging cable?

@DougS

It was Apple's chargers that had the failure where the AC power pins would pull out of the body, causing some folks to instinctively reach out and retrieve the metal prongs from the live socket. Apple's !

Turn your Apple AC charger over and see the green dot? That means that it hopefully won't kill you.

Yes, eBay junk can be crap. Cheap crap. Apple also makes crap sometimes. Expensive crap.

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: I can see the value in certification

Doug suggested, "...what stops a company from making the cheapest Lightning cable possible and selling it on eBay falsely claiming it is Apple certified? The chip is a technical way of preventing companies from lying about certification."

No it doesn't. Due to timing on a month by month time scale.

The Chinese companies and eBay sellers still do all exactly that, by using fake chips embedded in their "Lightning" cables. It's not until several months later that Apple rolls the code, thus revealing the fraud. This is after MONTHS of that batch of the fake cables working fine.

Then, with only Apple's greatest concern for their customers LOL, and certainly not as a money grab ROTFL, the new iPhone software gleefully stops accepting charging current from the fake cable. Thus forcing their customers to run out and buy a cable from the nearest supplier.

The Axis of Time reveals that Apple's explanations are a cover story, and that they are just being greedy. Their concept of embedding DRM in the Lightning charging cables has probably earned them about an extra billion dollars.

The Axis of Time is very revealing, almost a forensic tool. It's my very favorite axis.

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Crushed Juicero now officially a fruitless endeavor

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Re: They got squeezed

"...people juicer..."

The Ave tear down of the Juicer, and this 'people juicer' comment, reminded me of the Sci-Fi short story about the Transporter System...

Telephone Booth sized, people would enter one booth in (for example) NYC, and a minute later step out in London. One day there was a glitch, so the guy tried again. Worked normally the second time. But then he saw someone wearing the same clothes walking only a half-block ahead. He ran ahead, and discovered it was... ...himself.

Senate inquiry follows. We hear only the Senator's voice booming through the closed doors of the chamber. "Scan and Copy? Not really a 'Move', more like a 'Copy'...and Destroy Original?" "Grated Floor?" "Piston in the ceiling?" "Jammed Piston? Unforeseen failure?" "Sound-proof booth to cover the screams...?" At this point everyone starting counting the number of times that they'd been juiced.

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JeffyPoooh
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Re: I bet...

"Oh try Clive..."

Julian Ilett has hundreds of videos on embedded programming, power supply technology, and "Postbag!" which is eBay comedy. Often subtly hilarious, and quite informative.

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